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AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


I was thinking of doing a tensile test of HF's crimpers on some cheap HF ring terminals since I have the testing equipment available for free. Since automotive applications and installations typically don't use expensive shielded cable, worry about voltage drop, or have the need for real precise gaging like aerospace does, all of these tools should perform more than adequately. Ill be using some parts store wire and Im not sure which wire stripper.

Planning on comparing this:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=97420


To the ultra cheap and basic:


(Which I could find a comparable tool of on the HF website even though im 100% positive I've bought one there before)

and maybe this:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=36411


Which I think is making an attempt at being the M22520/24 tool:
https://assist.daps.dla.mil/quickse...nt_number=15454

EDIT
If I'm in the mood and have the tools/terminals/wire I may even try some with the HX4 and DCT4 Daniels tools although I wouldn't be surprised for a simple tensile test of cheaply manufactured wire and terminals to see the DCT4 and HF ratcheting tool perform similarly.

Oh and holy crap:
http://cgi.ebay.com/Mil-Spec-Daniel...=item2a04124fc5

This tool is $200+ die sets (another $100) new

AnomalousBoners fucked around with this message at 02:31 on Jan 16, 2010

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sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

I've done literally hundreds, if not a thousand crimps with the HF tool on various boats. It works as well or better than anything I've found. The only issue is that it doesn't come with the other dies. There's a set on Amazon that does:
http://www.amazon.com/Tool-Aid-1892...17&sr=8-1-spell

Pretty drat good deal if you have to do thicker wire, use uninsulated crimps, or use micro-crimps.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


I'm gonna check if their dies are interchangeable with the DMC dies.

jammyozzy
Dec 7, 2006

Is that a challenge?

My Google skills are failing me, does anybody in the UK know where I can get hold of a set of spline drive sockets in a real brick and mortar store? If you cold narrow it down to Berkshire that'd be a bonus. I was planning on swapping out the driveshaft on my Polo tomorrow, but didn't realise until just now that the thing is held onto the diff with spline bolts.

jammyozzy fucked around with this message at 22:11 on Jan 16, 2010

echomadman
Aug 24, 2004



Nap Ghost

jammyozzy posted:

My Google skills are failing me, does anybody in the UK know where I can get hold of a set of spline drive sockets in a real brick and mortar store? If you cold narrow it down to Berkshire that'd be a bonus. I was planning on swapping out the driveshaft on my Polo tomorrow, but didn't realise until just now that the thing is held onto the diff with spline bolts.

Where's your nearest halfords?
http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/...tegoryId_165469

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


jammyozzy posted:

My Google skills are failing me, does anybody in the UK know where I can get hold of a set of spline drive sockets in a real brick and mortar store? If you cold narrow it down to Berkshire that'd be a bonus. I was planning on swapping out the driveshaft on my Polo tomorrow, but didn't realise until just now that the thing is held onto the diff with spline bolts.
When you say "spline drive" I assume you mean Torx-style six-lobe? Internal or external? Like echomadman said, try Halfords, their tools are pretty good, or you can try Machine Mart.

jammyozzy
Dec 7, 2006

Is that a challenge?

God drat, I forgot Halfords even existed. That's exactly what I'm after I think, thanks.

The bolts look like Torx-style ones, but with 12 lobes, internal. The Haynes manual calls them spline bolts so I just took the name from that.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


jammyozzy posted:

The bolts look like Torx-style ones, but with 12 lobes, internal. The Haynes manual calls them spline bolts so I just took the name from that.
Hmm.

I think the fasteners should be 6-lobe interface - Haynes won't say "Torx" because it's someone's trade name.

If you do have 12 sharply-defined points, like a 12-point ring spanner, that's different. Same if they're square-profile splines.

EDIT: Well, pissflaps. Did some Googling. Looks like they're actually XZN triple-squares: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triple_square. Doubt Halfords have them, but Euro Car Parts or German, Swedish & French should be able to sort you out.

InitialDave fucked around with this message at 23:32 on Jan 16, 2010

jammyozzy
Dec 7, 2006

Is that a challenge?

Gimme a minute, I'll grab a camera.

*Edit* Or not, I'll go on another hunt for sockets.

Urge to kill...rising....

*Edit 3* Bollocks to this, I think I'll just order one from snap-on and do the work next weekend.

jammyozzy fucked around with this message at 00:13 on Jan 17, 2010

MATLAB 1988
Sep 20, 2009
Have I posted about my Subaru XT yet? Here are pictures of my Subaru XT. POST POST POST.



I picked up this 5 drawer toolbox/cart for $99 from Harbor Freight today. It's 100 lbs, pretty sturdy. About 50 bolts assembles it and foam mats are included for every drawer. It came with the keys locked in it, I had to pop the top drawer open with a screwdriver.

Wombot
Sep 11, 2001
Nerf herder


I've decided that I'd really like a good electric screwdriver, preferably one that can take/use thin bits for reaching in small areas. Any recommendations?

JonReremy
Jun 8, 2009

Stiffly penetrating a new era of "bizarro" porn genre


Well, I've been a technician for about a year and half now, so I thought it was about time to buy my own tools. Being that there is no money in the automotive technician profession, I've finally saved up enough money for a couple of months to buy some decent tools.

Here's what I got:

Mac Tools AW5500M 1/2" impact wrench- A couple of other techs at work have this wrench and I love it. It's loud as hell, powerful, light, and I got it at the right price after my Mac Tools guy let it go for $215. Not a bad deal at all.

Ingersoll-Rand 2115Ti 3/8" impact wrench- Ordered from Amazon. Another coworker has an IR 3/8" and I use it all the time too.

Harbor Freight 1/2" impact socket set. Nothing real special here. 10mm to 32mm. I got both sets in metric and standard. Also got the 3/8" impact sockets in metric and standard.

Some cheapass HF screwdrivers

Gearwrench socket set
http://www.amazon.com/GearWrench-80...3697817&sr=1-12

Gearwrench 16 piece XL set
http://www.amazon.com/Wrench-85099-...63698083&sr=1-5

Megillah Gorilla
Sep 22, 2003

One Potato to rule them all,
One Potato to find them,
One Potato to bring them all
And in the darkness bind them.





Bread Liar

RealKyleH posted:

To the ultra cheap and basic:

I had this. It sucked arse. I threw it out.

To be fair, it did the job. It just didn't make it easy. The lack of spring loading made using it a chore and it never stripped in one go, I always had to fiddle about with it.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Gorilla Salad posted:

I had this. It sucked arse. I threw it out.

To be fair, it did the job. It just didn't make it easy. The lack of spring loading made using it a chore and it never stripped in one go, I always had to fiddle about with it.
I always bend the bloody things. Not my fault, monkey bastard hands.

I found one of those ratcheting types at a car show cheap (8), and while it's not perfect, it's much better.

Kynetx
Jan 8, 2003


Full of ignorant tribalism. Kinda sad.


I use the Thomas and Betts version of that same crimper at work. I really, really like them:


http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/ww...000&N=0&sst=All

I also have a set of much better ratcheting crimpers with replaceable dies that I use if I've got my whole crash cart full of tools:


http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/3KF66?Pid=search

Between the two, I'd rather go with the one above. It strips, it's smaller and lighter (a big plus when your Kennedy tool box weighs 35 lbs empty) and doesn't require die changes. The second one is marginally better, but I'm not working on the Space Shuttle where that kind of precision is necessary.

Rhyno
Mar 22, 2003

Psst! It's me!
The Sinister with the mutant gene.


MATLAB 1988 posted:



I picked up this 5 drawer toolbox/cart for $99 from Harbor Freight today. It's 100 lbs, pretty sturdy. About 50 bolts assembles it and foam mats are included for every drawer. It came with the keys locked in it, I had to pop the top drawer open with a screwdriver.

Are you impressed with it? I have the 3 shelf cart that I've been customizing but that badboy looks like a better solution.

This morning I picked up a set of wheel dollies for $31 after sale and coupons. Gonna run back at 4 for some cheap impact sets.

MATLAB 1988
Sep 20, 2009
Have I posted about my Subaru XT yet? Here are pictures of my Subaru XT. POST POST POST.

Rhyno posted:

Are you impressed with it? I have the 3 shelf cart that I've been customizing but that badboy looks like a better solution.

This morning I picked up a set of wheel dollies for $31 after sale and coupons. Gonna run back at 4 for some cheap impact sets.

I am impressed with it, I believe the drawers have ball bearing slides, everything seems real sturdy and I've loaded it up with a few hundred pounds of tools already. No flex in the body and the drawers work great. The lock is cheezy so I removed it, the casters & handle are good. I sperg'd and applied wax and dymo labels to it already! The black one includes non-slip liners in each drawer.

I had outgrown my three drawer cart that I got for $30 at HF, which I added non-slip liners to. I've seen one where an owner replaced the second tray with an intermediate tool chest, but the black cart is bigger overall and holds all of my tools. I ziptied the three drawer cart to the back side of the black cart to make a SuperCart, to have absolutely everything in one place.

Kynetx
Jan 8, 2003


Full of ignorant tribalism. Kinda sad.


If Dymo labels are wrong (I use P-Touch) I don't want to be right.

scapulataf
Jul 18, 2007

by Ozmaugh


I'm not complaining, I like to talk tools as much as the next red blooded, beer swilling, tooth losing, knuckle scraping, hand cutting, lord cursing guy but it seems that this thread has degraded into a big harbour freight ad.
Now that I've gotten that out of the way, carry on.

For content. What is a good material for drill bits?
At work we've got a half dozen sets of bits with the smallest ones missing (broken) and tons of bent, and generally hosed up bits.
Some are HSS, some are titanium coated, some cobalt, some are probably coated with jizz. Understood that they aren't indestructible, and need to be sharpened periodically, But what should I be looking for in a set of drill bits? I'm not going to spend a thousand bucks on a set, but I want to buy some that are going to work and last.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Harbor Freight tools are what most people can afford. That said HF drill bits suck and the coatings suck. Don't get them.

What are you doing with the drill bits? Application is very important to this question. What materials and are the materials rigidly mounted (in a vise/fixture in a mill/lathe) The answer will probably be cobalt or carbide.

AnomalousBoners fucked around with this message at 14:00 on Jan 19, 2010

CornHolio
May 20, 2001



Toilet Rascal

In my experience, Harbor Freight tools are built cheap, but in most cases are still 'good enough' for the shadetree mechanic.

Actually my shop gets a lot of our tools from Harbor Freight, too, though I have seen a number get broken. I wouldn't get sockets or spanners from HF but for a lot of other things you really can't go wrong with their prices.

Kynetx
Jan 8, 2003


Full of ignorant tribalism. Kinda sad.


CornHolio posted:

In my experience, Harbor Freight tools are built cheap, but in most cases are still 'good enough' for the shadetree mechanic.

Actually my shop gets a lot of our tools from Harbor Freight, too, though I have seen a number get broken. I wouldn't get sockets or spanners from HF but for a lot of other things you really can't go wrong with their prices.

Huh, must be really variable. I've had REALLY good luck with their hand tools.


Aaanyway, I think a lot of people go and drill steel with the drill motor set to the highest speed and without any oil. Best way to dull a bit and blue the work.
I've had decent luck with Black and Decker titanium nitride coated bits as long as I use oil. On a 1/2" hole I'll start with 1/8" or 1/4" and work my way up progressively. If I get impatient I'll let the bit bite off a little too much steel and snap, but that result is due more to my own stupidity.

ab0z
Jun 28, 2008

by angerbotSD


Kynetx posted:

Huh, must be really variable. I've had REALLY good luck with their hand tools.


Aaanyway, I think a lot of people go and drill steel with the drill motor set to the highest speed and without any oil. Best way to dull a bit and blue the work.
I've had decent luck with Black and Decker titanium nitride coated bits as long as I use oil. On a 1/2" hole I'll start with 1/8" or 1/4" and work my way up progressively. If I get impatient I'll let the bit bite off a little too much steel and snap, but that result is due more to my own stupidity.

What kind of oil should I use?

Money Walrus
Sep 2, 2007


ab0z posted:

What kind of oil should I use?

Cutting fluid!

ab0z
Jun 28, 2008

by angerbotSD


Money Walrus posted:

Cutting fluid!

I was not aware of such a thing, but there are many things I am not aware of. What sort of stores would carry this magical bit saving invention?

Chubby Checker
Mar 27, 2004
David Hasselhoff Fanboi

Is there a fastenal or grainger near you? Don't get the kobalt cutting fluid from lowes, I'm pretty sure its just 3in1 oil. I use tap magic pro and can drill stainless with out dulling a harbor freight ti coated bit. You can also get it from enco for pretty cheap online.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Money Walrus posted:

Cutting fluid!
I like Rocol stuff, mainly because it looks like Predator blood.

Also, the trick to a good-cutting drill is having the correct grinding on the tip. Doesn't matter what it's made of without that.

ab0z
Jun 28, 2008

by angerbotSD


Chubby Checker posted:

Is there a fastenal or grainger near you? Don't get the kobalt cutting fluid from lowes, I'm pretty sure its just 3in1 oil. I use tap magic pro and can drill stainless with out dulling a harbor freight ti coated bit. You can also get it from enco for pretty cheap online.

Yeah there are 2 fastenal locations in town, and another fasteners place across the street from where I work. I'll check with them. Thanks!

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

scapulataf posted:

it seems that this thread has degraded into a big harbour freight ad.

Check the OP sucka

NinjaTech
Sep 30, 2003

do you have any PANTIES

Speaking of drill bits. Where would I get a bit sharpened? Would machine shops do that kind of work?

Slung Blade
Jul 10, 2002

IN STEEL WE TRUST



If you have an angle grinder and a vice or a bench grinder you can do it yourself.

Or you can get a little drill powered one for around 15 bucks.

Bench grinders are better, though. Take very small passes and keep the tip cool. Too much heat and you'll gently caress up the temper.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Im ok with a grinder and even on large radius drill bits I can never get an edge hand grinding. Theres services that grind them for businesses though ts usually only worth it for custom sizes and big drills. Drill doctor sucks. If its a small (less than 1/2") standard size youre best off just buying new. BTW you actually dont want to work your way up progressively with small steps youre likely to get an out of round hole and you'll wear a lot more on your drill bits. Drill a pilot bigger than the tip of the drill and drill at the right cutting speed at a reasonable feed rate. Cutting fluid will help but thats more to cool than anything.

AnomalousBoners fucked around with this message at 21:14 on Jan 19, 2010

scapulataf
Jul 18, 2007

by Ozmaugh


RealKyleH posted:

Harbor Freight tools are what most people can afford. That said HF drill bits suck and the coatings suck. Don't get them.

What are you doing with the drill bits? Application is very important to this question. What materials and are the materials rigidly mounted (in a vise/fixture in a mill/lathe) The answer will probably be cobalt or carbide.
Mostly metal, but some wood, and occasionally plastic.
Mounted in a drill press or hand drill. Our drill press does suck kinda bad though.
For wood and plastic its not an issue, just in metal. The material being drilled is usually mounted in a vice or on te table of the drill press. I've only ever seen carbide tipped drill bits for our hammer drills, for anchoring poo poo to concrete. I'll assume that the carbide bits you're referring to are carbide tipped as well? From my experience, carbide would be too brittle to have the whole bit made of it.
Also, God I would have such a boner if we had a lathe at our shop. The money and pain we could save if I could clean up the threads on our drilling (different type of drilling) rods and sampling tools.


Kynetx posted:

I think a lot of people go and drill steel with the drill motor set to the highest speed and without any oil. Best way to dull a bit and blue the work.
I've had decent luck with Black and Decker titanium nitride coated bits as long as I use oil. On a 1/2" hole I'll start with 1/8" or 1/4" and work my way up progressively. If I get impatient I'll let the bit bite off a little too much steel and snap, but that result is due more to my own stupidity.

I hate cutting fluid, but yeah, thats part of the problem. I don't like to use it (to my detriment) because usually after I'm done drilling a hole in a chunk of metal, I'm welding it afterwards. The drill speed is probably a bit of a problem and I'll keep that in mind next time I'm doing it.
Also I usually step up the sizes after I drill a pilot hole, but find that can gently caress me up later on down the road.


Chubby Checker posted:

Is there a fastenal or grainger near you? Don't get the kobalt cutting fluid from lowes, I'm pretty sure its just 3in1 oil. I use tap magic pro and can drill stainless with out dulling a harbor freight ti coated bit. You can also get it from enco for pretty cheap online.

We've got an account with our local fastenal, and a few other industrial supply stores. I'll check them out next time I'm there.

gently caress, I can drill a goddam 4-8 inch hole to 60 feet deep in just about any type of ground but bedrock, but can't drill a fuckin half inch hole through an inch of steel. What the gently caress.

oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


scapulataf posted:

gently caress, I can drill a goddam 4-8 inch hole to 60 feet deep in just about any type of ground but bedrock, but can't drill a fuckin half inch hole through an inch of steel. What the gently caress.

Steel is quite a bit harder than dirt.

ease
Jul 19, 2004

HUGE

oxbrain posted:

Steel is quite a bit harder than dirt.
And bed rock.

Kynetx
Jan 8, 2003


Full of ignorant tribalism. Kinda sad.


gently caress, you guys are awesome. Good stuff.

Drilling is actually kind of a last resort. If I can get my hands on one I prefer using our 50-ton hydraulic punch. 1" hole in 3/4" mild steel? No problem. Hope you don't like being able to hear things though.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


scapulataf posted:

Mostly metal, but some wood, and occasionally plastic.
Mounted in a drill press or hand drill. Our drill press does suck kinda bad though.
For wood and plastic its not an issue, just in metal. The material being drilled is usually mounted in a vice or on te table of the drill press. I've only ever seen carbide tipped drill bits for our hammer drills, for anchoring poo poo to concrete. I'll assume that the carbide bits you're referring to are carbide tipped as well? From my experience, carbide would be too brittle to have the whole bit made of it.
Also, God I would have such a boner if we had a lathe at our shop. The money and pain we could save if I could clean up the threads on our drilling (different type of drilling) rods and sampling tools.


I hate cutting fluid, but yeah, thats part of the problem.

The safe catch all answer to your question is probably quality 118* cobalt drill bits. (Which most will be 118*) I bought an inexpensive rigid set from home depot that cuts quite well. I often see good deals on USA made drills sets on ebay. I can give you a way better answer though if you read on...

They do have solid carbide drills they also have carbide tipped drills. They also have larger drills ( > 1/2")that have index-able carbide insets that cut awesome an clear chips awesome and are just great. The carbide ones however are only a solution if you have a rigid mounted work piece and are very concerned with both tool life and drilling speed. OR if you are using itty bitty drills (less than 1/16) to engrave and drill PCBs or anything else really. Remember to never use cutting oil on carbide bits.

Metal is not a material! Are you drilling steel after its been welded or near spots where welding has occurred? Is the steel stainless? High carbon?

If you don't drill stainless often or at all regular ol' HSS bit will be fine. If you drill stuff thats hard on tools like steel thats been welded (just dont do this if possible) and therefore has hard spots you want something that can absorb shock better. If its stainless use a cobalt bit that shits nasty on tools for most alloys you'd be doing.

Fun fact, cobalt drill bits are HSS drill bits with 5-8% cobalt added in the alloy. They simply last longer and are harder and thus can cut on higher speeds. They are not a cobalt alloy.

AnomalousBoners fucked around with this message at 02:18 on Jan 20, 2010

ASSTASTIC
Apr 26, 2003

Hey Gusy!

The metal fabricator I used to work with swears by the "As seen on TV" Drill Doctor where you can sharpen bits and stuff. Anyone else use it? I was thinking of getting one.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


ASSTASTIC posted:

The metal fabricator I used to work with swears by the "As seen on TV" Drill Doctor where you can sharpen bits and stuff. Anyone else use it? I was thinking of getting one.

Ive used it and it was worthless. I said that above.

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scapulataf
Jul 18, 2007

by Ozmaugh


oxbrain posted:

Steel is quite a bit harder than dirt.
Dirt still wears away steel, trust me, look up metal to earth hardfacing.

ease posted:

And bed rock.
What type of rock?

RealKyleH posted:


Metal is not a material! Are you drilling steel after its been welded or near spots where welding has occurred? Is the steel stainless? High carbon?


Yes, steel. Sorry I figuerd metal would be descriptive enough, but obviously not.
Mostly mild steel, rarely aluminum or stainless.
The main problem is when doing thicker poo poo, like 1" or 1 1/4" thick steel that needs something like a 1/2" or bigger hole in it.
This 118* that is the angle on the point I assume?

Thank you to my fellow goons, I will look into some of these drill bits that have been mentioned.

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