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mod sassinator
Dec 13, 2006



New rotors for my GTO are around $500. drat Australian part markups.

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AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


I am looking for a new mill. Info here:

http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...ber=37#lastpost

RapeWhistle
May 26, 2009


I'm looking for a good digital torque wrench because I hate clickers. Is Snap-On still a pretty good quality brand for this type of torque wrench?

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


CDI torque is snap-on's wrench manufacturer for all their clickers. Great but expensive. Snap-On branded dial types are still fantastic... if you like dials.

This isn't strictly automotive, but i've been sold on the necessity of a cordless impact driver. The mechs at work use them, and a friend brought his over for a carpentry/plumbing project we collaborated on. I need one now.

Hitachi has the best warranty by far, and rates near the top in reviews i've read online. Makita and Panasonic both rate higher but have a warranty less than half the duration of Hitachi's. Like SLRs, it seems you buy into a family of tools, instead of buying some tools. You get a few batteries, a charger, and then a buttload of bare tool bodies. So far i've been looking at this set to start me off. This is the Hitachi 18v tool page. Lowe's sells this set which is an 18v "compact pro". Admittedly the compact pro drill and driver are probably all I need, but they're also the only two items that use that battery.

So AI. How good are Hitachi cordless power tools?

Sockington
Jul 26, 2003


We have a DeWalt impact at work. I have used the ever-living gently caress out of it and it keeps on ticking. Great little tool. I use the little bugger to drive 3/8" head self-drilling screws through 1/4" steel L-channel for most of a day. Works wonderful.

Wish I had one at home sometimes.

RapeWhistle
May 26, 2009


Skyssx posted:

CDI torque is snap-on's wrench manufacturer for all their clickers. Great but expensive. Snap-On branded dial types are still fantastic... if you like dials.

This isn't strictly automotive, but i've been sold on the necessity of a cordless impact driver. The mechs at work use them, and a friend brought his over for a carpentry/plumbing project we collaborated on. I need one now.

Hitachi has the best warranty by far, and rates near the top in reviews i've read online. Makita and Panasonic both rate higher but have a warranty less than half the duration of Hitachi's. Like SLRs, it seems you buy into a family of tools, instead of buying some tools. You get a few batteries, a charger, and then a buttload of bare tool bodies. So far i've been looking at this set to start me off. This is the Hitachi 18v tool page. Lowe's sells this set which is an 18v "compact pro". Admittedly the compact pro drill and driver are probably all I need, but they're also the only two items that use that battery.

So AI. How good are Hitachi cordless power tools?

I used to work with a guy who loved his Hitachi cordless impact, never saw him have any problems with it. I, personally, prefer Makita just because I fell in love with their 18v Li-ion hammer drills and impact drivers as soon as they came out. The only problem I've had with either tool in 4-5 years is the chuck getting stripped out on the hammer drill.

Drunk Pledge Driver
Nov 10, 2004


Pittsburgh 1/2" Drive Click Stop Torque Wrench $10 at HF!

Dwight Eisenhower
Jan 24, 2006

Indeed, I think that people want peace so much that one of these days governments had better get out of the way and let them have it.

Sockington posted:

We have a DeWalt impact at work. I have used the ever-living gently caress out of it and it keeps on ticking. Great little tool. I use the little bugger to drive 3/8" head self-drilling screws through 1/4" steel L-channel for most of a day. Works wonderful.

Wish I had one at home sometimes.

Definitely gonna mirror this sentiment. I bought an 18v DeWalt cordless impact a couple years ago. It's held up real well and makes most jobs where you need to crack something loose pretty easy. The one case it's ever failed in was when Sigma X got a flat and the lug nuts were torqued down to probably 160+ ft-lb. I needed about a 5 foot lever to crack those nuts loose.

Except for cleaning up after idiots with air guns, it's pretty great.

Big K of Justice
Nov 27, 2005

Anyone seen my ball joints?


Dwight Eisenhower posted:

Definitely gonna mirror this sentiment. I bought an 18v DeWalt cordless impact a couple years ago. It's held up real well and makes most jobs where you need to crack something loose pretty easy. The one case it's ever failed in was when Sigma X got a flat and the lug nuts were torqued down to probably 160+ ft-lb. I needed about a 5 foot lever to crack those nuts loose.

Except for cleaning up after idiots with air guns, it's pretty great.

I got that same one, I was eyeballing it for a while, and when Home Depot had a special with the 18v impact with 3 batteries for 249$ I jumped on it.

Impressed the hell out of me, I was taking out seized shock mount bolts on a rusted truck frame and while I had to sit on it for a few seconds, they all popped out.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


In standard AI form, I have ignored all of your advise. I got a Makita impact drill/impact driver 18v 3AH lithium ion kit. Apaaaaarently, Hitachi has the 10 year warranty because they don't have any local service centers. You've got to send the tool off if it breaks. I've shied away from Dewalt since I was issued some in Germany. I melted one in about 30 seconds of use the first time, and then the other one about a week later.

the_reject
May 30, 2002


Dwight Eisenhower posted:

Definitely gonna mirror this sentiment. I bought an 18v DeWalt cordless impact a couple years ago. It's held up real well and makes most jobs where you need to crack something loose pretty easy. The one case it's ever failed in was when Sigma X got a flat and the lug nuts were torqued down to probably 160+ ft-lb. I needed about a 5 foot lever to crack those nuts loose.
The Snap-On 14.4v CT4410A setup (impact, 2 batteries, and charger) was one of my tool truck purchases a couple months ago when the kit was on special. Not cheap, of course, but when you need it right f'n now and can spread the payments out...

Anyhow, I work exclusively on motorcycles, and it's never failed me for what I use it for. Wish I'd gone cordless impact long ago, would've saved the wear and tear on my ratchets (much less me) and made my breaker bars obsolete. Being able to share the same battery with a cordless drill was a big plus, especially with a variable trigger. Impact to disassemble, drill with locking extension for reassembly on lowest torque setting, torque wrench to finish.

One Day Fish Sale
Aug 28, 2009



Grimey Drawer

After breaking innumerable Craftsman ratchets (I have at least two broken 3/8" ratchets with the bar code sticker on the handle in pristine condition), I swore off all ratchets with plastic parts. While I'm saving my pennies for a set of nice SK or Snap-on, I thought I'd take a look at these Harbor Freight ones:



I messed around with them in the store, and decided to pick up a 1/4" and a 3/8". I think I paid about what they are on the website right now.

I've used them a few times, and am already happy with them. The ratchet action is fairly fine, and the push-button quick release works well: tight when there's a socket on, socket drops off when pushed. Being able to swing the handle out to use it straight-on as a nutdriver is pretty handy too. I've not yet put an incredible amount of torque through them, but unless the materials turn out to be sub-par, the mechanism feels way beefier than the lovely Craftsman 3/8".

Anyway, I could see these lasting a long time. I intend to pick up the 1/2" next time I'm by a Harbor Freight.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

One Day Fish Sale posted:

I've not yet put an incredible amount of torque through them, but unless the materials turn out to be sub-par, the mechanism feels way beefier than the lovely Craftsman 3/8".

Anyway, I could see these lasting a long time. I intend to pick up the 1/2" next time I'm by a Harbor Freight.

I beat/torque the gently caress out of these and they have held up really well. The fine-ness of the mechanism will fade a little, like ....V.... will become ... V ...; as though the first tooth from wherever it stopped is hard to find. On the other hand, my Craftsmans did that out of the box.

Had to use the 1/2" one to tighten 10 bolts 60 degrees past 240 Newton-meters a couple weeks ago.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Week and a half until my non functioning CNC gets replaced by a 9x36 Pulley head bridgeport with all the basics needed to make chips. I am very excited.

Sockington
Jul 26, 2003


Skyssx posted:

I've shied away from Dewalt since I was issued some in Germany. I melted one in about 30 seconds of use the first time, and then the other one about a week later.

Just wanted to say I spent 8hrs last night drilling through solid steel I-beams with the DeWalt and self drilling screws. Worked like a champ (we seriously use these EVERYDAY and they seem to hold up). I don't know why yours was sooo cheap, but ours has been through hell and back.

2 years of almost daily use/abuse - and it keeps on working.

Skyssx posted:

This isn't strictly automotive, but i've been sold on the necessity of a cordless impact driver.

Suniikaa
Jul 4, 2004

Johnny Walker Wisdom

Canadians, Canadian Tire has a giant 95 piece screwdriver set on sale till the 29th for 29.99, regular price 99.99

http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/brow...e.jsp?locale=en

EnergizerFellow
Oct 11, 2005

More drunk than a barrel of monkeys

mod sassinator posted:

New rotors for my GTO are around $500. drat Australian part markups.
I'm seeing under $500 for a complete set of 4. Where you shopping at?

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

Suniikaa posted:

Canadians, Canadian Tire has a giant 95 piece screwdriver set on sale till the 29th for 29.99, regular price 99.99

http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/brow...e.jsp?locale=en

Holy crap, that's a lot of... oh. Robertson.

Sockington
Jul 26, 2003


Splizwarf posted:

Holy crap, that's a lot of... oh. Robertson.

Is there any other kind of screw? gently caress Mr. Phillips and his stupid rear end stripped out products.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Sockington posted:

Is there any other kind of screw? gently caress Mr. Phillips and his stupid rear end stripped out products.

Textron would like a word with you.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

Sockington posted:

Is there any other kind of screw?

Why, Torx, of course; bonus if the outside is hex so you can get a wrench on. Mr. Philips is a jackass.

I wish I could buy Torx at the hardware store, everything I own would get disassembled and put back together with nothing but.

FatCow
Apr 22, 2002
I MAP THE FUCK OUT OF PEOPLE


EnergizerFellow posted:

I'm seeing under $500 for a complete set of 4. Where you shopping at?

Seriously. NAPA has a set for ~350. Brake rotors are the same, get the cheapest parts store brand you can get.

PBCrunch
Jun 17, 2002

Lawrence Phillips Always #1 to Me

I assisted my neighbor with getting a Subaru STi ready for clutch replacement and I am sold on the awesomeness of wobbly sockets. They are far superior to u-joints in flexibility and power (torque, whatever) transfer.

Now, should I spend the money on a premium brand set or just get them from HF. I use my tools quite a bit, but I am just a hobbyist, not a pro. The HF sets are waaaay cheaper.

PBCrunch fucked around with this message at 15:35 on Jul 28, 2010

Aeka 2.0
Nov 16, 2000

Have you seen my apex seals? I seem to have lost them.






Dinosaur Gum

Anyone know who makes the Snap-On cordless 18v drill? Model CDR4850. I use them a lot but I don't own one and I'm not going to shell out 400 dollars for one.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Aeka 2.0 posted:

Anyone know who makes the Snap-On cordless 18v drill? Model CDR4850. I use them a lot but I don't own one and I'm not going to shell out 400 dollars for one.

I don't know who makes them, but the two riding equipment mechanics at work use the 14.4v version. They both say "best purchase ever".

the_reject
May 30, 2002


Skyssx posted:

I don't know who makes them, but the two riding equipment mechanics at work use the 14.4v version. They both say "best purchase ever".
I've got the same 14.4V drill, and can back up those remarks.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


the_reject posted:

I've got the same 14.4V drill, and can back up those remarks.

I did not read the post I replied to thoroughly enough. The two mechanics are using the 14.4v 3/8 impact guns.

the_reject
May 30, 2002


Skyssx posted:

I did not read the post I replied to thoroughly enough. The two mechanics are using the 14.4v 3/8 impact guns.
Got that too, which I mentioned a page or two ago. The drill uses the same battery, they should buy it and be equally happy. I think the bare drill was ~$200ish?

KaiserBen
Aug 11, 2007


Any recommendations for a lightweight 4000+ lb capacity floor jack? My new car is a wee bit (ok, half a ton) above the capacity of my old 3k lb aluminum "racing" jack and I need a lightish jack since I have to store it in the basement (down a short flight of steps from the driveway). I've seen a few (HF has one, Northern has a very similar looking one) in the $200/45lbs range, just wondering if AI has any experience with any of them.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

KaiserBen posted:

Any recommendations for a lightweight 4000+ lb capacity floor jack? My new car is a wee bit (ok, half a ton) above the capacity of my old 3k lb aluminum "racing" jack and I need a lightish jack since I have to store it in the basement (down a short flight of steps from the driveway). I've seen a few (HF has one, Northern has a very similar looking one) in the $200/45lbs range, just wondering if AI has any experience with any of them.

You aren't lifting the entire car with the jack, so your old jack should be fine. Heck, most of the time, you are only lifting ~60% (front of the car) of the weight.

In any case, anything over 3000# starts getting expensive. I'd just get a big heavy steel jack, and deal with the weight. We've got an older Craftsman that lifts 4 tons, and its been a workhorse. If you have $300+ to burn, then there are options out there in aluminum.

Big K of Justice
Nov 27, 2005

Anyone seen my ball joints?


I was eyeing the Torin/ Big Red 3-ton SUV jack, its around 45 lbs, and has a removable crown on the lift so you can remove it for lower profile vehicles. I need something that one person can haul off a humvee and lift it if needed. Something better than the oem control arm scissor jacks.

Its also 79$, may be worth trying. I tried racing jacks from HF which is fine for cars when bled properly , I like the aluminum jacks for the light weight, but I don't like how they flex when they are getting near their load limit, and the problem is finding an aluminum jack that isn't valved for a quick drop since most aluminum jacks tend to be race jacks.

Whenever I get a place with a garage, I'd like to get a Milwaukee model 40. It's a bit of a beast in weight but will last forever.

When I get that Torin model, I'll post a quick review on it, since I need to redo my steering system next week.

Big K of Justice fucked around with this message at 15:14 on Jul 29, 2010

meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



Sorry for the late notice, but this is a crazy good deal for those of you with Bosch Brick-and-Mortar stores nearby.

http://www.coptool.com/email/jun10/bosch100.pdf

Bosch 18V Lithium Ion tools with a $100 rebate. I bought the 18V drill/driver a couple weeks ago for $189 and get $100 back. :iamafag:

I've been waiting for my local store to get the 18V Impact Driver in, but they strung me along for a couple weeks and eventually said they wouldn't have any until at least next week, which is outside the rebate time. So, I did some cage-rattling up the Bosch chain and I was able to get 2 impact drivers ordered... but it's not something I'd advise banking on, unless you have a local store, the rebate is IN STORE PURCHASES only, no online orders.

Overall, the drill/driver seems to be a good drill/driver. Nothing spectacular, but it is compact compared to my older 19.2V chunk. I'm really anxious to see what the impact does, though.

Ericadia
Oct 31, 2007

Not A Unicorn

PBCrunch posted:

I assisted my neighbor with getting a Subaru STi ready for clutch replacement and I am sold on the awesomeness of wobbly sockets. They are far superior to u-joints in flexibility and power (torque, whatever) transfer.

Now, should I spend the money on a premium brand set or just get them from HF. I use my tools quite a bit, but I am just a hobbyist, not a pro. The HF sets are waaaay cheaper.

I have an SK set that I got at a yardsale. Love the things to death. As for u-joints, I find they are pretty useful for certain wacko jobs (serpentine belt on a 2001 Intrepid etc). The HF u-joints are absolute garbage. They bind up way too easily and are just way too loose in general. I have found the c-man u-joints to be much more manageable.

Dolphin
Dec 5, 2008


One Day Fish Sale posted:

After breaking innumerable Craftsman ratchets (I have at least two broken 3/8" ratchets with the bar code sticker on the handle in pristine condition), I swore off all ratchets with plastic parts. While I'm saving my pennies for a set of nice SK or Snap-on, I thought I'd take a look at these Harbor Freight ones:



I messed around with them in the store, and decided to pick up a 1/4" and a 3/8". I think I paid about what they are on the website right now.

I've used them a few times, and am already happy with them. The ratchet action is fairly fine, and the push-button quick release works well: tight when there's a socket on, socket drops off when pushed. Being able to swing the handle out to use it straight-on as a nutdriver is pretty handy too. I've not yet put an incredible amount of torque through them, but unless the materials turn out to be sub-par, the mechanism feels way beefier than the lovely Craftsman 3/8".

Anyway, I could see these lasting a long time. I intend to pick up the 1/2" next time I'm by a Harbor Freight.
Don't those Craftsman's have a lifetime no-questions-asked store replacement warranty?

extreme_accordion
Apr 9, 2009


Dolphin posted:

Don't those Craftsman's have a lifetime no-questions-asked store replacement warranty?

Yes. It's been great.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


This is one of those times where its worthwhile to mention that you get a rebuilt ratchet as a replacement typically. One that may have been run over by a huge truck.

One Day Fish Sale
Aug 28, 2009



Grimey Drawer

Dolphin posted:

Don't those Craftsman's have a lifetime no-questions-asked store replacement warranty?

Yes, but the replacement ratchets are junk. I have a few old Craftsman ratchets left that I'm afraid to use hard because Sears won't give me one of the same quality in exchange. Old ratchets have a metal pawl lever (there are several designs); the new ones have a plastic lever, and are much less precise and durable.

I like a lot of Craftsman tools. Ratchets aren't one, because they've clearly cheapened them up to keep replacement costs down.

PBCrunch
Jun 17, 2002

Lawrence Phillips Always #1 to Me

All my Craftsman ratchets are pretty much junk. They are too easy to switch between loosen and tighten, which leads to frustration. The action isn't very fine, so they aren't very useful in tight situations. They also seem to require a lot of resistance in order to ratchet, so a lot of the time I have to hold onto the socket with my other hand to provide enough resistance for the ratcheting mechanism to work.

The Snap-On ratchets I got on ebay are better in every respect. But they cost a lot more. If you can only afford one really good ratchet, make it the 1/4" drive. They fit in more of the smaller spots and bad situations that make use of a high end ratchet.

Also, the handles on the Snap-On ratchets are round so they don't hurt my hands and I can easily fit a deep well socket and a socket extension on the end as a ghetto cheater bar.

Aeka 2.0
Nov 16, 2000

Have you seen my apex seals? I seem to have lost them.






Dinosaur Gum

You can also get a snap-on ratchet with a soft grip.

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scapulataf
Jul 18, 2007

by Ozmaugh


Quick question, does anyone use speed handles anymore?

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