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Brigdh
Nov 23, 2007

That's not an oil leak. That's the automatic oil change and chassis protection feature.


Any battery tender recommendations? I'm looking for something I can put on the track day car to keep the battery healthy and charged for the 2-3 weeks it sits between sessions.

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sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Get a legit battery tender brand one, we've got a four bank charger for work, and it works awesome.

Uthor
Jul 9, 2006

Gummy Bear Heaven ... It's where I go when the world is too mean.

I have a Battery Tender Junior by Deltran for my bike. Works fine and I've never heard complaints from that company. They have larger and more feature filled models if you need something more for your car.

penis bandana
Aug 6, 2008


Just bought a Wera Koloss w/ all the goodies. My plan is to use it in lieu of all other hammers for a month and see how it holds up. Also I guess I'll ratchet some stuff with it, but I'd like to think of it more as a hammer with a ratchet than as a ratchet with a hammer during this trial period. The centering punch is pretty handy too.

http://chadstoolbox.com/Koloss-Hammerhead.aspx

PBCrunch
Jun 17, 2002

Lawrence Phillips Always #1 to Me

Couldn't a person just rig up a cheap battery tender on one of those household timers and just restrict it to running a half hour per day.

Rabble
Dec 3, 2005



Pillbug

Can anyone recommend a good starter set of ratchet/sockets for just general maintenance of a Ford. I was thinking about something like This but I don't really think I'll need the metric working on an american car (haha that's probably wishful thinking).

Anyway I'd like a good set with some deep sockets and at least a 6" extension to get into deep spots. Also, why do all of these kits come with the same socket in different ratchet sizes? 1/4, 1/2, and 3/8, is it mainly just for leverage situations or is it so they can bulk up their part count.

User Error
Aug 31, 2006


Rabble posted:

Can anyone recommend a good starter set of ratchet/sockets for just general maintenance of a Ford. I was thinking about something like This but I don't really think I'll need the metric working on an american car (haha that's probably wishful thinking).

Anyway I'd like a good set with some deep sockets and at least a 6" extension to get into deep spots. Also, why do all of these kits come with the same socket in different ratchet sizes? 1/4, 1/2, and 3/8, is it mainly just for leverage situations or is it so they can bulk up their part count.

A kit like that would be a good start. The 3 different socket wrench sizes have some overlap, but each can have advantages in certain situations. I probably use my 3/8" 75% of the time. You wouldn't want to use a big heavy 1/2" ratchet to remove some tiny bolt with a million threads in a cramped locations, and you wouldn't want to use a little 1/4" ratchet to put 200lb/ft on a rusty suspension bolt.

And American cars do use a lot of metric. When I'm king everything will be 100% metric so you'd better get used to it now.

e: speeling

User Error fucked around with this message at 00:43 on May 16, 2012

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

penis bandana posted:

Just bought a Wera Koloss w/ all the goodies. My plan is to use it in lieu of all other hammers for a month and see how it holds up. Also I guess I'll ratchet some stuff with it, but I'd like to think of it more as a hammer with a ratchet than as a ratchet with a hammer during this trial period. The centering punch is pretty handy too.

http://chadstoolbox.com/Koloss-Hammerhead.aspx

That's been on my Christmas list every year. Reviewers said it felt like the best-built tool they had ever used. Godspeed, goon sir.

Rabble
Dec 3, 2005



Pillbug

chem42 posted:

A kit like that would be a good start. The 3 different socket wrench sizes have same overlap, but each can have advantages in certain situations. I probably use my 3/8" 75% of the time. You wouldn't want to use a big heavy 1/2" ratchet to remove some tiny bolt with a million threads in a cramped locations, and you wouldn't want to use a little 1/4" ratchet to put 200lb/ft on a rusty suspension bolt.

And American cars do use a lot of metric. When I'm king everything will be 100% metric so you'd better get used to it now.

Good to know, maybe I'll pick one up next time I get a 20% sears coupon.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

Don't close. Don't close.

Nap Ghost

PBCrunch posted:

Couldn't a person just rig up a cheap battery tender on one of those household timers and just restrict it to running a half hour per day.

I'm not sure what you mean here. A Battery Tender (name brand) or other float or trickle charger are supposed to be used on a fully charged battery. Batteries naturally discharge just sitting around, and a low-current float charge cancels out the natural discharge. A true high-current battery charger, on the other hand, can only be used on a battery that has been discharged. Using a true charger on a full battery will cause it to overheat and boil. Using a timer on a trickle charger kinda defeats the purpose.

penis bandana
Aug 6, 2008


Splizwarf posted:

That's been on my Christmas list every year. Reviewers said it felt like the best-built tool they had ever used. Godspeed, goon sir.

The best part was my co-worker's face while I tried to drop a driveshaft on a 5-ton Army truck with nothing but the Koloss this afternoon.

I did in fact end up requiring a bigger hammer, but the tool is still in fine shape.

chem42 posted:

When I'm king everything will be 100% metric so you'd better get used to it now.

gently caress you dude. I have like $10,000 invested in SAE tools. As king you had better give me some sort of tax credit or something.

penis bandana fucked around with this message at 04:47 on May 15, 2012

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


That's all well and good, but have you taken lug nuts off the 5-ton with just that hammer?

And what's with all this metric vs SAE bigotry? We need to be more accepting of all fastener types, including Whitworth.

penis bandana
Aug 6, 2008


kastein posted:

That's all well and good, but have you taken lug nuts off the 5-ton with just that hammer?

And what's with all this metric vs SAE bigotry? We need to be more accepting of all fastener types, including Whitworth.

Actually we put the extension and a cheater pipe on it and broke a couple lugs on a HEMTT (a big 8WD Army thing) the day I got it. That's a little different though, because living without my nice hammers is not even close to the same thing as living without my nice impact guns.

And there is no metric vs SAE bigotry. There is only me vs tool company hatred.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

kastein posted:

We need to be more accepting of all fastener types, including Whitworth.

There's only two things I hate in this world. People who are intolerant of other people's fasteners and the Robertson.

Sockington
Jul 26, 2003


Splizwarf posted:

There's only two things I hate in this world. People who are intolerant of other people's fasteners and the Robertson.

I rock the #2 Robby all day at work

You just don't appreciate fasteners.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

I appreciate you keeping them contained in .

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


A coworker grabbed me a freebie sliderule jobbie froma tradeshow:





I've got a Loctite one somewhere, too: choose two materials and it notes how effective different adhesives are for holding them together.

Sockington
Jul 26, 2003


Splizwarf posted:

I appreciate you keeping them contained in .

I've heard a few stories of Canadians "back in the day" shipping things to Americans fastened with robby screws as a joke.


quote:

Robertson screwdrivers are easy to use one-handed, because the tapered socket tends to retain the screw, even if it is shaken. They also allow for the use of angled screw drivers and trim head screws. The socket-headed Robertson screws are self-centering, reduce cam out, stop a power tool when set, and can be removed if painted-over or old and rusty.In industry, they speed up production and reduce product damage.

Oh man, they sound so terrible!

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Sockington posted:

I've heard a few stories of Canadians "back in the day" shipping things to Americans fastened with robby screws as a joke.


Oh man, they sound so terrible!

Our boat was made in Canada, and uses Robertson throughout. They are great.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I love Robertson screws except where they are made from soft, low grade stainless and twist off the head before fully seating. I've bought some screws like that at Home Depot and ended up tossing the rest of the box.

The square socket also rounded out easily on them. I think it was just a lovely alloy they used.

Otherwise, I much prefer them over phillips, way easier to use.

penis bandana
Aug 6, 2008


Phillips are actually designed to cam out and strip though.

Posidriv is where it's at, son.

I guess Torx have grown on me too, but only because I've been forced to buy a ton of Torx stuff.

velocross
Sep 16, 2007

Disco Disco Disco Disco Disco Disco Disco Disco Disco


Any recommendations for getting out an almost stripped out allen bolt? It's an 8mm, going to try and pound in a 9mm + and use a torch. Anything else I can try before I pray to the ez-out gods? Curse you previous owners for using lovely tools and an even shitter torque wrench .

PeaceFrog
Jul 27, 2004
you'll shoot your eye out.

^^^^ Do the acetone/ATF mix 50/50. I preheat just to get things hot, not glowing just hot, and then use a tinman style oil can to squirt in some of the mix and the heat seems to accelerate the penetration. First battle to fight is making the screw looser, then worry about beating a torx bit in place and praying. I find that a tapping a bit solidly in place and then attaching the screwdriver helps me to properly seat everything and reduces swearing time.


I dont hate Phillips screws. I hate engineers who designed things with phillips screws where just about any other type of drive would work better. High torque load bearing? Lets use a #4 Phillips. Water is meant to collect and pass through here in daily operation of this drain but need to stick this here, oh hey, grade 2 carbon steel Phillips are cheap.

Low stress jobs in clean areas like electronics I'd rather have a Phillips because the screw will probably eat itself before damaging other things.

PeaceFrog fucked around with this message at 03:31 on May 16, 2012

penis bandana
Aug 6, 2008


velocross posted:

Any recommendations for getting out an almost stripped out allen bolt? It's an 8mm, going to try and pound in a 9mm + and use a torch. Anything else I can try before I pray to the ez-out gods? Curse you previous owners for using lovely tools and an even shitter torque wrench .

Ever since I got my own wire-feed, I usually just end up welding a nut on the head of a stripped bolt.

If that's not an option, I would just drill and extract if you don't have any luck with heat/penetrating oil/oversized driver.

velocross
Sep 16, 2007

Disco Disco Disco Disco Disco Disco Disco Disco Disco


PeaceFrog posted:

^^^^ Do the acetone/ATF mix 50/50.

I forgot how important penetrating fluid is. Is it worth trying the atf/acetone combo or is pb blaster good to go? I've always had good luck with it, but unless the mix is some kind of miracle fluid, I should be alright with blaster.

I sprayed some pb blaster, but the bolt is on the bottom of a motorcycle motor, so not much penetration in the threads. The bike is 80% dissembled, so I'm just going to flip the whole thing upside down and attack it from there. Should have known I would have run into a bad bolt, the whole project was going so well .


Adding to the thread, I'd recommend a long handled 1/4" ratchet. It seems kinda overkill having long leverage on smaller fastners, but for it's so much nicer for small, rusty 8/10mm bolts. I spoiled myself with a snap on, but that extra leverage is the bees knees. Gearwrench has a couple nice ones too.

velocross fucked around with this message at 04:36 on May 16, 2012

penis bandana
Aug 6, 2008


velocross posted:

Adding to the thread, I'd recommend a long handled 1/4" ratchet. It seems kinda overkill having long leverage on smaller fastners, but for it's so much nicer for small, rusty 8/10mm bolts. I spoiled myself with a snap on, but that extra leverage is the bees knees. Gearwrench has a couple nice ones too.

False. All work should be done with a Wera Koloss.

If the head is too large to use as a ratchet in a tight spot, use hammer function to make room.

NitroSpazzz
Dec 8, 2006

You don't need style when you've got strength!




Have a question for anyone who works with refrigeration equipment. We do a lot of work with 134A and the pumps we have been using only last a few months because they aren't made to move the volume we do. At the moment we are using the Promax RG6000, previously we were using a similar unit that I can't remember the name of.

The issue is we're pumping around 200-300 pounds at a time and within a couple uses the pumps sound like they are going to die, within a month or two they aren't pumping as fast as they were and within six months of normal use they aren't moving refrigerant.

On a medium sized install we send 20 pumps, if we are lucky 10 work at the end of the install. We're looking for a better option...any ideas?

GnarlyCharlie4u
Sep 23, 2007

I have an unhealthy obsession with motorcycles.

Proof


velocross posted:

I forgot how important penetrating fluid is. Is it worth trying the atf/acetone combo or is pb blaster good to go? I've always had good luck with it, but unless the mix is some kind of miracle fluid, I should be alright with blaster.

I sprayed some pb blaster, but the bolt is on the bottom of a motorcycle motor, so not much penetration in the threads. The bike is 80% dissembled, so I'm just going to flip the whole thing upside down and attack it from there. Should have known I would have run into a bad bolt, the whole project was going so well .


Adding to the thread, I'd recommend a long handled 1/4" ratchet. It seems kinda overkill having long leverage on smaller fastners, but for it's so much nicer for small, rusty 8/10mm bolts. I spoiled myself with a snap on, but that extra leverage is the bees knees. Gearwrench has a couple nice ones too.

PB blaster works better but it's more expensive.

OnlyJuanMon
Jan 25, 2010


Too tired to chase fences right now.


Starting at Tires Plus tomorrow. It's my first full time mechanic gig (I've done a NASCAR internship and worked at a BMW dealership as a service writer).

I've got a rolling Matco toolbox, a set of metric 10-21 Matco wrenches, I have a cheapo Husky socket set, an oil filter wrench, and a 60 dollar off brand pneumatic impact.

I have a good LED flashlight and a full screwdriver set.

I have a cheap set of sockets (metric and standard) for the impact as well.

I'll be doing oil changes, tire rotations, and alignments starting out.

Am I good to go AI, or is there something I'm missing?

Sockington
Jul 26, 2003


OnlyJuanMon posted:

Am I good to go AI, or is there something I'm missing?

You're missing the Snap-On guy's dick in your mouth.

But seriously, what is the scope of your work? Basic tires, brakes, and suspension?

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

OnlyJuanMon posted:

tire rotations,

Torque sticks and a print out of this PDF taped to your box.

OnlyJuanMon
Jan 25, 2010


Too tired to chase fences right now.


Sockington posted:

You're missing the Snap-On guy's dick in your mouth.

But seriously, what is the scope of your work? Basic tires, brakes, and suspension?

I'm starting out as a "GS" (General Services).

I'll be doing oil changes, tire mounting, rotations and alignments.

As I prove myself and show them I can handle it, they'll give me brake jobs, and basic mechanical stuff down the road.

I want to be a mechanic for a career, so I'm just making sure I've got my bases covered.

I DO NOT wanna be the new guy borrowing tools. I did too much of that poo poo in my internship, and it was horrible.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


You're probably gonna want some SAE sockets and wrenches as well, unless you only work on imports. Oh, and a set of cheap screwdrivers for taking some skid plates + plastic brush guards off, some makes like to hide the oil filter wayyyy up in there.

Doing air filters too? An 8mm and a 10mm nutdriver and a pair of pliers will make you much happier.

Uthor
Jul 9, 2006

Gummy Bear Heaven ... It's where I go when the world is too mean.

Triple square and Torx drivers if you are going to be working on VWs and Audis. I know my GTIs skid plate is held on by Torx and the calipers have a triple square bolt.

OnlyJuanMon
Jan 25, 2010


Too tired to chase fences right now.


THanks guys, I just sold some golf clubs today, so I'm gonna swing by and get a few things I missed.

And eventually I'll suck that Snap On guys cock and sell my soul for some decent tools.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

GnarlyCharlie4u posted:

PB blaster works better but it's more expensive.

I like PB and drat the slightly higher cost; acetone is exceptionally bad as "bad for you" chemicals go, and will happily penetrate almost any gloves (you need to buy the acetone-specific ones unless you just have ridiculous industrial ones available in the first place).

OnlyJuanMon posted:

Am I good to go AI, or is there something I'm missing?

Mother-loving safety glasses. Go to Harbor Freight and buy $30 worth of the $1.50 ones, so you don't have to think about throwing a pair in the trash when you scratch the poo poo out of them. Don't gently caress around with your eyes or hands, you only get two of each and if you lose any you won't be able to do what you want in life.

Disposable gloves, two kinds: cheap white nitrile ones (the $10 for 100 kind) and the thicker blue or black "use one pair for the day" nitrile ones with the little bit longer cuff (more expensive but worth it). For some jobs you'll want one inside the other.

Leather or "Mechanix"-style gloves for any time you handle tires, especially when something comes in with bands showing. Wear a disposable underneath if it's going to get nasty, they're not waterproof.

Groove-joint/slip-joint pliers, 8-inch or longer.

Diagonal cutters, 6-inch or longer.

2- or 3-lb brass hammer (shaped like a short sledge, not a carpenter's nail hammer). Harbor Freight actually has a pretty good one.

2- to 4-lb steel hammer (same shape, bonus if the whole thing is a single cast piece of metal, ie the head can't come off).

Dead-blow hammer.

Full-size vice grips, especially if you're doing alignments. These will often pair nicely with the steel hammer, you'll know it when you see it.

OnlyJuanMon
Jan 25, 2010


Too tired to chase fences right now.


All good advice. Is Harbor Freight a national chain? We have one right near my house here in Georgia. They're practically GIVING tools away there. It's where I picked up my impact.

I have several safety glasses and a dead blow.

Why exactly would I need diagonal cutters? Obviously it's good to have a tool for any circumstance, but would there be an everyday use for them?

OnlyJuanMon fucked around with this message at 18:27 on May 16, 2012

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

They are a chain. Read through this whole thread if you have a spare weekend, there's a lot of discussion. The tl;dr: is usually "hand tools good, air and power tools bad", with exceptions on both sides. The clicker torque wrenches and the welding helmets are surprisingly good, along with the aluminum racing jack. Don't buy the flare wrenches or the sonic cleaner.

e: dykes: the everyday use is for the pin in castle nuts, and... cuttin' stuff? I can't really give you a good answer, I guess, I just couldn't imagine not having mine in the box all the time. They're often useful. vv

Splizwarf fucked around with this message at 18:30 on May 16, 2012

OnlyJuanMon
Jan 25, 2010


Too tired to chase fences right now.


I just wanted a cheap impact to start out with. For 70 bucks, I also got a 27 month warranty...Soooooooooo...V V

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Jared592
Jan 23, 2003
JARED NUMBERS: BACK IN ACTION


I haven't heard anything negative about the "Earthquake" impact guns if that's what you got.

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