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Engineer Lenk
Aug 28, 2003

Mnogo losho e!

I made a simple dog pullover from a fleece remnant. It kind of looks like a basketball jersey.



I have enough fabric for another three attempts. I think the next one will be along the lines of a horse blanket, just one piece with velcro at the neck and around the chest.

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combee
Nov 17, 2007

it's the combee's knees!


..

combee fucked around with this message at 12:51 on Jul 23, 2013

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

combee posted:

How many metres of material would I need for a long-sleeved A-line dress like so?


I'm not using a pattern so I don't really have a guide.

Are those pleats in it?

I squeezed a 3/4 length sleve hooded tunic dress from a blanket that was about 1.5m x 2.75m. So to be safe, I'd say about 3.5m, maybe a little bit more. I cock up a lot, so I like to have extra material.

combee
Nov 17, 2007

it's the combee's knees!


..

combee fucked around with this message at 12:51 on Jul 23, 2013

Tequila Mockingbird
Oct 6, 2005



I am having trouble thinking of the right term for what I'm trying to do, so searching is a huge hassle.

I want to sew some ipod touch cases. Not a tough proposition to sew a 3-sided rectangle. However, I want the two larger walls to be stiff - reinforced with something in the middle, like thin, flexible plastic would be really effective. Any ideas where I could get something like that, or tips on sewing it in?

Ashcans
Jan 2, 2006

Let's do the space-time warp again!



You would probably do fine with the sort of boning you can get in most fabric stores like Joanns or Hancocks. It's basically a thin, semi-flexible plastic that comes in a little fabric sleeve. I'm not sure about the best way to sew it in for your purpose, though. I'll think about it and try to suggest something if no one with more experience chimes in.

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


Heavy iron-on interfacing? Heat'n Bond Ultra is a good heavy-duty iron-on adhesive, but you can't sew through it (although I'd imagine you could cut it carefully to sew around it). I've also used something called InnerFuse - it's iron-on and stiff (people sometimes use it to make fabric bowls of all things) but you can still sew through it.

Tequila Mockingbird
Oct 6, 2005



Both of these sound like good ideas!

I want the bottom edges to fit the rounded corners of the case, so I am thinking of sewing the sides and the bottom with the case inside out, and then carefully cutting the plastic to fit inside, then sewing it in. It's not a big deal if it wiggles a little. I'll probably pick up some fabric remnants and see what I can do this week with your suggestions :)

seriouslywtf
Jul 10, 2003

Seriously. WTF?

I've made similar stuff (laptop sleeves) and just used a really heavy interfacing fabric in the middle. I once tried to reinforce with cardboard cutouts similar to what you want to do with the plastic, but those never really worked out the way I wanted them to.

4R7 THi3F
Aug 8, 2005

oh... so you ARE sick....

hahahah, i'm working on a rough draft for my thesis right now. the actual garment will be orange + black.



pretend that i'm a sexy scandinavian woman wearing a fur coat and a swimsuit and you'll get the vibe i'm going for.

also pretend that i'm not standing in a public bathroom but a beautiful lush rainforest.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

4R7 THi3F posted:

hahahah, i'm working on a rough draft for my thesis right now. the actual garment will be orange + black.



pretend that i'm a sexy scandinavian woman wearing a fur coat and a swimsuit and you'll get the vibe i'm going for.

also pretend that i'm not standing in a public bathroom but a beautiful lush rainforest.



You being in the bathroom makes me think it's some sort of insane, overgrown bathmat. But I love texxxture so it's great by me.

Dr Hemulen
Jan 25, 2003



Tequila Mockingbird posted:

I want to sew some ipod touch cases. Not a tough proposition to sew a 3-sided rectangle. However, I want the two larger walls to be stiff - reinforced with something in the middle, like thin, flexible plastic would be really effective. Any ideas where I could get something like that, or tips on sewing it in?

Look for HDPE (High Density Poly Ethylene). You can get this in 1mm sheets. It's stiff, heat shapeable and sewable.

Tequila Mockingbird
Oct 6, 2005



HardCoil posted:

Look for HDPE (High Density Poly Ethylene). You can get this in 1mm sheets. It's stiff, heat shapeable and sewable.

That stuff sounds really cool!

I've run off a few decent cases thus far. I think my favourite one is UPS creepo:

Cawie McFuckyou
May 2, 2008



So I'm going out fabric shopping tonight, and I'd really like to try quilting. Nothing elaborate or large really, as I just want to hang it over a window (roughly 3 feet by 5 feet).

So my question is, is it a horrible, disastrous idea to go out shopping for quilt fabric without a definite plan? I'm not sure how much fabric I need, as it is much smaller than a normal quilt and I'm not sure know how many different fabrics I will end up using. I had planned on just buying a yard or two of whatever I liked, depending on how many different fabrics I end up with, and yay for leftovers.

All the books I've glanced at about quilting have been discouraging about this kind of spontaneity, though. I'm usually a calculating, mathematically inclined person, but the idea of meticulously planning and plotting a quilt before I can buy a single fabric is really off-putting. Any encouragement or words of caution?

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Cawie McFuckyou posted:

So my question is, is it a horrible, disastrous idea to go out shopping for quilt fabric without a definite plan? I'm not sure how much fabric I need, as it is much smaller than a normal quilt and I'm not sure know how many different fabrics I will end up using. I had planned on just buying a yard or two of whatever I liked, depending on how many different fabrics I end up with, and yay for leftovers.

Any encouragement or words of caution?

I am a very spontaneous person anyway, but was especially so with my first (last and only so far) quilt. I just went to the shop and grabbed about 10 fat quarters in various shades of orange and brown. It turned out I had a little less than I needed, so I padded it out with red sashing (left over fabric from a jacket lining) and it was still a little small, so I told my boyfriend to lose weight.

I would recommend you have an idea of the end result you want to achieve though- at least have the basic shape or pattern decided before you go colour grabbing. I knew I was going to do the maple leaf block, so I chose autumnal colours. It also depends on how far you live from a fabric source. If you're really far away and you run out, can you be bothered to go back and get some more?

So basically... have a rough idea of what you want to achieve and jump off from there. Also, wait for one of the more competant quilter goons to post.

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


Cawie McFuckyou posted:

So my question is, is it a horrible, disastrous idea to go out shopping for quilt fabric without a definite plan? I'm not sure how much fabric I need, as it is much smaller than a normal quilt and I'm not sure know how many different fabrics I will end up using. I had planned on just buying a yard or two of whatever I liked, depending on how many different fabrics I end up with, and yay for leftovers.
It's not something I would do without at least having a type of pattern in mind, though, I mean me personally. Because the type of pattern dictates what kind of print you're going to use (big or small or none at all) - also colors and styles. If you were going to make something with pieced blocks versus something with big blocks of fabric, it does make a difference on what you pick.

If you just want to buy some fabric to "fondle," as a friend of mine says, buy fat quarters or half-yard pieces. It's easier on the wallet and you get to see how things you like look next to each other and in your house before you end up with two yards of some fabric you hated once you got it home. (I unfortunately speak from experience here.)

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear


Have not been sleeping the past few nights to get this one pieced together. Now I just have to quilt it. It's hand dyed silk noile, duiponi and broadcloth pieced in a hexagonal patchwork (otherwise known as 'grandmother's flower garden) I'm playing with the idea of very subtle outsides (the quilting will go through to the other side, but will be black-on-black) with very intense interiors. It's a weird long vest/jacket shape. The black wool part was originally a military jacket.

And to throw in a tiny little bit of advertising: In the next couple days I'm going to throw up a bunch of older work on my blog for sale--I just lost my job, and hoping I can fill the gap until I get a new one. So if you ever wanted some red ruffled leggings...

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


I usually don't care much for your stuff but that is loving gorgeous.

edit: that came out harsher than I meant it to, I just am not au courant with art pieces :)

handbags at dawn fucked around with this message at 02:56 on Oct 30, 2009

4R7 THi3F
Aug 8, 2005

oh... so you ARE sick....

goldaline u no u can just buy printed fabric w/ that design rite!!!!

jk that's amazing. i've always wanted to do something that intricate, but i've never had any motivation to get those projects started.

Nettles Coterie
Dec 24, 2008

Play in the Dark, lest the Heat catch you standing still


Goldaline you are crazy. That must have taken loving forever, and it makes me sad that it's on the inside and won't be seen by EVERYONE. It's beautiful, and I love the colors.

I want to see what you put up for sale, even though I'm broke as hell right now. Where's your blog?

Molly Bloom
Nov 9, 2006

Yes.


Calvervtutrp posted:

Goldaline you are crazy. That must have taken loving forever, and it makes me sad that it's on the inside and won't be seen by EVERYONE. It's beautiful, and I love the colors.

That's the concept, though, unless I'm wrong. I entirely agree on the beauty.

Nettles Coterie
Dec 24, 2008

Play in the Dark, lest the Heat catch you standing still


I know that's the point, but it still makes me sad :( Actually, I think I'm mostly just jealous that I don't have those kinds of skills.

I have started getting my rear end into gear on a few little projects, though, so maybe once I find my camera I'll actually have something to post up in here.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

4R7 THi3F posted:

goldaline u no u can just buy printed fabric w/ that design rite!!!!

I have a phobia of printed fabrics~~don't make light of my neurosis!!
(but seriously, I can't use them, I suck at printing them. Anything beyond a stripe or plaid sends me into total confusion and helplessness)

Calvervtutrp posted:

Goldaline you are crazy. That must have taken loving forever, and it makes me sad that it's on the inside and won't be seen by EVERYONE. It's beautiful, and I love the colors.

I want to see what you put up for sale, even though I'm broke as hell right now. Where's your blog?

Yeah, it is sort of the point. It makes the work more important somehow--to put something on the outside...can edge into 'decorative' areas. On the inside, it's there for a reason.

The blog is http://havinghorns.blogspot.com. I'm finishing up the post now. The prices are not high for what they are, I promise. It's just so hard selling things when they take as long as my work does. Nobody's going to pay as much as would be a fair price. I think this is why I end up giving half of it away :(

4R7 THi3F
Aug 8, 2005

oh... so you ARE sick....

Goldaline posted:

The blog is http://havinghorns.blogspot.com. I'm finishing up the post now. The prices are not high for what they are, I promise. It's just so hard selling things when they take as long as my work does. Nobody's going to pay as much as would be a fair price. I think this is why I end up giving half of it away :(

*makes fun of u for having a hotmail e-mail!!*

i want to buy your electric animal fabric because it's kind of amazing!

Leonard Leroy
Feb 11, 2007

Filipino Box Spring Hog

Yo, anyone have any idea of the risks of using masking tape on leather?

I'm trying to put a temporary design on my leather jacket for halloween as part of a costume, think i'm going to use masking tape to do it.

bethinator
Aug 25, 2005


Antis0ciald0rk posted:

Nice Slant-o-matic. That's quite a deal.

I just got the 401a in the original cabinet and accessories for $75. I got it from a guy who said it used to belong to his mother and she used it all the time and had it serviced religiously but it's been in the basement now for many years.







It was pretty dirty but I managed to get it cleaned up and oiled. It does a nice straight stitch but I can't get the knobs for the other stitches to move and the red lever will move the needle to the left but then it stays stuck there and I have to push it back into place with my hand. Hopefully I can figure out how to fix this myself.

Other issue is that the rubber ring for the bobbin winder is all dried out and doesn't make contact with the wheel, but I figure that's easy enough to replace if I can find the part.

Anyone know anything about fixing these things up?


I have the exact same machine/attachments purchased from a thrift store for $25. Some of the parts on mine started working better after a lot of oil, wiggling and patience. The winder on mine is dried out as well, but I found that there's a sweet spot where it'll make contact and catch, I just can't push too hard or it won't work.

good luck, I absolutely love mine.

Antis0ciald0rk
Nov 30, 2002
wtf is this?

bethinator posted:

I have the exact same machine/attachments purchased from a thrift store for $25. Some of the parts on mine started working better after a lot of oil, wiggling and patience. The winder on mine is dried out as well, but I found that there's a sweet spot where it'll make contact and catch, I just can't push too hard or it won't work.

good luck, I absolutely love mine.

I found a sewing machine shop that sold the rubber winder wheel for 80 cents. You can just pop that dried out one off and pop a new one on and it'll work like new.

Timefortea
May 21, 2007

Finally, a fetish for everything!

The wonders of SA forums never cease to amaze me! I was helping my wife search for a pattern online, and I said, "let me see if there's a thread on sewing on SA forums!"

Her dancing group needs tuxedo jackets with tails for a string of performances. My wife has just started getting into sewing and a friend of hers who is quite experienced offered her assistance in making the jackets.

My question is then: "does anyone have, or have a link to a good tuxedo jacket pattern that has tails?" I have no problems paying for it, just need to find it soon.

Ashcans
Jan 2, 2006

Let's do the space-time warp again!



Funny enough, I spent a good long time looking for that sort of thing earlier in the year. As far as I can tell, patterns for tailcoats are like birds teeth. Fortunately the few that are out there are often tuxedo coats, because its not like anyone wearing tails is going for a more casual look. I'll see if I can dig up what I found at the time.

Ok, so this was the best that I found; scroll all the down toward the bottom, theres an entry for 1890 'Evening Suit', which is about right for a tuxedo tail:



If you search for 'frock coat' or 'evening suit' you might find some other patterns, but many of them are closed across the front or cut long instead of tailed. Still, you might have better luck than me.

Now the bad news: this is not a good pattern. I mean it's a pattern and its ok, but it was a big headache. The illustrations are frequently poorly done or just unhelpful, and it misses a lot of stuff - it completely omits how to assemble and insert the lining, for instance, which is not insurmountable but kind of a big oversight. Also pay close attention to the cutting/laying guide, because I seem to recall that it tells you to cut things you never really need. There are also a lot of steps that didn't make very much sense to me at all in terms of technique or order.

How good is the friend? I ask this because a tuxedo jacket is not an easy project. I consider myself a competent sewer, and I spent about two months struggling with this. In the end (once I had worked out the above) I still couldn't get the fit across the back quite right, and the gathering at the shoulders never worked out. I gave up and bought one. Some projects have a bit of give, but it really doesn't take much for a jacket to look simply bad - doubly a problem if they're performing. If she has someone who is capable and understands how to fit a jacket, then it might be a breeze.

Ashcans fucked around with this message at 16:50 on Nov 2, 2009

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


I'm currently working on my very first sewing project. EVER.

I taught myself how to backstitch and then created a pattern for a stuffed animal. Everything seems to be on track and I will hopefully finish the doll today, but there is one thing that's scaring me.

While sewing the pieces together, the doll has been inside-out. I have left a hole so that I can flip the doll rightside-out and stuff it when I'm ready. Now, how do I sew up the hole from the outside without making it look different compared to the other stitches?

Basically, how do I finish up the doll from the outside?

Bagleworm
Aug 15, 2007
I has your rocks

nolen posted:

I'm currently working on my very first sewing project. EVER.

I taught myself how to backstitch and then created a pattern for a stuffed animal. Everything seems to be on track and I will hopefully finish the doll today, but there is one thing that's scaring me.

While sewing the pieces together, the doll has been inside-out. I have left a hole so that I can flip the doll rightside-out and stuff it when I'm ready. Now, how do I sew up the hole from the outside without making it look different compared to the other stitches?

Basically, how do I finish up the doll from the outside?

Here's a site for finishing stuffed animals, and if that's still confusing, here's a video showing a slip stitch on a hem.

You basically turn the stuffed thing right side out, and then fold the seam allowances back inside the turning-hole so that everything is properly lined up like you want the finished look to be. Then you stitch the two seam allowances to each other right at the edge of the seam by sticking the needle in the hole to get the thread through them, like zipping something up from the inside.
At the very end you'll have to knot it off, but usually you can find a way to hide the knot.
I hope that clears it up, it's hard to describe things like this with words.

Bagleworm fucked around with this message at 19:26 on Nov 6, 2009

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Bagleworm posted:

Here's a site for finishing stuffed animals, and if that's still confusing, here's a video showing a slip stitch on a hem.

You basically turn the stuffed thing right side out, and then fold the seam allowances back inside the turning-hole so that everything is properly lined up like you want the finished look to be. Then you stitch the two seam allowances to each other right at the edge of the seam by sticking the needle in the hole to get the thread through them, like zipping something up from the inside.
At the very end you'll have to knot it off, but usually you can find a way to hide the knot.
I hope that clears it up, it's hard to describe things like this with words.

This is perfect and exactly what I was looking to learn. Thank you!

I can't wait to try it out when I get home and I'll post the finished product tonight hopefully.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

Cross post from the far reaches of the indigonet.

Well I don't know how you guys spend your Saturday nights but here was last weeks doings.


Red wine and leftovers

and



an old Singer 15/19/whatever. I picked it up from a Salvation Army for 27 dollars, dropped some oil in it and it is a goddamned monster.

It was mine back at school in Syracuse, I had no room for it in the car so I gave it told this dude in my apartment building that his pregnant girlfriend could have the machine if she wanted. And I left. And a few weeks ago I went back, for homecoming. Preggers lady went to baby daddy "what if this baby doesn't look like you?"

:eek:

She ran away, leaving my beautiful machine in the cold dark hallway. And thus my homecoming sewing machine rescue was born.

Anyways.









I always +rep this kind of repair because I suck so loving bad at it. The sewing machine is my way.





Moleskin/iPhone damage



Reinforced the bottom, patched the corner



Other pocket just needed some lovin'









Normally I'd have gone for a much more elegant repair than this, but you remember the redwine. You see, the red wine went much faster than the repairs and so I just added some more belt loop I had in the sewing drawer.



And some boring crotch repairs, no pics.

Boredumb posted:

Nicely done. Are you still planning/making your own jeans?

Slowly. I'm doing an AmeriCorps year right now and just trying to learn and network as much as possible. I can't go back to making them like I was with only 3 super basic machines, I couldn't get production time below 10 hours a pair, just crazy. Should be some cool antics coming up next spring and summer, I'll post the antics here and on the blog.

Leonard Leroy posted:

My two year old Samurais had their first very, very, very minor stitching repairs, just to prevent actual damage. But i need to get ready for denim tears. I don't see foresee any, at the moment...

What I'm saying is that you need to put up some step by steps and what exactly you did.

It might be redundant, but one never knows when some new information will come up.

Crotch repairs I'm assuming? The best most basic advice I can give is to cut an appropriate size piece of denim for the damaged area (if it's on the crotch make sure it can curve or just use more than one piece).
With the jeans inside out/looking at the patch, lay down one or two lines of stitching to make sure the patch is in the right place.
Flip the jeans and run forward then reverse as slowly and smoothly as possible till you get the hang of it. Try to match the stitches to the grain of the denim if you want to blend the tones. It's actually a little frustrating at first because it requires patience without industrial equipment.

Here's my Cougar 001's repaired with that same machine. I ran a line of stitching down the selvedge line on the scrap, lined up with the inseam of the jeans. Then just back and forth, back and forth.




Notes for your sewing machine- use the sharpest needles you can, they don't have to be big, 14 will be fine for a home machine.
Be sure to turn the presser foot pressure up as high as you can get it.
For the darning (back and forth bit), make the changes in direction for the next row of stitching at the end of your last one. Go forward, end with the needle down, rotate slightly, go reverse, needle down, etc.
It doesn't have to be perfect, it just has to hold until you feel like repairing it again, so don't stress.

For stuff like the back pockets and watch pocket I just cut the current stitching, made an outline onto new fabric, cut it down a bit, and sewed it in. There are securing stitches you can't see because I used dark thread, tone on tone.

I'll make a video before Christmas.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


My very first sewing experience. I made the pattern from scratch while bored at work and I think he turned out pretty good for a first try!

Here he is, saluting for a job well done:


and here he is being saucy:


Thanks again to Bagelworm for the help!

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

nolen posted:

My very first sewing experience. I made the pattern from scratch while bored at work and I think he turned out pretty good for a first try!

here he is being saucy:


Thanks again to Bagelworm for the help!

Are you kidding me? For a first time sewing project from a pattern you designed yourself, he is nothing short of fantastic. I wish to pass a motion that he has his own pair of glasses so he doesn't have to use yours.

Buuut, some people, eg my mum who just looked over my shoulder, think that visible/contrasting stitches look scruffy, so maybe next time use matching thread?

Bagleworm
Aug 15, 2007
I has your rocks

nolen posted:



This is adorable. I have a wooden lion on my nightstand I use to hold my glasses at night, reminds me of that. The little smile kills me.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


madlilnerd posted:

Are you kidding me? For a first time sewing project from a pattern you designed yourself, he is nothing short of fantastic. I wish to pass a motion that he has his own pair of glasses so he doesn't have to use yours.

Buuut, some people, eg my mum who just looked over my shoulder, think that visible/contrasting stitches look scruffy, so maybe next time use matching thread?

Oh yeah, I completely agree about the contrasting thread. I went with black because I was afraid of not seeing the stitches as I went along. Next time won't be nearly as scary.

Thanks for the compliments everyone! I think I've found a new hobby.

4R7 THi3F
Aug 8, 2005

oh... so you ARE sick....

there's actually an invisible hand stitch called a slip stitch/invisible stittch, look it up. you can use whatever color thread you want and not see it in the end.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I couldn't find a hat that I liked, so I made one.




It's a heavy felted wool knit, and some wool suiting for the trim, and a little buckle off an army bag. Still debating whether or not to put pom-poms on the back.

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4R7 THi3F
Aug 8, 2005

oh... so you ARE sick....

Goldaline posted:

I couldn't find a hat that I liked, so I made one.




It's a heavy felted wool knit, and some wool suiting for the trim, and a little buckle off an army bag. Still debating whether or not to put pom-poms on the back.

hey!

how did you sew on the trim? v-fold??

i'm making a sweater cardigan, and i'm conflicted on how to finish the edge since i can't get ribknit in the colors i need.

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