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Demie
Apr 2, 2004


BrokenKnucklez posted:

Would a 110 mig be enough? It says up to 3/16 cold steel on one of the mig welders .... I guess that would be frame territory on that size. I have used alot of stick welding though, guess its time to make the switch to MIG and get with the times.

I recently learned to weld on a 110 and it was very adequate. I might want to borrow something beefier for a trailer hitch, but I would be comfortable using it on anything automotive.

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BrokenKnucklez
Apr 22, 2008

by zen death robot


RealKyleH posted:

I've seen 130A 110V MIGs advertising a max material thickness of 1/4"

Sounds good, looks like I will be going down the MIG route. Thanks for the input, when it is received reports will follow. I wish I had my old Forney though. That thing could weld a battleship, or at least a large frigate together. I heard that they were getting stolen though because of the massive amount of copper inside.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


I want to organize all my nuts and bolts, right now I have a bunch just sorta thrown in with everything else. Mostly old metric bolts from my 4.6 and previous 302s but some SAE stuff as well.

Uthor
Jul 9, 2006

Gummy Bear Heaven ... It's where I go when the world is too mean.

RealKyleH posted:

I want to organize all my nuts and bolts, right now I have a bunch just sorta thrown in with everything else. Mostly old metric bolts from my 4.6 and previous 302s but some SAE stuff as well.

I'm totally getting something like this once I get enough stuff to warrant the cost and space:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=94375

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Uthor posted:

I'm totally getting something like this once I get enough stuff to warrant the cost and space:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=94375

I could certainly justify the cost as that would pay for itself in not having to buy 20 bolts or if I needed higher strength grade 5 or 8 bolts not having to buy 10 bolts. However, a lot of my bolts are considerably longer than 4-5/8. The plastic parts bins are awesome but very expensive for holding bolts. I don't really want to spend $40 for 40 storage places.

McCune
Mar 25, 2003
"HAS VEGETABLE SALTY

Does anyone know of a good company to use to calibrate torque wrenches (especially near Oklahoma City)? I have one that I know is off, and another older model that I'm not sure of (both are click-type). I thought at one time someone here worked for a company that does it. Thanks in advance.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Uthor posted:

I'm totally getting something like this once I get enough stuff to warrant the cost and space:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=94375

I just got one like that for Christmas. Holy poo poo is it nice not having my random bolts and other leftovers strewn all over the garage.

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


IOwnCalculus posted:

I just got one like that for Christmas. Holy poo poo is it nice not having my random bolts and other leftovers strewn all over the garage.

Don't you have a fender and some baggies to store your bolts?

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Ya know that might not be a bad solution in the mean time. I could pick up a set of those sticky labels and print them out for easy identification.

oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


Those disposable tupperware containers are nearly as cheap, and stackable.

Or just buy a car, like mine, that only uses 4 or 5 bolt types and throw everything in one bin.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





frozenphil posted:

Don't you have a fender and some baggies to store your bolts?



That was my previous storage solution, except that my fender can run and be legally driven

Except right now, because I need to put on two new front tires and get a new battery...

ease
Jul 19, 2004

HUGE

I think one of the best additions I made to my garage was a 2x3' adjustable rolling tray.

meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



RealKyleH posted:

Agreed. Used, cheap, whatever. I really like the cheap HF hanging kit. I bought two and have a bit left over.

I went with slatwall. I really should add some pictures to show. It's MDF with slats routed in it, the same thing you see in retail stores. It allows a lot more flexibility than pegboard and gives a much more finished look.

Tip: If you still have a Linens-n-Things near you, they are going out of business and will sell their fixtures. I bought their towel aisle... yes, the whole loving aisle... for $200. I fully shelved- and slatwalled the garage and had 20' of extra 9' high shelving to cut down for use in my crawl spaces.

While I'm thinking of it, I'll take some pictures now and add to this thread.

Edit:

Yes, I know I need to finish the rest of the walls/ceilings and I need to finish the stereo wiring and clean my poo poo up, but oh well.







The amount of material I got for $200 is amazing. It weighed a ton (literally) and allowed me to maximize the limited space I have in the garage.

meatpimp fucked around with this message at 23:14 on Jan 5, 2009

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


IOwnCalculus posted:

That was my previous storage solution, except that my fender can run and be legally driven

Except right now, because I need to put on two new front tires and get a new battery...

My car runs, is registered, and is insured. Legally I can drive it on the roads in Alabama since we don't have any of those pansy safety or emissions checks. Suck it down.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





frozenphil posted:

My car runs, is registered, and is insured. Legally I can drive it on the roads in Alabama since we don't have any of those pansy safety or emissions checks. Suck it down.

So, why are you posting on the internet instead of driving?

And while I usually don't mind that we don't have safety checks locally (my Volvo would probably fail on a few technicalities), every time I walk by a late-model truck in a parking lot on 20"+ wheels with tires showing cord, or see a car that's clearly taken a hard hit to one corner with no repairs, I rethink my opinion.

Bringing the thread back on topic, I think I might need to swap out the bench grinder I got for Christmas. The drat thing vibrates like hell when on, especially while it's spinning up - worse than my dad's 25-year-old grinder did when I finally bought him a new one for Christmas two years ago. I might try removing the wheels first, though, since it looks like one or both is out of round...I want a wirebrush wheel anyway.

Rhyno
Mar 22, 2003

Psst! It's me!
The Sinister with the mutant gene.


meatpimp posted:

The amount of material I got for $200 is amazing. It weighed a ton (literally) and allowed me to maximize the limited space I have in the garage.

Slatwall is fantastic and wouldn't you know it there's an L&T going under in the mall I work at. I think I'll pay them a visit tomorrow.

meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



Rhyno posted:

Slatwall is fantastic and wouldn't you know it there's an L&T going under in the mall I work at. I think I'll pay them a visit tomorrow.

You can't see from the pictures, but I had slatwall originally over my workbench only. I got that from a local retail supply place last year. It is "standard" slatwall which just has the grooves routed into the MDF. The Linens-n-Things slatwall has nice extruded aluminum channel inserted into each of the slots... that adds a ton of strength and finishes the wall nicely. Plus, if you price those aluminum channels themselves, you're looking at way over what I paid for the entire aisle.

In fact, the local store about made me sick. All of the stores are in the hands of liquidators and the liquidator here decided to abandon the lease, leaving 2/3 of the store intact... the owners of the property will probably pay someone to dispose of the rest... such a waste.

I was there the day before it was abandoned, so everything was free. I walked away with hundreds of slatwall hangers, fixtures, shelves, all kinds of stuff. Probably the best $200 I'll ever spend.

Oh yeah -- it's all negotiation. Ask at the front who is from the liquidators and talk to them about what you want to purchase. Cash talks and it's all cash-and-carry. It took me several hours to disassemble the aisle in the store and several more to load into the truck and haul away.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

meatpimp posted:

You can't see from the pictures, but I had slatwall originally over my workbench only. I got that from a local retail supply place last year. It is "standard" slatwall which just has the grooves routed into the MDF. The Linens-n-Things slatwall has nice extruded aluminum channel inserted into each of the slots... that adds a ton of strength and finishes the wall nicely. Plus, if you price those aluminum channels themselves, you're looking at way over what I paid for the entire aisle.

In fact, the local store about made me sick. All of the stores are in the hands of liquidators and the liquidator here decided to abandon the lease, leaving 2/3 of the store intact... the owners of the property will probably pay someone to dispose of the rest... such a waste.

I was there the day before it was abandoned, so everything was free. I walked away with hundreds of slatwall hangers, fixtures, shelves, all kinds of stuff. Probably the best $200 I'll ever spend.

Oh yeah -- it's all negotiation. Ask at the front who is from the liquidators and talk to them about what you want to purchase. Cash talks and it's all cash-and-carry. It took me several hours to disassemble the aisle in the store and several more to load into the truck and haul away.

I bought 2 4T8x4' fluorescent fixtures, 12 of the heavy duty metal shelves that attach to rails that screw into 2x4's, and 5x8' lengths of the rail for $107 inc. tax. The lights were $20 apiece ($50 each at HD, without commercial-grade ballasts), the shelves were $6 apiece, the rail was free with the shelves. I'll get off my rear end and get some pictures of what I mounted in my garage.

I looked at the slatwall, and didn't like it that much. I also didn't have enough time or space in the Fit to carry it. I tested some of it, and it seemed unfit to carry heavy stuff. I could bend the hangers with one hand pulling down. My metal shelving can handle my full 250lb weight.

Kynetx
Jan 8, 2003


Full of ignorant tribalism. Kinda sad.


meatpimp posted:

Yes, I know I need to finish the rest of the walls/ceilings and I need to finish the stereo wiring and clean my poo poo up, but oh well.

Says who? This is AI, not The Automotive Practicality and Wainscoting Appreciatorium.

meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



Kynetx posted:

Says who? This is AI, not The Automotive Practicality and Wainscoting Appreciatorium.

Then I'm in the wrong place.

sharkytm -- lighting is next on the list. I've got some room to work now, but two bare bulbs and two door opener bulbs do NOT give sufficient light... I'll probably end up with two 2-bulb or two 4-bulb fixtures where the bulbs are now.

I don't mean to derail this thread... isn't there a garage thread? I can't seem to find it.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Lighting are tools too! I have two 2 bulb flourescents haning in my garage and find that they are night bright enough for my two car garage. (One is in the middle, one is over my work bench.) I also don't like the white light near as much as the standard light bulbs and they are not near as bright as the standard 60 or 100W bulbs that are in the garage door motor.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



How important is it to bleed the air out of the top of the grease gun? I got this model and I started rounding the flathead slot a bit; couldn't get the air bleeder valve to budge at all. I put in a cartridge instead of bulk grease, if that matters.

The grease came out through the coupler just fine, but I imagine you need the air gone to get actual high PSI?

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Well, I finally uploaded my pictures of the garage. A few are old, and reposts from the Civic thread.
This was the North Wall when I moved in.

Drywall and R-13 insulation:

Painted with el-cheapo primer and semi-gloss paint, LnT Shelving installed, plus one 8' 4x4' T8 fixture badly installed (I need to run conduit and do it right:

The rail used for the shelving (free with shelves at LnT):

My Wheel/Tire rack


My new toolbox from HF... seriously well made, probably 80% of the quality of Snap-On, and only $340 with coupon.

LnT fluorescents installed in the woodshop/workroom (soon to be converted to a wall switch instead of a cord.

Cabinets from Freecycle installed (the dark ones came with the house)



My compressor is still in the corner, not hooked up, no air lines, and basically useless. I need to get on that soon. I'm going to run a single copper line down the middle of the garage, with taps in the workroom, in the garage, and one outside, for filling tires and such.

Mooecow
Aug 2, 2005



I need a couple of tool recommendations. I am coming into a 1953 Chevy pickup as a project that has been sitting for over 30 years. Needlessly to say, the frame and components have plenty of rusty parts. Rather than buying new replacement parts, I am looking into media blasting them.

Can anyone recommend a decent air compressor and blaster combo that wont break the bank? There is a Harbor Freight nearby, are their compressors any good?

A pic of the truck for your troubles:

Truck Pic

ACEofsnett
Feb 19, 2007

FILTHY CASUAL | CONSOLE PEASANT

Mooecow posted:

I need a couple of tool recommendations. I am coming into a 1953 Chevy pickup as a project that has been sitting for over 30 years. Needlessly to say, the frame and components have plenty of rusty parts. Rather than buying new replacement parts, I am looking into media blasting them.

Can anyone recommend a decent air compressor and blaster combo that wont break the bank? There is a Harbor Freight nearby, are their compressors any good?

A pic of the truck for your troubles:

Truck Pic

I've had good luck with the harbor freight Air compressor I picked up like 8 months ago - it hasn't had any issues, even in my often freezing cold garage. However - sandblasting requires a huge and CONSTANT supply of air. Soda blasting requires that, and more. Think massive CFM screw-powered compressors. Even a 100 gallon+ piston powered air compressor will be running almost constantly while sandblasting, and that's simply assuming you are using a small cabinet, not a free-standing compressor. Go the cabinet route if you have small parts, otherwise plan on being very annoyed waiting for your compressor to catch up. Lot's of places will do very cheap soda / sand blasting for you if you have a bare body or frame. Some will even come to you if you go the soda route. They will just blast the thing you want blasted and the soda simply washes away in the next rain.

Also - Can someone recommend me a decent welder to start repairing panels with? How are the harbor freight mig's? Decent? I really want to get into welding repair panels, but I'm not sure where to start.


frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


ACEofsnett posted:

I've had good luck with the harbor freight Air compressor I picked up like 8 months ago - it hasn't had any issues, even in my often freezing cold garage. However - sandblasting requires a huge and CONSTANT supply of air. Soda blasting requires that, and more. Think massive CFM screw-powered compressors. Even a 100 gallon+ piston powered air compressor will be running almost constantly while sandblasting, and that's simply assuming you are using a small cabinet, not a free-standing compressor. Go the cabinet route if you have small parts, otherwise plan on being very annoyed waiting for your compressor to catch up. Lot's of places will do very cheap soda / sand blasting for you if you have a bare body or frame. Some will even come to you if you go the soda route. They will just blast the thing you want blasted and the soda simply washes away in the next rain.

Also - Can someone recommend me a decent welder to start repairing panels with? How are the harbor freight mig's? Decent? I really want to get into welding repair panels, but I'm not sure where to start.

Agreeing with this. A compressor that can keep up with the demands of sandblasting an entire vehicle will run you tens of thousands of dollars; then you need to purchase the actual sandblasting stuff. If you try to use one of those little spot blasters you will want to kill yourself after the first hour it takes you to blast a quarter of a fender that you just warped to poo poo from the heat.

Strip the truck down to the frame and body shell, find a local blaster, and haul it in to them. You should be able to get both done for around $500 to $750. I got my Mustang blasted for $400 because I went in during a slow time. If you want them to do a really good job, consider buying, renting, or building a rotisserie for your body so they can get all over the thing. They more than likely won't provide you one and will just shoot the body as it sits, not shooting any parts they can't get to easily.

ACEofsnett: This Miller 180 is a good deal. It takes standard 1 phase 230v power, but it will do anything you will ever need a welder to do. Cheap welders suck tremendously and you won't learn very well on them. Buy the right tool the first time so you can actually learn how to weld instead of fighting the machine the entire time. 115v welders are fine if you don't want to pay an electrician to put in another 230 outlet for you. I just like the flexibility of a 230v outlet/welder.

It's important to note that I am in the Miller camp. I think their welders are superior to Lincoln, but opinions and assholes and all that. I just know that I've never seen someone who welds for their paycheck use anything other than a Miller.

destructo
Apr 29, 2006


Just poppin in to say that you can get two cans of Kroil for $12 shipped! In my experience, it's at least better than PB Blaster. Not a bad deal if you ask me.

http://www.kanolabs.com/google/

ACEofsnett
Feb 19, 2007

FILTHY CASUAL | CONSOLE PEASANT

frozenphil posted:

Agreeing with this. A compressor that can keep up with the demands of sandblasting an entire vehicle will run you tens of thousands of dollars; then you need to purchase the actual sandblasting stuff. If you try to use one of those little spot blasters you will want to kill yourself after the first hour it takes you to blast a quarter of a fender that you just warped to poo poo from the heat.

Strip the truck down to the frame and body shell, find a local blaster, and haul it in to them. You should be able to get both done for around $500 to $750. I got my Mustang blasted for $400 because I went in during a slow time. If you want them to do a really good job, consider buying, renting, or building a rotisserie for your body so they can get all over the thing. They more than likely won't provide you one and will just shoot the body as it sits, not shooting any parts they can't get to easily.

ACEofsnett: This Miller 180 is a good deal. It takes standard 1 phase 230v power, but it will do anything you will ever need a welder to do. Cheap welders suck tremendously and you won't learn very well on them. Buy the right tool the first time so you can actually learn how to weld instead of fighting the machine the entire time. 115v welders are fine if you don't want to pay an electrician to put in another 230 outlet for you. I just like the flexibility of a 230v outlet/welder.

It's important to note that I am in the Miller camp. I think their welders are superior to Lincoln, but opinions and assholes and all that. I just know that I've never seen someone who welds for their paycheck use anything other than a Miller.

Not disregarding what you said, but I just don't have that kind of money. As a reasonable alternative, would this work for minor panel repair and fabrication : http://providence.craigslist.org/tls/989247404.html ? I really don't know anything about welding.


frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


ACEofsnett posted:

Not disregarding what you said, but I just don't have that kind of money. As a reasonable alternative, would this work for minor panel repair and fabrication : http://providence.craigslist.org/tls/989247404.html ? I really don't know anything about welding.

If you just want to melt some poo poo together any old thing will work. If you want to have a quality piece of equipment that you don't have to fight against to get the job done and that will last your lifetime, you have to pay for it. It's up to you. Spend a hundred dollars every time you want to do a job or spend $800 once and have a tool that will work well for the rest of your life.

Vin BioEthanol
Jan 18, 2002

by Ralp


sharkytm posted:


Here's the breakdown:
If its electronic, and spins, it'll be junk.


I bought 2 $40 or $50 orange colored electric impact wrenches at HF last year for my dad and brother for christmas. They use them all the time and I've had to borrow them a few times and they were always great.

I bought a blue orbital sander there that broke the second time I used it.But it was like $7. And the only thing that broke were the mounts in the plastic sanding pad that hold the sandpaper clips on, so the clips fell off. I can still use it I'm just limited to the more expensive glue-backed sandpaper.

edit: oh and I bought a $30 obdII code reader "creader" there that has survived 2 oklahoma summers sitting inside the console of a black non-tinted car. It just shows the 5 digit code itself, you have to look in a book or the internet to see what it means.

A note to anyone considering an electric impact, make sure you look at and hold one in person, don't just order off the internet without ever having seen one. They're seriously huge, think about the biggest drill you've ever held and add 25%-50%. I'm holding out for air one when I get a comp sometime. too many places an electric wouldn't fit that an air would. I've been fortunate that the last few things I've done that absolutely required impact were things that I could take off the car and use my brother or dads electric impact on them.

And I'll have to add my love for the $15 central pneumatic air hammer HF sells. I thought I was going to have to call a tow truck and pay a huge bill at a shop this weekend when I thought I'd hammer my steering idler arm out of my center link with a 16oz claw hammer and replace it. It didn't happen and I completely destroyed the threads on the ballstud beating it with the hammer so the nut wasn't going to go back on. I borrowed a $129 central pneumatic 8 gallon harbor freight compressor from a friend, I ran a wedged air hammer chisel between the idler and the center link a few times and it just popped open like a goons already stretched belt at an all you can eat buffet.

Vin BioEthanol fucked around with this message at 22:29 on Jan 13, 2009

CatBus
May 12, 2001

Who wants a mustache ride?

frozenphil posted:

Agreeing with this. A compressor that can keep up with the demands of sandblasting an entire vehicle will run you tens of thousands of dollars; then you need to purchase the actual sandblasting stuff. If you try to use one of those little spot blasters you will want to kill yourself after the first hour it takes you to blast a quarter of a fender that you just warped to poo poo from the heat.

I'll have to disagree here. You can get a 15hp IR unit, pumping ~50ACFM @175PSI for ~$3.5k. Pretty much anything over 7.5hp is going to be three phase, ruling out many residential users, but that isn't the argument. The price is WAY less than tens of thousands of dollars, and I guarantee that no professional, let alone portable professional, setup requires more air than that.

I've done a few hundred hours of blasting using my 7.5hp unit (single phase), which is pushing 26ACFM @175psi, and it can catch up like I'm not even using air, when I'm sandblasting.

I'm not saying the guy should do it himself, but it's certainly not out of the question to buy a decent compressor that can put out WAY more air than you will ever use.

CatBus fucked around with this message at 23:01 on Jan 13, 2009

oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


The local redneck garage has a SBC they use for sandblasting. Cut the fuel(but not air) to four cylinders, connect the "exhaust" of those four to a manifold with a fuckoff big turbo wastegate to adjust pressure, run that to your air hose.

User Error
Aug 31, 2006


oxbrain posted:

The local redneck garage has a SBC they use for sandblasting. Cut the fuel(but not air) to four cylinders, connect the "exhaust" of those four to a manifold with a fuckoff big turbo wastegate to adjust pressure, run that to your air hose.

That is such a idea

frozenphil
Mar 13, 2003

YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE SO BIG THAT 80 GRIT CAN'T FIX IT!


CatBus posted:

I'll have to disagree here. You can get a 15hp IR unit, pumping ~50ACFM @175PSI for ~$3.5k. Pretty much anything over 7.5hp is going to be three phase, ruling out many residential users, but that isn't the argument. The price is WAY less than tens of thousands of dollars, and I guarantee that no professional, let alone portable professional, setup requires more air than that.

I've done a few hundred hours of blasting using my 7.5hp unit (single phase), which is pushing 26ACFM @175psi, and it can catch up like I'm not even using air, when I'm sandblasting.

I'm not saying the guy should do it himself, but it's certainly not out of the question to buy a decent compressor that can put out WAY more air than you will ever use.

I didn't realize those IR units had fallen in price that much. At any rate, they aren't really economical for home use for a single project and that compressor will be overkill for basically anything you will ever do at home. The point still stands that having a shop do it is the smarter idea.

Nerobro
Nov 4, 2005

Rider now with 100% more titanium!


chem42 posted:

That is such a idea
you have no idea. There was a tractor company, that had a four, or six cylinder engine in the tractor. Two cylinders were a compressor, and the tractor had built in air tanks.

EnergizerFellow
Oct 11, 2005

More drunk than a barrel of monkeys

frozenphil posted:

Strip the truck down to the frame and body shell, find a local blaster, and haul it in to them. You should be able to get both done for around $500 to $750. I got my Mustang blasted for $400 because I went in during a slow time. If you want them to do a really good job, consider buying, renting, or building a rotisserie for your body so they can get all over the thing. They more than likely won't provide you one and will just shoot the body as it sits, not shooting any parts they can't get to easily.
This needs to be quoted as you really need a rotisserie. If you do buy one, you can get most of your money back on Craigslist, eBay, etc when you're done.

New one from Northern Tool for $950:
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/...30851_200330851

Wagonburner posted:

I bought 2 $40 or $50 orange colored electric impact wrenches at HF last year for my dad and brother for christmas. They use them all the time and I've had to borrow them a few times and they were always great.

[...]

A note to anyone considering an electric impact, make sure you look at and hold one in person, don't just order off the internet without ever having seen one. They're seriously huge, think about the biggest drill you've ever held and add 25%-50%. I'm holding out for air one when I get a comp sometime. too many places an electric wouldn't fit that an air would. I've been fortunate that the last few things I've done that absolutely required impact were things that I could take off the car and use my brother or dads electric impact on them.
Try looking into the Milwaukee electric impacts as they are significantly smaller and lighter than the HF units. I've owned a couple and they have been great for me and will put down an honest 300+ ft-lbs. Then again, that's the difference between a $150 impact and a $50 one.

Speaking of electric impacts, anybody try the Ingersoll Rand IQv cordless tools? They make what looks like the only true cordless impact ratchet that I can find with a small head and square drive.

http://www.irtools.com/IS/product.aspx-en-21718

EvilCrayon
Dec 30, 2007


I'm looking for tools to start working on cars again. I used to use my friend's tool's or my dad's tools when I lived at home but now that my friend is in another state, I need some tools! I'm on a pretty low budget but I still want tools that last. I've been looking at getting a couple small pieces from snap-on or matco. Not too much but the bare minimum for working on cars.

I was thinking of some 1/2 sockets from craftsman and a snap-on socket wrench. Stuff like that.

I know there are some basic toolkits from Craftsman but how is the quality on those?

angryhampster
Oct 21, 2005



destructo posted:

Just poppin in to say that you can get two cans of Kroil for $12 shipped! In my experience, it's at least better than PB Blaster. Not a bad deal if you ask me.

http://www.kanolabs.com/google/

Good god..an aerosol solvent stronger than PB scares me. PB dripped down into my eye off a bolt once. I've never felt anything sting my eye that badly.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


EvilCrayon posted:

I'm looking for tools to start working on cars again. I used to use my friend's tool's or my dad's tools when I lived at home but now that my friend is in another state, I need some tools! I'm on a pretty low budget but I still want tools that last. I've been looking at getting a couple small pieces from snap-on or matco. Not too much but the bare minimum for working on cars.

I was thinking of some 1/2 sockets from craftsman and a snap-on socket wrench. Stuff like that.

I know there are some basic toolkits from Craftsman but how is the quality on those?

Craftsman are fine. In 4-5 years of working on cars/other things casually I have only broken one socket and my craftsman set is used from a garage sale. I've worn out 2-3 ratchets over that time but I keep like 3-4 of each kind around so it was never a problem, I just returned them later. They're of decent quality again mine were used so who knows how long they've lasted. The nice thing about craftsman is every moving sale has a set for sale and if you offer to just buy all their tools you can get killer deals and any rusty sockets or worn out wrenches you can return.

Air tools and stuff you can get from harbor freight although you might need a better air ratchet than theirs. I don't have theirs but I have a cheap one and I only bust it ou8t if I am doing a longer job because its kinda clunky and doesn't fit places that well. I also have a retarded loud compressor.

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Demie
Apr 2, 2004


ACEofsnett posted:

I've had good luck with the harbor freight Air compressor I picked up like 8 months ago - it hasn't had any issues, even in my often freezing cold garage. However - sandblasting requires a huge and CONSTANT supply of air.

What this guy said. I tried sandblasting only my wheels on an old full-sized non-HF compressor (don't recall the maker), and it just couldn't keep up at all. I could blast for 15-30 seconds and then wait 3 minutes for it to fill up again. If you're doing blasting of any kind, you need a serious compressor and not something that's barely good enough to fill your tires. This experience is why I never bought a cheapo compressor. I'm still tryna make up my mind on a real compressor that I can do reasonable work with.

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