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Acc-Risk
Sep 28, 2001


I'll start with the backstory so you don't think I'm weird... I bought my girlfriend a bunch of pretty racey swimwear for hut tubbing and I wanted something to match. I found a seller on Ebay that had some men's swimwear that was pretty cheap (under $20 cheap) so I grabbed it. What showed up was garbage. The strings were just knit elastic in the same color as the suit and just plain trash. Looking at it tho I thought hell, I'll bet I could make something better. So on payday last week I went and bought a serger and a machine. I jacked up the first few I made, not ever sewing anything before. Anyway, I'm starting to get the hang of it.

This is literally the fifth thing I've ever sewn. The strings are just spandex tubes. The suit is see through mesh in the center with spandex sides. I still have a lot of trouble with serging and especially elastic. For some reason, the bunches are really small. I'm using a fairly long zigzag but they just look kinda strange to me.



On a side note. A serging question... Every time I use it, there's always an extra string that ends up caught underneath somewhere. So when I finish, I have six strings. The stitches are perfect though. It's just an annoyance. Any idea what may be happening? It's not a terribly expensive serger (Kenmore)

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clarion ravenwood
Aug 5, 2005



I finally have pics of my first completed quilt. Sewn by me, quilted professionally. I love the japanese fabrics.





I haven't got the binding on here, but you get the idea. I've since bought myself a sexy new sewing machine, with which I would consider entering a monogamous life-time partnership. Hopefully it'll also let me quilt my own creations once I've practiced (..and practiced, and practiced).

Any other quilters out there? I've just had a hand quilting lesson, so am eager to try this out on a project. I love the simple/naive look of the hand quilting.

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


meche posted:

Any other quilters out there? I've just had a hand quilting lesson, so am eager to try this out on a project. I love the simple/naive look of the hand quilting.
Yay! Love the fabrics, it looks really nice. I'm too impatient to hand quilt - I do have a nice, small, almost invisible stitch, all that needlework in my past paid off there, but I do have a completed top that I'm thinking of quilting in perle cotton with big stitches. Something like this, where the stitches are meant to be visible:



What are you binding that quilt in, because a red would look really nice.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

meche posted:

Sewn by me, quilted professionally.
What's the difference here?

moana
Jun 18, 2005

one of the more intellectual satire communities on the web


RichBomb posted:

What's the difference here?
The sewing part is making the top layer of fabric (sewing together all the pieces to make the pattern). The quilting part is putting that fabric together with batting and backing material, and sewing all of that together - that's the wavy kind of stitches you can see on the quilt. It's the part that's not-as-creative, but still difficult to do correctly.

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


moana posted:

The sewing part is making the top layer of fabric (sewing together all the pieces to make the pattern). The quilting part is putting that fabric together with batting and backing material, and sewing all of that together - that's the wavy kind of stitches you can see on the quilt. It's the part that's not-as-creative, but still difficult to do correctly.
Actually people usually say "pieced" and "quilted" because really they're both sewing. And quilting can be mad creative: http://i43.tinypic.com/kamjcy.jpg

Triangulum
Oct 3, 2007

by Lowtax


Acc-Risk posted:

I'll start with the backstory so you don't think I'm weird... I bought my girlfriend a bunch of pretty racey swimwear for hut tubbing and I wanted something to match. I found a seller on Ebay that had some men's swimwear that was pretty cheap (under $20 cheap) so I grabbed it. What showed up was garbage. The strings were just knit elastic in the same color as the suit and just plain trash. Looking at it tho I thought hell, I'll bet I could make something better. So on payday last week I went and bought a serger and a machine. I jacked up the first few I made, not ever sewing anything before. Anyway, I'm starting to get the hang of it.

This is literally the fifth thing I've ever sewn. The strings are just spandex tubes. The suit is see through mesh in the center with spandex sides. I still have a lot of trouble with serging and especially elastic. For some reason, the bunches are really small. I'm using a fairly long zigzag but they just look kinda strange to me.



On a side note. A serging question... Every time I use it, there's always an extra string that ends up caught underneath somewhere. So when I finish, I have six strings. The stitches are perfect though. It's just an annoyance. Any idea what may be happening? It's not a terribly expensive serger (Kenmore)

Did you sew yourself a pair of grape smugglers? Is that what we're seeing here?

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


Acc-Risk posted:

On a side note. A serging question... Every time I use it, there's always an extra string that ends up caught underneath somewhere. So when I finish, I have six strings. The stitches are perfect though. It's just an annoyance. Any idea what may be happening? It's not a terribly expensive serger (Kenmore)
I don't have a serger myself but have tinkered with my mom's a little, so all I know to ask is have you threaded it in the correct order? Crafster.org has a good forum for these kinds of questions if you don't get an answer from someone here. (Sewing in General/Sewing Machines: Discussion and Questions)

clarion ravenwood
Aug 5, 2005



Sorry yes, I pieced the quilt, and had it professionally quilted.

handbags at dawn posted:


What are you binding that quilt in, because a red would look really nice.

I ended up backing and binding it in the plain blue fabric that makes up one of the smallest patches in the quilt. The backing is plain, but it's shot cotton - so you get the nice effect of the greens and blues showing up with the tight quilting. Hand sewing the binding was so satisfying, the difference is amazing - it goes from pretty scruffy looking to neat and finished really quickly!

I'm jealous of you small stitches! Mine are giant and ugly at the moment, so I need to get some serious practice time in. I love that sample you posted, is that yours? Lovely fabrics.

That's why I started quilting actually, to used up the fabric I love and buy for no real reason, other than it's gorgeous!

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


God no, that's not mine (the whole cloth quilt). I'd never have the patience to do even a small bit of that. The other picture I posted I'd had bookmarked because I have some of that same fabric and am trying to get ideas.

Now that I look at your quilt again, I think that blue was a good choice, because the blue does stand out. I just like red a lot. :)

I am in the process right now of making a very loud red white and blue bargello quilt. http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3333/3453998962_9286149cb2_b.jpg

clarion ravenwood
Aug 5, 2005



I like! The combination of solids/patterns and colours looks great. Those small pieces must be a huge challenge!

Is that a quilt rack that quilt is hanging on? Or something you made yourself? it looks useful!

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


Actually, it's kind of a fooler - you sew these huge panels of strips together into a tube, cut the panels apart in those widths, and then pick the tube apart at the color you want on top. So there are no tiny pieces, just loooong strips to sew together.

The quilt rack is my mother's. (You can see her longarm quilting machine behind the rack.) She owns a shop that has quilting stuff in the back, which is how I got into this in the first place. I went from taking a class to humor her in Jan 08 to now where I have 6 completed quilts and 3 tops ready to quilt. It is a disease.

What kind of machine did you get?

clarion ravenwood
Aug 5, 2005



Ah, that doesn't sound too bad - great effect.

I got a Janome 6600 - not a professional one, but good enough for me! I got a good deal on it because I bought it at a craft show. I did have a tiny little Brother which did me well, but I couldn't do any quilting on it. The new one is massive and metal! I was surprised how heavy (and big!) it was.

I agree, it's a disease. My mum suggested I should make quilts to use my piles of fabric, and I've just kept going! She's created a monster.

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


meche posted:

Ah, that doesn't sound too bad - great effect.

I got a Janome 6600 - not a professional one, but good enough for me! I got a good deal on it because I bought it at a craft show. I did have a tiny little Brother which did me well, but I couldn't do any quilting on it. The new one is massive and metal! I was surprised how heavy (and big!) it was.

I agree, it's a disease. My mum suggested I should make quilts to use my piles of fabric, and I've just kept going! She's created a monster.
That looks like a great machine - a friend of mine has a Janome and she really likes it. Did yours come with the table attachment? I have a Brother 6000i which is not as good as that at home, but my mother has started selling Baby Lock machines at her shop, so I get to use the floor models, which means I have been sewing on an Espire that has a huge table and a deep throat. (that part always sounds suspicious) I haven't gotten up the nerve to use her longarm quilting machine yet.

clarion ravenwood
Aug 5, 2005



It did. and I didn't use it straight away, but now I can't live without it! That's awesome you get to play with machines! I'd love to give a longarm a go - they look scary, but a lot of fun.

Can I ask, am I the only one who has to have multiple quilts on the go, or else I get bored????

district 12
Oct 19, 2004

muscles griffon~~

I posted this in the Ladies' thread in W&W, so sorry if you see this twice.

So for my 3d Concepts class we had to take containers and make a volumetric shape out of them. Inspired by Martin Margiela's artisanal collection (via Goldaline's post in the runway thread), I decided to use magic stretch gloves to make a skirt.





The end result is something I'm really pleased with! I plan on replacing the sewing machine needle I broke, reinforcing some of the seams and totally wearing this out. I've never sewn something to completion before (just tidied up holes in my old shirts and whatnot) but this was actually really easy. I want to make more clothes!

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


meche posted:

It did. and I didn't use it straight away, but now I can't live without it! That's awesome you get to play with machines! I'd love to give a longarm a go - they look scary, but a lot of fun.

Can I ask, am I the only one who has to have multiple quilts on the go, or else I get bored????
I have a very short sewing attention-span, so I have about ten projects of varying sizes going on. Which is good, because if I want to work on something hard I have a project, if I want a no-brainer I can work on some placemats I'm making. Having way too much fun.

district 12 - love the skirt and love the idea of gloves being containers, for some reason I'd never thought of them that way. :)

4R7 THi3F
Aug 8, 2005

oh... so you ARE sick....

district 12 posted:

I posted this in the Ladies' thread in W&W, so sorry if you see this twice.

So for my 3d Concepts class we had to take containers and make a volumetric shape out of them. Inspired by Martin Margiela's artisanal collection (via Goldaline's post in the runway thread), I decided to use magic stretch gloves to make a skirt.





The end result is something I'm really pleased with! I plan on replacing the sewing machine needle I broke, reinforcing some of the seams and totally wearing this out. I've never sewn something to completion before (just tidied up holes in my old shirts and whatnot) but this was actually really easy. I want to make more clothes!

super cool, district 12

district 12
Oct 19, 2004

muscles griffon~~

Thanks guys!! :)

Acc-Risk
Sep 28, 2001


Well I did something either really stupid or stupidly smart. I went to Jo-Ann's to pick up a book I had seen there before and stopped at the Husqvarna store they have in there to inquire about why I was having problems...

walked out with a Husqvarna Sapphire 830 and Huskylock 905. I didn't know you could haggle with those guys, but I did, and they dropped $400 off the total price, and threw in a couple of two hour classes. Both machines are freaking awesome and all of my problems are gone. The Sapphire is a little weird getting used to since it's all electronic. I keep reaching for handles and there are none. It has some sort of computerized pressure adjustment that adjusts on the fly, so when you get to a seam to sew over it automatically lowers the pressure to get over it. That part's pretty cool. Day and night compared to what I had. The serger is completely effortless and hasn't messed up one single time. Funny that a company that makes chainsaws does sewing equipment so well. Sewing and Sawing.

I've got some covers for audio equipment to work on so it's perfect timing.

And District12... That's awesome. Really...

clarion ravenwood
Aug 5, 2005



Congrats on the new machines, they sound awesome. I couldn't get used to the electronic scissors for a while - instead of pulling the work from under the needle and using scissors to cut the thread, you just press a button. Truly mindblowing.

That's sweet you get lessons too - happy sewing!

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

I like making quilt blocks, but I hate all that cutting out- I measure and use scissors and end up spending 45mins cutting and then 10mins actually sewing. Are there any shops that sell it all cut out ready for you to piece? Or is there any other way I can reduce the cutting time?

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


madlilnerd posted:

I like making quilt blocks, but I hate all that cutting out- I measure and use scissors and end up spending 45mins cutting and then 10mins actually sewing. Are there any shops that sell it all cut out ready for you to piece? Or is there any other way I can reduce the cutting time?
Rotary cutter.

wwjebusdo
Jan 1, 2009


handbags at dawn posted:

I am in the process right now of making a very loud red white and blue bargello quilt. http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3333/3453998962_9286149cb2_b.jpg

I LOVE making bargello quilts...even though I really don't like the way they look. Its one of the few times for me its really about the creation process and not the end result.

(yours looks great though, don't mind my irrational prejudice)

clarion ravenwood
Aug 5, 2005



madlilnerd posted:

I like making quilt blocks, but I hate all that cutting out- I measure and use scissors and end up spending 45mins cutting and then 10mins actually sewing. Are there any shops that sell it all cut out ready for you to piece? Or is there any other way I can reduce the cutting time?

Seconding the rotary cutter. A sharp rotary cutter, largish cutting mat and a nice sturdy quilting ruler will save you lots of time. Depending on what kinds of quilts you want to make, you can buy charm squares, jelly rolls and layer cakes - which are basically bundles of pre-cut fabric (i.e charms squares are generally 5" squares but can be between 1" and 10", jelly rolls are 2.5" x 44" strips etc.).

You can sew them together as they are, or cut them further depending on what you want to do.

Having said that, quilting is just a time consuming sport. You need patience, patience and more patience. Cutting does take time, and boy is it worth spending the time to get things to fit/line up. I learned that the hard way!

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


wwjebusdo posted:

I LOVE making bargello quilts...even though I really don't like the way they look. Its one of the few times for me its really about the creation process and not the end result.

(yours looks great though, don't mind my irrational prejudice)
No, I know where you're coming from. This was a class, I don't think I would have chosen this pattern myself. I don't like the way the pieces change width - I think if I do another one, the widths will all be the same.

no.no.notorious
Feb 19, 2009


district 12 posted:

I posted this in the Ladies' thread in W&W, so sorry if you see this twice.

So for my 3d Concepts class we had to take containers and make a volumetric shape out of them. Inspired by Martin Margiela's artisanal collection (via Goldaline's post in the runway thread), I decided to use magic stretch gloves to make a skirt.





The end result is something I'm really pleased with! I plan on replacing the sewing machine needle I broke, reinforcing some of the seams and totally wearing this out. I've never sewn something to completion before (just tidied up holes in my old shirts and whatnot) but this was actually really easy. I want to make more clothes!

you should smile! you made a sweet skirt that probably took weeks to make!

Gonktastic
Jan 18, 2007



Okay I HAVE to brag. You guys showed me the light in old sewing machines, for sure. I have an oldish one but it's a completely piece of junk- plus it's got all sorts of parts broken off and can't even keep a decent tension. Soo, I had my bf's mom scouting yard sales for "all metal machines". Found this baby from 1958. Barely used, obviously.
So unassuming.

Click here for the full 1000x750 image.

But it's great!

Click here for the full 923x618 image.

Look at all the stuff that came with it!

Click here for the full 1296x688 image.

Half of these feet completely baffled me. Luckily I have the book that explains EVERYTHING!

Click here for the full 848x494 image.


How much for this perfectly complete and like-new machine? A whopping $10 dollars. :smug:

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


That is sweet. Especially all the feet! And in such good shape. I am so jealous. :)

edit to add: my daughter made a chicken pincushion today

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

That's sweet, how old is your daughter?



Courtesy of the Salvation Army, $27



It's a Singer 66-16, and it's wonderful. The wiring is hosed but from spinning the wheel I can tell it's going to sew very well.

I also bought a gravity fed industrial iron today. The difference between an industrial iron and a home iron isn't as awesome as industrial/domestic sewing machine, but it's still great.

kanteyluip
Aug 4, 2004

Mommy, I feel seasick.

handbags at dawn posted:

edit to add: my daughter made a chicken pincushion today

What did she stuff it with?

spammy davis jr
Mar 21, 2009



Anybody know where to get parts for Vintage Necchi's? My girlfriend has a BU Mira from early '52, and we can't find the "Wonder Wheel" for it. I've searched for them online, and I only found one, but we would've had to have purchased the entire sewing machine.

Any ideas?

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


kanteyluip posted:

What did she stuff it with?
We just stuffed them with polyfil halfway down, then the bottom is plastic pellets (like beanie babies). They don't need dense stuffing to hold pins, because they are made of quilted blocks. I ended up making four of them, she ended up making two. (god only knows what I am going to do with four chicken pincushions) You can see from the picture that previously she's been making things with beads and floss - all her friends have multiple bracelets and chokers. I also finally taught her how to thread the machine and wind bobbins. She's almost 11. We're having fun.

So jealous at these old machines. I've had opportunities to get a couple, but I never do because of space concerns.

edit: here is one of my stupid chickens http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2432/3540352187_323c5f4c6a.jpg

handbags at dawn fucked around with this message at 01:43 on May 18, 2009

seriouslywtf
Jul 10, 2003

Seriously. WTF?

RichBomb posted:

Courtesy of the Salvation Army, $27



It's a Singer 66-16, and it's wonderful. The wiring is hosed but from spinning the wheel I can tell it's going to sew very well.


One of my writers found one of these this weekend at a flea market and asked me if I wanted him to get it for me, but I turned him down because he said it was rusty and he wasn't sure if it worked. It looks so sexy, though. ;) Jealous.

Operation Juicebox
Jun 26, 2006

Acnamino MR 100mg Capsules


Hello sewing thread ladies and gentlemen!

I am looking for some advice really.

My boyfriend and friends all are quite happily banging out daywear clothes and costumes for events and I've always been interested in learning as I normally end up doing 99% of the design work involved, but never any actual sewing unless I'm putting a button on or something. Talking over this with my mother she brought up the possibility of picking up an evening class or something similar so I can learn to do these things myself as she thought I'd make an excellent seamstress.

I'm still really looking for a real career path and this has really excited me as something I'd like to do. I'd like nothing better than seeing my designs on people and thinking 'I made that' and it actually strikes me as something I could be good at. I've discussed this with the boyfriend and he agrees, and is in the process of teaching me the basics.

So how realistic is this to follow through and what should I look for in classes? I've had a look around the internet and it seems like I can't actually go back to school around here and get a qualification in fashion design or similar without poncing off to University. Is there much work for seamstresses nowadays in the bridal sector or in something like maybe theatre work?

Thanks for answering any questions!

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

I can't speak to opportunities for costume shop seamstresses but if you're talking to educators you want to train sewing skills like a "sample maker," not a seamstress. Sample makers have the best sewing skills in the industry, they take the patterns from the pattern maker, do up a sample exactly according to the details given from the customer (this is to test the pattern and let the customer change specs before production). As far as I know there are no training tracks to becoming a sample maker other than being the best production line seamstress at a factory for a long time. IOW, not very much fun. I don't think learning the nitty gritty manufacturing end of a dying domestic industry is what you want.

Long story short, the best thing you can do to get answers quickly is start networking with heads of costume/bridal shops and ask what's up. You'll probably need to apprentice for a while.

Debbie Metallica
Jun 7, 2001



Troubleshooting:

I'm putting together a fleece blanket/quilt thing for a friend, and I ended up with some thicker batting than what I usually use in this sort of thing. I have two problems:

a) Because the fabric is so thick, I'm not putting the presser foot down. Though if I do, it doesn't seem to matter- what happens is, every couple of inches, I get an extra little loop of bobbin thread on the underside.

b) Even with a denim needle, it's cramming up and I'm getting bunched up bobbin thread until it clogs the machine and I can't do anything anymore.

It's a workhorse of a machine otherwise- normally I have very little trouble sewing through thick things (I made an Amy Butler overnight bag- notorious for being extremely thick/annoying- and had no issues really).

I've adjusted tension. I guess the one thing I haven't tried yet is just covering the feed dogs. Would that make a difference? Is there just a bobbin issue that's not even really related to this? I have noticed when working on another quilting project (just putting the squares together, not actually quilting yet) that the seams aren't even. But when I mess with the tension either way, nothing is happening. :(

It's a singer, I can't remember the model offhand though I'm sure that would make a difference.

Not an Anthem
Apr 27, 2003

I'm a fucking pain machine and if you even touch my fucking car I WILL FUCKING DESTROY YOU.


Rich those jeans are fantastic, you thinking of doing any other denim work?

Goldaline your experiments are always really cool, like the french military sweaterpants

seriouslywtf
Jul 10, 2003

Seriously. WTF?

Warning: big sewing project dump incoming.

I haven't posted my stuff in here for a while so here are a few things I've finished since the last time I updated.

Linen tulip skirt:


Along those same lines, a tulip dress (this one is still in progress):


Ruched purple pencil skirt:


A kimono-style dress out of bamboo jersey:


I don't really have any name for this dress:

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Bagleworm
Aug 15, 2007
I has your rocks

seriouslywtf posted:

I don't really have any name for this dress:


I like this one! It makes me think of snakes, but in a good way. :3: Really cool effect.
Also, you look so much different when you smile.

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