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Gonktastic
Jan 18, 2007



Wonderful, thanks!

Anybody have suggestions for replacing coat buttons. I bought a trench coat and a wool coat for the winter and both of them have already lost a button. I noticed that they're pretty different than regular button sewing- looser and not as close to the actual fabric. I'd prefer not to go to a tailor...

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Cherry Hammer
Jan 31, 2005

what's a cherry hammer?

Gonktastic posted:

Wonderful, thanks!

Anybody have suggestions for replacing coat buttons. I bought a trench coat and a wool coat for the winter and both of them have already lost a button. I noticed that they're pretty different than regular button sewing- looser and not as close to the actual fabric. I'd prefer not to go to a tailor...

1) Knot the thread on the reverse side, pulling the needle through to the outside.
2) Slide the button onto the thread, into place.
3) Place a toothpick on top of the button holes.
4) Stitch over the toothpick, sewing the button on as normal.
5) ???
6) Remove toothpick.
7) Profit.

Gonktastic
Jan 18, 2007



Brilliant!! Thanks.

Beebubbles
Dec 19, 2007

Brush yo' teef.

Gonktastic posted:

Wonderful, thanks!

Anybody have suggestions for replacing coat buttons. I bought a trench coat and a wool coat for the winter and both of them have already lost a button. I noticed that they're pretty different than regular button sewing- looser and not as close to the actual fabric. I'd prefer not to go to a tailor...

Depending on which button it is you can have a lot of fun replacing it. Like a giant one at the very top, almost like a pendant. Is it a classic trench or something more modern?

And listen to Chery Hammer, those are awesome instructions. And yeah, never go to a tailor for stuff like that. It just pisses them off.

King Skinny Pimp
Oct 24, 2004

by T. Finn


Lixer posted:

I just learned how to knit over thanksgiving break since I've always wanted to learn and my grandma was in town. Right now I'm working on my first scarf but it seems to be coming out a bit odd shaped. As I go along it gets wider and wider and I'm not sure why. It has the same number of stitches (can stitches even be added on?) Maybe I'm knitting it looser and looser?

For now, I think it has stopped widening but I'm not sure. I don't know what to do about a scarf with a skinny end either. Does anyone know why it's doing this and how to stop/fix it?

It kinda looks like this

I'm working on teaching a friend of mine to knit (not that I'm terribly good, I've only been knitting for a few months and I'm still deathly afraid of knitting in the round) and she had the same problem, but it's not that she was knitting looser with each stitch, but that she was either picking up an extra stitch at the beginning (not hard to do if your yarn isn't hanging right when you switch needles) or she was splitting the loops to make extra stitches or knitting god knows what to pick up extras. In any case, if you count your stitches after every row for a while and make sure you're not doubling anything up, it might help. I did that the first time I knitted a swatch and I had no problems at all once I got my tension relatively even.

In any case, I'm super glad this thread is around. I've come into possession of my boyfriend's mom's old sewing machine, and while I have yet to take a look at it (I have a double stitched merino wool scarf to knit for my boyfriend first, and a hat knit flat with 2x2 ribbing for a friend and a hat knit on straight needles with short row shaping for another friend and a scarf for myself and shortcut fingerless mits and oh goodness, it's never going to end), I do really want to get into sewing and now I have a place to look for ideas and whatnot! Hooray!

Also, entrelac knitting is awesome and looks loving fantastic. I just need to knit myself a sweet headband or some other such thing with it, since the first thing I knitted with it was a Christmas present. Oh, and a quick question, does anybody know a good website that will generate knitters' grid for a given gauge? I want to make a custom pattern for my scarf and the one for my boyfriend. Argyle is fabulous, but I want to actually design something to make it super special.

root a toot
Aug 7, 2006

mondo burger was manufactured and distributed to intentionally destroy the black community

Z Is Overrated posted:


By the way, is anyone else here on Ravelry? It's kinda like a pattern/yarn manager, but you can also see what everyone else is doing with their yarn and projects. I didn't think it'd be that interesting when I first joined, but now it's taking up a pretty big chunk of my day.

YES I AM ON RAVELRY. i was wondering how big the goon turn out was.... what's your name? i will look you up! (mine is ginandtoxic)

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


Cherry Hammer posted:

1) Knot the thread on the reverse side, pulling the needle through to the outside.
2) Slide the button onto the thread, into place.
3) Place a toothpick on top of the button holes.
4) Stitch over the toothpick, sewing the button on as normal.
5) ???
6) Remove toothpick.
7) Profit.
This is great, I'm terrible at explaining sewing techniques in words without photos or diagrams! I would just add:
6 1/2) Wrap your needle thread around the thread in the space between the button and your fabric to create a "stem" for the button

Gently Used Coat
Jul 4, 2005



root a toot posted:

YES I AM ON RAVELRY. i was wondering how big the goon turn out was.... what's your name? i will look you up! (mine is ginandtoxic)

Mine is VanGoghMango.

I am friending you and Strelnikov right now.

Reformed Tomboy
Feb 2, 2005

chu~~

I was hoping somebody here may have some suggestions for me... I need to find a very specific patterned fabric and am having a hard time finding anything. I've looked online, and a few local shops, but have had no luck.

What do you ladies (or gentlemen, I suppose) do in this case?

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


Reformed Tomboy posted:

I was hoping somebody here may have some suggestions for me... I need to find a very specific patterned fabric and am having a hard time finding anything. I've looked online, and a few local shops, but have had no luck.
Is it one that you know is already made, or is it a "I wish I had fabric like X" situation? If it's the former, try to find out who the designer is and search by that, as a lot of fabric sites will credit the designer in their listings. If it's the latter, I'm not really sure - maybe look into computer printing (like the scarf earlier in the thread) or screenprinting/stamping your own?

machinegirl
Apr 16, 2002

*sigh*

Another ravelgoon: elizasea

I think we need a group. Shall I start one?

root a toot
Aug 7, 2006

mondo burger was manufactured and distributed to intentionally destroy the black community

I almost did, yesterday, but was too lazy to make banners. I'll join!

Santclair
Aug 6, 2006

by angerbotSD


So it has been discovered that while I love sewing, I need to work a bit on hand-embroidery:



Made this as a speech project ('How to make _______'), and it came out decently, except for the sorry-looking kanji...I'm considering ripping it out and painting it on instead. Other than that I'm pretty happy with it!'

Any suggestions for paints that will work? I tried mixing acrylic and fabric paint, even watering down the acrylic quite a bit, but it wasn't really happening.

gum bichromate
Sep 4, 2006

~*~*~*~*~*~*~* I AM NOT A SLAVE! TO A BREED!! THAT DOESN'T EXIST!!! THE BEAUTIFUL PIBBLE, THE BEAUTIFUL PIBBLE
~*~*~*~*~*~*


Santclair posted:

Any suggestions for paints that will work? I tried mixing acrylic and fabric paint, even watering down the acrylic quite a bit, but it wasn't really happening.

Fabric paint, obviously. Screen printing paint might work better since the fabric paints I've used usually end up stiff and home-made-looking (which is never something I want). But from the looks of it, you just used a regular stitch for the embroidery. If you use a backstitch, you'll get a solid, neat line and it should look nicer. Here's how- http://www.coatscrafts.co.uk/Crafts/Needlecrafts/Howtos/back+stitch.htm

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


Vodafone UK are doing some great billboards right now. This one's my favourite, it always makes me giggle...



On the sewing front, I spent all weekend on my trouser suit: first I traced out all the pattern pieces for the jacket and trousers, then cut out all the pieces from the vintage Pendleton wool my grandmother gave me (she bought it from the mill in the 60s and then never did anything with it), and then yesterday I did allllll the interfacing. I want the under-lapels to be in navy satin so I have to wait for that to arrive before I can go much further, though.

I've got an interview with another big London newspaper this afternoon, who are actually getting me in a studio for a photo shoot tomorrow morning (with a hair and makeup person even! omg!), so I spent a good part of the weekend pressing all the clothes they want me to bring along. And then I had another girl come round on Saturday afternoon who wants to use our boat for a location for a fashion shoot next weekend. My god, it's been busy.

Micomicona
Aug 7, 2007


machinegirl posted:

Another ravelgoon: elizasea

I think we need a group. Shall I start one?

Oh you should! (I'm Ezmo over there, and I'd join)
I'm quite surprised at how many ravelling goons there are. Awesome.

Santclair
Aug 6, 2006

by angerbotSD


awapplesauce posted:

Fabric paint, obviously. Screen printing paint might work better since the fabric paints I've used usually end up stiff and home-made-looking (which is never something I want). But from the looks of it, you just used a regular stitch for the embroidery. If you use a backstitch, you'll get a solid, neat line and it should look nicer. Here's how- http://www.coatscrafts.co.uk/Crafts/Needlecrafts/Howtos/back+stitch.htm

HIlariously enough, a backstitch is precisely what I used. it kinda sucks...I used to be awesome at hand-stitching (I even have a baby blanket I helped my grandmother make that was entirely hand-embroidered by the two of us). But about six months ago I broke my wrist really badly and hosed up the tendons and the bone, and basically have no motor control in that hand, which of course is my sewing hand. :(

I'll definitely go look into the screen-printing paint though. Is that available at places like Hobby Lobby or will I have to go online?

deety
Aug 2, 2004

zombies + sharks = fun



King Skinny Pimp posted:

I'm working on teaching a friend of mine to knit (not that I'm terribly good, I've only been knitting for a few months and I'm still deathly afraid of knitting in the round) and she had the same problem, but it's not that she was knitting looser with each stitch, but that she was either picking up an extra stitch at the beginning (not hard to do if your yarn isn't hanging right when you switch needles) or she was splitting the loops to make extra stitches or knitting god knows what to pick up extras.
When I first started, I had this problem a lot. In my case, I was often knitting the first stitch as two separate ones because I wasn't holding the yarn correctly at the start of each row.

Knitters, what are your favorite stitch dictionaries? I got one of the Barbara Walker books from Ebay and I love it. Each pattern has a decent photo (most are black and white, but that's not a big deal to me). And unlike most guides she actually writes a bit, explaining about the texture of them or what uses they're appropriate for.

barraGOUDA
Apr 19, 2006

FISH + CHEESE = YAY

machinegirl posted:

Another ravelgoon: elizasea

I think we need a group. Shall I start one?

OOH OOH PLEASE DO (I'm barraGOUDA there too and I shall look all of you up!) I'm excited that there are this many goons on Ravelry. I loving love that site.

spatula posted:

Right now I'm working on this hat for my mom. I'm using a varigated yarn, and the cables don't show up as well as I'd like among all the colors, but it's still nice. The recommended hook size is sort of big though, I probably would have gone down one size... the hat doesn't seem quite as snug as I would like it to be.

I love, love, love that pattern. I picked a nice bright red so while the cabling is still not as prominent as I'd like, it's still pretty visible. And yes, the suggested hook size is way too loving big. I switched to an H hook halfway through and it's still a little loose on my head, but it gets the job done. (Surprisingly, you can't tell by looking at it that I switched hooks halfway through...that was a nice surprise.)

Man, I love seeing everyone's projects. You guys are some talented motherfuckers.

Here's my contribution:

A Jayne Cobb hat for my boyfriend (also a goon, as you can tell from :iamafag: ).


I get so many comments on this scarf when I wear it out. Pattern from here.


Baby Mario and Yoshi I made for a Craftster swap back in the day.

All right, that's enough of my junk.

district 12
Oct 19, 2004

muscles griffon~~

hello all!

I both knit and sew (although I sew pretty terribly) and I've made various scarves, hats, etc. My favorite project recently was sewing an iPhone case that looked like an iPhone for my then-bf for St. Nick's. My most recent project was making a laptop case for my new Macbook so it doesn't get ruined.





How I made it:
I had a dress lying around that I never wore anymore, and some yellow yarn I hadn't used yet. I took the dress, cut it up, took a tapestry needle and sewed it up into a rectangle. I then took the buttons from the back of the dress and used it to make a closure.
It's pretty poorly made and there are uneven stitches, runaway pieces of fabric.

But I must've done something right because I have gotten so many compliments on it from strangers and the people who work the Genius Bar at the Apple store.

Does anyone have any advice on how I can even out the stitches for the next one? I'm making it for a friend, and if I can, I'd like to turn this project into a potential moneymaker (I'm a poor college student!). I'm also looking into printing something on it. Would a stencil and that jacquard fabric paint work, do you think?

I really like this thread; I grew up with a mom who loved making things. She has a sewing machine, a serger, a knitting machine, a sock machine, and she has a walk-in closet plus a cabinet full of yarn and one of those white plastic dressers full of knitting needles. She's insane, and I think it's passed onto me.

district 12 fucked around with this message at 01:27 on Jan 8, 2008

DeliciousDarkness
Apr 29, 2007

by Y Kant Ozma Post


district 12 posted:


Does anyone have any advice on how I can even out the stitches for the next one?

You can use a "C-Thru" ruler (clear with gridded measurements printed on it, C-Thru is the brand) and mark each place where the needle will go through (Like every 1/4" or 1/8" ). Personally I'd go about 1/4"-3/8" away from the raw edge, with a stitch at every 1/8". If you want to sell these things though, I'd advise you to learn to use a machine. Whereas it would probably take you at least an hour by hand, with a machine you could sew this in less than five minutes. Although if you just are doing it for fun and don't care if you're working for sweatshop wages, then I guess it doesn't really matter.

Cool thread. I've been handsewing since I was little, and machine sewing for about 12 years. Knitting and crocheting for about 2 years. Now I'm in my last semester going for my BFA in Fashion Design, and working on my awesome senior collection which is full of steel-boned corsets and hoopskirts (and a little bit of handknits) XD.

district 12
Oct 19, 2004

muscles griffon~~

DeliciousDarkness posted:

You can use a "C-Thru" ruler (clear with gridded measurements printed on it, C-Thru is the brand) and mark each place where the needle will go through (Like every 1/4" or 1/8" ). Personally I'd go about 1/4"-3/8" away from the raw edge, with a stitch at every 1/8". If you want to sell these things though, I'd advise you to learn to use a machine. Whereas it would probably take you at least an hour by hand, with a machine you could sew this in less than five minutes. Although if you just are doing it for fun and don't care if you're working for sweatshop wages, then I guess it doesn't really matter.

Cool thread. I've been handsewing since I was little, and machine sewing for about 12 years. Knitting and crocheting for about 2 years. Now I'm in my last semester going for my BFA in Fashion Design, and working on my awesome senior collection which is full of steel-boned corsets and hoopskirts (and a little bit of handknits) XD.

Oh no worries, I know how to use a sewing machine, I like to think there is charm from the yarn stitching, and you can't really use yarn in a machine :) I'll look into the ruler though! I think my mom has one, maybe I could borrow it. It did take me about an hour to cut and sew, but I definitely wouldn't be mass-producing these things. I'd probably sell them on etsy or to friends by request. I think the more I do, the more I'll get a technique and be able to churn them out neater and (maybe) faster.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Hey ladies and gents! I'm excited we have a sewing thread now.

I'm a Crafts/Fibers major at the moment, so I'm pretty constantly sewing--most of my stuff is not really wearable or practical at all though. In fact it's largely awfully uncomfortable. But I love it, I'm one of the only students in my major that do garments at all, everyone else does sculpture or objects or what not. Boo.

Anyway. Some stuff from this semester:


Experiment in creating constructed surfaces with fabric.

Simple t-shirt remix/dye. I like solid bright colors and shape I guess

Excuse the awful photo in my living room, I haven't got back a good picture yet. My big piece this semester, it has an jumper, shirt, shoes, and hat that go with it. All in lovely shades of magenta, safety orange and tennis-ball green. It's also fully reversible, and the other side is neon gree. I beat out seniors and juniors (I'm a sophomore) for a spot at the Philadelphia Flower Show. Yay! It almost makes the hours of hand-stitching those tunnels and actually wearing it (it weighs about 15 pounds) worth it!

Oh, and I do sometimes make real clothes! This one isn't terribly well crafted, sorry, I just whipped it up yesterday for kicks--winter break is boring!


And sometimes I do embroidery too. Last one, I promise, I just get overly excited about Fibers~!

DeliciousDarkness
Apr 29, 2007

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Goldaline posted:

Philadelphia Flower Show.

Sup Philly goon :) what school? I go to Moore. Congrats on that btw... your work is really interesting.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

DeliciousDarkness posted:

Sup Philly goon :) what school? I go to Moore. Congrats on that btw... your work is really interesting.
Hey there! I very-nearly-almost went to Moore! I'm actually at The University of the Arts. And thanks--it was a crazy competition, the juniors and seniors had over a month to work on their pieces, and the head of our department decided to let us participate with only 2.5 weeks until judging.

ps: really dumb question, but is it true that Moore sucked all the queer girls out of Uarts? Because they don't exist here :smith:

Muffy_the_Diver
Oct 19, 2004

ALL ABOARD THE BUTT TRAIN

I'm working on a bathrobe! I went out to buy one, but they're all ugly pastel colours, with sleeves that are too damned short, and made with fabric that sends shivers up my spine when I touch it. I have an old one that sort-of fits but is too short and ugly, so I made a pattern from it, modified it, and will soon be purchasing some awesome fabric (once I determine the yardage I'll need) and sewing it up. I'll show y'all the before and after once it's finished, if there's interest.

Strelnikov posted:


And just for fun, here's the skirt and corset I made for my halloween costume. I was Typhoid Mary.

That looks really cool. Do you have any clearer photos of it?

Pile of Kittens posted:

I just keep wanting to make Burning Man clothing. Origami crane tail bustle made of layered muslin and tulle.

Do you have a pattern you use for the bustle? I've been meaning to try my hand at one for a while now but I don't know where to look.

Zhentar posted:

My gf would like to sew more often, but whenever she does, after a little while her back gets really tired. How does one go about maintaining a proper posture while sewing?

I get this exact same problem, and I can't really place why. The really odd thing is that it will happen even in chairs/benches/whatever that don't give me problems while doing other things. So far the best solution I've found is to get a comfy computer chair (one of the swivel types on casters) and force myself to lean back against it (not slouching - just so some of the weight of my upper body is resting on the chair rather than my spine), which will at least postpone the aches and pains. When I sit straight with "proper" posture it just fucks my back up sooner. Anyhow, just have her experiment with different chairs/postures until she finds one that is at least tolerable. Wish her luck for me! :)

Goldaline: that monster tunnel-filled dress is all sorts of awesome.


Anyhow, the main point of my post is to see if any of y'alls have any suggestions as to why my machine's straight-stitch keeps loving up!



It's a Babylock EA-605, built like a little brick shithouse and in near pristine condition. I managed to get it with the instruction manual, and set it up, oiled it, adjusted tension, everything according to the manual. It does both overlocking as well as some fancy-assed form of straight stitch that I'm not really familiar with; Double-Chain stitching. As far as I can tell, it's a lot like overlock in terms of the movement of the needle, only, you know, doesn't overlock.

Now, the overlocking works just fine and peachy (kept missing stitches but I adjusted some things and now it's great). My problem is this - When I use the double-chain setup and stitch through rather thin fabric (two layers of lovely-threadcount bedsheets), it will get would up around the underside-thread-feeder (I've no idea what the thing is called, so here's a photo):

(thumbnailed) The yellow dotted line is the thread path, the pink loops at the end of it are what happens with the thread passing through the needle after a few stitches. It gets bundled around, then the needle's thread snaps, and all sorts of hell break loose. I've tried different speeds, different tensions, all sorts of stuff but nothing seems to help.

The kicker? It only started this maybe a week ago, with no prior modifications to tension or any other settings. Suggestions?

Muffy_the_Diver fucked around with this message at 04:05 on Jan 8, 2008

district 12
Oct 19, 2004

muscles griffon~~

Goldaline posted:

Hey ladies and gents! I'm excited we have a sewing thread now.

I'm a Crafts/Fibers major at the moment, so I'm pretty constantly sewing--most of my stuff is not really wearable or practical at all though. In fact it's largely awfully uncomfortable. But I love it, I'm one of the only students in my major that do garments at all, everyone else does sculpture or objects or what not. Boo.

Anyway. Some stuff from this semester:


Experiment in creating constructed surfaces with fabric.

words cannot express how much I love that. if you ever want to sell it pleeeease let me know I would wear it everyday!!

DeliciousDarkness
Apr 29, 2007

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Goldaline posted:

really dumb question, but is it true that Moore sucked all the queer girls out of Uarts? Because they don't exist here :smith:

Hahaha, it's entirely possible given our all-female ways and feminist leanings. There are quite a few lesbians and probably a lot more bi girls here. And even the straight ones are 99.9% feminists (not bra-burners, you know, normal ones. Myself included.)

Muffy_the_Diver posted:

Do you have a pattern you use for the bustle? I've been meaning to try my hand at one for a while now but I don't know where to look.
A few companies to google are Truly Victorian, Mantua Maker, Past Patterns, Ageless Patterns. Even Butterick has one. To get you started this website has a pretty good source of reviews of patterns, mostly historical: http://www.gbacg.org/GreatPatternReview/index.htm
As you may guess I'm very much into historical garments :) If you have any questions I'll be happy to answer. Maybe I'll post a GWS-esque thread with pics on making a corset if I get around to it.


About the machine tension, off hand my suggestions would be change the needle, and clean/dust the machine to make sure there's no lint. Also, rethread every thread, maybe something came off.

DeliciousDarkness fucked around with this message at 05:19 on Jan 8, 2008

Rap Songs From Anime
Aug 15, 2007



Santclair posted:


Any suggestions for paints that will work? I tried mixing acrylic and fabric paint, even watering down the acrylic quite a bit, but it wasn't really happening.

I did a design on one of my jackets with acrylic paint mixed with a fabric medium. It came out really good, I wasn't as careful as I should have been with ironing it to set and smooth the paint so I accidentally pulled up a few small parts where it hadn't dried completely and stuck to the baking sheet between the paint/fabric and iron. It held up very well, didn't lose flexibility through being washed or over time.

Rap Songs From Anime fucked around with this message at 13:50 on Jan 8, 2008

squirrellypoo
Feb 8, 2003


Goldaline posted:

Anyway. Some stuff from this semester:


Experiment in creating constructed surfaces with fabric.
omfg I love that. Perfect styling with the headband and 1950s vibe, too.

And I just now realised we have a DIY subform. thank you mods!

RobertKerans
Aug 25, 2006

There is a heppy lend
Fur, fur aw-a-a-ay.

Muffy_the_Diver posted:

Anyhow, the main point of my post is to see if any of y'alls have any suggestions as to why my machine's straight-stitch keeps loving up!

It's a Babylock EA-605, built like a little brick shithouse and in near pristine condition. I managed to get it with the instruction manual, and set it up, oiled it, adjusted tension, everything according to the manual. It does both overlocking as well as some fancy-assed form of straight stitch that I'm not really familiar with; Double-Chain stitching. As far as I can tell, it's a lot like overlock in terms of the movement of the needle, only, you know, doesn't overlock.

Now, the overlocking works just fine and peachy (kept missing stitches but I adjusted some things and now it's great). My problem is this - When I use the double-chain setup and stitch through rather thin fabric (two layers of lovely-threadcount bedsheets), it will get would up around the underside-thread-feeder (I've no idea what the thing is called, so here's a photo):

The yellow dotted line is the thread path, the pink loops at the end of it are what happens with the thread passing through the needle after a few stitches. It gets bundled around, then the needle's thread snaps, and all sorts of hell break loose. I've tried different speeds, different tensions, all sorts of stuff but nothing seems to help.

The kicker? It only started this maybe a week ago, with no prior modifications to tension or any other settings. Suggestions?

It's the tension, and the weight of fabric together. You might be able to get around this by keeping the material very taught, but that might be a pain.

You should only be using the chain stitch for embroidery, though, it unravels too easily if used for basic stitching. Use either a basic sewing maching, or overlock fully.
EDIT: the overlocker has chain stitch as an option because it works normally by running a line of it alongside the loop stitches finishing the edges off. It's a fairly pointless addition to have it as an option on its oown, thogh I suppose it could be used for repairing bits of overlocking, and for decorative edging. Used to be the default stitch on basic machines until they invented ones that didn't unravel straightaway.

Also, in addition to the other replies,

Gonktastic posted:

Wonderful, thanks!

Anybody have suggestions for replacing coat buttons. I bought a trench coat and a wool coat for the winter and both of them have already lost a button. I noticed that they're pretty different than regular button sewing- looser and not as close to the actual fabric. I'd prefer not to go to a tailor...

Especially with the wool coat, using a small button on the inside will hold it on for much longer. So you essentially stitch two buttons together, one on each side of the material.

RobertKerans fucked around with this message at 13:36 on Jan 8, 2008

RobertKerans
Aug 25, 2006

There is a heppy lend
Fur, fur aw-a-a-ay.

bobua posted:

What kind of skill level would be required to make something like fitted t-shirts?


Not that I understand anything about sewing, but I'm especially bewildered by the way a single piece of fabric seems to be 'shaped' to a form. If I was to cut a t-shirt up at the seems, the individual pieces wouldn't be naturally flat(I don't think).

Not high at all BUT to do it and make it look halfway decent you need an overlocker and a blind stitch machine. Then it's as simple as getting a pattern/taking apart a tee shirt and drawing around the bits, cutting out a pair of each of the 2 [very simple] shapes, and running the seams through the overlocker, and the hem, neck, and cuffs through the blind stitch machine. Like nuclear power, it's the startup cost that's a bitch though.

If you cut up a tee shirt, you'll see all the pieces are flat. Material is flat, you mould it with seams and darts on on some material, but on tee-shirts there should be no need for that. The shape should come from the side seams being curved.

RobertKerans fucked around with this message at 13:53 on Jan 8, 2008

Moms Stuffing
Jun 2, 2005

the little green one

I have a question for knitters. What do any of you know about knitting something that's supposed to be on dpns like socks on two circular needles instead? I got the SnB day calendar for Christmas and today's useful tip mentions something about it. I HATE dpns and would love to do away with them forever if possible! Has anyone tried this method?

barraGOUDA
Apr 19, 2006

FISH + CHEESE = YAY

Santclair posted:

Any suggestions for paints that will work? I tried mixing acrylic and fabric paint, even watering down the acrylic quite a bit, but it wasn't really happening.

Santclair posted:

I'll definitely go look into the screen-printing paint though. Is that available at places like Hobby Lobby or will I have to go online?

You should be able to find screen printing ink pretty easily at your local art store, but it's online too (Dick Blick, for one). Are you planning on freehanding your design, or are you considering actually going through the whole screen printing process? Here's a tutorial from Instructables if you are...there are kits out there but they can get pretty expensive.

I'll be honest, I have never screen printed anything so I can't give much advice. But if you're just making one design you won't be repeating, screen printing seems like it would be a lot of work.

I personally prefer stenciling, myself (though again, if you're just freehanding a design you can ignore this next part). My favorite stuff to work with is Tulip "Soft, Brushable" fabric paint. It's inexpensive and handles repeated washings very well, in my experience. (Use the "Matte" kind of paint. The "Neon" and "Glitter" kinds are rear end paints, made of rear end.)

Acrylic paint can be mixed with textile medium and that works pretty well too. I keep it in a 2:1 ratio of paint to textile medium. The drawback is that the design will be very stiff, but it shouldn't crack over time like acrylic by itself would (though honestly I find that mine has a little bit anyway. Perhaps a ratio of 1:1 would crack less, but haven't tried it myself yet). I still like fabric paint better, but acrylic paint is wicked cheap and sometimes you just can't get the color you want in fabric paint.

One last thing I wanted to post here for the benefit of anyone who is considering stenciling is using the freezer paper method. Your edges will be so sharp and professional looking and it's so freaking easy to do. Here's an okay tutorial. I love, love, love freezer paper. (Which you can get at Wal-Mart, though it's hard to find sometimes.)

Sorry this is kind of a crappy pic (the design is much sharper and darker in person), but this is a shirt I made with the freezer paper method:

district 12
Oct 19, 2004

muscles griffon~~

Google Embryo posted:

I have a question for knitters. What do any of you know about knitting something that's supposed to be on dpns like socks on two circular needles instead? I got the SnB day calendar for Christmas and today's useful tip mentions something about it. I HATE dpns and would love to do away with them forever if possible! Has anyone tried this method?

From what little I know, if something is knit on dpns, it's because it's supposed to be a lot tighter and smaller. Circular needles are rather large and clunky and for something like, mittens or gloves, it'd be better to use dpns just because they're smaller. I might be mixing them up though so hopefully someone else chimes in.

gum bichromate
Sep 4, 2006

~*~*~*~*~*~*~* I AM NOT A SLAVE! TO A BREED!! THAT DOESN'T EXIST!!! THE BEAUTIFUL PIBBLE, THE BEAUTIFUL PIBBLE
~*~*~*~*~*~*


Santclair posted:

HIlariously enough, a backstitch is precisely what I used. it kinda sucks...I used to be awesome at hand-stitching (I even have a baby blanket I helped my grandmother make that was entirely hand-embroidered by the two of us). But about six months ago I broke my wrist really badly and hosed up the tendons and the bone, and basically have no motor control in that hand, which of course is my sewing hand. :(

I'll definitely go look into the screen-printing paint though. Is that available at places like Hobby Lobby or will I have to go online?

Oh that's awful, I'm sorry! :( Screen-printing paint would probably be at an art supplies store, but you might be able to find it at a Michael's or something.


Google Embryo posted:

I have a question for knitters. What do any of you know about knitting something that's supposed to be on dpns like socks on two circular needles instead? I got the SnB day calendar for Christmas and today's useful tip mentions something about it. I HATE dpns and would love to do away with them forever if possible! Has anyone tried this method?

I used to hate DPNs but they really aren't as scary as they seem! You just but the stitching on all but one needle, and use that needle for knitting. The knitting gets rotated around the needles. There is a method called "magic loop knitting" that's done with circular needles, but I've found that it ends up messy with big gaps. http://www.knittinghelp.com/ is a great resource with videos and everything.

Moms Stuffing
Jun 2, 2005

the little green one

awapplesauce posted:

Oh that's awful, I'm sorry! :( Screen-printing paint would probably be at an art supplies store, but you might be able to find it at a Michael's or something.


I used to hate DPNs but they really aren't as scary as they seem! You just but the stitching on all but one needle, and use that needle for knitting. The knitting gets rotated around the needles. There is a method called "magic loop knitting" that's done with circular needles, but I've found that it ends up messy with big gaps. http://www.knittinghelp.com/ is a great resource with videos and everything.

Oh I know how to use dpns I just hate them. They're really annoying! This was something I kind of read about on this day calendar so I was curious. You're supposed to be able to knit small things like socks with 2 sets of circulars instead of dpns and I was just trying to think about how that would work according to the paragraph I read.

Here I typed up the blurb:

quote:

Socks are one of those things that are always knit in the round. It's just a fact. For many of us, using dpns can be daunting: The tiny stitches fall off of the ends, there can be a "laddering" effect when you move from one needle to the next, and we get confused trying to figure out which needle is needle 1. Knitting socks on two circulars addresses all of these issues. Dropped stitches are infrequent because the live stitches hang on the connecting wire. Laddering is minimized and we always know which needle we are on because there are only two to keep track of.

Moms Stuffing fucked around with this message at 16:13 on Jan 8, 2008

Strelnikov
Jul 24, 2004
I want to compose and decompose.

Google Embryo posted:

I have a question for knitters. What do any of you know about knitting something that's supposed to be on dpns like socks on two circular needles instead? I got the SnB day calendar for Christmas and today's useful tip mentions something about it. I HATE dpns and would love to do away with them forever if possible! Has anyone tried this method?

The two circular needle method is basically the same as dpns -- when you use dpns, you work with 1/4 of the stitches at a time on two needles while the rest sit on the other three needles, and with the two-circ method you work with half the stitches on both ends of one circ while the rest of the stitches sit on the cable of the other circular needle. I like the two-circ method for socks and mittens, just because it's impossible to lose a needle. I do think it's more difficult to tighten up the ladders that want to appear when you change needles, though, than it is with dpns. And for me, it seems like I can go a lot faster on dpns than I can with two circs, probably because I can just go around and around instead of moving stitches from the needle to the cable all the time. The method I prefer really depends on what I'm doing -- something like a flat toe for a sock is easier on two circs, but for a spiral decrease for the top of a hat I'd use dpns.

I don't like Magic Loop at all. It's possible to get rid of the gaps if you change up where you pull out the loop every few rows, but I just think it's more trouble than it's worth.

Moms Stuffing
Jun 2, 2005

the little green one

Strelnikov posted:

The two circular needle method is basically the same as dpns -- when you use dpns, you work with 1/4 of the stitches at a time on two needles while the rest sit on the other three needles, and with the two-circ method you work with half the stitches on both ends of one circ while the rest of the stitches sit on the cable of the other circular needle. I like the two-circ method for socks and mittens, just because it's impossible to lose a needle. I do think it's more difficult to tighten up the ladders that want to appear when you change needles, though, than it is with dpns. And for me, it seems like I can go a lot faster on dpns than I can with two circs, probably because I can just go around and around instead of moving stitches from the needle to the cable all the time. The method I prefer really depends on what I'm doing -- something like a flat toe for a sock is easier on two circs, but for a spiral decrease for the top of a hat I'd use dpns.

That's what I was thinking but I wanted confirmation. I really especially dpns because I find it almost impossible to take my knitting with me anywhere since they're so awkward. I have a really long commute and knitting makes the time go by MUCH faster.

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Kalista
Oct 18, 2001


Google Embryo posted:

That's what I was thinking but I wanted confirmation. I really especially dpns because I find it almost impossible to take my knitting with me anywhere since they're so awkward. I have a really long commute and knitting makes the time go by MUCH faster.

You can use two circulars, or the magic loop method in place of dpn's in any project in the round, given that you have the right length needles, or the number of circulars needed.

I started off doing socks on dpns, and then found I was getting wrist pain from holding the needles so tightly at needle changes to prevent ladders. I tried two circulars and found them to be too 'fiddly' for my taste, learned how to magic loop and never looked back. I've done sleeves and hats using magic loop, and it works fine.

The only problem is finding circular needles in the right size that are long enough! For some reason, I've never had trouble with holes, or ladders where the needle change happens, and my wrist pain went away. Bye bye dpns!

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