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Respekt
Aug 8, 2007
la la la

RichBomb posted:

Third pair of jeans.


Seriously, you've convinced me to make my own pair of jeans. If I may ask, where did you get the selvedge denim from ? Is there a way to get Japanese selvedge ?

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squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


Ashcans posted:

1) The pattern is for denim; one of the reasons I picked it was that this seemed closer in weight to a leather than other patterns for wool or fleece. What sort of things do I need to watch out for, being as I'm making it out of a different material?
Yeah, the weights between denim and leather are usually pretty similar (unless you get the really buttery soft leather, which would be thinner). One thing is that leather doesn't have grainlines so you can ignore that totally and just place the pieces however you can.

Leather isn't that difficult to sew, but main things to remember:
  • use a leather needle in your machine
  • use a teflon or roller foot
  • any holes in leather are permanent and will weaken it, so you cannot use pins. Binder clips or even rubber cement can temporarily hold pieces if you need it
  • Be very sure of your seams before you sew, because you can rip out stitches but the holes will remain (I'd highly recommend sewing a muslin in a cheaper, more forgiving fabric first!)

quote:

2) What material options do I have for this? I've worked with leather before but not to actually make a whole garment. It's also expensive, and I worry about not being able to fit the whole pattern on one side and ending up with different shades. Is there a decent synthetic product that I could use? If I go for actual leather, any idea what sort of weight I should aim at?
Are you planning on wearing this at all after Halloween, or is it just a costume? I think that should answer whether you should spend the money on real leather or synthetics... I buy my skins (for purses, mostly) from some of the leather jacket shops around my office. They usually have a few holes in the middle meaning they can't use them for big pieces, but they're perfect for smaller bag pieces and it means I can get a handbag out of a skin or two, about 20ish, which is way cheaper than buying elsewhere. So it might be worth asking a leather shop near you if they sell any seconds.

Sorry, I've got no idea about weights since I just go by feel...

Also, the selvedge on selvedge jeans is just on the outseam? Colour me stupid, I've never seen any myself and thought it ran up both sides and the denim came off really narrow looms... Oops. In that case, all denim is selvedge, you just have to do the pattern layout right.

Ashcans
Jan 2, 2006

Let's do the space-time warp again!



squirrellypoo posted:

Leather isn't that difficult to sew, but main things to remember:
  • use a leather needle in your machine
  • use a teflon or roller foot
I suspected that I would need some new needles, but I admit I had no idea there were so many different feet for sewing machines. I'm assuming that I will need to match the foot to my machine, so I'll have to check the model when I get home and do some research. Are feet generally interchangeable? Can I take the current foot to a store and match it, or is it more complicated?

quote:

  • any holes in leather are permanent and will weaken it, so you cannot use pins. Binder clips or even rubber cement can temporarily hold pieces if you need it
  • Be very sure of your seams before you sew, because you can rip out stitches but the holes will remain (I'd highly recommend sewing a muslin in a cheaper, more forgiving fabric first!)
I will keep these in mind! I usually throw together some sort of muslin mockup, and I will definitely do that for this. Can I seam leather in the same ways I would regular heavy fabrics?

quote:

Are you planning on wearing this at all after Halloween, or is it just a costume? I think that should answer whether you should spend the money on real leather or synthetics...

I admit that I like the jacket, but its sort of a difficult thing to wear outside of the costume without looking pretty eccentric. I also live in Georgia, so the portion of the year where its comfortable to wear a leather jacket is smallish. It's kind of a cost-balancing question; based on the pattern it seems like I'd need about 40sqft of leather (equivalent to 2 5/8yards 60" fabric), depending on how I can arrange things. I can't imagine getting a hold of enough matching leather at less than $2/sqft, so if I can find a synthetic at $15/yd it would come out on top. The problem is partly that I don't really know what would be a sbustitute; I know the OP says that Hancocks et al is crap, but would it be worth going there to actually handle some alternatives? I suppose I should check upholstery suppliers, as well.

quote:

So it might be worth asking a leather shop near you if they sell any seconds.

I will also give this a go, maybe I'll be able to call around and get lucky with some place local.

Sorry to barrage you with a whole new slew of questions, and thank you for the advice!

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


Ashcans posted:

I suspected that I would need some new needles, but I admit I had no idea there were so many different feet for sewing machines. I'm assuming that I will need to match the foot to my machine, so I'll have to check the model when I get home and do some research. Are feet generally interchangeable? Can I take the current foot to a store and match it, or is it more complicated?
In general there are only a few sizes of feet: snap on (just the bottom bit), low shank (with a short vertical bit sticking up), and high shank (with a longer vertical bit), though there are just as many exceptions so don't assume anything. And if you get the wrong kind for your machine you're pretty much out of luck. Google search for your machine and model and you should hopefully be able to figure out which type yours takes, then just hit up eBay. My machine is really weird and is a Googlewhack, but I can just buy any low shank foot and they work fine.

Oh, and add a walking foot to my above recommendations for leather - they're expensive, but I use mine all the time. I've got some photos of my machine feet collection here if you want to ID any against eBay (I don't have a teflon foot, though - I personally use rolling or walking for leather).


quote:

Can I seam leather in the same ways I would regular heavy fabrics?
Pretty much, yeah. Though doing anything really bulky like flat felled seams might require the use of a hammer.

quote:

I can't imagine getting a hold of enough matching leather at less than $2/sqft, so if I can find a synthetic at $15/yd it would come out on top. The problem is partly that I don't really know what would be a sbustitute; I know the OP says that Hancocks et al is crap, but would it be worth going there to actually handle some alternatives? I suppose I should check upholstery suppliers, as well.
Sure, knock yourself out. You might find some synthetics in the upholstery dept, though whether it'll be any good or not, I can't say.

At least you're smart and getting a head start on Halloween with this! :)

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Respekt posted:

Seriously, you've convinced me to make my own pair of jeans. If I may ask, where did you get the selvedge denim from ? Is there a way to get Japanese selvedge ?
Don't bother with selvedge for your first pair, getting the outseam right will be the least of your worries. Just go to a fabric shop (independent if you have one, Joannes will have some denim if you can't find another store) and get the heaviest denim you can. I don't know about Japanese sourcing but I've never looked into it. I bought this selvedge from Top Textile in LA

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

squirrellypoo posted:


Also, the selvedge on selvedge jeans is just on the outseam? Colour me stupid, I've never seen any myself and thought it ran up both sides and the denim came off really narrow looms... Oops. In that case, all denim is selvedge, you just have to do the pattern layout right.
Just the outseam, selvedge denim fabric are around 30 inches with the finished selvedge seam on both ends. Not all denim is selvedge, the 60 inch bolts have a normal ugly unfinished selvages.


Sorry about the double post, typing with an iPod.

Cockmaster
Feb 24, 2002


Does anyone know anything about knitting machines? I've recently gotten my hands on a Brother Profile 552, and it's missing a number of parts, including the carriage and manual. I've looked on eBay for replacements, but all I see is stuff from the later KH series (which use punch cards, which should give you some idea of how old mine is). Is there anywhere where I might find parts for something that old?

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


Dunno if this is the right thread, but how can I lighten a navy-blue article of clothing to a sort of Robins'-Egg blue? Is it even possible?
Would I have to dye a white/cream/what-have-you article of clothing to the right shade or what?

e: I'm not sure of the fabric composition, but it could be polyester, cotton or even wool, or a combination, so instructions for each would be wonderful.

Ambrose Burnside fucked around with this message at 02:47 on Sep 8, 2008

stars
Jun 11, 2008


Ambrose Burnside posted:

Dunno if this is the right thread, but how can I lighten a navy-blue article of clothing to a sort of Robins'-Egg blue? Is it even possible?
Would I have to dye a white/cream/what-have-you article of clothing to the right shade or what?

e: I'm not sure of the fabric composition, but it could be polyester, cotton or even wool, or a combination, so instructions for each would be wonderful.

First remove the dye with dye remover or bleach, then re-dye it. I am too lazy for instructions for each and if it's a bend, more then likely you'll have to just experiment anyway. If it's mostly polyester, I'd just give up.

LasterTrain
Aug 2, 2008


Stupid Backpack alteration/making questions:

Is riveting cordura fabric to cordura fabric, or to nylon webbing, likely to last?

I have no sewing experience whatsoever. If the only sort of 'sewing' I ever plan to do is making and altering backpacks and the related nylon webbing, and possibly heavy canvas and thin leather webbing, is there a specific sort of sewing machine that handles these sorts of thick and stiff fabric?

Is there somewhere to learn sewing? Is it offered as an adult education class somewhere? Are there classes offered by manufacturers? Can I appretice somewhere to learn?

I am a complete newbie so I am perfectly willing to listen to any advice, even if it is just to tell me I have no idea what I am talking about. I am just sick of having backpacks fail on me, and just want to be able to fix them, and possibly make them from scratch.

If these sorts of projects are beyond the skill of a beginner like me, how do I find a alterations shop that can deal with these rough heavy fabrics?

Where do I find cordura, webbing, and 'truck tarp' as new raw materials? Truck tarp seesm to be a name for the layer of waterproofing that is sewn into many 'messenger' style bags. I have no idea what it actually is.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

LasterTrain posted:

Stupid Backpack alteration/making questions:

Is riveting cordura fabric to cordura fabric, or to nylon webbing, likely to last?

I have no sewing experience whatsoever. If the only sort of 'sewing' I ever plan to do is making and altering backpacks and the related nylon webbing, and possibly heavy canvas and thin leather webbing, is there a specific sort of sewing machine that handles these sorts of thick and stiff fabric?

Is there somewhere to learn sewing? Is it offered as an adult education class somewhere? Are there classes offered by manufacturers? Can I appretice somewhere to learn?

I am a complete newbie so I am perfectly willing to listen to any advice, even if it is just to tell me I have no idea what I am talking about. I am just sick of having backpacks fail on me, and just want to be able to fix them, and possibly make them from scratch.

If these sorts of projects are beyond the skill of a beginner like me, how do I find a alterations shop that can deal with these rough heavy fabrics?

Where do I find cordura, webbing, and 'truck tarp' as new raw materials? Truck tarp seesm to be a name for the layer of waterproofing that is sewn into many 'messenger' style bags. I have no idea what it actually is.

Your best bet would be to look at your local community center, they often have sewing lessons--or even a sewing group in your town. Have any patient friends that like to sew?

And it sound like you need an industrial machine if you're going to be using lots of layers of tough fabrics--we have one at my school that can go through multiple layer of leather no problem.

And I just did a quick google search--these people seem to specialize in tough outdoors fabrics: http://www.ahh.biz/catagories/fabric.htm

Slaughtermelon
Dec 24, 2007
The most metal fruit.

Ambrose Burnside posted:

Dunno if this is the right thread, but how can I lighten a navy-blue article of clothing to a sort of Robins'-Egg blue? Is it even possible?
Would I have to dye a white/cream/what-have-you article of clothing to the right shade or what?

e: I'm not sure of the fabric composition, but it could be polyester, cotton or even wool, or a combination, so instructions for each would be wonderful.

Watch out because it can be hard to either lighten something with bleach or bleach white and redye without getting a tie-dye effect where it bunches or folds, especially if you're new to dyeing.
The other thing to watch out for is that the thread is often made of a different material than the fabric so it will bleach/dye differently. I have a shirt that my mom tried to dye with both of these problems.

seriouslywtf
Jul 10, 2003

Seriously. WTF?

LasterTrain posted:

Is there somewhere to learn sewing? Is it offered as an adult education class somewhere? Are there classes offered by manufacturers? Can I appretice somewhere to learn?
I just looked on Yelp and found a tiny local business near me run by a couple of kickass ladies who teach sewing classes. Also if you have a JoAnn's near you, they do sewing classes as well. They may suck overall for fabrics, but you can probably learn some beginner skills that way if there isn't some other alternative nearby.

Dr Scoofles
Dec 6, 2004



I just finished this today and wanted to share. I love sewing teddy bears. I don't know how I got into this but I've been making them for about a year now.



I design my own patterns and I hand sew. This takes ages, but the results are worth it. I did run a ted through a sewing machine once and it ended up a mess. You need to sew in minute detail, particularly on smaller bears. Here is another picture with different lighting.



All my bears are jointed with old fashioned cotter pins (you can buy plastic joints but I prefer the old way) and have glass eyes. I stuff them really tightly so they feel very firm and sit upright just fine. I sometimes stuff them with steel shot and woodwool to give them even more weight and firm-ness.

It's a great hobby, and best of all people really do love getting given a hand made teddy. A friend of mine recently had a baby girl, so I'm going to order some soft pink materials and get sewing again :)

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


That bear is adorable and just so amazingly perfect! It really does look like one of the fine, German heirloom bears. Excellent work!

Unreal
Mar 14, 2007
unf! unf!

Scoofles, that looks really great. I was interested in getting into making stuffed animals like that. Can you give me a few starting points? I'm not even sure where to begin. The tutorials I've found online to make stuffed toys are all pretty... horrible. Terrible designs and the end product isn't something I'd like to give someone to cuddle with. Yours, however, is exactly what I've been dreaming of making. :]

ludosti
Feb 25, 2007

Cute, but psycho

Wow that bear is great!

I need a good source for some organic fabrics (jersey, flannel, and fleece). I've found a few online retailers just using google, but does anyone actually have any experience and can recommend a couple to me?

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


ludosti posted:

I need a good source for some organic fabrics (jersey, flannel, and fleece). I've found a few online retailers just using google, but does anyone actually have any experience and can recommend a couple to me?
Wazoodle have a bunch of Eco fabrics - I've only ever used their bamboo jersey, which is AWESOME. Threads magazine also had an eco fabric special a few issues ago and they've put the supplier list online.

Dr Scoofles
Dec 6, 2004



Unreal posted:

Scoofles, that looks really great. I was interested in getting into making stuffed animals like that. Can you give me a few starting points? I'm not even sure where to begin. The tutorials I've found online to make stuffed toys are all pretty... horrible. Terrible designs and the end product isn't something I'd like to give someone to cuddle with. Yours, however, is exactly what I've been dreaming of making. :]

Thank you!

And of course I'll offer some pointers. I found it the same when I started out. There are a few free patterns online but like you say most are not great. I found this one online. I would say it's a basic pattern that will make a nice shaped bear.



Print it out bigger, to whatever size suits really!

As for materials. I'm in the UK so I buy all my stuff from http://www.christiebears.co.uk/
Something that's great for beginners is to order one of their kits which include all you need (mohair, joints, embroidery thread for noses etc) along with step by step instructions. They go into great details, even down the sewing techniques. It's not that expensive either. If your looking to get into teds I say do this! I don't know where you are from but you won't have any problem finding a decent supplier for your country and most of them will sell starter kits.

The fur looks expensive, at about 100 a meter. But you don't ever need that much! I buy 1/8th of a meter which works out at about 10-15. That will make a good sized bear. For me I spend about 20 on materials for a bear if I go for really decent fur. Considering a good bear can sell for over 100 thats not bad but can be off putting when starting out. so stick with the cheapy materials :)

What you'll need for your sewing kit is good needles, a long needle for doing the eyes and nose (called a dollmaking needle in sewing shops), a small pair of needle nose pliars to do the cotter pin joints, something to poke stuffing in to small spaces (I'm cheap and use a chopstick) and a REALLY good pair of fine embroidery scissors as you need to make fine cuts.

I'm not sure what else to advise except for get a starter kit, its the only way to learn with proper materials and instructions. :)

LasterTrain
Aug 2, 2008


Does anyone working on heavy fabrics or leathers have any advice on a 'sailmaker's palm"?

If the term is wrong please correct me, I just read about it online. It seeems like it would be necessary for the type of sewing (backpacks, and the webbing and leather associated with it), I would like to learn how to do.

Another question, if I need something that can handle getting wet, staying wet, not rotting etc., what sort of thread should I shoot for? Is most thread cotton? I assume cotton would be bad for getting wet and staying wet, but I have no idea about fabric and thread.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Not sure about the seamakers palm thing, google is showing a variety of fancy wrist strap thimbles? Anyways, for thread you're going to want something nylon and UV resistant, probably monster TEX 80 size or something

LasterTrain
Aug 2, 2008


RichBomb posted:

Not sure about the seamakers palm thing, google is showing a variety of fancy wrist strap thimbles? Anyways, for thread you're going to want something nylon and UV resistant, probably monster TEX 80 size or something

I know nothing about sewing things, so I have to ask this stupid question: Is Tex 80 just a shize measurement? SO there are is Tex 80 Nylon thread and Tex 80 Polyester thread, and Tex 80 Cotton thread (for instance)?

Corla Plankun
May 8, 2007

improve the lives of everyone


Its kind of a long shot, but can any of you all recommend a good sewing-machine shop near the Dallas area? I took mine apart to undo a knot, and I am clearly too retarded to put it back together.

clarion ravenwood
Aug 5, 2005



Not as impressive as the bear! But I've been practicing my sewing skills on poor defenseless animals before diving into anything more exciting.



Daisy the elephant - I hope you can't see, but I totally rooted her foot :rolleyes:



Blossom the bunny. I loved the fabric on her belly. In fact, sewing toys is really just a ruse so I have an excuse to buy gorgeous fabric :)

BrideOfUglycat
Oct 30, 2000

I am a beautiful person, you GODDAMN IDIOTS


So, the last time I posted, I had just gotten my Grandmother's sewing machine and was trying to figure out how to thread the thing since the manual disappeared in the 25 years since my grandmother died.

Since then, I've taken it into a sewing Center and had them look it over and teach me how to thread it... It's not much different than hand-sewing after all.

Now, I have no excuses to not start sewing. I'm super excited and also super clueless.

For example, how do you end a stitch once you reach the end of where you want to sew (like a seam or a hem)? That seams to be MUCH easier when hand sewing.

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


BrideOfUglycat posted:

For example, how do you end a stitch once you reach the end of where you want to sew (like a seam or a hem)?
You can either pull one thread to the other side and tie the ends together, or what I normally do - backstitch a few stitches, then go forward again, then clip the tails. Done!

BrideOfUglycat
Oct 30, 2000

I am a beautiful person, you GODDAMN IDIOTS


Well, finished my first project. My mom had asked me to make her an apron with a pocket big enough for Chicken feed.

I had lots of scraps that weren't quite the right size for the quilt blocks I had made, so I put them together.



It's not the neatest bit of work, but I can already tell I'm getting better.

seriouslywtf
Jul 10, 2003

Seriously. WTF?

Bumping this thread so I can showcase my most recently-completed project. I made this coat out of some fabric I got on eBay for super cheap. It's a cotton-poly houndstooth weave and the perfect weight for a coat. I also used a grape-colored lining for the inside. Here it is:





This is the first time I made actual buttonholes too, so I'm pretty proud of that.



Here it is actually on me.



:) :) :)

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


That looks AWESOME. You've done such a good job on it! I'm not sure what you meant by the buttonholes, are they bound?

I started working on my first winter coat in July as part of The Great Coat Sew Along that like 100 people on the internet are doing but I completely lost all momentum on it and now am really bored with the whole thing. But I've put so much expense into that I really just need to suck it up and work on it instead of making lots of quick, pretty, and fun projects that take my whim. But that's mostly because I'm a really impatient sewer...

So therefore I'm also jealous that you've completed yours!

seriouslywtf
Jul 10, 2003

Seriously. WTF?

squirrellypoo posted:

That looks AWESOME. You've done such a good job on it! I'm not sure what you meant by the buttonholes, are they bound?

I started working on my first winter coat in July as part of The Great Coat Sew Along that like 100 people on the internet are doing but I completely lost all momentum on it and now am really bored with the whole thing. But I've put so much expense into that I really just need to suck it up and work on it instead of making lots of quick, pretty, and fun projects that take my whim. But that's mostly because I'm a really impatient sewer...

So therefore I'm also jealous that you've completed yours!
You know, I wasn't even aware of the Great Coat Sew Along until like, last week. I feel so out of touch.

Thank you for your kind comments. ;) No, the buttonholes aren't bound (I'm not that badass yet) but the original pattern called for them to be sewn on the outside and for snaps to be sewn on the inside. I thought that was lame, so I made them "real" buttons instead.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

That is so freaking cool. I want to make a nice houndstooth button up when I get back to the states.

seriouslywtf
Jul 10, 2003

Seriously. WTF?

I swear I'm not trying to take over the thread; I just happen to have finished a small handful of projects at the same time. I made this skirt last weekend based on a pattern I drafted myself, although it has now been brought to my attention that it is strikingly similar to the Kasia skirt at BurdaStyle, so that's kind of depressing. :saddowns: Just kiddin'. I'm still happy with it.



It's a high-waisted A-line skirt with a kangaroo pocket. The fabric is a 100% silk herringbone weave with very subtle purple pinstripes. The buttons are also a dark purple. I got them 50% off at JoAnn's during their crazy weekend sale last weekend.



Here's the skirt on me. There must be something about how I'm standing that makes it look like a pencil skirt with fins, but I swear it's not really like that. ;)



That's all! I'm in love with this skirt. It's definitely one of my new favorite items in my wardrobe. In fact, I'm wearing it right now!

ludosti
Feb 25, 2007

Cute, but psycho

Ok, I'm seriously about to rip my hair out, so I appeal to the goon sewing gods to help me. I'm working with some lightweight bamboo jersey that I totally love, but trying to sew on it is making me contemplate murder. I'm using a ballpoint needle (I've been using a 70/10) and it doesn't matter what stitch I'm using - it skips stitches. I've tried experimenting with how many layers I'm sewing through (3 or 5 are the choices) and adding some interfacing, to no avail. I don't know what else to try... :cry:

discordiaskitten
Aug 22, 2004

I'm a fucking genuis


Can anyone help me with a clothes refurbing question? I've recently lost a fair bit of weight and all of a sudden six of my favourite skirts are two sizes too big around the waist. Is there any easy way of taking them in? Most of them are zip-fastened and made up of panels...I'm not sure how to describe it but the panels are pieced in a kind of diagonal curve so that they flare out a bit. I'd like to shorten some of them, too.

I have a sewing machine but am not very confident, patterns scare the crap out of me.

Pile of Kittens
Apr 23, 2005

Why does everything STILL smell like pussy?



ludosti posted:

Ok, I'm seriously about to rip my hair out, so I appeal to the goon sewing gods to help me. I'm working with some lightweight bamboo jersey that I totally love, but trying to sew on it is making me contemplate murder. I'm using a ballpoint needle (I've been using a 70/10) and it doesn't matter what stitch I'm using - it skips stitches. I've tried experimenting with how many layers I'm sewing through (3 or 5 are the choices) and adding some interfacing, to no avail. I don't know what else to try... :cry:

Dumb question, but you checked that your bobbin is put the right way around in the bobbin-holding-assembly thingy right? And loosening the top tension? Skipped stitches are always a problem with the machine's configuration for me.

ludosti
Feb 25, 2007

Cute, but psycho

Yeah, I've checked the tension and re-threaded about a million times. This is a problem I only have when working with this particular fabric. I talked to a few other people who suggested using stretch needles (rather than ballpoint) and using stabilizer on the bottom if that doesn't work, so we'll see if those help....

4R7 THi3F
Aug 8, 2005

oh... so you ARE sick....

it's called the grim reaper goes to the beach

seriouslywtf
Jul 10, 2003

Seriously. WTF?

I just wanted to post here to vent my frustration. I had a pile of fabric on the floor, some of it neatly folded and some not, just waiting to be organized. Then I went on a business trip for a week. I came back and everything seemed to be fine, but just now I was organizing that fabric finally, and it turns out that my cats PEED ON IT. I assume it's because they were pissed at me (no pun intended) for going away, I dunno.

Some of it is washable, but some isn't. And even then, I washed this one fabric three times and it still stinks of cat piss. I had to throw it out along with a bunch of other stuff that was un-saveable.

UGHHHHAHDSFLKSJF:SLKDFJL:KAJDSALS:D!*#@&(*.

:emo:

ludosti
Feb 25, 2007

Cute, but psycho

seriouslywtf posted:

stupid cats :emo:
I feel your pain! When I stop to think about all the things my cats have ruined, I get really angry. Hopefully you were able to save most of your fabric! I've resorted to keeping all my fabric in a ton of plastic storage boxes and an Ikea armoire to make sure the cats don't decide to help. I also have to pretty much put everything away any time I'm not right there working on it (and with a young baby, I often have to get up suddenly) so the kleptomaniac kitten doesn't make off with things like pins or scissors or what not.

And oh yes - stretch needles saved the day! I have no idea what exactly makes them so special, but they're working great for my lightweight jersey.

ludosti fucked around with this message at 03:30 on Oct 28, 2008

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ludosti
Feb 25, 2007

Cute, but psycho

discordiaskitten posted:

Can anyone help me with a clothes refurbing question? I've recently lost a fair bit of weight and all of a sudden six of my favorite skirts are two sizes too big around the waist. Is there any easy way of taking them in? Most of them are zip-fastened and made up of panels...I'm not sure how to describe it but the panels are pieced in a kind of diagonal curve so that they flare out a bit. I'd like to shorten some of them, too.
Shortening them would be easy. Taking them in may well be more hassle than it's worth. To do it properly, you would take in each seam by a small amount (tapering it down to wherever the current seams fit well), which would likely be a huge pain in the rear end.

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