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HodjasBitch
Apr 24, 2003

Too bad you revealed what a huge asshole you are so early in the game.....I woulda put out.

Instant Jellyfish, I love your cat quilt AND your "dog" quilt! It's not stealing a pattern when they put it out there for free, yay for free patterns. I also have a sweet spot for freckled dogs. :)

I wouldn't feel too badly about losing those points on the Ohio star, those are pretty small HSTs, aren't they? As you said, babies don't care, and you learn as you go along. Better to make them a little larger and trim them down (and I hate trimming HSTs) than to have the quilt police on your rear end.

Your father will certainly love his shades of grey quilt. I'm not exactly sure how RG colorblind people see things.

I finished a quilted floor cushion this week, just in time to tease some quilter/NaNoWriMo friends on Facebook..if I can wait until then to post this pic. I'm such a dork.



eta: I'm certainly no expert at free motion quilting, but I am finally at a point where it is quicker and easier for me than straight lines. I don't have a walking foot, so that sucks, but I quilted a diamond pattern in a measured grid on that book, and it was agonizing. You can't really see them because I am a poo poo photographer.

HodjasBitch fucked around with this message at 09:37 on Oct 28, 2014

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Verimus
Oct 1, 2009


I've been apprenticed (sort of) to a tailor for about six months, and we finished this waiscoat the other day. The fabric is just something he had lying around and I wouldn't have necessarily chosen it myself, but it's grown on me. The photo is a little blurry, because the 74 year old tailor hasn't had much practice taking photos with smartphones, but I don't mind that you can make out my rubbish buttonholes. It is a shame you can't see the topstitching though.

The garment was made mostly by hand, from a pattern drafted from my measurements directly onto the fabric. It's such a satisfying thing to have finished, but at the same time I can see a bunch of things to improve on. It's not quite as tight as it looks here, but I did mess up the side seams a little. It's fully lined, and the back is made of lining with no belt or darts. I'm interested in any notes you might have on fit/shape. It might be next year before I start another vest (Starting my first jacket soon, so pumped), but I'll keep any critiques in mind.

Koivunen
Oct 7, 2011

there's definitely no logic
to human behaviour

Urgent Halloween question: I made a dress out of tulle strips and the static electricity is insane. In retrospect I should have chosen a different fabric but I was just following the DIY instructions! What's the best way to reduce static electricity in tulle?

Fruity Gordo
Aug 5, 2013

Neurotic, Impotent Rage!

Verimus posted:

I've been apprenticed (sort of) to a tailor for about six months, and we finished this waiscoat the other day. The fabric is just something he had lying around and I wouldn't have necessarily chosen it myself, but it's grown on me. The photo is a little blurry, because the 74 year old tailor hasn't had much practice taking photos with smartphones, but I don't mind that you can make out my rubbish buttonholes. It is a shame you can't see the topstitching though.

The garment was made mostly by hand, from a pattern drafted from my measurements directly onto the fabric. It's such a satisfying thing to have finished, but at the same time I can see a bunch of things to improve on. It's not quite as tight as it looks here, but I did mess up the side seams a little. It's fully lined, and the back is made of lining with no belt or darts. I'm interested in any notes you might have on fit/shape. It might be next year before I start another vest (Starting my first jacket soon, so pumped), but I'll keep any critiques in mind.



CONGRATS! menswear is crazy hard. it's tight on the hips and a bit too loose under the arms, which is what's giving your model the look of a big tummy. don't underestimate the value of a sturdy back when it comes to vests, the darts are very important for fit. imo your big problem here is underarm fit, i think you could widen the shoulder seams and recut the underarms, while widening the hip. proper darting in the back is needed, but drafting a pattern from measurements can only go so far, fitting on the bloke is aloways going to be the definitive thing in men's tailoring. which is why i don't make stuff for men unless i love them, haha

Koivunen posted:

Urgent Halloween question: I made a dress out of tulle strips and the static electricity is insane. In retrospect I should have chosen a different fabric but I was just following the DIY instructions! What's the best way to reduce static electricity in tulle?

spritz some water on the fabric and run your hand over it while you're wearing it, that should remove the static. if the static is sticking the fabric to your legs, wet your hands and flip the skirt up while you're wearing it like you're flashing. a cotton petticoat will help avoid static cling to your legs too

Verimus
Oct 1, 2009


Fruity Gordo posted:

CONGRATS! menswear is crazy hard. it's tight on the hips and a bit too loose under the arms, which is what's giving your model the look of a big tummy. don't underestimate the value of a sturdy back when it comes to vests, the darts are very important for fit. imo your big problem here is underarm fit, i think you could widen the shoulder seams and recut the underarms, while widening the hip. proper darting in the back is needed, but drafting a pattern from measurements can only go so far, fitting on the bloke is aloways going to be the definitive thing in men's tailoring. which is why i don't make stuff for men unless i love them, haha


Thanks for the feedback. The tightness across the hips is due to a mistake I made in the first few steps, so I'm afraid there's nothing more to let out there. The fullness under the arm allows me to raise my arms without moving the hem of the vest. I think that you're right, it does look too loose but I think it would look better if it fit across the hips properly. The back fits better than I expected, I'll try to get a photo.

taiyoko
Jan 10, 2008




Does anyone else get nervous when getting ready to use a pattern they've drafted themselves? I'm making a costume for an indie film, and I've got my pattern as finalized as it's gonna get, but I'm afraid to actually cut the fabric with it because what if I got it wrong and don't have enough to redo it? Is that feeling just something that goes away with more experience?

Comrade Quack
Jun 6, 2006
Witty closing remarks have been replaced by massive head trauma and general stupidity.

Fallen Rib

taiyoko posted:

Does anyone else get nervous when getting ready to use a pattern they've drafted themselves? I'm making a costume for an indie film, and I've got my pattern as finalized as it's gonna get, but I'm afraid to actually cut the fabric with it because what if I got it wrong and don't have enough to redo it? Is that feeling just something that goes away with more experience?

Are you talking about after making a muslin?

taiyoko
Jan 10, 2008




That's probably the reason I'm so nervous...I don't have the fabric to make a muslin. This is straight up 'draw it out onto paper, tada, pattern'. Thankfully it's meant to be rather loose-fitting, so as long as I haven't done the math too badly it should be fine.

Amykinz
May 6, 2007


taiyoko posted:

That's probably the reason I'm so nervous...I don't have the fabric to make a muslin. This is straight up 'draw it out onto paper, tada, pattern'. Thankfully it's meant to be rather loose-fitting, so as long as I haven't done the math too badly it should be fine.

Do you live near a thrift store? Go there and buy a couple of sheets and use those for making a muslin. It might not be the same fabric or color as your finished object (it might be goddamn hideous), but you at least be able to make sure the shape and drape are correct before you cut into your garment fabric.

Pile of Kittens
Apr 23, 2005

Why does everything STILL smell like pussy?



Seriously, if you're in a situation where it might be bad if you gently caress up on the final fabric, do a muslin no matter how confident you are because Murphy dictates you will gently caress up in the most humiliatingly stupid way possible.

Rabbit Hill
Mar 11, 2009

God knows what lives in me in place of me.

Grimey Drawer

Hey, if any of you are interested in costume design and/or are familiar with Janie Bryant's work as the costume designer for Mad Men and Deadwood and live near Wilmington, DE, she is going to be giving a talk at Winterthur on Nov. 18 about how she does it.

There will also be a talk the following week on Nov. 25 about costume design in film, "from conceptualization to realization," by the designer Gina Scarnati, who did the costumes for The Hunger Games, Snow White and the Huntsman, and more.

Lovelyn
Jul 8, 2008

Eat more beans


Hopefully I'm posting in the right place! I'm cross-posting to the Women's Fashion Megathread just in case because I could really use some advice. I'm absolutely clueless when it comes to this stuff.

I just scored this cute dress for cheap at Marshall's:


I got an extra discount because it has this defect:


The tag says it's 82% rayon, 16% nylon, and 2% spandex. Can this just be mended normally or is there something about the fabric/location that would make it difficult/unsightly?

If it isn't possible to mend, is it possible to just prevent the hole from getting bigger? It's in an easy enough place to cover up, so if I can wear it with my hair down or a scarf or something, I'm fine with the hole being there.

Any advice?

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

Lovelyn posted:

Hopefully I'm posting in the right place! I'm cross-posting to the Women's Fashion Megathread just in case because I could really use some advice. I'm absolutely clueless when it comes to this stuff.

I just scored this cute dress for cheap at Marshall's:


I got an extra discount because it has this defect:


The tag says it's 82% rayon, 16% nylon, and 2% spandex. Can this just be mended normally or is there something about the fabric/location that would make it difficult/unsightly?

If it isn't possible to mend, is it possible to just prevent the hole from getting bigger? It's in an easy enough place to cover up, so if I can wear it with my hair down or a scarf or something, I'm fine with the hole being there.

Any advice?

I would stitch it up similar to how you would fix a hole in a sock.

Kinda like this. http://www.marthastewart.com/307177/how-to-repair-small-holes-in-sweaters-an

Lovelyn
Jul 8, 2008

Eat more beans


Funhilde posted:

I would stitch it up similar to how you would fix a hole in a sock.

Kinda like this. http://www.marthastewart.com/307177/how-to-repair-small-holes-in-sweaters-an

Thank you!

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

Lovelyn posted:

Thank you!

They say use yarn but I'd probably just use regular thread for a shirt like that. No need to be too fancy- it is unlikely to show much if you use a grey thread.

DragQueenofAngmar
Dec 29, 2009

You shall not pass!


I'm currently sewing on a borrowed machine (well, right now I gave it back for a week) which is a fairly newish domestic. I'd like to get my own machine, and I really don't want any special types of stitches. I'm trying to learn how to make my own clothes, and a tailor and designer told me that he essentially only uses straight stitch and overlock (and a buttonholer but it seems that those are phenomenally expensive).

If I become good at this and need to upgrade to industrial machines, I know basically what I should buy from talking to this designer and some others, but I'm lost on what domestics I should be looking at. I'm trying to find a machine that has straight stitch, some kind of overlock/zigzag locking stitch, and buttonholing, but not much else. My main problem has been that I have no clue what brands are considered good in terms of the more modern domestic machines. I know Singer and I think Pfaff are good if you can get a vintage one, but I don't know what's considered good now. If anyone can help with this, that would be awesome. Thanks :)

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

DragQueenofAngmar posted:

I'm currently sewing on a borrowed machine (well, right now I gave it back for a week) which is a fairly newish domestic. I'd like to get my own machine, and I really don't want any special types of stitches. I'm trying to learn how to make my own clothes, and a tailor and designer told me that he essentially only uses straight stitch and overlock (and a buttonholer but it seems that those are phenomenally expensive).

If I become good at this and need to upgrade to industrial machines, I know basically what I should buy from talking to this designer and some others, but I'm lost on what domestics I should be looking at. I'm trying to find a machine that has straight stitch, some kind of overlock/zigzag locking stitch, and buttonholing, but not much else. My main problem has been that I have no clue what brands are considered good in terms of the more modern domestic machines. I know Singer and I think Pfaff are good if you can get a vintage one, but I don't know what's considered good now. If anyone can help with this, that would be awesome. Thanks :)

I use a Pfaff home machine that is maybe from the 80s. It does a few good stitches but the features I like are the automatic walking foot and stretch stitches. I also have a Pfaff coverlock. I don't really use the coverlock feature on that machine as I find it intimidating and not fully necessary for most of what I do. My back up machine is a Janome that is also a nice powerhouse. All of my machines came from a sewing machine shop/dealer. They usually offer free lessons on how to use the machine and also good service plans. I would never suggest that anyone get a machine from Wal-Mart or Jo-anns ect. if they wanted to use the machine on a pretty regular basis and to make nicer stitches. Brother, Bernina and Baby Lock all seem to have some nice things as well. Older machines can be great too- many dealers will have some refurbished options that are worth looking at.

DragQueenofAngmar
Dec 29, 2009

You shall not pass!


Funhilde posted:

I use a Pfaff home machine that is maybe from the 80s. It does a few good stitches but the features I like are the automatic walking foot and stretch stitches. I also have a Pfaff coverlock. I don't really use the coverlock feature on that machine as I find it intimidating and not fully necessary for most of what I do. My back up machine is a Janome that is also a nice powerhouse. All of my machines came from a sewing machine shop/dealer. They usually offer free lessons on how to use the machine and also good service plans. I would never suggest that anyone get a machine from Wal-Mart or Jo-anns ect. if they wanted to use the machine on a pretty regular basis and to make nicer stitches. Brother, Bernina and Baby Lock all seem to have some nice things as well. Older machines can be great too- many dealers will have some refurbished options that are worth looking at.

Would this be a good option? pfaff 332 heavy duty sewing machine It looks like from the pictures that the machine can do zigzag stitch as well as straight, and there are a lot of different feet attachments. I thought maybe you'd know whether it looks good or not because you have a pfaff yourself :)

Bitter Beard
Sep 11, 2001

I don't even know what the fuck I'm doing!!


DragQueenofAngmar posted:

Would this be a good option? pfaff 332 heavy duty sewing machine It looks like from the pictures that the machine can do zigzag stitch as well as straight, and there are a lot of different feet attachments. I thought maybe you'd know whether it looks good or not because you have a pfaff yourself :)

I would start by finding a local sewing shop and ask them if they repair that model and how much a general tune up is. If you buy that it is the first thing you'll HAVE to do it if is not timed right or has something bent or broken inside.

DragQueenofAngmar
Dec 29, 2009

You shall not pass!


Bitter Beard posted:

I would start by finding a local sewing shop and ask them if they repair that model and how much a general tune up is. If you buy that it is the first thing you'll HAVE to do it if is not timed right or has something bent or broken inside.

There is a sewing shop near me that has Pfaff in the list of brands they specialize in for repair, I'm calling tomorrow to confirm. Is anyone familiar enough with older pfaffs to figure out from those pictures what this machine can do, specifically? for example what are all those different attachments and pieces of metal (I assume feet attachments), how do I know if the machine has a walking foot or a standard, etc. Sorry for asking so much, I've just never sewn or really gotten to examine an older machine

Here's another vintage home machine I've found. It kinda looks like it only does straight stitch, but perhaps someone more knowledgeable could enlighten me?

1946 singer

Also, if all these questions about equipment are unwelcome without any contributions to the thread, please let me know!

DragQueenofAngmar fucked around with this message at 09:36 on Nov 10, 2014

Stultus Maximus
Dec 21, 2009

USPOL May


DragQueenofAngmar posted:

There is a sewing shop near me that has Pfaff in the list of brands they specialize in for repair, I'm calling tomorrow to confirm. Is anyone familiar enough with older pfaffs to figure out from those pictures what this machine can do, specifically? for example what are all those different attachments and pieces of metal (I assume feet attachments), how do I know if the machine has a walking foot or a standard, etc. Sorry for asking so much, I've just never sewn or really gotten to examine an older machine

Here's another vintage home machine I've found. It kinda looks like it only does straight stitch, but perhaps someone more knowledgeable could enlighten me?

1946 singer

Also, if all these questions about equipment are unwelcome without any contributions to the thread, please let me know!

The Singer 15-91 is a little less common than the ubiquitous 66 class, and a little better. That one, however, is very expensive.

I used a 99 (3/4 size 66) for a few years and I really like those old Singers - they're beautiful, simple, and bulletproof - but I eventually found the lack of zig-zag limiting so now I have two machines. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

DragQueenofAngmar posted:

Would this be a good option? pfaff 332 heavy duty sewing machine It looks like from the pictures that the machine can do zigzag stitch as well as straight, and there are a lot of different feet attachments. I thought maybe you'd know whether it looks good or not because you have a pfaff yourself :)

Those Pfaff heavy duties are pretty solid as far as I've seen. I prefer a bit of a newer machine myself. I don't want to be lugging a heavy machine around.

DragQueenofAngmar
Dec 29, 2009

You shall not pass!


This is all really helpful :) Ok last post about buying old machines, I swear. I was asking some family/friends about the Pfaff I linked, and my girlfriend said something like "suitcase sewing machines aren't really considered very good." Now, I know that's a pretty vague statement, and vintage machines in general are tougher than modern, so maybe it would be okay. I would like to be able to sew thicker fabrics too, though. So I thought maybe this Pfaff would be a better bet: 1952 Pfaff 130 heavy-duty



It's at the upper limit of my budget, but since it was just serviced, ships free, and comes with needles, bobbins, etc I don't mind that (seller has a 99.8% positive feedback with 3000+ reviews, too). This machine does zigzag, lockstitch, and reverse unlike that Singer I posted which only does lock. (Also, I think it's a great looking machine, though of course that doesn't really matter.)

So I guess what I'm asking is whether you guys agree with my gf that suitcase/smaller machines aren't great and I shouldn't spend my money on that, and whether this larger Pfaff looks like what I'd need (just a few simple stitches) if that's the case.

Bitter Beard
Sep 11, 2001

I don't even know what the fuck I'm doing!!


DragQueenofAngmar posted:

This is all really helpful :) Ok last post about buying old machines, I swear. I was asking some family/friends about the Pfaff I linked, and my girlfriend said something like "suitcase sewing machines aren't really considered very good." Now, I know that's a pretty vague statement, and vintage machines in general are tougher than modern, so maybe it would be okay. I would like to be able to sew thicker fabrics too, though. So I thought maybe this Pfaff would be a better bet: 1952 Pfaff 130 heavy-duty



It's at the upper limit of my budget, but since it was just serviced, ships free, and comes with needles, bobbins, etc I don't mind that (seller has a 99.8% positive feedback with 3000+ reviews, too). This machine does zigzag, lockstitch, and reverse unlike that Singer I posted which only does lock. (Also, I think it's a great looking machine, though of course that doesn't really matter.)

So I guess what I'm asking is whether you guys agree with my gf that suitcase/smaller machines aren't great and I shouldn't spend my money on that, and whether this larger Pfaff looks like what I'd need (just a few simple stitches) if that's the case.

If you are starting I'd seriously consider hitting Goodwill in local areas or near retirement communities and try your first machine being bargain basement priced. That is a nice machine but I think you can find a better deal IMO. Even Craigslist can offer up some fantastic stuff at a fraction of Ebay prices, usually people put things on Ebay at a higher selling point because they know what max monies they can get for it. Try putting up a 'Wanting To Buy' on Craigslist and do some fishing to see what people will almost give away.

I caution against rushing into an Ebay purchase.

I have seen quite a few times people just dumping industrial machines on Craigslist when they no longer have the room or stuff just won't sell, especially around Christmas when people need money.

DragQueenofAngmar
Dec 29, 2009

You shall not pass!


Oh, I'm not planning to make a purchase tomorrow or anything! Sorry if that wasn't very clear. I do have access to a domestic Singer that I can use nearly all the time (unless I have to give it back when the lender needs to make a repair). It's this model:

It's not in the best shape though, and has some weird issues that I don't think are entirely me being a novice. Anyway, I'm happy to sew on this while I learn and get better, but I don't want to buy a super cheap machine for myself when I can just use this one, which is why I'm looking at these older and more heavy duty models. I'm also looking around craigslist and thrift shops, but I figured there's no harm in looking on eBay, even if I just end up using it to get an idea of what's out there :)

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

This is my main machine. It is a little powerhouse- sews through vinyl and leather, does a great stretch stitch as well.


edit: My machine has googly eyes.

Funhilde fucked around with this message at 19:20 on Nov 10, 2014

Wungus
Mar 5, 2004



I've got a Brother CS-6000i, aka "the only good machine you can get at Walmart" - it was a gift, and I'm surprised daily by the kinds of things it can sew. Like, you can get a $12 addon to do free motion quilting, it's got a decent buttonhole foot, I've used it to do alterations on heavy weight denim jeans, and it has a really decent range of overcasting and decorative options, as well as coming standard with a surprisingly good zipper foot. My biggest problem with it is that the feed dogs tend to stretch jersey fabric too far, and that cheaper thread tends to get stuck in the bobbin mechanism.

I don't really need leather or vinyl sewing options at the moment though; I work somewhere that gives me access to a bunch of Juki brand industrial sewing machines, including a machine with a really nice walking foot, and a serger. So, y'know, if I ever desperately need to sew some oilcloth into the side of a cowboy boot, I can just take it in to work.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


I posted this in the Fix it Fast thread, but they suggested I try here.


Is this fixable? Columbia will fix or replace it under warranty, but that takes 4-6 weeks and its pretty much winter now. I'd like to do it myself, or get it fixed locally due to time and shipping costs.



How would something like this be repaired?

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

FogHelmut posted:

I posted this in the Fix it Fast thread, but they suggested I try here.


Is this fixable? Columbia will fix or replace it under warranty, but that takes 4-6 weeks and its pretty much winter now. I'd like to do it myself, or get it fixed locally due to time and shipping costs.



How would something like this be repaired?

Looks like it just needs to be sewn back in. Find a local seamstress and send her the picture. Ask columbia if they would take it back after winter if you had it temporarily mended.

Pile of Kittens
Apr 23, 2005

Why does everything STILL smell like pussy?



Most dry cleaning places have a seamstress.

Bees on Wheat
Jul 18, 2007

I've never been happy



QUAIL DIVISION


Buglord

It looks like it could be easy to fix, but the zipper tape might be too shredded. Unless you can get better pics, or show it to someone in person it's hard to say whether or not it can be fixed easily.

Muffy_the_Diver
Oct 19, 2004

ALL ABOARD THE BUTT TRAIN

Hey folks, since we're on machine-chat, what's your favourite modern serger? I've decided to just buck up and buy new since both of the used ones I've purchased have ended in tears and I'm tired of fussing and I have an actual budget now and I just want something that works. My ideal budget is around $250 but I'm willing to go up to about $450 if it's worth it.

I'm used to Singers, have had bad experiences with Babylock, don't have much of an opinion on Bernina, Husqvarna, or Brother. The last serger I successfully used was a 3-thread Singer from the early '80s and I had no problems with it.

I've been doing a bunch of reading and can't decide if the difference between 3- 4- and 5-thread will be at all useful/noticeable for home use. Is there a good guide somewhere? I plan to mostly serge knits and spandex, and would also like to be able to do flatlocking (which I've read you can fake on a 2, 3, and 4 thread), so I don't know if that has any bearing on the decision.

So far in my research I've got my eye on this one, but without any experience with 4+ thread machines I don't really know if it's practical or worth the extra money.

I also don't mind threading machines (I actually find it rather cathartic), so I'm not fussed about whether it's self-threading. Seems like more parts to break than anything, to me.

Are there other considerations I'm not taking into account that I should be?
Thank you guys! :)

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


Thanks for the replies. It was pretty frayed, and the zipper tape went between two layers of the jacket. I decided just to mail it in.

Bitter Beard
Sep 11, 2001

I don't even know what the fuck I'm doing!!


Muffy_the_Diver posted:

Hey folks, since we're on machine-chat, what's your favourite modern serger? I've decided to just buck up and buy new since both of the used ones I've purchased have ended in tears and I'm tired of fussing and I have an actual budget now and I just want something that works. My ideal budget is around $250 but I'm willing to go up to about $450 if it's worth it.

I'm used to Singers, have had bad experiences with Babylock, don't have much of an opinion on Bernina, Husqvarna, or Brother. The last serger I successfully used was a 3-thread Singer from the early '80s and I had no problems with it.

I've been doing a bunch of reading and can't decide if the difference between 3- 4- and 5-thread will be at all useful/noticeable for home use. Is there a good guide somewhere? I plan to mostly serge knits and spandex, and would also like to be able to do flatlocking (which I've read you can fake on a 2, 3, and 4 thread), so I don't know if that has any bearing on the decision.

So far in my research I've got my eye on this one, but without any experience with 4+ thread machines I don't really know if it's practical or worth the extra money.

I also don't mind threading machines (I actually find it rather cathartic), so I'm not fussed about whether it's self-threading. Seems like more parts to break than anything, to me.

Are there other considerations I'm not taking into account that I should be?
Thank you guys! :)

If I was going to buy a serger again I'd go with that Singer 14T968DC. I knew next to nothing about them when I found mine at a massive bargain, 40 bucks for a baby lock bl4-738 and it works great. The only issue is that I can only do edging with it, I can't do the seams like I want for soccer jerseys and sports practice clothing for my kids, that super light material any sport likes to use. I honestly don't even know the vernacular of what it is called of what ending or hemming my serger can do and that Singer can. I've had that Singer on my Amazon wish list for some time now, amongst many other machines, I just don't really "NEED" it. Least that's what my wife tells me...

coyo7e
Aug 23, 2007

by zen death robot

FogHelmut posted:

Thanks for the replies. It was pretty frayed, and the zipper tape went between two layers of the jacket. I decided just to mail it in.
From my experience pricing repairs and adjustments at a cleaner for several years, zippers are really a "how much do you love this garment?" issue. A zipper will easily cost $20-40 or more (a zipper for a pair of pants is $10-15 easily) , and will never look quite right ever again (at best - at worst it'll look awful and leave tons of pinhole leaks on the front of the jacket.) For a coat or leather jacket I'd say it'd be worth it, but for something you actually depend on for keeping dry, use the warranty or just buy a thimble and thread and DIY (if that won't ruin the warranty) as a temporary repair.

If it was my jacket I'd probably hand-stitch the zipper back on and then hit the backing with a tent repair patch or maybe dab the stitching with a glue gun - but I live in a very very rainy place so water resistance is primary when I see a jacket like that. ;)


edit: the main issue is that the zipper backing is frayed to hell so you can't really stitch it back in - that requires a full zipper replacement, and when you get into multiple layers of water-resistant garment you're going to have something that will cost a ton and take a ton of effort for the person who repairs it, and you won't be happy with it and they will be upset that you don't want to pay for work you're not happy with (and can't really be happy with due to the garment's nominal purpose).

coyo7e fucked around with this message at 02:29 on Nov 26, 2014

Pip pip pip
Oct 24, 2010

The cutest little fascist



I have a similar(ish) zipper related question, The zipper on one of my snow boots is destroyed. The teeth are ripping out of the fabric. The only cobbler I could find near me that will do zippers replaced the zipper on the other boot last year and I am not really a fan of his work. I have some okay sewing skills and would like to try fixing it myself. Is a sewing awl the right tool for this job? I saw this posted earlier in the thread for fixing a purse strap: http://www.amazon.com/Speedy-Stitcher-T200-Sewing-Awl/dp/B000HGIJQ4/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1389625550&sr=8-2&keywords=speedy+stitcher


Here's the boot:


It's about 4 years old and otherwise in great shape but the zippers are just awful apparently :( If I can do a decent job replacing this zipper, I will probably pull out the one the cobbler did last year and redo it myself as well.

Muffy_the_Diver
Oct 19, 2004

ALL ABOARD THE BUTT TRAIN

I've had the best success with just running a sturdy needle through the existing holes in the leather, to be honest. Most of the time you don't even need pliers or a thimble or anything, it just goes right through, and the end results pretty much look stock. The hardest part is keeping the two halves of the zipper aligned as you're stitching it up to avoid weird tensions on the zipper tape once you've finished. Just make sure you pull out all the old thread when you remove the old zipper, otherwise it's harder to run the needle through and it looks janky.

Bitter Beard, thank you for that! I did a bit more research as well, and I'm going to bite the bullet and go for it. The only type of negative review I've managed to find for that particular machine is "ugh I've been a quilter for FIFTY YEARS and I know EVERY last thing there is to know about machines and I CAN'T THREAD IT. DON'T WASTE YOUR MONEY" (emphasis original) so I think that machine and I will get along just fine. So excited!

Pile of Kittens
Apr 23, 2005

Why does everything STILL smell like pussy?



With heavy duty leather you want to use the original holes as much as possible, yeah. Use bent-tipped pliers and a curved needle (like so http://www.joann.com/dritzhome-curved-upholstery-needles-4-pkg/5597463.html) if you want easy mode. Tack the zipper in with a bit of hot glue or whatever to keep it in place as you go. Since it's heavy leather you won't really feel it in the final seam because it's all beefy to begin with! I hate working in leather because it's so unforgiving, but I love repairing it because since it's unforgiving, there's no way you can screw up where to put the needle! The hole is right there!

Pip pip pip
Oct 24, 2010

The cutest little fascist



Thanks for the tips, guys! I had a hard time seeing the holes from the inside of the shoe, so it was pretty tough. 3 hours of my life I will never get back. I think I will hold off on redoing the other shoe.



The metal/black zipper on the right is the new replacement! Hopefully the mismatched zipper colors won't bother me too much, but these aren't fashion boots anyway... I hope it lasts :ohdear:

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Bitter Beard
Sep 11, 2001

I don't even know what the fuck I'm doing!!


Muffy_the_Diver posted:

Bitter Beard, thank you for that! I did a bit more research as well, and I'm going to bite the bullet and go for it. The only type of negative review I've managed to find for that particular machine is "ugh I've been a quilter for FIFTY YEARS and I know EVERY last thing there is to know about machines and I CAN'T THREAD IT. DON'T WASTE YOUR MONEY" (emphasis original) so I think that machine and I will get along just fine. So excited!

Sweet! Make sure to post pics of what you make with it and what you think of the machine, it will most likely tip the scales for me as well...

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