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ludosti
Feb 25, 2007

Cute, but psycho

Cross_ posted:

- expensive option: replace presser foot and throatplate with a straight stitch one, i.e. a tiny hole in both instead of the regular wide slot
I've also heard some people have used strategically placed tape on their throatplate to simulate the straight stitch throatplate's tiny hole (but I haven't tried it before).

Stabilizer will probably help quite a bit. In some situations, I have good luck with gently pulling the thread tails as I'm starting to sew (and after a few inches, gently pulling on my newly sewn seam) to keep the fabric from getting sucked into the throatplate.

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Chessna
Dec 24, 2008


Does anyone have a pattern for tobi pants? I could probably just use a normal pants pattern and adjust the size of the thighs and how it tappers on the ankle, but figured I might as well ask first. For reference:

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


My next project is going to be a vest and the silly pattern instructions suggest putting fake pocket welts on it. We can't have that so I have done some digging for double welt construction.

This approach here seems really nice so enjoy the link:
http://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/welt_pocket_construction/

Palmer/Pletsch have a different take on it which avoids the cardboard pattern and uses basting instead:
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...WeltPocket.pdf&
ei=nSE1TNLnCsiErAeK5NjmCQ&usg=AFQjCNHUWQoSXc4-BEcNriT8AU7QRIlEzQ

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga



Putting this guy back on the market for Long Island/NYC area. 75ish, paleo.denim at gmail.com

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

My best friend's sister has been in and out of hospital a lot lately, so her mum commissioned me to make her a quilt as a surprise late birthday/get well soon present.


Click here for the full 1679x1318 image.


I love it so much even though there's a mistake in it (middle row, first column).

They asked for a Moulin Rouge quote for her label:


The birthday girl was over the moon with it and sent me a really lovely thank you card :3: It was pretty fun to make, but I don't know if I'll ever do a commission again because it made me so anal about cutting accuracy. I'd rather stick with doing it slapdash and having more fun!

teknicolor
Jul 18, 2004

I Want to Meet That Dad!
Do Da Doo Doo


IT Crowd in the background, nice! (oh and also zomg that quilt is awesome)

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

teknicolor posted:

IT Crowd in the background, nice! (oh and also zomg that quilt is awesome)

Of the 2 near identical pics I took, I deliberately chose that one to see if anyone would notice him in the background! 10 points to you.

My favourite thing about the quilt: it shares a couple of fabrics with one I made for my best friend last year, so it's like their quilts are sisters too :allears:
I'm clearly just a schmaltzy old lady, trapped in the body of a 20 year old girl.


On a completely unrelated note- is there anything I need to worry about when sewing very shiny, slippery satin? Should I put a new needle in? It hasn't been very long since I changed the last one.

very
Jan 25, 2005

I err on the side of handsome.

Lately I've had a wild hair about making my own clothes. I got these two books: Couture Sewing Techniques and Shirtmaking, and they are both great. Also, this guy has a lot of videos that deconstruct how to create slopers and such. It doesn't seem all that hard, but I'm sure there is a lot that I'm not seeing. What's the catch? Will I be able to make things that don't look home-made? If I just pick up and examine a shirt or something it does look awfully complicated.

Nettles Coterie
Dec 24, 2008

Play in the Dark, lest the Heat catch you standing still


The first few things you make will probably look pretty homemade. I think it really depends on how much effort you put into it, and how well you follow all the directions. For the longest time I paid no attention to how patterns were laid out on the fabric, and just shoved them in wherever they could fit. It took me forever to realize that the bias actually affected anything. Turns out there IS a reason they have those little arrows on all the pattern pieces... little things like that can have a big impact on how the finished product looks.

It seems like you're off to a good start, though. Just have some patience, and don't try anything TOO out there for your first couple projects, but most things really aren't that complicated when you take time to think about how they go together. Don't worry too much about it looking "homemade." Even when YOU think it looks a little off, people will still be shocked and amazed when you tell them you made it. :3: That's my favorite part!

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


madlilnerd posted:

On a completely unrelated note- is there anything I need to worry about when sewing very shiny, slippery satin? Should I put a new needle in? It hasn't been very long since I changed the last one.
I find cutting satin to be a major pain- the actual sewing not so much. The one thing that made a huge difference on my last project was using tons of spray starch. With the fabric taking on more of a paper-like consistency it got really easy to keep it from slipping. The other issue is fraying and I relied on overcasting and Fray Block to keep it under control. For my current project I am using pinking shears instead, but the jury is still out on whether that suffices.

RichBomb
Nov 16, 2004
a strange and terrible saga

very posted:

Lately I've had a wild hair about making my own clothes. I got these two books: Couture Sewing Techniques and Shirtmaking, and they are both great. Also, this guy has a lot of videos that deconstruct how to create slopers and such. It doesn't seem all that hard, but I'm sure there is a lot that I'm not seeing. What's the catch? Will I be able to make things that don't look home-made? If I just pick up and examine a shirt or something it does look awfully complicated.

Making slopers and patterns for one-offs where you have the leisure of spending full afternoons and weekends isn't terribly tough. Industrial pattern making means making patterns that sew together immediately with no though necessary from the technician and a silhouette designed for your target audience with the proper color ways takes years and years and years. Time is money concept.

vaginadeathgrip
Jun 18, 2003

all them bitches can't handle my sassy ass mouth

madlilnerd posted:


On a completely unrelated note- is there anything I need to worry about when sewing very shiny, slippery satin? Should I put a new needle in? It hasn't been very long since I changed the last one.

Baste it together before you sew it. It will slip around even if you pin it.

I took a class on couture sewing, and now I always thread trace and baste any finer fabric. You can't always rely on seam allowances, but if you have your stitch lines clearly marked, sewing it is a breeze. That couture book listed is pretty good in explaining it. And yes, always put a new needle in. The sharper, the better.

CureMinorWounds
Apr 29, 2007
Faster Casting Time!

So I've managed to lose the power cord to my sewing machine, and I've searched Janome's site and can't find anything even relating to my sewing machine. Is there such a thing as a universal sewing machine cord? Or am I getting my hopes up here?

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


CureMinorWounds posted:

So I've managed to lose the power cord to my sewing machine, and I've searched Janome's site and can't find anything even relating to my sewing machine. Is there such a thing as a universal sewing machine cord? Or am I getting my hopes up here?

I've found that most local dealers will be able to acquire stuff like this for you.

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


Let's say I have a piece of fabric that's shaped like a hexagon (i.e. 6 x 30degree angles) and would like to add some trim to it. Either by wrapping tape around the edges or extending the edges. Most bias binding and mitering tutorials I have found assume 90 degree angles and in my trials the smaller folds don't look very nice. Any recommendations ?

CureMinorWounds posted:

So I've managed to lose the power cord to my sewing machine, and I've searched Janome's site and can't find anything even relating to my sewing machine. Is there such a thing as a universal sewing machine cord? Or am I getting my hopes up here?

A photo would help. Maybe something like this is what you're looking for:
http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3875429

A.s.P.
Jun 29, 2006

They're just a bunch of shapes. Don't read too deeply into it.

I just spent hours reading this entire thread, page by page. Goldaline, you're incredible! It's also been really cool watching everyone's progress (RichBomb's jeans and workstations are so enviable it's crazy).

Just wanted to share what I made for my Draping final this past spring semester. I took a year of evening courses at FIT and did sewing, patternmaking, draping, and I'm taking a summer session of sewing II. If anyone has any questions I'll try to answer them!


That's mine on the left. The skirt is a 14-gore skirt made out of African wax-print cotton. The top is kind of an eyelet fabric (not sure if that's the right description -- has embroidered dots all over it). The oversized ruffle was a freaking bitch to do. It was draped from scratch with a muslin and then traced onto paper, then onto fabric.

I also have the Brother XR9000 from Overstock. So far it's served me well. Certainly a world of difference from the industrial Juki machines I use at school, but to tell you the truth, I have never had any problems with the Brother bobbin tangling or silk shifting around like I've experienced on the Juki. I have no complaints really. :)

I have a few questions --

Can someone tell me the best place to buy/order an adjustable mannequin? I got an old, old adjustable one as a gift but the fabric on it is stretchy and just don't stay in place very well.

Also -- anyone know of any good tulip skirt tutorials? The kind that tapers at the knee and has pleats/tucks around the waist?

And lastly, for anyone that uses Burda to print out patterns -- is it just me or are almost all of their patterns on A4 paper? Has anyone had luck printing on a different size paper (e.g. 8x14) and just trimming it down?

4R7 THi3F
Aug 8, 2005

oh... so you ARE sick....

when i draped a tulip skirt, i think i aligned the straight grain (or maybe it was my bias line?) with the side seam and pleated my way to the CF and CB

4R7 THi3F fucked around with this message at 03:09 on Jul 17, 2010

Comrade Quack
Jun 6, 2006
Witty closing remarks have been replaced by massive head trauma and general stupidity.

I'm trying to make what I guess is called a fleece applique quilt. I'm working of a pattern from a book, but the book is a little lacking in description. The pattern has solid lines for cut and dotted lines where you just sew details. I'm confused about the edges for the different colors.

For example I'm working on a yellow Care Bear. The body is yellow which is I guess is the bottom layer. There is a cut line for the white belly. Does that mean cut the white and yellow so the pieces sit side by side (but slightly off because I suck at tracing and cutting) or do I place the white on top of the yellow? Side by side seems easier but it doesn't seem like it would match up very well.

Any ideas?

teknicolor
Jul 18, 2004

I Want to Meet That Dad!
Do Da Doo Doo


Without seeing the pattern, I would logically assume the white is sewn over the yellow, rather than cut. Unless the pattern also gives you seam allowances (or factors those in based on the cut/sew lines), there'd be no room for error. Also, why would they make you cut out a bear-shaped yellow piece only to make you cut out the white belly part, instead of just telling you to cut out the yellow bear minus the belly in the first place? Does that make sense? I just woke up :P

ludosti
Feb 25, 2007

Cute, but psycho

With applique you're sewing one fabric on top of another (and unless you're doing reverse applique, you don't do any cutting to the base fabric). With the care bear, the white belly piece is the applique that is sewn on top of the yellow body fabric (which is left intact).

vaginadeathgrip
Jun 18, 2003

all them bitches can't handle my sassy ass mouth

amishsexpot posted:


I have a few questions --

Can someone tell me the best place to buy/order an adjustable mannequin? I got an old, old adjustable one as a gift but the fabric on it is stretchy and just don't stay in place very well.

Also -- anyone know of any good tulip skirt tutorials? The kind that tapers at the knee and has pleats/tucks around the waist?


Your draping stuff looks awesome!

I haven't had much luck with adjustable dress forms. When I first got into sewing, my mom bought me one of those horrendous Singer forms with all of the adjustable dials. Needless to say, it now serves as a place to hang things or perhaps display something I've made. I guess I'd be curious to know the answer to this, as well.

As far as the tulip skirt goes, my draping book says you start by aligning the grain to center back, but I really think it depends where you want your pleats to go. If you want more in the front, start at the back, and vice versa. You'll have to experiment if you want it asymmetrical. If you start from the back, draw in your hip line, and align your hip line to the center front waist. Where you align the hip line depends on how much or how little fabric you want to work with. After that, grab the excess fabric above the waist line and tie some twill tape around the waist. You can manipulate the pleats and gathers from there. Hope this wasn't confusing.

A.s.P.
Jun 29, 2006

They're just a bunch of shapes. Don't read too deeply into it.

Thanks ladies!

Another question -- does anyone recommend a good draping book for basic skirts/dresses, ideally including tucks/pleats/fullness, etc.?

I'd love one with good illustrations, too. Thanks!

roads
Feb 21, 2009

WILL AMOUNT TO NOTHING IN LIFE.

Sorry if this isn't the best place to ask this, but what are your favorite no/little sewing clothing endeavors?

I'm really big into T-shirt recons/recycling and making my own clothes but since my sewing machine has been in storage (moving around) it's put quite a damper on my fun. Summer is no fun without new clothes, and without a sewing machine and terrible hand sewing skills it's been kind of hard to make any cute ones :(

I've done a lot of Ed-Hardy esque slash-and-weave stuff but I don't like how they look at all, it's a bit too trashy looking.

Tube tops, wrap shirts/skirts, and things to wear overtop Bikinis are all I've really come up with that don't look terrible.

Any ideas? I have plenty of men's T-shirts in every size from kid's to huge, lots of time, but very bad hand-sewing skills. :(

Someone suggested Stitch Witchery to me, and I got some. It seems pretty nice, I've made a few wallets with it, but how does it stand up to the wear and tear of clothing?

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

roads posted:

Sorry if this isn't the best place to ask this, but what are your favorite no/little sewing clothing endeavors?

I'm really big into T-shirt recons/recycling and making my own clothes but since my sewing machine has been in storage (moving around) it's put quite a damper on my fun. Summer is no fun without new clothes, and without a sewing machine and terrible hand sewing skills it's been kind of hard to make any cute ones :(

I've done a lot of Ed-Hardy esque slash-and-weave stuff but I don't like how they look at all, it's a bit too trashy looking.

Tube tops, wrap shirts/skirts, and things to wear overtop Bikinis are all I've really come up with that don't look terrible.

Any ideas? I have plenty of men's T-shirts in every size from kid's to huge, lots of time, but very bad hand-sewing skills. :(

Someone suggested Stitch Witchery to me, and I got some. It seems pretty nice, I've made a few wallets with it, but how does it stand up to the wear and tear of clothing?

Oh, but handsewing is so much fun, how could you not want to handsew everything? :downs: Anyway, handsewing jersey is pretty useless and prone to coming apart and not stretching at all, so I wouldn't recommend doing it much anyway.

I'd maybe play with coming up with some neat textures and maybe making them into garments or acessories? Jersey knit does some fun things works up into strips and tubes and braids (like this scarf) Or if you have a million shirts like I did way back when, you could do something like this dress which was really only sewn up braid to braid, everything else is just tied up.

Or maybe play with some dying or printing techniques? Shibori's lots of fun, and you could use RIT dyes.

c0ldfuse
Jun 18, 2004

The pursuit of excellence.


I'm looking for a simple pattern for a swimshort I'm going to be making. It's tough to find decent pairs (even online) and I'd like to have a simple German-flag striped suit. I already bought the nylon-lycra fabric, mesh, and drawstrings. I could disassemble the pair I already have but I'd prefer not to in case I struggle with this project.

In case you don't know what I'm talking about :

Click here for the full 533x800 image.


My current suit is sewn in 4 pieces. I'm going to make a simple red with white stripe on sides first to figure out pattern before I try something more complicated. Should I just get a pattern for a pair of boxers/shorts? This will be my first fabricated on my own project, but it shouldn't be terribly difficult outside of never having used this fabric before, I bought some stretch needles since they're fairly cheap.

The other thought I have is if a mesh liner for the whole suit will be better than just a basket for the boys, as it will stop the fabric from sticking too much to my skin when wet.

c0ldfuse fucked around with this message at 20:49 on Jul 27, 2010

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


@coldfuse:
Since it's an excellent deal I'd recommend picking up this pattern collection (Simplicity 2741-BB) which contains a 2-piece boxer pattern:
http://compare.ebay.com/like/370349...4=263602_263632

You probably need to reduce the waist/width when using it for swimshorts and with stretch material. I'd also recommend using Solvy Super/Ultra as stabilizer for the lycra. All my swimshorts have full length mesh liners, I have never seen partial mesh liners and it sounds kind of weird.

c0ldfuse
Jun 18, 2004

The pursuit of excellence.


Cross_ posted:

@coldfuse:
Since it's an excellent deal I'd recommend picking up this pattern collection (Simplicity 2741-BB) which contains a 2-piece boxer pattern:
http://compare.ebay.com/like/370349...4=263602_263632

You probably need to reduce the waist/width when using it for swimshorts and with stretch material. I'd also recommend using Solvy Super/Ultra as stabilizer for the lycra. All my swimshorts have full length mesh liners, I have never seen partial mesh liners and it sounds kind of weird.

Thanks, actually gonna try it with a cheap pattern I found at a fabric store as a simple guide and work it down from there.

First suit is going to be more figuring out shape, red with white stripe on each side. Also after checking out some other suits going to have the full mesh like I mentioned. I should be starting it tonight, I'll update the thread with progress.

Smoogle
Aug 12, 2005


Hey everyone! I just discovered this thread and wanted to say it looks like goons are some pretty creative people. As for me I've only been sewing about a year since now I have a job at Jo-Ann Fabrics. I was wondering what goons actually go there for their stuff, or are all the nerds I see here just going to Comicon? I guess I'm really only in this thread in an attempt to be somebody on the "inside". However, I am attempting a dress! How much harder is a dress than pants? Its just a knee length sundress but the sleeves have some ruffles :(

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


Hi there Smoogle !
I have been sewing for about the same time that you have. As for Jo-Ann's - that is where I get 90% of my fabric. It seems like the long-time seamstresses in this here thread are not too fond of the store though.
From my limited experience the skirt part of your dress will be a lot easier than pants- it's fitting the bodice and setting the sleeve that can be painful. For the sleeve ruffles you could either gather with two parallel rows of gathering stitches using sturdy thread, or stitch the sleeve cap to a stretched piece of elastic. Either way is a PITA. I've also tried using a ruffler foot, but the resulting gathers/pleats have been unpredictable so it's not something I'd go back to.

Smoogle
Aug 12, 2005


I've tried the elastic way and the 2 threads way with a skirt and both didn't turn out well. It always gathers unevenly and I can't even it out enough without messing it up moving it =/

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


I'm considering opening a sewing/fabric store within the next year (because Austin is severely lacking in good ones) and I'm curious what everyone in this thread would like to see in a sewing/fabric store.

Most stores seem to cater to the little old lady crowd and I'd like to change that up a bit and try to spark interest in the younger adult crowd. Any suggestions?

A.s.P.
Jun 29, 2006

They're just a bunch of shapes. Don't read too deeply into it.

nolen posted:

I'm considering opening a sewing/fabric store within the next year (because Austin is severely lacking in good ones) and I'm curious what everyone in this thread would like to see in a sewing/fabric store.

Most stores seem to cater to the little old lady crowd and I'd like to change that up a bit and try to spark interest in the younger adult crowd. Any suggestions?

That's so cool -- good luck to you!

I can never find kitschy novelty prints that I actually like! Like vintage/vintage-style prints, english rose prints, teeny floral prints, etc.

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

nolen posted:

I'm considering opening a sewing/fabric store within the next year (because Austin is severely lacking in good ones) and I'm curious what everyone in this thread would like to see in a sewing/fabric store.

Most stores seem to cater to the little old lady crowd and I'd like to change that up a bit and try to spark interest in the younger adult crowd. Any suggestions?

A scraps corner where you pay $5 to fill up a bag or box with scraps from a bin full of offcuts. Whenever I want to do patchwork I either have to raid my scraps box at home or buy whole lengths of fabric or buy those expensive jelly-roll packs and it's a pain.
Also a section with cheapy stuff, like polycotton that's $3 a metre. Beginners need scope to make mistakes and you can't do that if you've just paid 40 for enough Cath Kidstone cotton to make a skirt.

I think friendly and knowledgeable staff are the most important thing in a fabric store. Staff who ask you if you need help, but won't hassle you if you're having a good browse and are knowledgeable but not stuck up or patronising.

If you got a shop that had a window display, that would be cool. You could do a different look every month that was similar to a designer/high end look and show how much cheaper it was and how long it took to make, along with which fabric, pattern and notions from your store you used. Show people that they can make something that doesn't look home-made.

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


nolen posted:

Most stores seem to cater to the little old lady crowd and I'd like to change that up a bit and try to spark interest in the younger adult crowd. Any suggestions?

Nice idea, but do you really think the young adult crowd will provide enough revenue ? Everywhere I look they seem to cater to old time quilting folk because they have money to burn.

What I would like to see in a store is damasque fabric. Cotton prints and unicolor synthetics are easy to find, but fancy fabric is rare around here.

quote:

I've tried the elastic way and the 2 threads way with a skirt and both didn't turn out well. It always gathers unevenly and I can't even it out enough without messing it up moving it =/
I've never seen uneven gathers with the elastic method. My only issues with it are the risk of skipped stitches and broken needles if the elastic is not stretched equally in front and behind the needle.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Thanks for the suggestions so far everyone. Keep them coming!


Cross_, that's one of my concerns. This whole thing is just an idea and will still need a lot of business planning. I have no problem catering to a broader crowd, but I don't want the store to feel like only old ladies are welcome in the establishment (this is my main gripe with most fabric/sewing shops in Austin right now). Hitting both demographics would be tough.

madlilnerd, I LOVE the idea of a "all-you-can-eat" scrap section.

Shnooks
Mar 24, 2007

I'M BEING BORN D:


Not sure if I'm in the right thread, but...

I got a Kenmore 4 Stitch for $5 at a yard sale about a year ago and it works well for a $5 machine. It's pretty old - at least 20-30 years?

Anyways, it has come time for me to replace the belts in the machine. I took them out and it's two v-shaped ones, sizes 6 1/2" and 5 1/2". I did some looking around online and it said that stretch belts are pretty universal and will work even on older machines. My problem is that I keep finding sewing machine stretch belts in the 10-15" range, un-stretched.

So, where or what is the best place to find sewing machine belts? We don't have a sewing machine repair shop nearby (it's a trek to get to), and I've looked online and I haven't been able to find the exact replacement for my model I have (385.1233280 I think?).

I want my sewing machine back :(

vaginadeathgrip
Jun 18, 2003

all them bitches can't handle my sassy ass mouth

nolen posted:

I'm considering opening a sewing/fabric store within the next year (because Austin is severely lacking in good ones) and I'm curious what everyone in this thread would like to see in a sewing/fabric store.

Most stores seem to cater to the little old lady crowd and I'd like to change that up a bit and try to spark interest in the younger adult crowd. Any suggestions?

If you want to set yourself apart from the old lady quilting brigade, I think you should carry more fashion fabrics. Silks, wool, things you can't buy at Joann's. There has to be a market for that sort of thing if the nearby fabric stores only carry kitschy cottons. Also, you'll probably make more money if you put the store near a fashion design school.

ludosti
Feb 25, 2007

Cute, but psycho

nolen posted:

I'm curious what everyone in this thread would like to see in a sewing/fabric store.
I would love to see a store that actually carried a decent selection of eco-friendly fabrics - bamboo, organic cotton, hemp, etc. I don't know how many people in Austin are into eco-fabrics, but I have to buy all of mine online (since I've been unable to find any place in Phoenix that carries more than 1 token eco-fabric).

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


vaginadeathgrip posted:

If you want to set yourself apart from the old lady quilting brigade, I think you should carry more fashion fabrics. Silks, wool, things you can't buy at Joann's. There has to be a market for that sort of thing if the nearby fabric stores only carry kitschy cottons. Also, you'll probably make more money if you put the store near a fashion design school.
This is basically what I came here to say. If you don't want to get just the quilters, carry fabrics other than cottons. However, if you want to make sure you don't get any business from quilters at all, be sure and keep calling us old ladies. ;)

Also, Schnooks - even if the machine repair shop is a trek, if you're not absolutely positive what kind of belt to put in that machine, make the trek. It will be worth it to not screw your machine up.

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Scooty Puff Jr.
Oct 2, 2004
Who's ready for safe fun?

Perhaps you good sewing folk can help me!

I'm doing a bunch of sewing/costume work for my film school's sketch show, and they're going to pay me.

Basically, I'm repairing some things, and creating some costumes out of scraps and whatnot. They'll reimburse me for whatever I have to buy, but they're also going to pay me by the hour.

I have to figure out how much to charge by the hour, but I'm not sure. I don't want to overcharge because, obviously, they're asking me so that it will be cheap, but still beneficial to a poor starving film student.

Basically the sort of projects are like "Take these several meters of scrap white fabric and make some angel-type robes." or "Put some velcro on these adult diapers"

It's very easy stuff, none of it requires a pattern, it just requires some legwork and brainwork.

Does anyone know how to suss out what to charge?

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