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big black turnout
Jan 13, 2009





Fallen Rib

Are the links in the decade old op still the best places to find stuff? I picked up a sewing machine a couple years ago and just opened the box today. I'm kind of in love already and all I've been doing is learning how to sew straight, but I'm looking for where to go from there.

edit: also are there any better places to find men's patterns these days?

big black turnout fucked around with this message at 06:34 on Sep 4, 2016

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Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Testing, testing, 1, 2, 3....


I got an idea to make a really clean looking spike bay making a cone with a circle "base" that extends outward a little bit, then poking it, unstuffed up through a hole in the main fabric. Then a tight zig zag around the edge of the hole, and cutting a tiny slit in the back of the 'base' to stuff it through. It sounds crazy, but:


It worked!



Which is great, because this:

Is my next big project. Can't wait to make a million of them!!

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Holy poo poo that will be cool af

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



I have a small hole in a peacoat that I need to cover up until I can find a new coat (it's from my backpack rubbing up against my back after years of long walks/commutes. The hole's about the size of a quarter. Are iron-on patches a viable option until for this? Or is there a better, faster way to go about repairing a hole in a coat?

Crocobile
Dec 2, 2006



big black turnout posted:

Are the links in the decade old op still the best places to find stuff? I picked up a sewing machine a couple years ago and just opened the box today. I'm kind of in love already and all I've been doing is learning how to sew straight, but I'm looking for where to go from there.

edit: also are there any better places to find men's patterns these days?

Is there anything in particular you're looking for? Here's some inexpensive (aka my favorite) sites for apparel fabric:

CaliFabrics. I've actually ordered from these guys and was pleased!
Fabric.com. I've ordered from them and had a good experience, but I've heard they can be inconsistent and check your yardage when you receive it.
Fashion Fabric Club . Haven't tried them yet.
Denver Fabrics. Also haven't tried them yet.

I could go on with fabric suppliers but if you want something specific like lets say...

Dharma Trading. Tons of fabric for dying (so all natural fibers), they sell dye here too. Now that they have handkerchief linen back in I'll be ordering from them pretty soon.
Organic Cotton Plus. Exactly what it says. I have ordered cotton ribbon from them and it went smoothly! I know someone else who's ordered cotton sheeting and batiste from them and they enjoyed their experience.

Unfortunately I don't know much about men's sewing! Have you checked out Male Pattern Boldness? He has some sew alongs for pants and a shirt, and he updates pretty regularly. I've learned a lot from following sewing blogs and fortunately they all tend to link to eachother (he links to some other men's blogs further down on the right side of his page). PatternReview.com is still pretty great, and I've found good info on their forums before. I use Youtube for help with specific things (like installing invisible zippers). This book has been a great resource for me (lots and lots of great diagrams for every little thing), and I recently bought this to help me with learn how to deal with different kinds of fabrics.

Goldaline posted:

Awesome JoJo stuff
Hell YES.

Crocobile fucked around with this message at 17:26 on Sep 6, 2016

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Crocobile posted:

Fabric.com. I've ordered from them and had a good experience, but I've heard they can be inconsistent and check your yardage when you receive it.
Fashion Fabric Club . Haven't tried them yet.
I'm a big fan of Fashion Fabrics Club. Sign up for their email list, they change up what fabrics get marked down all the time. But a great resource for cheap apparel fabrics. I've bought a lot of knits and shirting and twills there. You just have to know what you're looking for, since the pictures and descriptions aren't so hot.
[/quote]

quote:

Hell YES.
I just finished up a rough sketch, and it looks like "a million" is a little exaggerated. I'm looking at about 142 spikes.

Now I just have to decide if I'm doing the black/pink/gold colorway, or tan/green/blue, so I can buy my fabrics.

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

by Fluffdaddy


melon cat posted:

I have a small hole in a peacoat that I need to cover up until I can find a new coat (it's from my backpack rubbing up against my back after years of long walks/commutes. The hole's about the size of a quarter. Are iron-on patches a viable option until for this? Or is there a better, faster way to go about repairing a hole in a coat?

Do you want a new coat? A good patch will get you years more life out of it. The best way to repair a peacoat is to felt more wool over the hole. It's not that difficult but you'll need loose wool in the right color, the proper needle, and probably a few felting tutorials to accomplish it. An easier but still durable way would be to sew a wool patch on; use a same-colored patch for a discrete repair or some kind of fun color/shape that's decorative. Iron on patches are the easiest fix, but also the most temporary because they're just glued on. They're more susceptible to washing/water, but you can always go back and stitch them on if they start coming loose. If you go with with patching over felting, remember to sew the actual hole up first and apply the patch over the stitching.

Anarcho-Commissar
May 22, 2002

"The means of production being the collective work of humanity, the product should be the collective property of the race. Individual appropriation is neither just nor serviceable. All belongs to all."
- Pyotr Kropotkin




Sewing this coat, the instructions say to press the seams towards the back (rather than open, I think). It creates an overlap, which might be fine , except along the hem edge where it looks odd to me.

It's possible this is okay, I've just never seen it before. I could also get creative with trimming and make it fit, but I want to check with you experts first.



Crocobile
Dec 2, 2006



Colonial Air Force posted:

Sewing this coat, the instructions say to press the seams towards the back (rather than open, I think). It creates an overlap, which might be fine , except along the hem edge where it looks odd to me.

It's possible this is okay, I've just never seen it before. I could also get creative with trimming and make it fit, but I want to check with you experts first.

Oh cool, 18th century! I don't know much about 18th century men's clothing construction but I found someone's blog post on the same pattern. I've followed patterns that instructed me to press the seams towards the back before; I usually press the seams flat, open, and then back.

I don't know if that helps, but good luck with all that hand sewing! IDK if you've gotten to the buttonholes yet but here's a great tutorial on hand-worked buttonholes. There's also this more abbreviated version, which I use but my results aren't even half as pretty as the beautifully tailored ones from Williams Clothiers.

Crocobile fucked around with this message at 04:28 on Sep 8, 2016

Anarcho-Commissar
May 22, 2002

"The means of production being the collective work of humanity, the product should be the collective property of the race. Individual appropriation is neither just nor serviceable. All belongs to all."
- Pyotr Kropotkin




Yeah, I saw her post. She did what I probably should have done and left the edges raw, but I kind of like the way it looks hemmed.

I think what I'll probably do is press them open and alter it a little bit. The pattern is primarily meant for linen, but wool is acceptable, so making a couple changes isn't the end of the world.

Thanks for the button hole resources, too. I haven't started them yet, but I'm dreading it. I doubt they'll look amazing, but I figure they'll be good enough.

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



there wolf posted:

Do you want a new coat? A good patch will get you years more life out of it. The best way to repair a peacoat is to felt more wool over the hole. It's not that difficult but you'll need loose wool in the right color, the proper needle, and probably a few felting tutorials to accomplish it. An easier but still durable way would be to sew a wool patch on; use a same-colored patch for a discrete repair or some kind of fun color/shape that's decorative. Iron on patches are the easiest fix, but also the most temporary because they're just glued on. They're more susceptible to washing/water, but you can always go back and stitch them on if they start coming loose. If you go with with patching over felting, remember to sew the actual hole up first and apply the patch over the stitching.
Thanks for all of this info. To be honest, I was looking for the quickest fix (because yes, I do want a new coat!). But I like the option of the wool patch. My wife recently bought a sewing machine, and she might like having a project like this to start on. Because of my coat gets chewed up, I wouldn't really be upset over it.

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

I posted these up and they sold in a few seconds. Now I have to figure out how many more I can make!

No Egrets
May 30, 2013


Funhilde posted:

I posted these up and they sold in a few seconds. Now I have to figure out how many more I can make!


Where did you get that fabric?! :swoon:

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

No Egrets posted:

Where did you get that fabric?! :swoon:

From a special order fabric company. They do pre sale purchasing and very little retail. This one is Cuddle Muffins fabric.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Anyone have a good source for swimsuit fabric? Alternately, can I just use Lycra or another performance/tech fabric and if so, anyone have a good source for some? Looking for personal recommendations. Fabric quality and allowing me to order small (1-2 yards at a time) quantities are the highest priorities, although cheaper is obvs better.

MIL gave me a serger. I don't recall the brand and I'm not at home, but hopefully I can start widening my sewing horizons.

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

NancyPants posted:

Anyone have a good source for swimsuit fabric? Alternately, can I just use Lycra or another performance/tech fabric and if so, anyone have a good source for some? Looking for personal recommendations. Fabric quality and allowing me to order small (1-2 yards at a time) quantities are the highest priorities, although cheaper is obvs better.

MIL gave me a serger. I don't recall the brand and I'm not at home, but hopefully I can start widening my sewing horizons.

Spandex World is awesome

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Funhilde posted:

Spandex World is awesome

Spandex House as well. And now you can actually order through their new website, instead of having them call you for your CC #.

Update: I've got the leggings and leotard drafted and the spike placements figured out.


My fabric just arrived, so I'm heading into spike making hell now. 121 is the final count, in two sizes.

Rotten Cookies
Nov 11, 2008

gosh! i like both the islanders and the rangers!!! :^)



God loving speed.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Thanks for the leads, dudes.

Goldaline, I'm so stoked to see that when you're done.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear



*cackles*

My dream of becoming a weird cactus rock person architect man is coming together. This is going to be slow going though, like the waffleshirt there's a lot of trimming/clipping involved, and it hurts my hand. So I'll do an arm, wait a week, do another piece, ect.

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

Just wanted to say that I don't post in here much, but I love your art-inspired pieces Goldaline. They are an inspiration <3

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

cloudy posted:

Just wanted to say that I don't post in here much, but I love your art-inspired pieces Goldaline. They are an inspiration <3

Ah, man, thank you so much! This is just dumb old cosplay though! Somehow I can't really justify it as 'real' work so I feel a bit silly spending so much time on them. But it's fun I guess, and I get to wear them at conventions!

cloudy
Jul 3, 2007

Alive to the universe; dead to the world.

Goldaline posted:

Ah, man, thank you so much! This is just dumb old cosplay though! Somehow I can't really justify it as 'real' work so I feel a bit silly spending so much time on them. But it's fun I guess, and I get to wear them at conventions!

I see no reason why cosplay, which is based on cool art, can't be real work! :swoon: Like, if you wanted to make a portfolio that was all about the colorful and avant garde, this could totally be in it! (Assuming that sort of thing is allowed.... Pieces based off other peoples art, etc).

vaguely
Apr 29, 2013

hot_squirting_honey.gif



omg yes, cosplay is where you get to try out cool and weird poo poo that you'd probably never even think of doing if you're just making 'real' clothes
taking designs which were never meant to be made and worn by a real person, and making them actually possible, is so so fun

Silver Alicorn
Mar 30, 2008

The Game is Never Over


Hello, I'm a big fan of pandas and there's currently a fat quarter bundle on massdrop heavily featuring both giant and red pandas:


MOD EDIT: no heckin referral links

Just thought you'd like to know.

Somebody fucked around with this message at 07:03 on Oct 5, 2016

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
of night windows



Fallen Rib

Somehow I missed that there was a sewing thread up in here.

I make quilts! This is my most recently finished one. I dyed the fabric (sheet from the thrift store), pieced it, quilted it, and bound it all by myself.





However it is very small and I don't need a tiny quilt so I'm waiting for someone to have a baby so I can give it to them.

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

by Fluffdaddy


HelloIAmYourHeart posted:

Somehow I missed that there was a sewing thread up in here.

I make quilts! This is my most recently finished one. I dyed the fabric (sheet from the thrift store), pieced it, quilted it, and bound it all by myself.





However it is very small and I don't need a tiny quilt so I'm waiting for someone to have a baby so I can give it to them.

I liked the pieced back. Is it more blue of grey in person? I don't really get the trend of grey baby quilts, but then I guess it's a step up from blue-for-boys, pink-for-girls sticklers.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



HelloIAmYourHeart posted:

Somehow I missed that there was a sewing thread up in here.

I make quilts! This is my most recently finished one. I dyed the fabric (sheet from the thrift store), pieced it, quilted it, and bound it all by myself.





However it is very small and I don't need a tiny quilt so I'm waiting for someone to have a baby so I can give it to them.

I dig this quilt.

Is there a template/pattern somewhere? I am a newbie and I want to see how that top is pieced (also I like watching videos of quilts being made).

Gray is the best color for everything, baby blankets included. I don't know whether it is objectively modern but people think of it that way so here we are.

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

by Fluffdaddy


NancyPants posted:

Gray is the best color for everything, baby blankets included.

Pinterest follower spotted...

But seriously, the pattern would be something like this


I plugged in some easy numbers for the block sizes but the formula is pretty flexible. Pick the size of your smallest block, that's going to be your rate of increase on the other blocks. I started with a 2" square add two more inches with every new square, 2, 4, 6, 8. Your borders are your final block size, minus the inset square and divided by two. Don't forget to add in what you need for seam allowances.

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Hey that is cool, thank you.

Would you make the border of each block using 4 strips around the center square like for a log cabin block (without the color considerations)?

e: VVV excellent, thanks

BonerGhost fucked around with this message at 18:17 on Oct 3, 2016

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

by Fluffdaddy


NancyPants posted:

Hey that is cool, thank you.

Would you make the border of each block using 4 strips around the center square like for a log cabin block (without the color considerations)?

Umm, yes but there are two different ways to do log cabins and I'm not sure which you're referring to. In this case add to strips the width of your square to the top and bottom, and two longer strips to the sides. That's the basic method for adding any boarders.

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
of night windows



Fallen Rib

NancyPants posted:

I dig this quilt.

Is there a template/pattern somewhere? I am a newbie and I want to see how that top is pieced (also I like watching videos of quilts being made).

Gray is the best color for everything, baby blankets included. I don't know whether it is objectively modern but people think of it that way so here we are.

The pattern is called an "archipelago quilt" which I found while looking for a quilt pattern that called for two solid colors.

The color is more gray in person. I was trying to dye a moon shape and it didn't work so I cut it up. I wasn't really trying to make a baby quilt specifically, but who else uses a tiny quilt?

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

by Fluffdaddy


HelloIAmYourHeart posted:

The pattern is called an "archipelago quilt" which I found while looking for a quilt pattern that called for two solid colors.

The color is more gray in person. I was trying to dye a moon shape and it didn't work so I cut it up. I wasn't really trying to make a baby quilt specifically, but who else uses a tiny quilt?

Moon shape? How were you dying it?

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
of night windows



Fallen Rib

there wolf posted:

Moon shape? How were you dying it?

Stitched shibori with jacquard dyes.



This is one that I made that came out really well, so I decided to get a big piece of fabric and make a giant moon using the same technique. However, the thrift store sheet I used was much thicker and softer than the muslin I practiced on, so there wasn't nearly as much contrast between the white and color.



Lame. So I cut it up. The back of the quilt is made of other shibori experiments as well.

And here is the link to the pattern I used: http://www.9-stitches.com/blog/quilting/square-quilt-pattern

HelloIAmYourHeart fucked around with this message at 02:42 on Oct 4, 2016

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

by Fluffdaddy


Oof. Yeah, sheets have a pretty high thread count compared to muslin. It'll cost a little more, but Kaufman makes PFD at 60" if you want something nicer than muslin that might work better with the shibori technique.

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

there wolf posted:

Oof. Yeah, sheets have a pretty high thread count compared to muslin. It'll cost a little more, but Kaufman makes PFD at 60" if you want something nicer than muslin that might work better with the shibori technique.

The pricing for fabrics from Dharma Trading Company are also very reasonable. Some of the best pricing on Linen I've ever found.

vaginadeathgrip
Jun 18, 2003

all them bitches can't handle my sassy ass mouth

This thread has made me realize that I have forgotten I am able to sew things and that I miss doing it for fun. I went to school for fashion design which beat all the desire to sew out of me, and sometimes I am forced to do it at work, but I haven't done it for myself in a really long time. Now I want to make a leather bomber jacket, because I am outrageously ambitious with projects.

Also Goldaline is the coolest.

Funhilde
Jun 1, 2011

Cats Love Me.

Took a break from Halloween sewing to make a bolero for my friend.


Basically finished my daughter's jacket too.

Agrinja
Nov 30, 2013

Praise the Sun!


Total Clam

So, I'm learning, I've made a couple of things before in my life, mostly pillows of varying complexities, the most advanced one being a pleated zafu. My eventual goal is to be able to do nice garments and things, but in the meantime I do little projects to try and learn the skills required for that. My most recent project was a lined zipper bag going off the tutorial in the OP, it could be better, it could be worse. I think I should have trimmed my zipper ends down more, it made the top of the bag less square than I'd like, and the embroidery sucks, but hey, zipper. I am happy with the top-stitching so the fabric lays down around the zipper, it's fairly invisible, at least to my eye. I own a machine, but this is all hand stitched, and while the finished edges aren't visible, they're all overcast because I don't have an overlocker. I recently got a bunch of green and blue plaid, and a pattern, and intend to make a housecoat of it. I'll post bits about that when I get going on it. Thank you kindly.





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BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



That cross stitch spider is cute.

That's a good bag, especially for a first bag and especially hand-sewn. You can get crisper corners if you trim the inside seam allowance, use a turning tool, and iron the seams.

These are not the most useful pictures but you might get the gist here: http://www.simplesimonandco.com/2014/01/tips-for-sewing-smooth-curves-and-creating-crisp-corners.html/

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