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Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

Liberte
Egalite
Beyonce


Can you post a picture of the outside of the jacket?

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Wungus
Mar 5, 2004



theflyingexecutive posted:

Ok, first real project besides pillows, got my 347 all oiled up and pedal fixed. I got a jacket at the Targ for this price:


And I'm replacing (half of) the bland liner with something a little more exciting, here it is halfway done:



Any recommendations for how else to spruce up this jacket? The buttons are going for sure and I've got lots of star fabric and crimson thread.
Embroider skulls in the middle of the collarbone, and take the wrist cuffs and make them 4x as large and shaped like gauntlets. Also, replace the collar fabric with animal print fabric and sew on a velvet cape.

theflyingexecutive
Apr 22, 2007




Eponine posted:

Can you post a picture of the outside of the jacket?

It's v basic:

theflyingexecutive
Apr 22, 2007




If I've sewn fur with a white backing to a coat collar, what's the best way to color the edges of the backing black to match the coat?

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

Liberte
Egalite
Beyonce



Contrast red top stitching? Real pockets, if they aren't already. If they are real, line them with the star fabric?

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

theflyingexecutive posted:

If I've sewn fur with a white backing to a coat collar, what's the best way to color the edges of the backing black to match the coat?

Probably Sharpie? If it's a small area I'd go with Sharpie. If it's large, maybe consider sewing some sort of trim over the edge?

I finished my lace singlet! If you want to read a lot of artist-statementy words about why I'm making this weird stuff, check out my rambly tumblr post about it, I'm not putting you all through that here.



I will say I learned a valuable lesson from this one to not make the pieces so big. What a disaster that central medallion/straps piece was. I think I might test out my mask making skills and make a matching mask for this one. I'm assuming that 'spacer' material sold on a lot of spandex websites is probably what I'm looking for as a base?

I'm also stuck between granny square crochet and marquetry--they make wood print spandex!--for my next project. What to do? Now I'm taking a break and just making myself some quick t-shirts.

Oh and I also took my first pro-wrestling class and really enjoyed it, so maybe I'll have some reason to wear these dumb things in the future, hahaha.

Micomicona
Aug 7, 2007


Goldaline posted:


Oh and I also took my first pro-wrestling class and really enjoyed it, so maybe I'll have some reason to wear these dumb things in the future, hahaha.

I am continually blown away by all of your work, including this piece!!! Amazing amazing amazing. Also, please make a matching whitework luchador mask and wear it to a wrestling meet and KICK EVERYONE'S rear end.

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

Goldaline posted:

Probably Sharpie? If it's a small area I'd go with Sharpie. If it's large, maybe consider sewing some sort of trim over the edge?

I finished my lace singlet! If you want to read a lot of artist-statementy words about why I'm making this weird stuff, check out my rambly tumblr post about it, I'm not putting you all through that here.



I will say I learned a valuable lesson from this one to not make the pieces so big. What a disaster that central medallion/straps piece was. I think I might test out my mask making skills and make a matching mask for this one. I'm assuming that 'spacer' material sold on a lot of spandex websites is probably what I'm looking for as a base?

I'm also stuck between granny square crochet and marquetry--they make wood print spandex!--for my next project. What to do? Now I'm taking a break and just making myself some quick t-shirts.

Oh and I also took my first pro-wrestling class and really enjoyed it, so maybe I'll have some reason to wear these dumb things in the future, hahaha.



This is just unbelievably cool. I wish I had the time/patience to do something like that or clients willing to pay me for that kind of work.

edit: I hope you don't mind but I shared this on my business FB page because I like sharing other cool stuff on there.

Funhilde fucked around with this message at 19:55 on Jul 23, 2015

Amykinz
May 6, 2007




Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Funhilde posted:

This is just unbelievably cool. I wish I had the time/patience to do something like that or clients willing to pay me for that kind of work.

edit: I hope you don't mind but I shared this on my business FB page because I like sharing other cool stuff on there.

Of course, thank you! Your website is lovely by the way. I should really work on that so I can stop linking people to the tumblr where I post all sorts of dumb things.

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

Goldaline posted:

Of course, thank you! Your website is lovely by the way. I should really work on that so I can stop linking people to the tumblr where I post all sorts of dumb things.

Thanks. Current site is through square space but was done by a design friend of mine. It is out of date with pictures and such due to having been pregnant/new baby.

Sewing while trying to care for a baby is a big challenge.

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

Does anyone have any experience with recurrent neck/upper back pain due to sewing for long periods of time?
Sewing is my full time job (luckily I get days where I don't have to sew and I get to stand or work on a computer instead) -- but when I have a big project and have to sew full time for a week sometimes I get really bad neck pain that doesn't go away for awhile. (I've been treating it with sports therapy type procedures so far: icing, rolling it, massages, etc)

Of course I am assuming it's the posture (often times I really crane my neck down to get my face right in there to do precision stuff) but I'm wondering if anyone has dealt with this and what their experience was?

Hopefully this is.. appropriate for this thread. Really just wanna know if people who do the same thing as me have the same issue, or if it's just me (caused by an entire life of being a hunched over nerd).

cloudy fucked around with this message at 16:55 on Jul 30, 2015

Stultus Maximus
Dec 21, 2009

USPOL May


cloudy posted:

Does anyone have any experience with recurrent neck/upper back pain due to sewing for long periods of time?
Sewing is my full time job (luckily I get days where I don't have to sew and I get to stand or work on a computer instead) -- but when I have a big project and have to sew full time for a week sometimes I get really bad neck pain that doesn't go away for awhile. (I've been treating it with sports therapy type procedures so far: icing, rolling it, massages, etc)

Of course I am assuming it's the posture (often times I really crane my neck down to get my face right in there to do precision stuff) but I'm wondering if anyone has dealt with this and what their experience was?

Hopefully this is.. appropriate for this thread. Really just wanna know if people who do the same thing as me have the same issue, or if it's just me (caused by an entire life of being a hunched over nerd).

No, but I do get lower back pain during large/complex projects from bending over the cutting table so much.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

cloudy posted:

Does anyone have any experience with recurrent neck/upper back pain due to sewing for long periods of time?
Sewing is my full time job (luckily I get days where I don't have to sew and I get to stand or work on a computer instead) -- but when I have a big project and have to sew full time for a week sometimes I get really bad neck pain that doesn't go away for awhile. (I've been treating it with sports therapy type procedures so far: icing, rolling it, massages, etc)

Of course I am assuming it's the posture (often times I really crane my neck down to get my face right in there to do precision stuff) but I'm wondering if anyone has dealt with this and what their experience was?

Hopefully this is.. appropriate for this thread. Really just wanna know if people who do the same thing as me have the same issue, or if it's just me (caused by an entire life of being a hunched over nerd).

Oh yeah, I have to work really hard not to have neck/shoulder/back issues. The combination of my weightlifting and textile hobbies are sometimes at odds with each other--my right pec/front shoulder muscles are super tight from years of pulling needle-and-thread and knitting motions and I had to do a lot of mobility work to fix it. It was messing with my overhead and bench press pretty badly.

I do mostly the same as you, plus lots of stretching. Look up mobility work outs/stretches for your specific trouble areas, and really stick to doing them every day. Get up and take lots of little breaks to move around and loosen up when you're working for long periods of time. Yoga is great too if you have the time. DDP Yoga, as goofy as it is, is a great back stretch/strengthener.

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

Goldaline posted:

Oh yeah, I have to work really hard not to have neck/shoulder/back issues. The combination of my weightlifting and textile hobbies are sometimes at odds with each other--my right pec/front shoulder muscles are super tight from years of pulling needle-and-thread and knitting motions and I had to do a lot of mobility work to fix it. It was messing with my overhead and bench press pretty badly.

I do mostly the same as you, plus lots of stretching. Look up mobility work outs/stretches for your specific trouble areas, and really stick to doing them every day. Get up and take lots of little breaks to move around and loosen up when you're working for long periods of time. Yoga is great too if you have the time. DDP Yoga, as goofy as it is, is a great back stretch/strengthener.

Oooooo I was going to ask about yoga, I'm glad you brought it up! Thanks for your response. Sounds like I really should be stretching every day, time to really try to get in to a new routine.

I actually had to stop weightlifting because I kept hurting my neck doing overhead press (surprise-- probably cause it was so tight from my sewing posture) so this all makes a lot of sense.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

cloudy posted:

Oooooo I was going to ask about yoga, I'm glad you brought it up! Thanks for your response. Sounds like I really should be stretching every day, time to really try to get in to a new routine.

I actually had to stop weightlifting because I kept hurting my neck doing overhead press (surprise-- probably cause it was so tight from my sewing posture) so this all makes a lot of sense.

Hmm sounds like we may have had similar issues. Definitely try a doorway stretch after swinging your arms a bit to warm them up. That has been the most helpful stretch, personally.

Micomicona
Aug 7, 2007


Goldaline posted:

Oh yeah, I have to work really hard not to have neck/shoulder/back issues. The combination of my weightlifting and textile hobbies are sometimes at odds with each other--my right pec/front shoulder muscles are super tight from years of pulling needle-and-thread and knitting motions and I had to do a lot of mobility work to fix it. It was messing with my overhead and bench press pretty badly.


Oh my gosh, I think you just discovered the source of my weird shoulder problems. I threw out my right whole arm once doing rows and my handquilting habit probably had quite a bit to do with that :/ Thanks for the stretch rec, I will try it out!

In other sewing health related news, a good HIGH cutting table makes all the difference! I was a dedicated floor cutter for awhile, even though it would mess up my knees, because cutting on a table would make my lower back sore like nothing else. But when we moved I found a grungy old linoleum table in the basement that comes basically up to right below my boobs (I am short); I've been cutting on that and have had ZERO back pain. Suddenly, cutting my pieces has gone from my utterly least-favorite step to a pleasant task! Plus the table is still in the basement which means that I can escape the horrible heat.

canyoneer
Sep 13, 2005


I only have canyoneyes for you


Got a 6 foot folding table from Costco that has 3 leg settings (short, sitting height, and standing height)
Standing cutting tables are the business.

Pile of Kittens
Apr 23, 2005

Why does everything STILL smell like pussy?



OSHA actually has some good suggestions for preventing strain and RSI. https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/sewing/index.html

It's important that your sewing chair be able to lower to where you can see what you're working on without hunching too much. You have good light on what you're sewing, right? Like a desk lamp pointed directly at the foot?

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

Liberte
Egalite
Beyonce


For those of you who use standing cutting tables, are you able to still get enough leverage to do rotary cutting?

Micomicona
Aug 7, 2007


You know, I only just got a rotary cutter recently; I haven't used it in conjunction with the new tall table yet... But using the rotary cutter on a standard height desk resulted in some of the worst and most lingering lower back pain I've had, and it was kind of the <i>"there must be an easier way!"</i> moment that led to me moving the Sew Zone to the basement. So ergonomically it's gotta be more functional but I hadn't thought of the leverage thing! I'll test today and report back.

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

Pile of Kittens posted:

OSHA actually has some good suggestions for preventing strain and RSI. https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/sewing/index.html

It's important that your sewing chair be able to lower to where you can see what you're working on without hunching too much. You have good light on what you're sewing, right? Like a desk lamp pointed directly at the foot?

Wow, awesome resource. Thank you!
I do have an adjustable light pointed right at the foot. But I definitely need a better chair like they show in the workstation setup examples.

theflyingexecutive
Apr 22, 2007




So how would I go about doing this: I have some satin in a cool (giraffe) print and I have a donor jacket. The jacket is only a nylon shell with lining, so I'd like to keep the nylon in place to keep the jacket warm. I have a basic but reliable standard sewing machine (Singer 347) and am a sewing rookie. What I'm trying to do is leave the original sleeves and sew the satin onto the torso pieces of the jacket. Any suggestions?

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

I'm not totally understanding--do you want to replace the lining with the giraffe print, or layer it over top on the outside? Also does it fasten with zips or buttons up the front? When working on already-sewn-up clothing, you often end up either needing to seam rip it apart, or hand sew. It's hard to maneuver a sewing machine around a sewn up garment. It's why you add pockets/details before you get things put together when you're making from scratch.

edit to add: satin is pretty much the devil in terms of shifting around while being sewn, and putting it on top of nylon sounds really un-fun.

theflyingexecutive
Apr 22, 2007




If I do seam rip it all up, would I be able to put it back together with just the machine I have on hand? And yes I want to layer the satin over the nylon. Also, I don't mind accidentally destroying the jacket. It was three bucks and I have a ton of the satin.

vaguely
Apr 29, 2013

hot_squirting_honey.gif



at this point I would say it would probably be easier to get a pattern for a jacket and make one from scratch imo

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

theflyingexecutive posted:

If I do seam rip it all up, would I be able to put it back together with just the machine I have on hand? And yes I want to layer the satin over the nylon. Also, I don't mind accidentally destroying the jacket. It was three bucks and I have a ton of the satin.

In theory, yes, in practice, maybe?? If you nick it while seam ripping it, as I always do, it's pretty much over.

If I had to try this I'd probably:

-Rip the sleeves off
-Rip up the side seam so I could lay the piece flat.
-Use tracing paper to trace out the back and two fronts, then cut out of satin, adding seam allowances.
-Stitch the shoulder seams on your new pieces
-Attach them at center front (this may take some finagling if there's a zip or something.) and I guess around the neck? Is there a collar?
-Sew up the side seams with all four layers held together
-Pop the sleeves back on.
-Hem the bottom

But really, I'd probably just trace out the jacket pieces and make a new one out of satin at that point. It's definitely going to look sort of messy putting it over top. Which is okay if you're going for sort of a punk aesthetic I suppose.

I'm big into finding thrift store items with interesting patterns or good fits and tearing them apart to make my own.

Marius Pontmercy
Apr 2, 2007

Liberte
Egalite
Beyonce


Can you spray baste and paper-piece satin?

theflyingexecutive
Apr 22, 2007




Goldaline posted:

In theory, yes, in practice, maybe?? If you nick it while seam ripping it, as I always do, it's pretty much over.

If I had to try this I'd probably:

-Rip the sleeves off
-Rip up the side seam so I could lay the piece flat.
-Use tracing paper to trace out the back and two fronts, then cut out of satin, adding seam allowances.
-Stitch the shoulder seams on your new pieces
-Attach them at center front (this may take some finagling if there's a zip or something.) and I guess around the neck? Is there a collar?
-Sew up the side seams with all four layers held together
-Pop the sleeves back on.
-Hem the bottom

But really, I'd probably just trace out the jacket pieces and make a new one out of satin at that point. It's definitely going to look sort of messy putting it over top. Which is okay if you're going for sort of a punk aesthetic I suppose.

I'm big into finding thrift store items with interesting patterns or good fits and tearing them apart to make my own.

Oh geez, this is a hugely informative post thanks! I plan on tracing the pieces I hack off so I can make a new one if need be. I could even salvage the sleeves from this jacket and Frankenstein them onto a handmade one, right? The main reason I want to try this method is to preserve the collar, pockets, zipper and hem, which I can't readily replicate.

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





For Americans: JoAnn is having their annual pattern sale August 6-8, up to 10 Simplicity or McCalls for $1 each, $2 Butterick. No mention of Vogue or Burda.

https://www.reddit.com/r/sewing/comments/3fzx0n/hear_ye_hear_ye_joanns_pattern_sale_has_rolled/

theflyingexecutive
Apr 22, 2007




The McCalls are two bucks, but still I got two hundo of patterns for fourteen bucks.

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





At my local Joann, it turned out that the McCalls didn't go on sale until Sunday, so I filled my paws with Simplicity and Butterick. I am disappointed that most of the Butterick Making History poems have been pulled; presumably they didn't sell well enough. Tons of steampunk, Lolita, Goth, and TV/movie tie-ins, if that's your bag.

taiyoko
Jan 10, 2008




So we came across some fabric and a pattern that my mom had gotten ~20 years ago to make my sister and I some dresses with, and had never gotten any further than pinning the pattern pieces. We've decided we're going to make a dress for my 5-year-old niece now with it. The fabric is a decently thick crimson cotton, and I'm really not sure how to jazz it up a bit that doesn't make it look Christmas-y. Suggestions from the pattern include rick-rack, rosettes, and/or decorative buttons.

The pattern:



The fabric:

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





I think blue piping at the waist seamline, neck, and armholes would look snazzy. So would bought white eyelet ruffles at the neck, armholes, and hem. You'd know your niece best -- would she like frills everywhere or a more tailored look?

e: You can also buy embroidered appliques for things like stars and wings and initials and whatever -- check out that section for things that might look good around the neck or down the front.

DragQueenofAngmar
Dec 29, 2009

You shall not pass!


Has anyone got any experience re: mounting an old sewing machine into a table?

I've been practicing my sewing for about 6 months or so and a couple months ago I came across a very nice old machine which only needed a little bit of tuning up to be completely functional. It's this Pfaff 130 from 1952:



Straight stitch and zigzag only, but the stitches are incredibly strong (I watched one of the ladies at the shop sew through about a quarter inch of leather with this machine). Guess that's what you get when you buy a machine from the time when people actually made a lot of clothes instead of just doing occasional repairs :)

Anyway, sewing on the machine is great, but I don't like having to sew up to the platform, so I'm planning to router out an old desk I have so the machine can sit flush with the desk surface. However, I don't really want to have to fumble around under the desk every time I need to change the bobbin. (The desktop is also thick enough that it would be tough to get to the bobbin without moving the machine out of the hole anyway.) I know that most of these came mounted in tables originally, and there are two holes in the back of the machine with tightening screws, which I assume used to hold the machine to the hinges that let you tilt it back so you can access the bottom.

Has anyone here tried anything like this? Where should I look for the right kind of hinges? I'm planning to ask in my local sewing shop, but it's a good long drive away so I thought I'd try the very knowledgeable people here first. I will take a picture of the back of the machine and what I think are the hinge mounters in a few hours and post that as well if it's helpful :) Much obliged to anyone who can share info on this!

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





http://www.ebay.com/itm/Pfaff-Sewing-Machine-Part-Machine-to-Hinges-Mounting-Screws-Original-Pfaff-/291041581234

claims that these are the screws that attach the machine to the hinges. It's fairly cheap to buy these and see if they fit into the mounting holes on the machine. Then you have to find the hinges....

You'd be in great shape if your machine were a Singer, but I can't find *any* Pfaff mounting screws. You might buy these
http://www.sew4less.com/category/98/Cabinet_Parts

and try them, but I have no idea what shape the interior of the Pfaff mounting hole is.

DragQueenofAngmar
Dec 29, 2009

You shall not pass!


Arsenic Lupin posted:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Pfaff-Sewing-Machine-Part-Machine-to-Hinges-Mounting-Screws-Original-Pfaff-/291041581234

claims that these are the screws that attach the machine to the hinges. It's fairly cheap to buy these and see if they fit into the mounting holes on the machine. Then you have to find the hinges....

You'd be in great shape if your machine were a Singer, but I can't find *any* Pfaff mounting screws. You might buy these
http://www.sew4less.com/category/98/Cabinet_Parts

and try them, but I have no idea what shape the interior of the Pfaff mounting hole is.

I think that the screws are already in there as shown in these pictures. These are the only things on the back of the machine that seem like they could be for the hinges to me.





Does that maybe help? I'm only guessing that those are the mounting holes.

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





Those are the mounting holes.

http://www.sew4less.com/category/98/Cabinet_Parts

Either the second or third on this page *might* work. The question is whether the shape of the mounting pegs for Singers is close enough to the shape of the Pfaff pegs that you can use Singer hardware.

Pile of Kittens
Apr 23, 2005

Why does everything STILL smell like pussy?



Oh, I reach under the table to grab the bobbin. Router the table out totally through, not just a ditch in a thick table. Buy an appropriate oil catch pan so the dribbles of nasty oil don't fall onto your legs. It should end under the bobbin area with space on the left for your left hand to grasp the bobbin case. The little slide window on top is just so you can see what you're groping at.

Call these guys and ask for the parts department guy. He's a goddamn genius who knows which parts fit which machines across which brands and can probably even sell you the right bits, and at the very least will tell you what serial numbers (probably from memory because did I mention he's a genius) to plug into eBay. This guy has saved my rear end a few times. http://www.chholderby.com/

Come to think of it, he can probably give you some insight as to what you should be routing the table to fit.

Pile of Kittens fucked around with this message at 09:13 on Aug 13, 2015

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Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





I'll just leave this here and tiptoe away.

Scented fabric collection

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