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Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


Raw_Beef posted:

Wait, youve got an affordable scan tool that resets SRS system lights?
They were the bain of my trim shop's operations. Remove a seat and turn the key on (required in some cars to get the column trim off, turning the wheel without the steering lock) and bam you got an SRS light.

Can't you just d/c the battery to get around this? No live electronics at the time of the disconnect means no fault triggers, right? Or does it know even if the battery is out?

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sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Black88GTA posted:

Can't you just d/c the battery to get around this? No live electronics at the time of the disconnect means no fault triggers, right? Or does it know even if the battery is out?

The manufacturers have specific instructions about how to disable each zone of the srs system. Follow those, and your are golden.

Sockington
Jul 26, 2003


Motronic posted:

If you don't know what one or more of these things are and are serious about wrenching on 1996+ vehicles it would be a very good idea to get familiar. OBDII is a lot more then DTCs, clearing "Check Engine" lights (MILs), and making cheap extra gauges.

I just wasn't sure if these more consumer priced units are performing as well as the multi-thousand dollar Snap-On poo poo.

I haven't looked at the prices on the high end ones, so I was a bit surprised to find good capabilities for under $1000.

stevobob
Nov 16, 2008

Alchemy - the study of how to turn LS1's into a 20B.


Protip: for cutting, stripping and crimping wire, get one of these: http://www.princessauto.com/pal/pro...e-Crimping-Tool

Do not, if possible, get this: http://www.princessauto.com/pal/pro...1-Wire-Stripper

I use the first one every day at work and it's working great, no need for $50 fancy electrician pliers for stripping and crimping automotive wiring. The second one is shite and not worth the money.

Lowclock
Oct 26, 2005


stevobob posted:

Do not, if possible, get this: http://www.princessauto.com/pal/pro...1-Wire-Stripper

The second one is shite and not worth the money.
Any reason why? Just that particular one? Those are way easier to strip wires with that are short or in tight spaces/bundles than those lovely multi-tools.

Sockington
Jul 26, 2003


I have the small Klein(HD) set (one solid core, one stranded) that works great for tight spots.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


I use one of these for stripping and clipping wires, works really well:



For crimping, I got a cheap ratchet type crimper afer killing several of the ones made from thin pressings - I end up dishing them when I squeeze the handles.

stevobob
Nov 16, 2008

Alchemy - the study of how to turn LS1's into a 20B.


Lowclock posted:

Any reason why? Just that particular one? Those are way easier to strip wires with that are short or in tight spaces/bundles than those lovely multi-tools.

I've had not a single half-strip with the larger pair as long as I use the proper sized spot for the wire, but with various smaller pairs I quite often only get half of the insulation stripped. I also haven't had a spot yet that I couldn't fit the larger set in to strip the wire, anywhere that's too tight I free up the harness or whatever and pull it out a bit. YMMV obviously but the way that the larger set feels, with the stripper on the grip-side of the hinge, feels like you have more control and seems to work better.

The one dude I work under has a set of snips that he uses for stripping wire of any size, just because he's been doing it for 30 years and has a feel for it. Pretty much these:

Every time I try to use those I end up nipping a few strands off.

thecobra
Aug 8, 2011

by Y Kant Ozma Boo


I used to do mass amounts of cutting and crimping and ferruling in production, and the only time we'd use the big pair would be for really tiny gauges or for crimping bare leads. I don't think I could ever use them for how much cutting and stripping I did.

CatBus
May 12, 2001

Who wants a mustache ride?

sharkytm posted:

Get a usb to serial adapter with an ftdi chip. I use serial data a lot... Dozens of laptops, dozens of usb adapters that sucked, and $400 pcmcia serial adapters. The ftdi chips are the only ones that don't suck complete rear end.

That is exactly the advice I needed. Thanks!

I will probably order this:
Windows 7 Compatible USB Serial Adapter FTDI Chip RS232 DB-9 920K with TX/RX LED http://amzn.com/B004WLA4P4

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

The model I have several of is the US232R-100-Bulk. We got them from a supplier, but any of those FTDI cables will work. Don't worry about the drivers on Win7, they install natively.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


InitialDave posted:

For crimping, I got a cheap ratchet type crimper afer killing several of the ones made from thin pressings - I end up dishing them when I squeeze the handles.

No loss, you can't get good crimps out of one of those "pressed sheetmetal pliers pretending to be a crimper" deals anyways. All they do is flatten the ferrule instead of actually compressing it around the wire, like a good ratchet or hydro crimper will.

I used to use Harbor Freight grade crimp terminals and a pressed sheetmetal crimper, then I started using the fully brazed sealant+heatshrink insulated terminals and a ratchet crimper and to say the quality of the result is an order of magnitude better is an understatement. If I try to rip a wire out of a crimp now, the wire generally snaps instead of pulling out.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Sockington posted:

I just wasn't sure if these more consumer priced units are performing as well as the multi-thousand dollar Snap-On poo poo.

I haven't looked at the prices on the high end ones, so I was a bit surprised to find good capabilities for under $1000.

Going with an ELM USB/bluetooth to OBDII cable and software makes for an even cheaper setup with more capabilities if you already have a laptop to use with it. Even cheaper yet if you have flexible morals and a torrent client.

The Third Man
Nov 5, 2005

I know how much you like ponies so I got you a ponies avatar bro


Not necessarily auto-related, but I'm making a run out to harbor freight tomorrow afternoon, and I'm thinking about picking up a general around-the-house power drill. Is there generally affordable model that should last me a good long while? I don't want to cheap out since this is the sort of thing I'd like to have for a while, and I'm thinking about building a deck later this summer anyway. I just need something to drill holes and drive screws and not crap out on me after a few months of use.

Black88GTA
Oct 8, 2009


The Third Man posted:

...I'm making a run out to harbor freight tomorrow afternoon...thinking about picking up a general around-the-house power drill...not crap out on me after a few months of use.

Keep driving until you hit Sears or Home Depot. HF is good for some things, but power tools are not one of them.

That said, I have a couple HF power tools and they still work. Then again, I don't use them often.

Lord Gaga
May 9, 2010

by T. Finninho


InitialDave posted:

I use one of these for stripping and clipping wires, works really well:



For crimping, I got a cheap ratchet type crimper afer killing several of the ones made from thin pressings - I end up dishing them when I squeeze the handles.

I have used a high end tensile tester to test crimps made with harbor freight, UL listed and milspec ring terminals and butt connectors with the R/B/Y harbor freight ratchet crimper. It made milspec tensile and UL tensile passing crimps on milspec wire. The HF terminals didnt come close to meeting the UL listing. Cheap wal mart wire, even with good terminals, failed both with both a HF tool and DMC (milspec manufacturer) ratcheting tool. The HF tool closed position hole sizes were within .002 of the DMC IIRC. Sample size tested was one tool of each manufacturer. Two crimps on each combination.

Lord Gaga fucked around with this message at 00:44 on Jul 29, 2012

The Third Man
Nov 5, 2005

I know how much you like ponies so I got you a ponies avatar bro


Black88GTA posted:

Keep driving until you hit Sears or Home Depot. HF is good for some things, but power tools are not one of them.

That said, I have a couple HF power tools and they still work. Then again, I don't use them often.

Ok, thanks for the advice. Would something like this be a good investment? http://www.sears.com/craftsman-19.2...=1&blockType=G1

For those more knowledgeable than I, is there specific voltage/power level I should be looking at?

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

The Third Man posted:

Ok, thanks for the advice. Would something like this be a good investment? http://www.sears.com/craftsman-19.2...=1&blockType=G1

For those more knowledgeable than I, is there specific voltage/power level I should be looking at?

Avoid craftsman. Get a Makita, Milwaukee, or rigid. Lithium ion is the way to go.

Raw_Beef
Jul 2, 2004

We know what you been up to and my advice on that little venture is to pack it in. It won't work. It will all end in tears.

Seconding what Sharkytm said. Also you might consider a cordless impact gun. An impact can be a drill but a drill cant be an impact. Requires quick change bits or a twist tight style adaptor for regular bits.

my milwaulkee M12 pistol style 1/4 impact is a great little tool that i use for everything. A 14 or 18v impact would make a better drill though.

Picked up a Power Probe today. No more running jumper wires to a battery to test components. The PPmk3 has a digital readout for voltage and ohms, woop woop!

Kinda sad that i might retire my faithful craftsman multimeter now, but we'll see how things play out in the shop.

Those were some good ideas on how to avoid tripping the SRS. Wish i had had the authority to discon the batteries in those cars but i wasnt the boss and he had 'his way'
Though without battery voltage i couldnt check for ignition hot wires, so that might not have worked anyhow.

edit: the famous craftsman warranty doesnt apply to anything but their hand tools. And even then i belive there is a catch that if youre professionaly using them, the warranty doesnt apply. That said, a fair amount of my sockets are craftsman. I find their wrenches are too fat though maybe theyve slimmed down, my last craftsman wrenches are over 8 years old.

Raw_Beef fucked around with this message at 05:48 on Jul 29, 2012

peepsalot
Apr 24, 2007

        PEEP THIS...
           BITCH!



The Third Man posted:

Not necessarily auto-related, but I'm making a run out to harbor freight tomorrow afternoon, and I'm thinking about picking up a general around-the-house power drill. Is there generally affordable model that should last me a good long while? I don't want to cheap out since this is the sort of thing I'd like to have for a while, and I'm thinking about building a deck later this summer anyway. I just need something to drill holes and drive screws and not crap out on me after a few months of use.
If you really want affordable and reliable you might consider something corded. Cordless batteries wear down and lose capacity after a few years and sometimes need replacing. With a corded drill you've got full power all the time and you can get something much more powerful than a similarly priced cordless. Especially for a large project like a deck where you could easily run out of juice and not want to wait for a recharge.

sharkytm posted:

Avoid craftsman. Get a Makita, Milwaukee, or rigid. Lithium ion is the way to go.
Agreeing with this except I would add DeWalt to the list too.

If you must go cordless, I would recommend looking into something that uses a Lithium Iron Phosphate aka LiFePO4 battery pack. LiFePO4 is a relatively new battery chemistry type and more robust than a typical lithium ion. I know DeWalt has a couple models that use LiFePO4, not sure if any other brands are doing it at the moment.

bolind
Jun 19, 2005



Pillbug

I live in an apartment complex, with a basement level parking garage. I've pitched the idea of installing a compressor there, ostensibly to air up bicycle and car tires, but maybe I'd like to sneak in the odd air-tool as well.

It'll live in its own little room, with some sort of air line running out to the garage space proper.

What size compressor will I be looking at? Any idea how to limit running time on the actual motor to, say, 9am to 7pm (which is our official "power tools are allowed".) How do I detect a leak and shut it down so it doesn't burn itself up? Oiled or oilless? Is this even feasible?

Raw_Beef
Jul 2, 2004

We know what you been up to and my advice on that little venture is to pack it in. It won't work. It will all end in tears.

bolind posted:

I live in an apartment complex, with a basement level parking garage. I've pitched the idea of installing a compressor there, ostensibly to air up bicycle and car tires, but maybe I'd like to sneak in the odd air-tool as well.

It'll live in its own little room, with some sort of air line running out to the garage space proper.

What size compressor will I be looking at? Any idea how to limit running time on the actual motor to, say, 9am to 7pm (which is our official "power tools are allowed".) How do I detect a leak and shut it down so it doesn't burn itself up? Oiled or oilless? Is this even feasible?

Most shops shut their compressor breakers off at the end of the day to prevent running all night, you could just unplug it.

Theyre loud, you will probably have to build a box with sound deading, and then a vent fan to prevent overheating.

cant reccomend a specific model but just in the last few pages there were some porta-pressors linked.

bolind
Jun 19, 2005



Pillbug

We'd probably need some sort of auto on/off timer thingie as I won't be around to baby it 24/7/365.

Good point on the noise suppression box, I've actually seen one of those at one point. But, like you said, heat issues need to be considered.

Raw_Beef
Jul 2, 2004

We know what you been up to and my advice on that little venture is to pack it in. It won't work. It will all end in tears.

If youre going to run off of regular plug in voltage, not that fancy 220, you could just get a standard timer at your local hardware store and that would take care of it.
Edit: despite being a farily competent auto electrician i know zilch about home/commercial electrical, so i dont know how much load one of said timers can sustain before blowing out or whatever. Look into that before taking a vacation and finding out you burned the apartments down.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Super cheap and really useful tool alert

While posting in MiniFoo's RX7 thread, I once again mentioned one of my favourite tools, Stanley's locking adjustable:



Googling to check the model number and so on showed me it's currently reduced to $11.88 on Amazon. Seriously, buy one, they're great, and that price is ridiculous.

revmoo
May 25, 2006

#basta


The Third Man posted:

Ok, thanks for the advice. Would something like this be a good investment? http://www.sears.com/craftsman-19.2...=1&blockType=G1

For those more knowledgeable than I, is there specific voltage/power level I should be looking at?

No do not get that. That 1/4" impact is only really good for driving bolts into wood around the house. It's probably good at that but it's useless on the car.

Pick a top-tier brand and stick with it. Dewalt, Milwaukee, Makita, Ryobi, etc. Buy a charger/batteries as a separate investment. I own two Lithium batteries and a charger that cost me like $160 or so plus 10-12 tools (Ryobi). Get any drill from one of these brands and get their uprated 1/2" impact. Make sure whatever brand you get supports lithium batteries.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







bolind posted:

We'd probably need some sort of auto on/off timer thingie as I won't be around to baby it 24/7/365.

Good point on the noise suppression box, I've actually seen one of those at one point. But, like you said, heat issues need to be considered.
You don't need to be around it 24/7 if you're only going to use it for pumping up tires and running air tools. Just plug it in when you need to use it.

bolind
Jun 19, 2005



Pillbug

^^^^^^ The concept was that it would be available to the rest of the unwashed masses as well. The timer was just so it didn't made noise during the night. People would then have to use the air in the tank, which should be plenty if they don't abuse it.

Raw_Beef posted:

If youre going to run off of regular plug in voltage, not that fancy 220, you could just get a standard timer at your local hardware store and that would take care of it.
Edit: despite being a farily competent auto electrician i know zilch about home/commercial electrical, so i dont know how much load one of said timers can sustain before blowing out or whatever. Look into that before taking a vacation and finding out you burned the apartments down.

I'm in Europe, we have 230V everywhere

I found a fairly cheap "industrial" timer that'll do 16A (in 230V) so I guess that should suffice.

Raw_Beef
Jul 2, 2004

We know what you been up to and my advice on that little venture is to pack it in. It won't work. It will all end in tears.

16 amps aint poo poo, id expect a compressor to draw way more than that. Most cars made today roll with 60 amp fuses on their main power feed junction box.

Plan it well, like i said there is the possiblity you burn the house down and kill everyone youve ever loved.

Edit: This post is full of pre-coffee massive retardation please ignore everything i said.

Raw_Beef fucked around with this message at 17:17 on Jul 29, 2012

Raluek
Nov 3, 2006

WUT.


Raw_Beef posted:

16 amps aint poo poo, id expect a compressor to draw way more than that. Most cars made today roll with 60 amp fuses on their main power feed junction box.

Plan it well, like i said there is the possiblity you burn the house down and kill everyone youve ever loved.

16A at 230V is much more power than 60A at 12V.

Colonel K
Jun 29, 2009


Most cars don't run 240 volts.

A 16amp 240 should let you run a 3hp compressor which is really the minimum decent size you want if you want to run air tools. Go for the biggest resevoir you can fit in, it's usually not that much more and is just extremely useful to have the extra legs. It also means that you won't have the motor going all the time which may help with the noise problem.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Raw_Beef posted:

16 amps aint poo poo, id expect a compressor to draw way more than that. Most cars made today roll with 60 amp fuses on their main power feed junction box.

I = V/R

16 amps at 240v is 3840 watts. At 12 volts you'd need a 320 amp circuit breaker to handle the same amount of power.

Raw_Beef
Jul 2, 2004

We know what you been up to and my advice on that little venture is to pack it in. It won't work. It will all end in tears.

Listen to these people and not me. I am not good with math, numbers, or anything really.

But seriously, i know Ohm's law, i just wasnt thinking clearly when i woke up and rushed to post on the internet. using voltages above 12-24 is outside my experience so i didnt do the conversions myself, just gut-reaction posted "hurr i use 60 amp fuses 16 is not enough you will die!"

i apologize.

Raw_Beef fucked around with this message at 17:05 on Jul 29, 2012

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

Don't close. Don't close.

Nap Ghost

1hp = ~750watts, so figure 4amps per hp at 230/240V, or double at 120V, and that will give you a decent estimate with some wiggle room built in

bolind
Jun 19, 2005



Pillbug

Well, all the compressors I've looked at had ratings in kW so...

Raw_Beef, even simpler: amps times volts equals watts (A x V = W)*. So the same power (watts) can be had by increasing voltage while dropping amperage, and vice versa.

This is why you 'mercuns stress so much when using more than average juice (welders, compressors, espresso machines). Your 120V is fixed, so the amps go up, and there's a limit to how many amps you can draw through normal house wiring. Meanwhile, I have 13 and 16 amp fuses in my little yuppie flat, but since it's in 230V, I can draw the equivalent of 26/32amps had I had half the voltage (120V-ish).

*In not very rigorous mathematical terms. It's still true, though.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

bolind posted:

This is why you 'mercuns stress so much when using more than average juice (welders, compressors, espresso machines). Your 120V is fixed, so the amps go up, and there's a limit to how many amps you can draw through normal house wiring. Meanwhile, I have 13 and 16 amp fuses in my little yuppie flat, but since it's in 230V, I can draw the equivalent of 26/32amps had I had half the voltage (120V-ish).

*In not very rigorous mathematical terms. It's still true, though.

It's also why most of us have 240v in our shops, and why we run server racks and other large computing installations on 208v. Most of my blade chassis have a couple of 208V 20A 3-phase lines feeding them. Trying to run them with 120V would be madness and require all manner of additional power cables all over the place.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Oh, we can get 415v three-phase if we want, too, but it's not at all common for domestic premises. A proper workshop would normally have it.

If you need occasional compressed air in an area without suitable electrical supply, you could always just get a small engine-drven compressor and only pull it out when you need it. They can be a little privey, though.

echomadman
Aug 24, 2004



Nap Ghost

In Ireland at least despite having 230V mains most professional tools are 120v ones as that's what's required on building sites by safety regs, meaning you have to haul big heavy transformers around with you to run your tools.
Only DIY stuff is 230V, any industrial workplace will be running on 415v 3 phase for bigger equipment like welders, compressors or hydraulic pumps.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Seconding the Milwaukee, Makita, Dewalt, Ridgid recommendation. Specifically I am a fan of the Milwaukee and Makita. I'm also partial to Ryobi for angle grinders.

Right now I've got: Milwaukee 1/2" corded drill (loving amazing), Ridgid 14" abrasive chop saw (pretty good), Makita circular saw (awesome, been dropped off the roof of my house a few times and still kicks rear end), Dewalt 3/8" corded drill (good for most homeowner stuff, I ran out of power while putting a 7/8" ship augur through a 6" oak beam though), a Ryobi compound chop saw for carpentry/construction (has a laser sight, pretty nice especially for the price) and a Milwaukee sawzall that will probably dislocate my elbow, sprain my wrist, or shred a blade before it actually stalls out. I did jam it once, but it pretzeled the blade instead of stopping the motor.

That stanley vise grip / adjustable wrench is in my tool bag, it rarely gets used, but when I need it, it's awesome.

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grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







SNiPER_Magnum posted:

1hp = ~750watts, so figure 4amps per hp at 230/240V, or double at 120V, and that will give you a decent estimate with some wiggle room built in
Motors draw about 6x that for a fraction of a second on start-up, though. Circuit breakers and fuses have trip curves and won't open for it under normal conditions, but cheap timers built for a couple strings of christmas lights may not be able to handle it.

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