Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«514 »
  • Post
  • Reply
oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


Wow, it's not really a community garage as much as a shop class for adults. Their class list is pretty impressive. I'll have to check them out when the seattle location opens.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

General_Failure
Apr 17, 2005


sharkytm posted:

This is not true. My 33G Craftsman compressor holds pressure perfectly. Try opening and closing the bottom drain valve a few times, and then set the compressor in its side, and spray soapy water on the drain valve. If it bubbles, its leaking, a new one is about $13. You QD should seal perfectly, unless its worn out. You could also try taking it off, and re-applying teflon tape to seal the threads. Try the soapy water trick there too.


So true. My black or blue something? err... Generic branded 2.5HP compressor doesn't leak at all. I bought it in a combo with airtools and a lovely coil hose that came pre-split! I got them to replace it and bought a nice 20m hose anyway. Never tried the replacement coil.
The combo included everything except the bloody QD connector, which I had to buy from the hardware store.
After I did that I realised I didn't have any tape to seal it with. So I just did my normal thing and improvised. Threadlocker works perfectly. My compressor loses nothing even if I leave the cutoff valve open and have the quick connector bearing the brunt.

Ferremit
Sep 14, 2007
if I haven't posted about MY LANDCRUISER yet, check my bullbars for kangaroo prints



Left to Right, Top to bottom.

Unknown Brand 4" Air Angle grinder.
Atlas Copco 3/8" rattle gun
Unknown Die Grinder
Ingersoll Rand 5040 1/2" rattle gun
IR 3/8" Air ratchet
(yellow one below it) Atlas Copco 3/4" Air ratchet
Seisaku 1/2" air ratchet
Atlas Copco 3/8" air ratchet
IR 1/2" Air ratchet
Unknown Air tec gun
Atlas Copco die grinder
UR-Sol 3/8" Rattle gun

A$5 each!

The sockets and extensions cost me A$20 for the lot!

I was lucky enough to be around when they were selling everything out of a car factory they were shutting down!


Now i need a MUCH bigger compressor... and 1/2" airline!

multiprotocol
Sep 16, 2004
label switching is fun. i can relate to that.

Does anyone own a set of Big Red jack stands?

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/...13355_200313355

I had the opportunity to work with some during some emergency maintenance on miklm's car at a DE last weekend, and I thought they were really well made, and perfect for the paddock area at Barber (where you have to have the jack stand weight evenly distributed). Any feedback on them?

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







devnull420 posted:

Also, is there a good way to get a new bolt to stick back in? My ghetto fabulous plan is to get the bolt out, stick a new bolt through the gate into the hole left in the concrete wall, and then fill it in with pieces of broken concrete (have a bunch of it lying around) and concrete cement. I don't really have a great selection of tools (just the minimum I need to work on my car and various assorted others) so I'm trying to make do with what I got, no way to stick a new bolt into concrete (that I know of at least).
The bolt may be epoxied in, in which case, it's not going to come back out.

Speaking of which, use epoxy to get the new bolt to stick in the old hole They're probably with the hurricane straps in the big box, as they're common to tie houses to foundations.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


multiprotocol posted:

Does anyone own a set of Big Red jack stands?

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/...13355_200313355

I had the opportunity to work with some during some emergency maintenance on miklm's car at a DE last weekend, and I thought they were really well made, and perfect for the paddock area at Barber (where you have to have the jack stand weight evenly distributed). Any feedback on them?

I have the Torin Big Red Jack set.

I got this exact set:
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/...05241_200305241

About 4 years ago. The trolley jack has since failed but I was overusing it anyway. I still use the jacks and have 0 issues or complaints with them. The wheel chocks are wheel chocks. I replaced the crappy trolley jack with a nice harbor freight unit and man it makes setup a breeze compared to before.

Toucan Sam
Sep 2, 2000


RealKyleH posted:

I have the Torin Big Red Jack set.

I got this exact set:
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/...05241_200305241

About 4 years ago. The trolley jack has since failed but I was overusing it anyway.

How the gently caress do you overuse a jack?

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Toucan Sam posted:

How the gently caress do you overuse a jack?

Its a 2 ton (yea sure) jack under a 4500+ lb car.

Toucan Sam
Sep 2, 2000


In other words you bought a jack to small for your vehicle and proceeded to use it anyway.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Toucan Sam posted:

In other words you bought a jack to small for your vehicle and proceeded to use it anyway.

I love it when people read something, assume a bunch of other conditions are true and proceed to make snarky comments. It always goes well and is accurate.

whiskas
May 30, 2005


My lovely little air compressor that plugs into the cigarette lighter plug died on me at the track last weekend.

So I just picked up a small oil-less air compressor. 3 gallon tank with max 100psi. This one: http://www.amazon.com/Campbell-Haus...n/dp/B0002ZHBNM

I was wondering if it'll be sufficient enough to take the the track with me to inflate tires. Keep in mind I likely won't have access to a power cord, so assuming the 3 gallon tank is topped up to 100psi, will I have enough air to inflate 4 tires from 32psi to 45psi?

fishmech_1.1_RC
Jul 22, 2003



Toucan Sam posted:

In other words you bought a jack to small for your vehicle and proceeded to use it anyway.

Unless he somehow managed to stick the jack under the very center of the car and tried to lift the whole thing, I really doubt that the jack was even lifting 2 tons.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


whiskas posted:

I was wondering if it'll be sufficient enough to take the the track with me to inflate tires. Keep in mind I likely won't have access to a power cord, so assuming the 3 gallon tank is topped up to 100psi, will I have enough air to inflate 4 tires from 32psi to 45psi?
Eh, I highly doubt it - I have a little compressor (1.5 USG) that I use for topping up my tyres, and it won't up the pressure in one tyre that much without cutting the compressor in.

What's it's current draw? You might be able to run it with an inverter from the car anyway, but you're probably better off looking at the 12v compressors people like Viair produce

Contraband posted:

I really doubt that the jack was even lifting 2 tons.
I think he's more getting at the fact that, like my crappy back-up one, a "two-tonne" budget jack really earns its optimistic quotation marks.

oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


whiskas posted:

I was wondering if it'll be sufficient enough to take the the track with me to inflate tires. Keep in mind I likely won't have access to a power cord, so assuming the 3 gallon tank is topped up to 100psi, will I have enough air to inflate 4 tires from 32psi to 45psi?

No, you'll need a lot more than that.

I'm planning on building something like this, but with a larger tank, for track use.
http://www.instructables.com/id/CO2...-filling-tires/

Nerobro
Nov 4, 2005

Rider now with 100% more titanium!


oxbrain posted:

No, you'll need a lot more than that.

I'm planning on building something like this, but with a larger tank, for track use.
http://www.instructables.com/id/CO2...-filling-tires/
I don't like that rig. There are some problems with it that I could fix.. But filling your tires with CO2 has it's own trouble. CO2's pressure of vaporization is a rather nasty curve, and you can reach tempratures and pressures that will cause co2 to condense without any real trouble. If that's "all I had to work with" I'd do it, and I'd put a vapor separator between the bottle and the regulator, and then I'd put some sort of radiator on the regulators output, the closer to ambiant the co2 is when it goes int the tires the better off you are. And then I'd fill my tires slowly.

The 100psi air tank won't get you far either. If you picked up a paintball air tank you could have a chance, but you'd need to find a 88 or 114/4500 do do any real good.

Maxwedge
May 7, 2007


oxbrain posted:

I'm planning on building something like this, but with a larger tank, for track use.
http://www.instructables.com/id/CO2...-filling-tires/

I have one of those. Quoting myself.

maxwedge posted:

http://www.ultimate-air.com/



It's cheaper version of the more popular power tank.

So its basically a Co2 tank and regulator that can do everything an air compressor can do except its portable. I use it primarly for airing up tires and cleaning out my computer. You can run air tools off of it. I think a 10lb tank can run a 1/2" impact for over 3 minutes continuously. Its also got enough balls to reseat tire beads. To refill it, just take it to a welding supply store and it costs about $20. True, a normal compressor is probably cheaper but, I can keep mine in my car for emergencies and its great if you live in an apartment and dont want to piss off the neighbors with a noisy compressor.

oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


Nerobro posted:

I don't like that rig. There are some problems with it that I could fix.. But filling your tires with CO2 has it's own trouble. CO2's pressure of vaporization is a rather nasty curve, and you can reach tempratures and pressures that will cause co2 to condense without any real trouble. If that's "all I had to work with" I'd do it, and I'd put a vapor separator between the bottle and the regulator, and then I'd put some sort of radiator on the regulators output, the closer to ambiant the co2 is when it goes int the tires the better off you are. And then I'd fill my tires slowly.

The 100psi air tank won't get you far either. If you picked up a paintball air tank you could have a chance, but you'd need to find a 88 or 114/4500 do do any real good.

You kind of hit on my reason for a bigger tank. A 15# bottle filled 2/3 full wouldn't have nearly the same problems as a full 10#. Running an impact hammer or grinder takes a lot of flow, and they usually vent right at your hand. The cold also attracts moisture, and since your co2 won't have any oil it can lead to rusty tools in no time.

I wouldn't worry about track tires. Topping off a 195/60/14 on a warm day isn't going to use much volume, and the wheel/tire would retain plenty of heat to flash-boil any vapor that makes it through the hose. Any pressure change after filling would be too small to measure with normal gages. Filling a 35" off-road tire in cold weather is another matter, and I see your point. This isn't usually an issue as you're either filling from flat to low-psi or from low-psi to road-psi. Unless you're coming very close to the sidewall rating you won't see enough pressure change to blow the tire.

My original idea was to use a 20oz paintball co2 tank through a 5gal expansion tank. The problem was that paintball regulators that flow enough to run an impact hammer are far more costly than what I want, and adapting a standard regulator would have been far more clunky. Instead of adding weight in fittings and a mount I figure I'll add weight in the bottle.


I like their setup, I don't like the $200 price tag for something I could assemble for <$100.

Money Walrus
Sep 2, 2007


Survey for you guys- For those like myself who love pick and pull junkyards, what tools do you usually bring with ya? I know half the time I'm kicking myself for not sharpening my knife to cut through hoses, but usually I have a socket set, metric wrenches, a prybar, torx and regular scredrivers, wire cutters, and various other goodies in my bag.

Anyone else want to share their junkyard tool set?

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Usually all I need is a metric set of sockets, screwdriver with 5 types of bits, knife, socket extensions, ratchets, hammer, and a 3/8 breaker bar.

oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


Serrated knives go through hose when dull.

I bring an assortment of everything, some of the bigger stuff gets left in the car. Socket sets in long and short, ratchet in 1/2" and 3/8", breaker bars, nitrile gloves, pry bars, box wrenches, flarenut wrenches, vice-grips, flatnose and needlenose pliers, big wire cutters, long and short screw drivers, impact driver, rubber mallet, lead hammer, slide hammer, and small bolt cutters(great for power steering lines). I've also brought my engine hoist for pulling engines.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







Back when I was driving my 15 year old camaro, I'd never go anywhere without a full toolset; english and metric sockets, set of craftsmen ratchet wrenches, pliers, adjustable wrench, channel locks, a set of screwdrivers, fix-a-flat, tire plug kit, air pump, and every kind of fluid the car could possibly leak.

Ferremit
Sep 14, 2007
if I haven't posted about MY LANDCRUISER yet, check my bullbars for kangaroo prints

Money Walrus posted:

Survey for you guys- For those like myself who love pick and pull junkyards, what tools do you usually bring with ya? I know half the time I'm kicking myself for not sharpening my knife to cut through hoses, but usually I have a socket set, metric wrenches, a prybar, torx and regular scredrivers, wire cutters, and various other goodies in my bag.

Anyone else want to share their junkyard tool set?

is a sawzall the wrong answer?

Last time i helped someone get some parts from a car, we just sawed off roughly where we needed!

Big K of Justice
Nov 27, 2005

Anyone seen my ball joints?


Ferremit posted:

is a sawzall the wrong answer?

Last time i helped someone get some parts from a car, we just sawed off roughly where we needed!

You'd fit in with all those guys selling the catalytic converters at a pick n' pull

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

Hey bebe





$60 yard sale score.



Recommendations for 1/2 airline? I plan on piping with galv down to my garage.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Sweet compressor.

Should be getting a Husky tool case and some extra tools this weekend for a good deal. Can't wait

ease
Jul 19, 2004

HUGE

I bought a house with a nice 2 car garage about a month ago, and I've been going nuts over tools ever since.

I just picked up this from amazon for 88$.


It's going to be my first air ratchet, it has 90lbs of torque! Needless to say I'm excited. I've used impact wrenches since I was 15, but I never had a ratchet.

For those of you who have air ratchets, how awesome are they, and how much would you hate not having one now that you do?

oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


ease posted:

For those of you who have air ratchets, how awesome are they, and how much would you hate not having one now that you do?

They're more cumbersome than normal ratchets and it's much too easy to break or strip threads. I used mine a couple times, then put it away and haven't touched it since.

Upgrayedd
Apr 25, 2004
When this baby hits 88mph, you're gonna see some serious shit

Just a tip for refreshing "worn-out" Hydraulic jacks.

I had some off-brand floorjack that served me well for a while.
Lately it had gotten weaker and wouldn't lift anything more than a few inches.

Popped off the sheet metal and there were two bolts. one was the bleeder valve on the front to let the thing down, and the other was a bit bigger and on top of the reservoir.

I pulled the jack up all the way by hand and filled the reservoir with brake fluid through that top hole, closed it up and bled out the air through the normal bleeding valve to let it down. Now it works perfectly and lifts my truck up to its full height.

Just as before, I would never get under the car supported by this jack. I've been extra careful using it since adding the fluid, but it has performed well since then.

And about air ratchets, I've found that they don't really help. Its not like Impact wrench where it uses the inertia of the hammer to drive the bolt in. In the end, you still have to supply the torque, it just goes a bit faster. The Torque rating doesn't really matter, if you can't get it off with a normal socket wrench, an air ratchet won't help, it'll just jerk your wrist around a lot more.

I use mine occasionally when I already have the compressor going, but only because it makes a sweet noise. Otherwise its useless to me.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Upgrayedd posted:

I pulled the jack up all the way by hand and filled the reservoir with brake fluid through that top hole, closed it up and bled out the air through the normal bleeding valve to let it down. Now it works perfectly and lifts my truck up to its full height.
You should probably use proper hydraulic oil - brake fluid can do nasty things to seals in systems designed for mineral oils.

Kynetx
Jan 8, 2003


Full of ignorant tribalism. Kinda sad.


oxbrain posted:

They're more cumbersome than normal ratchets and it's much too easy to break or strip threads. I used mine a couple times, then put it away and haven't touched it since.

They're really handy for a few applications like removing transmission pans and valve covers where there is a lot of low-torque repetition, but that's about it.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Kynetx posted:

They're really handy for a few applications like removing transmission pans and valve covers where there is a lot of low-torque repetition, but that's about it.

I use ours from time to time. It actually came in really handy screwing 40 or so lag bolts into wood while building a hay trailer.

Disciple of Pain
Dec 4, 2005


RandomG posted:

Finally chose to get an expensive tiny crowbar:

http://www.e30m3performance.com/mai...pegs/pict01.jpg

I ignored step one of the valve adjustment procedure which is make sure the car is cold, I dealt with the slight pain of heat as I took off the valve cover, only to realize I couldn't get the shims out with the tools that were supposed to work... I think you're suppose to have the car cool off so everything contracts a little bit.

Um. On many motors (all?) that you need to adjust the valves on it makes a HUGE difference. If you set the clearances to a COLD setting when the motor was at operating temperature, they are going to be LOOOOSE. Although, worse - if you set to a COLD setting when the engine is even a little warm - they will be too tight.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

PainterofCrap posted:

$60 yard sale score.



Recommendations for 1/2 airline? I plan on piping with galv down to my garage.
Use "L" Copper, not galvanized steel. The price is a little higher, but you won't get steel rusty bits in your air tools and most importantly, any paint job you do, and its easier to work with, just solder it, no need for pipe tape or threaded fittings or having to thread pipe. I'm running my air lines this weekend (hopefully), and I'll take pictures if you are interested.

Upgrayedd posted:

And about air ratchets, I've found that they don't really help. Its not like Impact wrench where it uses the inertia of the hammer to drive the bolt in. In the end, you still have to supply the torque, it just goes a bit faster. The Torque rating doesn't really matter, if you can't get it off with a normal socket wrench, an air ratchet won't help, it'll just jerk your wrist around a lot more.
An Air ratchet is AWESOME for hard-to-get bolts. If you can wedge the air ratchet into position and hit the lever, it'll do the knuckle-busting for you. If you use one a lot, you learn to love it.

Pissingintowind
Jul 27, 2006
Better than shitting into a fan.

Decision time guys:

I need to get some power tools. Namely, a drill and a jigsaw. A circular saw or router might be helpful too, but aren't necessary.

They'll be used lightly and not very often (not a contractor or pro mechanic).

There was a pretty badass deal on a DeWalt DC728KA at Lowe's, and I picked one up. $89 for it. Only thing I don't like is that it uses NiCad batteries and is kinda pricey.

Now, after seeing a deal at Home Depot for a Ryobi One+ starter kit, I'm kind of questioning myself.

I can get a drill and circular saw for $99. Then, I can pick any tool or One+ accessory for free. I'd probably either get the Li-Ion upgrade kit, then hock the original batteries (and maybe the circular saw) on eBay and get a decent jigsaw. Essentially, I could probably end up paying about $40 for a Li-Ion drill.

I can still return (or eBay, since they're going for quite a bit) the DeWalt. Should I? Or will the difference in quality be vast. Keep in mind, the tools will be used sparingly and newbishly .

Pissingintowind fucked around with this message at 19:16 on Jun 13, 2008

Pissingintowind
Jul 27, 2006
Better than shitting into a fan.

Nice double post there, Pissingintowind .

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


InitialDave posted:

You should probably use proper hydraulic oil - brake fluid can do nasty things to seals in systems designed for mineral oils.

Absolutely. The brake fluid will soften/swell up an oil seal tremendously. Eventually when it is under pressure (in your case, that would be jacking up a car) the seal will have catastrophic failure and it will fail.

It will work for some time and indeed the "swelling" effect of the seal surface may actually help it "seal" better temporarily, but the pressure capacity of the seal will be compromised.

Throw any jack away that you've done this to. The only way it won't fail is if by freak chance the manufacturer made the jack with a seal that is compatible with brake fluid AND oils, which is unlikely. Heck, I don't even know if such a material exists.

oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


PTFE works fine with brake fluid or mineral oil and is the most commonly used material for hydraulic seals.

You shouldn't use brake fluid because it absorbs water and will rust the metal in the cylinder faster. The sudden failure is from the seal tearing after being rubbed on a rusty cylinder too many times. If you change the fluid every 6-12 months(like your car) it'll be fine.

Big K of Justice
Nov 27, 2005

Anyone seen my ball joints?


Any suggestions for riveting tools?

I need to rivet and bond in some patches on the humvee's aluminum body while I got everything apart. I don't have access to an air compressor so it'll probably have to be a hand tool.

I'm basically drilling out the ends of cracks, and placing T6 aluminum sheets with pre drilled rivet holes and a slather of bonding agent/epoxy before I snap them in.

AnomalousBoners
Dec 22, 2007

by Ozma


Today I refreshed my cheapo air impact gun. (Coleman Powermate) I was surprised to find out it was made of very few parts. I simply took 4 set screws out of the back and removed the two assemblies and the shaft. I cleaned out all the parts and housing and began to lube it up. The old oil sitting in the housing was disgusting and looked like a bit of light rust mixed with coolant and oil. My air compressor has a big leak so I haven't tested it yet but I am confident it will work as new again.

Quick guide to cleaning mine:

On the front was the shaft which, if I am not mistaken, sits in a small bearing. I simply wiped it off and put a little wheel bearing grease on it and slid it back in.

Next were these two assemblies. the one between the shaft and back assembly was a fastened together piece made of what looked like a few cast, then machined steel parts. This was the one that when you put oil in the side of your impact gun, it goes directly onto it. I cleaned it, gave it a bath in some Syn ATF I had from a previous tranny change, and slid it back in. (I added syn ATF to the housing walls as well.)

The rear assembly was just 5 main pieces that went together in rear part of the gun's housing. Two end pieces made out of aluminum that air flowed through, a cast steel body and the innards of the assembly which contained little blades that came out when you depressed the trigger due to centrifugal force. This wasn't as dirty so I just wiped it down, gave everything a good coating of oil and put it all back in. Its important to note that theres a small piece that causes a few different parts to line up including the rear assembly with the housing and the front assembly.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Aeka 2.0
Nov 16, 2000

Have you seen my apex seals? I seem to have lost them.






Dinosaur Gum

BigKOfJustice posted:

Any suggestions for riveting tools?

I need to rivet and bond in some patches on the humvee's aluminum body while I got everything apart. I don't have access to an air compressor so it'll probably have to be a hand tool.

I'm basically drilling out the ends of cracks, and placing T6 aluminum sheets with pre drilled rivet holes and a slather of bonding agent/epoxy before I snap them in.

I use a hand riveter by craftsman on a regular basis if I can't get to an air line.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«514 »