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4R7 THi3F
Aug 8, 2005

oh... so you ARE sick....

Cross_ posted:

There were two problems with that fabric; because it's so stretchy it would frequently get pulled through the throatplate and then get stuck there. I had to set the maximum stitch length (an embarassing 3mm) in order to get stitches that were more like 1mm long. Using the stabilizer solved both problems easily- no puckered fabric and stitches that matched the setting, but then getting rid of the stabilizer became the new challenge.

did you change the type of needle you were using in your machine? get a pack of ballpoint needles snd stretch the fabric as you sew (if you're using a straight stich and not a zigzag)

also, we use wax paper as a stabilizer for sewing fabrics like charmeuses and chiffons (that stabilizes the fabric and stops it from getting stuck in that plate) maybe it can be used in the same manner for knits.

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Muffy_the_Diver
Oct 19, 2004

ALL ABOARD THE BUTT TRAIN

I'm really interested in trying my hand at a Cathedral Window quilt after reading through the thread (Goldaline, you are a horrible influence on me :ohdear: ). I have a pile of white bedsheets (and I do mean a PILE) that I can use for the backing fabric, but I really want a black-or-very-dark backed quilt. What sorts of readily available (and preferably cheap!) dyes are there?

The only one I know of offhand is Rit, which I am scared to death of using since I expect it will run/bleed like crazy when (not if) I need to wash the thing, ruining the window squares. Is there something that is colourfast enough that will, when it bleeds, not affect the windows? This is going to be piecemeal, probably with silk and wool and synthetics and all sorts of fabrics used. I am okay with shopping online, since JoAnn's (the only fabric store near me) almost certainly doesn't happen to carry anything of decent enough quality (their site appears to be somehow down right now so I can't check).

Oh, I'm also not worried if the backing itself fades. I just don't want the windows getting dyed in the process.

Thanks! :)

4R7 THi3F
Aug 8, 2005

oh... so you ARE sick....

there's a dye fixative called retayne that will help you set your dye

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


4R7 THi3F posted:

did you change the type of needle you were using in your machine? get a pack of ballpoint needles snd stretch the fabric as you sew (if you're using a straight stich and not a zigzag)also, we use wax paper as a stabilizer for sewing fabrics like charmeuses and chiffons (that stabilizes the fabric and stops it from getting stuck in that plate) maybe it can be used in the same manner for knits.

At first tried a regular needle and then switched to a size 11 ballpoint- I did not notice any difference whatsoever. Wax paper was one of the things I tried as well as other tear-away stabilizer; they all did the job of preventing the fabric from getting stuck but then removing the paper/stabilizer from the finished seams was painful. One of my books mentions wash-away stabilizer that's not fiber-based but somehow dissolves when it comes in contact with water. Unfortunately I have not seen anything like it in local stores.

quote:

The only one I know of offhand is Rit, which I am scared to death of using since I expect it will run/bleed like crazy when (not if) I need to wash the thing, ruining the window squares. Is there something that is colourfast enough that will, when it bleeds, not affect the windows? This is going to be piecemeal, probably with silk and wool and synthetics and all sorts of fabrics used.

Last weekend I used Jacquard acid dye on white silk twill with very good results:
http://dharmatrading.com/html/eng/1344-AA.shtml?lnav=dyes.html
After ~40 minutes of stove top cooking all the dye was absorbed with a pretty even distribution and the color exactly matched the sample swatch (620 Navy Blue in my case). Even after some rough treatment (hot/cold water, ironing, steaming, starching) it seems to be colorfast. Oddly enough the white synthetic fabric care label that was attached to the fabric was not dyed at all. Maybe it was pretreated or that dye simply does not take well to synthetics, either way it works great for silk.

Muffy_the_Diver
Oct 19, 2004

ALL ABOARD THE BUTT TRAIN

4R7 THi3F posted:

there's a dye fixative called retayne that will help you set your dye

Searching for this, I stumbled upon http://www.dharmatrading.com and am thinking of putting in an order for a couple of basic colours from them (the permanent fiber-reactive dyes). Do any of you know about the general quality of the stuff they sell? It seems leaps and bounds ahead of anything I could hope to get locally.

edit2: I forgot to ask; do any of you know how many tbsp are in one of their 2oz jars? I'm trying to figure out how much I'll need for my project.

edit1:

Cross_ posted:

Last weekend I used Jacquard acid dye on white silk twill with very good results:http://dharmatrading.com/html/eng/1344-AA.shtml?lnav=dyes.html
After ~40 minutes of stove top cooking all the dye was absorbed with a pretty even distribution and the color exactly matched the sample swatch (620 Navy Blue in my case). Even after some rough treatment (hot/cold water, ironing, steaming, starching) it seems to be colorfast. Oddly enough the white synthetic fabric care label that was attached to the fabric was not dyed at all. Maybe it was pretreated or that dye simply does not take well to synthetics, either way it works great for silk.

Look at me and my inability to read new replies before posting!

Apparently the acid dye is only for protein-based fabrics, like silk and wool. Their 'Procion' dyes seem to be for cotton/rayon/etc, which is what I'm leaning towards. Though, judging by your experience, it looks like their dyes are of pretty decent quality, which is promising! Thank you!

Muffy_the_Diver fucked around with this message at 08:03 on Dec 2, 2009

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


Muffy_the_Diver posted:

edit2: I forgot to ask; do any of you know how many tbsp are in one of their 2oz jars? I'm trying to figure out how much I'll need for my project.
it's a powder, right? there's 1/2 oz in one tablespoon.

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


For your reference, I used 1/4 oz of that powder dye for 0.5 lbs of silk. The table on their webpage is for washing machine use only.

Muffy_the_Diver
Oct 19, 2004

ALL ABOARD THE BUTT TRAIN

Handbags and Cross: thank you both! Just placed an order, I am excited. :)

CutiePie
Apr 29, 2009


Well, I'm going to take a look at my "workspace" later in the evening. I should be studying, my exam is next week but it's going for so cheap I don't want someone else to grab the place before I do.

Watch me crash and burn on this Sewing Adventure!
I have read and read but I still can't wrap my mind around how fitted bodice works.

Wish me luck!

kanteyluip
Aug 4, 2004

Mommy, I feel seasick.

Cross_ posted:

At first tried a regular needle and then switched to a size 11 ballpoint- I did not notice any difference whatsoever. Wax paper was one of the things I tried as well as other tear-away stabilizer; they all did the job of preventing the fabric from getting stuck but then removing the paper/stabilizer from the finished seams was painful. One of my books mentions wash-away stabilizer that's not fiber-based but somehow dissolves when it comes in contact with water. Unfortunately I have not seen anything like it in local stores.


Have you tried Solvy? http://www.sulky.com/stabilizers/solvy.php

I don't remember it having any kind of fibers in it, but I haven't used it in a while.

fine-tune
Mar 31, 2004

If you want to be a EE, bend over and grab your knees...

What do you all think of this machine? http://tippecanoe.craigslist.org/art/1464074969.html

I haven't heard back yet from the seller, so for all I know it's sold (:(). At any rate, is this the sort of thing I should be looking for?

My current machine is a cheapo Singer that works OK, sometimes. The bobbin feed tends to get all messed up after sewing for a while though (normal -> giant knots and jamming over the course of a small project). I made pajama pants the other weekend and it nearly frustrated me to the point of giving up on them.

vaginadeathgrip
Jun 18, 2003

all them bitches can't handle my sassy ass mouth

Ashcans posted:





Tailcoat stuff

I found a pattern in a men's patterning book from the 50's, and was unable to decipher the instructions. They gave you preset measurements. I tried to make a shirt sloper from the book, and it only used three measurements (center back length, chest width, and full length of the shirt...???) of course it came out ridiculous. Tailcoat patterns are hard to come by, so I basically made a jacket sloper, looked at a lot of pictures of tailcoats, and made my own pattern. Here's how it turned out:





Muslin prototypes for my senior project. It's for costume. Ignore the lack of pressing please :blush:.

Bonus fatsuit

Ashcans
Jan 2, 2006

Let's do the space-time warp again!



vaginadeathgrip posted:

I found a pattern in a men's patterning book from the 50's, and was unable to decipher the instructions. They gave you preset measurements. I tried to make a shirt sloper from the book, and it only used three measurements (center back length, chest width, and full length of the shirt...???) of course it came out ridiculous. Tailcoat patterns are hard to come by, so I basically made a jacket sloper, looked at a lot of pictures of tailcoats, and made my own pattern. Here's how it turned out:





Muslin prototypes for my senior project. It's for costume. Ignore the lack of pressing please :blush:.

Wow, I think that came out really well. The collar and shoulders look good, which is what totally killed my attempt. The styling on the tail is interesting, any particular reason that you decided to go with an outward flare instead of the regular cut? The outside points are pretty neat. I'd love to see the final product when you get that done - what are you going to be making it from?

I have no idea why suit patterns seem to be universally so terrible. It's hard enough to find them at all, and when you do they seem to be a complete mess. It's very frustrating because I would love to be able to make my own suit jackets, but at the moment if I try I end up looking like a clown.

vaginadeathgrip
Jun 18, 2003

all them bitches can't handle my sassy ass mouth

Ashcans posted:

Wow, I think that came out really well. The collar and shoulders look good, which is what totally killed my attempt. The styling on the tail is interesting, any particular reason that you decided to go with an outward flare instead of the regular cut? The outside points are pretty neat. I'd love to see the final product when you get that done - what are you going to be making it from?

I have no idea why suit patterns seem to be universally so terrible. It's hard enough to find them at all, and when you do they seem to be a complete mess. It's very frustrating because I would love to be able to make my own suit jackets, but at the moment if I try I end up looking like a clown.

I'm actually doing a weird 1930's sort-of-surreal version of Alice in Wonderland (designed it before I heard about Tim Burton's :argh:) and he is my rabbit. He's gonna be really tall and long (he's kind of inspired by this guy right here). The nice thing is that I don't have to have any reasoning behind design details because everything is wacky in Wonderland :). It will be made from a puke green wool (the pants and coat). The fatsuit I posted is for my Cheshire Cat.

I think for you, the best thing would be to make your own patterns. Patternmaking is easy if you have a good book to follow, and will get you a much better fit than commercial patterns. I can't remember the last time I bought a pattern.

edit: Here is my Alice



3 months and they'll all be in real fabric. Bonus: I might use a drag queen as my Queen of Hearts model.

vaginadeathgrip fucked around with this message at 21:52 on Dec 6, 2009

Nettles Coterie
Dec 24, 2008

Play in the Dark, lest the Heat catch you standing still


Vaginadeathgrip, between your username, Gogol Bordello title, and those costumes, I have decided that you are completely loving awesome.

Both those costumes look wonderful. Please post pics when you get the real things finished!

calcio
May 7, 2007

No Totti No party

Saw at costco today a Brother xr-9000 on sale for 169. Is this a good machine and what about the price?

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


I just ordered a refurb'ed XR9000 from overstock for $149 (incl. shipping). Costco used to sell them for $179 so I guess they discounted it a little bit.
Its main selling point over similarly priced machines is the monogram feature- unfortunately it seems to be fixed-size, single-font only. The manual is available online: http://welcome.solutions.brother.com/BSC/public/files/dlf/doch000571/xr9000ug01en.pdf

kanteyluip posted:

Have you tried Solvy? http://www.sulky.com/stabilizers/solvy.php
Thanks for that recommendation! I have tried the "light" version of their stabilizer and rinsing it in cold water for a minute completely removes it. The light one reminds me too much of clingwrap though - I picked up the "ultra" one which is more sturdy like regular stabilizer and I will give it a try tonight.

The Alice dress looks real nice- exactly what I'd imagine her to wear. As for the tailcoat, has anybody tried it on yet? From the picture it looks like that's a Small shirt with extra long pants.

Cross_ fucked around with this message at 23:51 on Dec 7, 2009

concreteelephant
Jul 13, 2009


Hey, I didn't know this thread was here!

Sorry if this has been asked, I'm still reading through.

I bought this fabric:


It's 22 inches wide and I have a yard. The men are each 13 inches tall or so. My original plan was to make a pair of lounge shorts, but I realized to match up pattern pieces with the men I'd probably have to use up a lot of the fabric and would have lots of little useless scraps leftover. I'm not keen on doing throw pillows either, but I can't think of anything else to do. Has anyone else ever worked with large print fabric like this before? What did you use it for?

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


Tote-bag, messenger bag, pillowcases? Campy apron? The more I'm thinking about it the more I like the idea of a full bib apron with musclemen on it.

Ashcans
Jan 2, 2006

Let's do the space-time warp again!



vaginadeathgrip posted:

I think for you, the best thing would be to make your own patterns. Patternmaking is easy if you have a good book to follow, and will get you a much better fit than commercial patterns. I can't remember the last time I bought a pattern.
I've never actually made my own patterns, at most I've modified existing ones or switched around bits between similar patterns. I did make a sleeveless tailcoat for my Halloween costume (which was sort of a grasshopper. I wish I had a decent picture of the whole getup) but I'd like to take another swing at the real thing. Do you have any recommendation on a good book for patternmaking? A lot of people in the thread seem to be actual professionals or seriously training, but I'm just a guy with an old sewing machine.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Ashcans posted:

I've never actually made my own patterns, at most I've modified existing ones or switched around bits between similar patterns. I did make a sleeveless tailcoat for my Halloween costume (which was sort of a grasshopper. I wish I had a decent picture of the whole getup) but I'd like to take another swing at the real thing. Do you have any recommendation on a good book for patternmaking? A lot of people in the thread seem to be actual professionals or seriously training, but I'm just a guy with an old sewing machine.

I'm just a guy with an old sewing machine too but all the things I've made were from self-created patterns.

For my stuffed animals, I just sketch everything out on paper and then cut it out, glue it up papercraft style, and look for areas that need improvement.

As for clothing, I look at how my current clothes are sewn together and build off of that. Measure, measure, measure. Draw pattern, cut pattern, try pattern out on test fabric. Prototypes tell me what needs correction.


I'm sure there's a better way to learn, but this seems to be the most-rewarding for me.

vaginadeathgrip
Jun 18, 2003

all them bitches can't handle my sassy ass mouth

Ashcans posted:

I've never actually made my own patterns, at most I've modified existing ones or switched around bits between similar patterns. I did make a sleeveless tailcoat for my Halloween costume (which was sort of a grasshopper. I wish I had a decent picture of the whole getup) but I'd like to take another swing at the real thing. Do you have any recommendation on a good book for patternmaking? A lot of people in the thread seem to be actual professionals or seriously training, but I'm just a guy with an old sewing machine.

I used this one which is pretty good. I just took a basic jacket pattern and modified the hell out of it. Although, their instructions for making a 2 piece sleeve made my eyes bleed so I just winged it. If you decide to venture into the ladies clothing for any reason, this one is pretty much a staple at any design school. Pattern books are pretty easy but if you have any questions, I'm sure plenty of ladies (or gentlemen!) here would be able to help with the technical stuff.

If you decide to start making your own, be sure and have someone else take your measurements. You can't really do it all yourself and have it be accurate. Buy some muslin and make a prototype so you can check the fit before you cut it in real fabric. I was never fond of prototypes before, but once you buy expensive fabric, it's necessary. Cutting it out in nice fabric is terrifying enough without worrying if it fits or not.

I'm having a love affair with wool right now. It really is great to work with, but so expensive :(.

vaginadeathgrip fucked around with this message at 08:36 on Dec 8, 2009

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

concreteelephant posted:


I bought this fabric:

Has anyone else ever worked with large print fabric like this before? What did you use it for?

With large novelty prints like that I generally cut out the motifs and applique them onto other things. A friend of mine bought some Carebear fabric where each of the bears was around 5 inches- she just cut them all out and stuck them on other stuff.

Another suggestion would be curtains or a large circle skirt, but I don't think you have enough.

I have a fair few friends who would kill for one of those creepy anime hug pillows patterned with that fireman stuff.

Shnooks
Mar 24, 2007

I'M BEING BORN D:


concreteelephant posted:

Hey, I didn't know this thread was here!

Sorry if this has been asked, I'm still reading through.

I bought this fabric:


It's 22 inches wide and I have a yard. The men are each 13 inches tall or so. My original plan was to make a pair of lounge shorts, but I realized to match up pattern pieces with the men I'd probably have to use up a lot of the fabric and would have lots of little useless scraps leftover. I'm not keen on doing throw pillows either, but I can't think of anything else to do. Has anyone else ever worked with large print fabric like this before? What did you use it for?

I have this fabric with construction workers instead. It's been sitting around for a while - wtf am I going to do with it? I feel bad cutting the guys in half, too.

We hung it on our wall for a while, but that's about it.

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


Sulky update: their "Ultra" stabilizer does pretty much exactly what I want. The only downside is that it takes quite a bit of scrubbing under hot water to dissolve it and get out all the stains completely- but it can be done!

Next question: I am thinking about attaching a removable garment shield to a dress shirt using velcro. Instead of using the loop fastener, are there any fabrics that naturally cling to the velcro hooks? Felt? Wool?

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

My plasticky piece of crap $99 White sewing machine gave up the ghost while I was trying to force it to sew through only two layers of fleece and one layer of anchor fabric. The needle mechanism, the entire thing, just snapped and sheared off cleanly. I'm lucky it whipped outwards and not in towards me... that much metal shrapnel would have hurt. :(

I'm sick of not being able to sew fleece without a lot of cajoling the machine, so I said "gently caress this" and bid on a Singer 237 on eBay. It's an all-metal industrial workhorse (that sold for $99 in the late 1960's :laugh: ) with good reviews, and it has the capability to sew through leather. :awesomelon:

I think I overpaid for it, though. Ah well. If it really does last me forever, it's every dime well spent.

So, although the auction says it was cleaned and works great, what can I do to check it out to make sure that, say, the needle mechanism isn't going to snap off and go flying the minute I set it up and start using it?

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


calcio posted:

Saw at costco today a Brother xr-9000 on sale for 169. Is this a good machine and what about the price?
I received the machine yesterday and played around with it during the evening- here's a quick review. Let me know if you got any specific questions.

The XR9000 is very lightweight, I don't know if that makes it less robust or not- it seems pretty sturdy but I would not use it for leather. The sewing mechanism is wonderful- very quiet and soft, like cutting through butter. Foot pedal is responsive and the speed limit slider works great. There's also a button control but for whatever weird reason you can not use the start/stop button while the pedal is plugged in; I don't foresee that button getting a lot of use.
There's a reverse/reinforce button which unfortunately is a temporary switch only- not a toggle. It can be used in conjunction with the foot pedal or you just hold the button down and it will go in reverse at a slow speed.

Several extra presser feet are included, e.g. buttonhole, buttonstitch, zipper, blind hem. The one thing I am missing is a quilting guide. There's a slot for it in the foot but it has to be purchased separately. While the accessories are fine, the accessory storage is not. There's a front panel section that you have to pull out and then inside there's a plastic pouch with all the goodies. You have to keep the stuff in the pouch or they'll fall out of the machine. For $0.20 more Brother could have added a proper compartment with a hinge- instead they took a very cheap and impractical storage approach.

Lighting is provided by a bright but focussed white LED. I am somewhat spoiled by having a high wattage light bulb in the previous machine which lit up the entire working area. The XR9000 LED lights up the presser foot really well but that's about it. The "automatic needle threading" is not automatic, but still extremely useful (I keep missing the eye when trying to do it manually).

Even though I wound 3 bobbins I still can't tell whether the machine has an automatic stopping mechanism or just slows down a lot once the bobbin is full. Either way you can run the winding at full speed for a minute and it's quite noticeable once it's complete. The bobbins are full-size and top-loading. There's a somewhat tricky part about catching a hook when loading the bobbin which is not well explained in the manual. The first time I missed that which resulted in unbalanced stitches; reloading the bobbin more carefully took care of it. Another nice feature is that you don't have to pull up the lower thread before you can start to sew.

The stitch patterns are plentiful and half of them look quite nice. The other half has weird default settings where the default stitch length is too long, you can adjust that in the display but it still strikes me as odd. The monogramming feature works- it's fixed size, fixed font and does not look all that great. The XR9000 does not have any adjustable settings for presser foot height or pressure. However, the included default presser foot has some kind of spring adjustment built in which is supposed to help with thick fabric layers. I have not had a chance to try it out yet. The manual and instructional DVD are great and cover all the essentials.
Summary: well worth it at <$200

Antis0ciald0rk
Nov 30, 2002
wtf is this?

daggerdragon posted:


So, although the auction says it was cleaned and works great, what can I do to check it out to make sure that, say, the needle mechanism isn't going to snap off and go flying the minute I set it up and start using it?

The old all-metal machines are more likely to just freeze up and stop moving than to have parts come off (aside from a piece of broken needle). The thing I'd look for to help you figure out how well cleaned it was is to find one of the places that you're supposed to oil regularly, take off the panel, and run your finger across the gears and see what you get. Thick brownish gunk = not recently cleaned, if it's clear or slightly yellow you're good. Check the manual for the places you're supposed to add oil or gear lube and follow the instructions for how frequently you should do it to prevent future freezing.

If it's one of the models with an external motor/drive belt you need to check the belt for wear and cracks and replace it if necessary. Also, check any wiring to make sure the casing isn't cracking or becoming brittle (an all metal machine is a great conductor if live wires become exposed! ). The motor is the part you should worry the most about, if it burns out it can be expensive/difficult to get a replacement. It probably wouldn't hurt to take it somewhere to have the motor checked and/or serviced. If you're confident in your tinkering abilities there are tutorials online for taking the motor apart and servicing it.

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


Cross_ posted:

Even though I wound 3 bobbins I still can't tell whether the machine has an automatic stopping mechanism or just slows down a lot once the bobbin is full. Either way you can run the winding at full speed for a minute and it's quite noticeable once it's complete.
I have a similar machine (the 6000i - basically the same as yours but about 10 less stitches) and if yours is like mine, it doesn't stop automatically but it will slow down. (I just looked online and that is correct.)

Did yours come with a little table attachment? Mine did and I really like it. I do use the start/stop button instead of the foot pedal almost exclusively, but as I quilt and not sew clothing I do a lot of short, straight seams and the button is great for that.

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

Antis0ciald0rk posted:

:words:
Thank you!

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


handbags at dawn posted:

I have a similar machine (the 6000i - basically the same as yours but about 10 less stitches) and if yours is like mine, it doesn't stop automatically but it will slow down. (I just looked online and that is correct.)
The reason I wrote this is because the first time it slowed down, but the second time it came to a complete stop. It could be that the plastic knob had enough friction on the other thread to stop the motor from spinning.

The table is included and very useful for monogramming christmas wrapping paper (I had to try it out on something :haw: ). I only have a tiny work area so it takes up precious real estate- I will probably switch back to regular or free-arm configuration.

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


Cross_ posted:

The reason I wrote this is because the first time it slowed down, but the second time it came to a complete stop. It could be that the plastic knob had enough friction on the other thread to stop the motor from spinning.
I never quite let it get to the point where it stops, I think I'm afraid I'll break the thread or wind it too tight at the last of the bobbin. Kind of my version of not stepping on sidewalk cracks probably to be honest. :)

concreteelephant
Jul 13, 2009


hey, thanks to you all for the ideas. I liked madlilnerd's idea of the apron, but I don't use them. The kitchen theme stayed with me though and I ended up making these:



Unfortunately I am terrible at quilting but I imagine they will function just fine.

So, thanks for the input everyone!

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


Ahahaha those are awesome.

dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

If anyone else is in the East Bay, I found this neat resource, a lending library for vintage patterns (1860-1970). http://www.vpll.org/ Doesn't seem like they have mens though which bums me out


My girlfriends Singer CG550 is having problems with timing. I'm not familiar with how to accurately describe the problem but the needle wont go down to its lowest point on the stroke, it gets stopped by something. She said it happened after she was trying to sew fabric that was apparently too thick.
Been trying to find the manual for the machine online but Singer wants 15 bucks :| Called a repair place and they wanted $130 :|

ColobusMonkey
Jan 23, 2005



Hahah those turned out amazing.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

concreteelephant posted:

hey, thanks to you all for the ideas. I liked madlilnerd's idea of the apron, but I don't use them. The kitchen theme stayed with me though and I ended up making these:



Unfortunately I am terrible at quilting but I imagine they will function just fine.

So, thanks for the input everyone!

I NEEED THESE.

Seriously I want these even more than a PS3 or a place at St Martins doing ceramics.

MUST HAVE SEXY GLOVES.

And it was Handbags at Dawn who suggested something useful like an apron. I wanted you to make it into a creepy hug pillow. I really like the oven glove thing though because they're firemen and the oven is hot (leave me alone I gave blood today and then drank Red Bull and now feel odd)

BTW, I am in the middle of making a quilt for a friend and need some advice. I'm making it out of fabric recycled from other things (60s pillowcases, a skirt with a stain on it, etc) and I fear it's starting to look too busy. The block I'm using is Mary's triangle, and I've got a consistant background of navy blue, with all kinds of crazy colours and prints next to it. Can there be such a thing as too busy, or will the dark blue balance everything out? :ohdear:
I'm starting to think that this is just a process I go through with quilts because I felt the same on the leaf block one and it turned out fine. I don't have any money for nice planned colour schemes :(

concreteelephant
Jul 13, 2009


madlilnerd posted:


And it was Handbags at Dawn who suggested something useful like an apron.

Oh, my bad! Thanks Handbags at Dawn then.

It's kind of hard to tell if something looks busy or not without seeing it. Maybe you could post a photo of the blocks laid out. I'm doing a similar project, trying to get rid of old fabric and it does become difficult after a while to keep things matching and so on. Though if the recipient is worth a drat they won't care, considering your sweat and blood went into making it.

Antis0ciald0rk
Nov 30, 2002
wtf is this?

dwoloz posted:


Been trying to find the manual for the machine online but Singer wants 15 bucks :| Called a repair place and they wanted $130 :|

Save your $15, the regular owner's manual won't have instructions for timing adjustments. Those types of instructions are only distributed to Singer Authorized Service Reps. I've found generic sewing machine repair/maintenance guides at my local library or you could join the wefixit Yahoo! group and post your problem. They have a pretty big collection of pdfs and you might be able to find your timing adjustment instructions there.

Typically, adjusting the timing isn't hard. You usually have to remove the panel above the needle and the bar that goes up and down will have 2 lines on it. There will be some sort of mechanism to adjust the bar and something the lines should line up with, you adjust the bar so that the top line matches up when the needle is in the correct down position and the bottom line matches up when the needle is in the correct up position. At least that's how it works on the Singer machines I've had.

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handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


madlilnerd posted:

BTW, I am in the middle of making a quilt for a friend and need some advice. I'm making it out of fabric recycled from other things (60s pillowcases, a skirt with a stain on it, etc) and I fear it's starting to look too busy. The block I'm using is Mary's triangle, and I've got a consistant background of navy blue, with all kinds of crazy colours and prints next to it. Can there be such a thing as too busy, or will the dark blue balance everything out? :ohdear:
I'm starting to think that this is just a process I go through with quilts because I felt the same on the leaf block one and it turned out fine. I don't have any money for nice planned colour schemes :(
I wasn't familiar with that block, Mary's triangle, but when I looked it up all the examples I could find were calm background (solid or almost solid) with crazy prints. So it sounds like you should be fine. Can you post a picture of what it looks like so far? I'd be interested to see it.

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