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Cat Hatter
Oct 24, 2006

Hatters gonna hat.


FogHelmut posted:

Yeah, its a 2008 Cobalt. Do you really need an ultra-low profile socket?

Yes. I helped my girlfriend change the oil on her Sunfire way too many times before we got that socket. The only thing she needed help with was unscrewing that stupid filter an eighth of a turn at a time with channel locks from alternating directions. After we finally broke down and bought that exact socket we would argue over who got to effortlessly defeat the evil oil filter this time.

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Rap Songs From Anime
Aug 15, 2007



grover posted:

No matter how awesome a toolbox may be, is it really worth paying that much more for it than for something from harbor freight or home depot that may rattle and squeak a bit, but organize your tools just as well?

Are they really that nice?

Absolutely. It's worth it to be able to get to your tools easily instead of fight a lovely slide mechanism. And not have to worry about caving in the bottom of a drawer if you drop a heavy tool on it. And not have the box sound like an 80's GM product at highway speed when you roll it across the garage.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







akeidolon posted:

Absolutely. It's worth it to be able to get to your tools easily instead of fight a lovely slide mechanism. And not have to worry about caving in the bottom of a drawer if you drop a heavy tool on it. And not have the box sound like an 80's GM product at highway speed when you roll it across the garage.
With so few still on the road, it may literally be an 80s GM product in there.

Toucan Sam
Sep 2, 2000


The low profile socket is great for the Ecotec but cutting a cheap 32mm wrench in half works just as good.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







In the last 15 minutes I've made use of a sawzall, dremel, chisel, hammer, and great big fuckoff c-clamp to handle some rather delicate automotive repairs. Tools are awesome sometimes.

Elephanthead
Sep 11, 2008




Toilet Rascal

I use a tiny pair of channel locks to filter change my ecotech. Someone should just sell a filter top with a socket hole in it.

eddiewalker
Apr 27, 2004


All this talk about HF coupons- I just stacked 20% off and "advertised special" miter saw. Maybe it differs by location, or maybe a special is different from a sale.

Either way, I got a $150-list saw for $80.

oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


grover posted:

In the last 15 minutes I've made use of a sawzall, dremel, chisel, hammer, and great big fuckoff c-clamp to handle some rather delicate automotive repairs.

I hate changing cabin air filters.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





I know there's been a lot of bitching in here about the poo poo quality of Harbor Freight's tap sets, but are they any good for at least chasing / cleaning threads that are already cut in aluminum? I managed to do a number on a threaded hole in the intercooler on my Mazdaspeed3 and while it's far from critical, I would rather not have a gaping hole in the engine bay.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Yes they are perfectly fine to reform and recut threads.

Valkyn
Jun 5, 2004

Have you seen this camwhore before?

If anyone is looking for a really nice set of snap ring pliers check out this link

This blue point plier set sells for over $150 usually, only $54 bucks plus shipping on this ebay auction.

I had been looking for a pair of the big pliers in this set forever and they go for more than this by themselves usually.

MomJeans420
Mar 19, 2007

Most of the gear, most of the time


I know this has been discussed before in the tool thread, but I don't remember the consensus. What's the preferred way to make electrical connections for car audio work? I'm an rear end who used electrical tape, but now I have to change things around and it's all messy from the tape.

Also, what's the best way to make connections for wire that will be handling 110V that is also outside? The people who owned my house before me extended the cord for an outside light by cutting off the plug at the end of the card, then using electrical tape to connect it to an extension cord that was cut in half. I figure this can't be a good way to handle 110V near sprinklers...

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


MomJeans420 posted:

I know this has been discussed before in the tool thread, but I don't remember the consensus. What's the preferred way to make electrical connections for car audio work? I'm an rear end who used electrical tape, but now I have to change things around and it's all messy from the tape.
It's a total can of worms - some say solder, some say bullet connectors or similar (citing that solder will crack with vibration). Personally, I solder a lot of the time, and have never had a wire-wire joint come apart. I can see how a surface soldering could crack, though.

quote:

Also, what's the best way to make connections for wire that will be handling 110V that is also outside? The people who owned my house before me extended the cord for an outside light by cutting off the plug at the end of the card, then using electrical tape to connect it to an extension cord that was cut in half. I figure this can't be a good way to handle 110V near sprinklers...
DIY store connector box of the correct IP rating for where it'll be sited. Usually have regular screw-clamp fixings inside.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

Don't close. Don't close.

Nap Ghost

Solder splicing and butt splicing will be essentially the same if done correctly. Just be sure the joint is soldered or crimped properly, then heat shrink over it (unless you use insulated butt slices). I hate using electrical tape. Heat shrink insulated butt splices are awesome.

Cat Hatter
Oct 24, 2006

Hatters gonna hat.


Wouldn't soldered wires have to already be under tension for the joint to even experience vibration, much less break because of it?

Coincidentally, soldering a new speaker wire to replace the broken one in my car door has convinced me to buy a soldering gun to replace my Wal-Mart soldering iron (it was all I could find open the night I bought it) that takes many minutes to heat up any wires thicker than 24 gauge.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


Home Depot has all of their stocking stuffers out. 5" Chinese knockoff vise-grip style locking pliers for $0.88.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

So you know what turns out to be the best holder for a soldering gun or iron? An old water pump, that's what.

SNiPER_Magnum posted:

Heat shrink insulated butt splices are awesome.

I looked these up and fell in love.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Cat Hatter posted:

Wouldn't soldered wires have to already be under tension for the joint to even experience vibration, much less break because of it?
Pretty much, but people really latch onto the "DIY solder joints crack in automotive applications" thing for some reason.

SNiPER_Magnum
Jan 21, 2001

Don't close. Don't close.

Nap Ghost

If your soldering skills are crap, then the joint will crack. A lot of people submit to "the bigger the glob, the better the job" method and just slap it on without good wet solder tension.
Heating the wires will help, but flux is really your friend. Use flux and be amazed.

wav3form
Aug 10, 2008


SNiPER_Magnum posted:

If your soldering skills are crap, then the joint will crack. A lot of people submit to "the bigger the glob, the better the job" method and just slap it on without good wet solder tension.
Heating the wires will help, but flux is really your friend. Use flux and be amazed.

Be sure to use a no-clean flux when soldering insulated wire... stranded or not. Flux is corrosive and can cause damage over time. Not a problem on easily cleaned components but flux wicking up past wire insulation is not good if it's anything but no-clean.

Goob
Jul 10, 2001

The M-1 does my talking.

I stopped by my local Harbor Freight today. They had coupons out for 25% off a single item on Thanksgiving Day. Thanks to their new crappy coupon policy, there's a bunch of things that you can't use it for. I was pumped that I could get an air compressor for 25% off, but I read the fine print and saw that air compressors are exempt from that coupon. Harbor Freight

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


SNiPER_Magnum posted:

If your soldering skills are crap, then the joint will crack. A lot of people submit to "the bigger the glob, the better the job" method and just slap it on without good wet solder tension.
Heating the wires will help, but flux is really your friend. Use flux and be amazed.

There's a lot more to soldering than heating wire and sticking some lead and tin on the joint. It's not quite as complex as welding, but you definitely need to read a book or take a class.

Geoj
May 28, 2008

BITTER POOR PERSON


Goob posted:

I stopped by my local Harbor Freight today. They had coupons out for 25% off a single item on Thanksgiving Day. Thanks to their new crappy coupon policy, there's a bunch of things that you can't use it for. I was pumped that I could get an air compressor for 25% off, but I read the fine print and saw that air compressors are exempt from that coupon. Harbor Freight

I kind of get the impression that Harbor Freight finally figured out that with some of their coupons and a very lax policy they were practically giving some items away.

Josh Lyman
May 24, 2009





This is a total newbie question and I wasn't sure whether to post it in DIY, A/T, or AI, so I'll give this thread a shot and repost if appropriate.

My mom bought a hardware set about 15 years ago called "DO-IT HERSELF" that was light blue. It had:

-6 precision screwdrivers
-3" standard slotted & phillips head screwdrvers
-Needlenose and regular pliers
-Monkey wrench and that wrench with the sliding pivot point
-25' measuring tape
-Scissors
-Box cutter
-Hammer

For the past decade and a half, it's been the perfect general purpose tool set. I've used literally every piece of the set and the only thing it's missing that I regularly need are allen wrenches, which I now own.

Over the years, pieces have gone missing and most everything is rusting, so I figured I would get a replacement set this Black Friday. Alas, anything from Home Depot or Lowe's comes with 9000 drill bits (which I don't need) or are screwdriver bits + nutdriver, which makes them highly impractical for recessed screws; I want at least 3" on my screwdrivers and 2" on my precision screwdrivers.

That said, is there a better solution than just going to Home Depot and buying all these pieces separately? On a related note, what's the consensus on plastic tool boxes vs fabric tool bags?

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Josh Lyman posted:

That said, is there a better solution than just going to Home Depot and buying all these pieces separately? On a related note, what's the consensus on plastic tool boxes vs fabric tool bags?
Annoyingly, Halfords make exactly what you need, but the Atlantic is in the way:
http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/...tegoryId_165572

As for bags or boxes, boxes all the way.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Go to Sears and make your own tool set out of individual packs. I did this for my Mom last year so she would stop commandeering my Dad's tools and stashing them places. Ended up spending about $120.

Josh Lyman
May 24, 2009





Skyssx posted:

Go to Sears and make your own tool set out of individual packs. I did this for my Mom last year so she would stop commandeering my Dad's tools and stashing them places. Ended up spending about $120.
Should I focus on getting Craftsmen branded stuff or does that not really matter? $120 is a bit more than I'd like to spend but I imagine I could put together a set of essentials for $50.

What's the consensus on a tool boxes vs. bags?

mod sassinator
Dec 13, 2006



Josh Lyman posted:

Should I focus on getting Craftsmen branded stuff or does that not really matter? $120 is a bit more than I'd like to spend but I imagine I could put together a set of essentials for $50.

What's the consensus on a tool boxes vs. bags?

You'll probably pay a premium if you buy all Craftsman tools individually--I would look for another cheap tool set. Do you have a Harbor Freight nearby? Something like this would be perfect: http://www.harborfreight.com/130-pi...case-91507.html

I'd put everything in a small box--bags are a pain if you have a lot of tools because everything gets mixed up and they can be tough to sort through.

Josh Lyman
May 24, 2009





mod sassinator posted:

You'll probably pay a premium if you buy all Craftsman tools individually--I would look for another cheap tool set. Do you have a Harbor Freight nearby? Something like this would be perfect: http://www.harborfreight.com/130-pi...case-91507.html
Turns out there's a Harbor Freight about 15 miles away and that set looks perfect! I'll check it out.

Josh Lyman fucked around with this message at 19:54 on Nov 21, 2010

eddiewalker
Apr 27, 2004


Josh Lyman posted:

Turns out there's a Harbor Freight about 15 miles away and that set looks perfect! Any chance they would discount below their "sale" price of $34.99 for Black Friday? I'm fine with paying $35, but a penny saved.

Mine has after-Thanksgiving coupons at the register. 20%, I think, but amongst recent reports of coupons not working with sale items...

Sockington
Jul 26, 2003


Home Depot (Canada) had their Ryobi 6" bench grinder on for $20 (today only). Picked one up.

MonkeyNutZ
Dec 26, 2008

"A cave isn't gonna cut it, we're going to have to use Beebo"


After a lot of searching I finally found some triple square (serrated) bits that don't suck. KD Tools are nowhere near the cost of the Snap-On triple square bits but they're incredibly well built, the set my dad has is over 30 years old.

12mm
http://www.amazon.com/KD-Tools-2306...0373364&sr=1-52

10mm
http://www.amazon.com/Tools-2305-10...90373321&sr=8-4

8mm
http://www.amazon.com/K-D-Tools-230...90373321&sr=8-3

If you're working on VWs, Opels, or some other German cars you're probably going to want to avoid those lovely Lisle branded ones, these KDs actually last more than one use.

Uthor
Jul 9, 2006

Gummy Bear Heaven ... It's where I go when the world is too mean.

MonkeyNutZ posted:

After a lot of searching I finally found some triple square (serrated) bits that don't suck.

Are these crap:
http://www.ecstuning.com/Volkswagen...iew_All/ES9013/
:?:

I haven't had the need for triple squares yet, but I think I'll need 'em when I get around to doing my brakes (still going strong after 40,000 miles). The ones from ECS tuning are 50% cheaper and have an extra bit.

MonkeyNutZ
Dec 26, 2008

"A cave isn't gonna cut it, we're going to have to use Beebo"


Those should be good, it looks like Schwaben tools are made in Germany.

Chillbro Baggins
Oct 8, 2004
Bad Angus! Bad!


Josh Lyman posted:

My mom bought a hardware set about 15 years ago called "DO-IT HERSELF" that was light blue.

My mom has the same kit in the trunk of her car for emergency tools, also missing several pieces. It also came in pink -- she got her mom the pink one at the same time.

Josh Lyman posted:

Should I focus on getting Craftsmen branded stuff or does that not really matter? $120 is a bit more than I'd like to spend but I imagine I could put together a set of essentials for $50.

What's the consensus on a tool boxes vs. bags?
The original kit probably wasn't all that high-quality.

As for a toolbox, this thing is pretty awesome for a general-purpose home-repair kit.



I use one at work, resetting grocery stores -- you need a surprising number of tools for it, and the stepstool is essential. Tangent: Most of my coworkers carry rubber mallets for when a bent shelf needs a bit of massaging. I carry a three-pound drilling hammer. My coworkers rarely use their mallets, they just ask me to beat on things.

One of my coworkers has a girly (i.e. all-pink) toolkit that came with a stepstool toolbox, but I can't remember the brand name, sorry. Bonus of pink tools: her stuff goes missing a lot less than anybody else's. (I, on the other hand, just write my name on all my tools, only loan them to people I trust, and make it known that I will use the 3lb hammer on anybody that touches my toolbox without permission.)

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Holy poo poo that would be perfect to have by a taller milling machine to get at the drawbar comfortably and have the basic tools Id need for it. I think I will pick one up and maybe one for the boss at work as a christmas present.

AnomalousBoners fucked around with this message at 03:53 on Nov 22, 2010

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Josh Lyman posted:

Should I focus on getting Craftsmen branded stuff or does that not really matter? $120 is a bit more than I'd like to spend but I imagine I could put together a set of essentials for $50.

What's the consensus on a tool boxes vs. bags?

Well, if it says Craftsman on it, you can walk into a Sears in 50 years (assuming it still exists) and get a new tool because you were using your screwdriver like a chisel and broke it. If it says Evolv, you'll need your receipt, and Sears will still tell you to get bent. For me, Craftsman is bare minimum except for 'truck' tools where I get Husky or Kobalt, whichever is cheapest. Although, there was an Evolv hammer for $9.99 that felt better in my hand than any of the $20 Craftsman hammers.

Tool bags are for taking places, tool boxes are for sitting on benches, again IMO.

Sears will have stuff like '8 screw drivers for ' or '10 screw drivers for 11bux' or '18 for 13'. At a certain point, their kits go into ridiculous poo poo you'll never use, so stop before then. Don't get pliers and wrenches with grips. Bare metal is best, or thin foamed rubber because it'll slide off easily in a few years.

Rhyno
Mar 22, 2003

Psst! It's me!
The Sinister with the mutant gene.


So how many of you live in apartments and keep a rolling chest there? I was looking at apartments this week and one of them had this nook behind the front door that would fit a tool chest almost perfectly.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

Skyssx posted:

Well, if it says Craftsman on it, you can walk into a Sears in 50 years (assuming it still exists) and get a new tool because you were using your screwdriver like a chisel and broke it. If it says Evolv, you'll need your receipt, and Sears will still tell you to get bent. For me, Craftsman is bare minimum except for 'truck' tools where I get Husky or Kobalt, whichever is cheapest. Although, there was an Evolv hammer for $9.99 that felt better in my hand than any of the $20 Craftsman hammers.

I quit buying Craftsman the day I took a broken ratchet wrench (teeth broke) in and didn't get handed a new one off the shelf but rather one from behind the counter made of pot metal with the paint flaking off. It bent the first time I used it and I threw it across a parking lot. gently caress Sears. Husky and Kobalt's guarantee at least still gets you the same tool you'd get if you just bought a replacement.

On the other hand, Harbor Freight ratchet wrenches have been so loving good that I just don't care about the Cola Wars poo poo anymore.

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Suniikaa
Jul 4, 2004

Johnny Walker Wisdom

Skyssx posted:

Well, if it says Craftsman on it, you can walk into a Sears in 50 years (assuming it still exists) and get a new tool because you were using your screwdriver like a chisel and broke it.

I took my fathers Craftsman staple gun in to get replaced because the slide wouldn't lock anymore and they basically told me to get hosed, so YMMV.

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