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BlackMK4
Aug 23, 2006

wat.

Megamarm

Motronic posted:

So is that actually a conical washer, or does it have a pronounced lip on it that happens to fit exactly with whatever mount it receives? Because if it's that, those are likely not commonly made parts and could be all the way to custom for that assembly.

You probably could figure out a way to jig something up to kinda sorta draw out fender washers to fit depending on what you have laying around the shop (that must include a press).

IOwnCalculus posted:

Is the idea that they slot into those rounded out spaces in those brackets? I'm inclined to agree that those look like custom-machined pieces.

If they were thin I'd think maybe belleville washers but those are usually for adjusting tension, not locating.

I haven't actually held the original ones in my own hands, but I was hoping/assuming that they were some kind of off the shelf conical washer that was tacked to the bolt head with a captive metal spacer covering the threads on the bolt that the other bracket slipped over.

Ah well, I think you're right about the fender washer and press idea. I'll see what I can come up with. . I guess it isn't that big of a deal either way, more of a convenience factor than anything.

BlackMK4 fucked around with this message at 23:34 on May 30, 2020

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Achtane
Apr 2, 2008

Set me on fire, Kerosene.



Thanks dudes re: engine hoist stuffs!
I'll have to do a little looking but it certainly seems safest to go with a high powered jack. Not that I plan on lifting ridiculously heavy poo poo, but you never know.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





BlackMK4 posted:

I haven't actually held the original ones in my own hands, but I was hoping/assuming that they were some kind of off the shelf conical washer that was tacked to the bolt head with a captive metal spacer covering the threads on the bolt that the other bracket slipped over.

Ah well, I think you're right about the fender washer and press idea. I'll see what I can come up with. . I guess it isn't that big of a deal either way, more of a convenience factor than anything.

When you're dealing with what appears to be a reasonably high-end aftermarket part, custom-machined components aren't too uncommon. I had to pay Novak $24 for some hardware for a cable shifter because their design depends on some custom stepped bushings and rod ends that I couldn't find anywhere else.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


That's one reason I'm allergic to aftermarket car parts where I can parts bin something from somewhere else. Half the time I'm stuck waiting for the manufacturer (hope they are still in business) or an online vendor like McMaster for parts instead of being able to get it anywhere.

Achtane posted:

I grabbed a heavy duty engine hoist off the side of the road (and mostly fit it into the back of my 1995 Corolla, which made for the scariest drive home of my life). Looks like it's in good shape, minus the jack thing, which is missing.

I see that there are replacement jacks for hoists online, but my possibly stupid question is this:
The hoist is rated for 2000LB.
So do I just get a 2000LB jack to fit onto it? Or is it like...since the boom extends out, do I actually need a jack rated higher than that to compensate for the fully extended boom? Am I being dumb?

As noted you probably want the 3 ton at least. Bear in mind you need to measure the extended and collapsed lengths you'll need for full extension and lowered boom, too, or you might install the jack and realize you're screwed.

This is not my tool, but I'll be able to use it as soon as it's up and running. Man I can't wait. 22ish X travel, 16ish Y, can't remember Z but it's decent, with rotary 4th axis and 16 slot tool changer. I just helped my hangar-mate move it into position and get it set up and test powered yesterday. It's 35 years old but works great.

Dacheat
Feb 21, 2003


I'm looking to track down the tools/know how to be able to crimp my own stainless braided hoses (think brake hoses, fuel lines etc). Any thoughts?

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




I would recommend just using your local hydraulic shop, there's some cheap hydraulic swaging tools out there, but I wouldn't trust them, and for the real-deal big hydraulic crimpers you're looking at $$$$$.

The process is pretty easy though, the fitting slides up in the hose, you slide your swaging sleeve over the top, then crimp it in place. You can also use something like this they only work on the exact hose they're designed for, and they're not cheap.

Dacheat
Feb 21, 2003


Elviscat posted:

I would recommend just using your local hydraulic shop, there's some cheap hydraulic swaging tools out there, but I wouldn't trust them, and for the real-deal big hydraulic crimpers you're looking at $$$$$.

The process is pretty easy though, the fitting slides up in the hose, you slide your swaging sleeve over the top, then crimp it in place. You can also use something like this they only work on the exact hose they're designed for, and they're not cheap.

Thanks, that explains a lot. and this is not something i'd cheap out on (probably would go mid-range)

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Dacheat posted:

I'm looking to track down the tools/know how to be able to crimp my own stainless braided hoses (think brake hoses, fuel lines etc). Any thoughts?

This is a bad idea unless you're doing volume, because

Elviscat posted:

I would recommend just using your local hydraulic shop, there's some cheap hydraulic swaging tools out there, but I wouldn't trust them, and for the real-deal big hydraulic crimpers you're looking at $$$$$.

The process is pretty easy though, the fitting slides up in the hose, you slide your swaging sleeve over the top, then crimp it in place. You can also use something like this they only work on the exact hose they're designed for, and they're not cheap.

of exactly this. We used the fittings with pre-attached crimp sleeve, which is preferable in most cases.

Dacheat posted:

Thanks, that explains a lot. and this is not something i'd cheap out on (probably would go mid-range)

Smart idea. It'll be cheap to have a shop do them, assuming they're well-equipped.
I've run hundreds of hydraulic hoses and use a manual pump crimper to put the ends on them. It sucks rear end, take forever, and is not fun even with the "proper" tools. We were working in a boat, where the lines often ran through spaces without enough room for the fittings, so we were pretty much stuck doing it this way. I do not recommend it.
Parker 387TC hose and Steel fittings sealed with glue-lined heatshrink or Petro-tape all the way...

Measure everything twice, take good notes, and go to a line shop. They'll knock them out with great results for less than you'd expect.

sharkytm fucked around with this message at 16:03 on Jun 2, 2020

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


Only slightly tool related and only slightly automotive tool related at that, but people seemed to like the vintage calipers I got. So to let everyone know they are now well protected:
I built a couple of boxes for them. This was my first attempt at building boxes so they are far from perfect, but I think they came out ok.
I used the vinyl leather wrap for speakers / amps as the covering and 1/4" plywood for the structure (wood glue and 18ga x 5/8" brads to hold it together) and a lot of 3M 77 spray adhesive. I did use contact cement for the outside covering for the first box, that worked much better, but I didn't have enough to do the second. The spray adhesive works great on the inside felt lining.

First box:



Second box, I had left over materials. Not sure this one turned out quite as well, but a bit more general purpose:



Any how...back to your regularly scheduled automotive tools.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

nadmonk posted:

Only slightly tool related and only slightly automotive tool related at that, but people seemed to like the vintage calipers I got. So to let everyone know they are now well protected:
I built a couple of boxes for them. This was my first attempt at building boxes so they are far from perfect, but I think they came out ok.
I used the vinyl leather wrap for speakers / amps as the covering and 1/4" plywood for the structure (wood glue and 18ga x 5/8" brads to hold it together) and a lot of 3M 77 spray adhesive. I did use contact cement for the outside covering for the first box, that worked much better, but I didn't have enough to do the second. The spray adhesive works great on the inside felt lining.

First box:



Second box, I had left over materials. Not sure this one turned out quite as well, but a bit more general purpose:



Any how...back to your regularly scheduled automotive tools.

Those are really nice. Care to detail how you made them? My wife needs an oboe case re-felted, and I've got zero clue how to even approach it.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


sharkytm posted:

Those are really nice. Care to detail how you made them? My wife needs an oboe case re-felted, and I've got zero clue how to even approach it.

I could, but I don't know how much I'd trust my methods

The basic method I used was pretty similar to how Adam Savage builds his display boxes. Although I think he uses a 22ga brad nailer.
The 18ga I used worked fine, just needed to be extra careful with angle. Honestly, I think the box would have been reasonably strong just using wood glue.

Basic steps:
Used 1/4" plywood (I think some decent looking birch stuff, but that was only because I wasn't sure if I wanted to leave the wood exposed or not)
Cut the various sides to size.
One mistake I made there that I would do differently, is where the sides are split where it opens. When I did it, I cut the opening in those side pieces before assembling the box. If I did it next time, I would assemble the box first, then use the table saw to cut it open.
This Tested video gives a pretty good overview of what he does: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPAGZpNZrwU

After the box was together, I figured out where I wanted stuff to go inside and cut some other pieces of wood to be dividers and holds. A couple are secured with wood glue and brads, but I found the brads really difficult to get lined up right and the wood glue seemed to hold fine on its own, especially for the pieces that ran from one side to another.

The felt I put in as separate pieces. I'm not sure if this is the right way at all, but it seemed ok.
I cut pieces that matched the footprint of the flat bottom pieces. Where there are those vertical supports sticking up through the middle, I just cut a slit about the size for those to poke through.
Then I cut other pieces to cover the vertical bits. I tried to use one piece for each vertical support other than the outside perimeter doing test fits and adjusting until I could get it to completely cover and wrap around all sides.
3M Super 77 worked great for adhering the felt. I sprayed the felt, then stuck on as carefully as I could.

For the exterior, I used a knockoff Tolex. I believe they make stuff that is more paper like. This is fairly substantial and more akin to leather.

I did the top and bottom each as single pieces.
A couple I did with 3m Super 77 to stick it and a couple with contact cement.
Contact cement is really the way to go. It had better coverage and instant hold so less bubbles and better control at getting the edges to hold.
The little spots at the edges where they pulled up a bit (mostly a problem when I used Super 77 instead of contact cement) I just used some cyanoacrylate glue to keep them together and down.

Finish it off with some cheap brass hardware from Amazon for the corners and hinges.
For an oboe or anything with a bit more heft that calipers, I'd say maybe beef up the supports you use inside. I'd imagine a little bump and it might just snap off little vertical tabs of 1/4" ply.

Honestly, a good way might be if you can find some foam rubber inserts, sculpt to match, then adhere the felt to that, with another piece of foam at the top also covered in felt. That would give it a nice secure hold.

Hope that helps!

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

nadmonk posted:

I could, but I don't know how much I'd trust my methods

The basic method I used was pretty similar to how Adam Savage builds his display boxes. Although I think he uses a 22ga brad nailer.
The 18ga I used worked fine, just needed to be extra careful with angle. Honestly, I think the box would have been reasonably strong just using wood glue.

Basic steps:
Used 1/4" plywood (I think some decent looking birch stuff, but that was only because I wasn't sure if I wanted to leave the wood exposed or not)
Cut the various sides to size.
One mistake I made there that I would do differently, is where the sides are split where it opens. When I did it, I cut the opening in those side pieces before assembling the box. If I did it next time, I would assemble the box first, then use the table saw to cut it open.
This Tested video gives a pretty good overview of what he does: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPAGZpNZrwU

After the box was together, I figured out where I wanted stuff to go inside and cut some other pieces of wood to be dividers and holds. A couple are secured with wood glue and brads, but I found the brads really difficult to get lined up right and the wood glue seemed to hold fine on its own, especially for the pieces that ran from one side to another.

The felt I put in as separate pieces. I'm not sure if this is the right way at all, but it seemed ok.
I cut pieces that matched the footprint of the flat bottom pieces. Where there are those vertical supports sticking up through the middle, I just cut a slit about the size for those to poke through.
Then I cut other pieces to cover the vertical bits. I tried to use one piece for each vertical support other than the outside perimeter doing test fits and adjusting until I could get it to completely cover and wrap around all sides.
3M Super 77 worked great for adhering the felt. I sprayed the felt, then stuck on as carefully as I could.

For the exterior, I used a knockoff Tolex. I believe they make stuff that is more paper like. This is fairly substantial and more akin to leather.

I did the top and bottom each as single pieces.
A couple I did with 3m Super 77 to stick it and a couple with contact cement.
Contact cement is really the way to go. It had better coverage and instant hold so less bubbles and better control at getting the edges to hold.
The little spots at the edges where they pulled up a bit (mostly a problem when I used Super 77 instead of contact cement) I just used some cyanoacrylate glue to keep them together and down.

Finish it off with some cheap brass hardware from Amazon for the corners and hinges.
For an oboe or anything with a bit more heft that calipers, I'd say maybe beef up the supports you use inside. I'd imagine a little bump and it might just snap off little vertical tabs of 1/4" ply.

Honestly, a good way might be if you can find some foam rubber inserts, sculpt to match, then adhere the felt to that, with another piece of foam at the top also covered in felt. That would give it a nice secure hold.

Hope that helps!
Thanks for the info. I'm really not sure how the cases are made internally, but it looks like it's discrete pieces of wood, glued/pinned in place, and then the felt covers all sins. I wasn't sure if you had a trick for using one piece of felt and avoiding edges. It seems like a royal PITA to get everything lined up and glued without gaps or wrinkles.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


sharkytm posted:

Thanks for the info. I'm really not sure how the cases are made internally, but it looks like it's discrete pieces of wood, glued/pinned in place, and then the felt covers all sins. I wasn't sure if you had a trick for using one piece of felt and avoiding edges. It seems like a royal PITA to get everything lined up and glued without gaps or wrinkles.

The felt does a pretty good job of hiding mistakes. Even little gaps between the discrete pieces you can kind of massage together.
Mostly, I just tried to cut as large a pieces as possible for each contiguous section. Those vertical pieces essentially have a piece of felt as large as their surface area (both flats, top, both skinny sides). I'm sure there are better ways to do it, but it seemed to work ok. There are a couple of spots where I needed to cut little slivers to fill in. But thankfully the felt does a decent job of hiding that, and with the Super 77, once it's dry, it doesn't move anywhere.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!




nadmonk posted:

Only slightly tool related and only slightly automotive tool related at that, but people seemed to like the vintage calipers I got. So to let everyone know they are now well protected:
I built a couple of boxes for them. This was my first attempt at building boxes so they are far from perfect, but I think they came out ok.
I used the vinyl leather wrap for speakers / amps as the covering and 1/4" plywood for the structure (wood glue and 18ga x 5/8" brads to hold it together) and a lot of 3M 77 spray adhesive. I did use contact cement for the outside covering for the first box, that worked much better, but I didn't have enough to do the second. The spray adhesive works great on the inside felt lining.

First box:



Second box, I had left over materials. Not sure this one turned out quite as well, but a bit more general purpose:



Any how...back to your regularly scheduled automotive tools.

Dang that looks nice.

Calipers have plenty of automotive applications, plus I think most of us here are tool nerds for all tools of all types.

um excuse me
Jan 1, 2016

This avatar brought to you by the 'save our dead gay forums' foundation.


Harbor Freight did exactly zero planning on how any of their poo poo is supposed to work together.

Raluek
Nov 3, 2006

WUT.


um excuse me posted:

Harbor Freight did exactly zero planning on how any of their poo poo is supposed to work together.



I usually just come at it straight on and it lines up fine. No need to come in from the side like that.

um excuse me
Jan 1, 2016

This avatar brought to you by the 'save our dead gay forums' foundation.


This was, like, plan C. Yours was plan A. The boom arm is waaaay to short to reach the stand. It's even too short for the engine bay. It would have been useful to use two different size caster wheels for the hoist and the engine stand so one could slide under the other.

Raluek
Nov 3, 2006

WUT.


um excuse me posted:

This was, like, plan C. Yours was plan A. The boom arm is waaaay to short to reach the stand. It's even too short for the engine bay. It would have been useful to use two different size caster wheels for the hoist and the engine stand so one could slide under the other.

Oh, I just realized that's the 1-ton hoist and one of the beefier engine stands. I have the 2-ton hoist (whose legs are farther apart at the end due to being longer) and my stand is one of the ones whose front wheels are on a little T underneath the engine, so it is much more narrow in front.

I actually own one of those 1-ton hoists. I used it once to unload an engine I just bought from the back of the truck, then went to pull the old engine in my car but realized that it didn't even reach the engine. So now I own both sizes, haha.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

I flushed the oil in my HF compressor with some Sanborn 30wt compressor oil and it runs noticeably cooler.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


um excuse me posted:

Harbor Freight did exactly zero planning on how any of their poo poo is supposed to work together.

Yeah.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


My brother asked me to pick up this ancient jack which some guy has locally. I have zero clue what he's going to do with it.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Probably raise heavy things. MAYBE move heavy things sideways too.

Or perhaps just level a very wobbly table.

Frank Dillinger
May 16, 2007
Jawohl mein herr!


Top of it looks just like a meat tenderizer to me, maybe itís a hydraulic schnitzel press.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


I don't even think it's hydraulic...think it's geared.

0toShifty
Aug 21, 2005
0 to Stiffy?

I'm just about to buy a Milwaukee M12 FUEL 3/8 stubby impact - and I need to pick out batteries for it. This will be my first entry into the M12 system.

They have 3.0 compact, and 3.0 extended capacity batteries. The only difference seems to be the physical size - the actual capacity is the same. Anything else I should consider?

Krakkles
May 5, 2003

like and subscribe for more passive-aggressive roadway bullshit adventure in Chigcao

0toShifty posted:

I'm just about to buy a Milwaukee M12 FUEL 3/8 stubby impact - and I need to pick out batteries for it. This will be my first entry into the M12 system.

They have 3.0 compact, and 3.0 extended capacity batteries. The only difference seems to be the physical size - the actual capacity is the same. Anything else I should consider?
Nope, pretty sure thatís it. I think XC is older than CP, so Iíd expect them to be cheaper.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Definitely mechanical.. and smooth as hell.

Interestingly it's made by a company I deal with at work, Duff Norton. Looks like it's called a railway jack and got it for $25 which appears to be one hell of a score compared to what I see for sale on line.



Krakkles
May 5, 2003

like and subscribe for more passive-aggressive roadway bullshit adventure in Chigcao

Does that say 25 ton, 5Ē rise?

drat, thatís nuts.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Krakkles posted:

Nope, pretty sure thatís it. I think XC is older than CP, so Iíd expect them to be cheaper.

Looks like that's the case right now thanks to sales, though long-run the CPs should come down in price to be less. The 3.0 XC is six 1.5 AH cells, the 3.0 CP is three 3.0 AH cells.

I don't have any 3.0 CP packs but I do have one 3.0 XC and a few regular 1.5 compacts. The extra size is very noticeable on certain tools but it doesn't usually cause an issue.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Krakkles posted:

Does that say 25 ton, 5Ē rise?

drat, thatís nuts.

Railroad jacks are no joke, and that's pretty standard for a small one.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


0toShifty posted:

I'm just about to buy a Milwaukee M12 FUEL 3/8 stubby impact - and I need to pick out batteries for it. This will be my first entry into the M12 system.

They have 3.0 compact, and 3.0 extended capacity batteries. The only difference seems to be the physical size - the actual capacity is the same. Anything else I should consider?

I'd min max it and get the most compact battery to fit the stubby form factor.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Krakkles posted:

Does that say 25 ton, 5Ē rise?

drat, thatís nuts.

That's it. Probably weighs.. oh... 25lbs? Surprisingly light for such a sturdy beast and the built in handle is, well, handy.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Gearing is a crazy thing, as is forged steel.

Frank Dillinger
May 16, 2007
Jawohl mein herr!


StormDrain posted:

I'd min max it and get the most compact battery to fit the stubby form factor.

Honestly the wider base on the bigger m12 batteries hasnít been an issue for me working on cars.

Iím not sure where the diminishing returns are, but I also feel like the power on the stubby impact is limited by battery as well. I could t take wheel bolts off with a 2.0 battery, but a 4.0 made a huge difference.

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002


Grimey Drawer

the 2.0s are not great, any of the 3-4-5s will be better

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Frank Dillinger posted:

Honestly the wider base on the bigger m12 batteries hasnít been an issue for me working on cars.

Iím not sure where the diminishing returns are, but I also feel like the power on the stubby impact is limited by battery as well. I could t take wheel bolts off with a 2.0 battery, but a 4.0 made a huge difference.

Do you actually get more power ("OOMPH") out of the bigger batteries or do they just last longer?
Or how loose were these wheel nuts?

BigPaddy
Jun 30, 2008

That night we performed the rite and opened the gate.
Halfway through, I went to fix us both a coke float.
By the time I got back, he'd gone insane.
Plus, he'd left the gate open and there was evil everywhere.

Bigger ones tend to have higher amp ratings which gives you more omph. I recently started switching to air tools as I got a compressor for a few jobs and just been adding new air tools as a need comes up. Also having an impact that is rated for 2000 ft/lbs was helpful for removing rusty bolts to say the least.

Colostomy Bag
Jan 11, 2016

C-Bangin' it



Had a laugh yesterday. Wife bought a couple patio chairs in a box you had to assemble. Instead of the usual allen wrench, they included a ratchet with replaceable bits. Wasn't half bad actually for the throw-away stuff. drat thing even had rubber grips.

Frank Dillinger
May 16, 2007
Jawohl mein herr!


wesleywillis posted:

Do you actually get more power ("OOMPH") out of the bigger batteries or do they just last longer?
Or how loose were these wheel nuts?

Iíd say itís a noticeable boost from 2.0 to 4.0, not much at all from 4.0 to 6.0

The bolts are torqued to130-150 NM. (95-110 ft-lb)

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meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



BigPaddy posted:

Bigger ones tend to have higher amp ratings which gives you more omph. I recently started switching to air tools as I got a compressor for a few jobs and just been adding new air tools as a need comes up. Also having an impact that is rated for 2000 ft/lbs was helpful for removing rusty bolts to say the least.

On that note, I'm going the other way. I've got one of the mythical Jnnythndr IR Titanium air impacts. If someone wants it in the US, just pay me for shipping. Could be a couple weeks to ship, I'm buried in house stuff right now.

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