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regulargonzalez
Aug 18, 2006
UNGH LET ME LICK THOSE BOOTS DADDY HULU YES YES GIVE ME ALL THE CORPORATE CUMMIES ADBLOCK USERS DESERVE THE DEATH PENALTY, DON'T THEY DADDY?
WHEN THE RICH GET RICHER I GET HORNIER


Head Hit Keyboard posted:

Speaking of Mass Effect 1, I just finished that, so what can you guys tell me about Mass Effect 2? Specifically things that might help with the genre shift because I'm generally bad at cover shooters.

Combat is fun but also very easy and straightforward, I wouldn't worry about it from a mechanics-standpoint. Basically if you walk into a room and see a bunch of crates in the middle of the room, you know baddies are about to enter so just run up to the crates to take cover. It's pretty simplistic.

The most important thing imo is that the end game can go perfectly, horribly, or anywhere in between and still get you a 'win' condition. I think the point of RPGs is to actually play your role, so don't worry about min-maxing every decision. Decide who your character is and what they stand for and just play your role and enjoy the ride.

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Cirofren
Jun 13, 2005



Pillbug

ME2 has a few points where you need to advance to stop enemies spawning. Try to take out enemies that would flank as you advance and move up before the new spawns can get into position.

Flame112
Apr 21, 2011


I don't think I have ever seen a place where the enemies wouldn't stop spawning.

Burning Mustache
Sep 4, 2006

Zaeed got stories.
Kasumi got loot.
All I got was a hole in my suit.


Mass Effect 1:

There are four main storyline planets (not all of them available to do right away), but I would definitely recommend doing Therum first as you'll get a new squadmate which you can bring along for the other missions so you'll want to do that early, and do Virmire last as it will make for the best story progression / pacing in my opinion.

Talk to your squadmates on your ship between missions. Some of them will give you sidequests when doing so, do those sidequests. Generally, the other sidequests can be safely ignored if you get bored of them, they don't really have a meaningful impact on the story or in the later games. Do the one sidequest on Luna though.

After you have completed all four main storyline planets, you will eventually hit a point of no return and you may not access the Citadel anymore once it triggers, so make sure you get all sidequest / Citadel business that you want done before that.

You'll encounter containers which are locked and can be opened with either Electronics or Decryption skills. You can bring along party members with those skills to do that but even then you'll have to put quite some points into the skills to be able to open all the difficult containers. If you're unable to open absolutely every container, don't worry about it. All they contain is loot that is also dropped regularly from plain combat, and most of it is pretty redundant anyway.

Get the Bring Down the Sky DLC, it's a really good and fun mission.


Mass Effect 2:

Combat-wise it should be noted that the game really wants you to stick behind cover and play defensively. Playing Vanguard can be a bit tricky because of that as the basic design of the class requires you to do the exact opposite of sitting in cover. The class has a steep learning curve but it's really rewarding once you've figured it out. It may not be the best class for your first playthrough though. Also keep in mind that only Soldiers will be able to use all classes of guns, the other classes are limited to a combinations of SMGs, pistols, shotguns or sniper rifles (in the case of the Infiltrator), and usually only two of them (i.e. SMGs and pistols for the caster classes), but you will get a character specialization options half-way through the game that will allow you to pick one additional type of gun that you can carry.

If you have the Kasumi DLC (you should!), this will get you the best SMG in the entire game which can be handy for caster classes. You can do her mission quite early too, i.e. once you can access the Citadel, so you might want to go there and recruit her and do her loyalty misssion sooner rather than later, to get access to her character and that SMG.

Similarly, if you feel like getting the Firepower DLC, the Mattock is the absolutely best assault rifle in the game.

The Incisor is the best sniper rifle to give to squadmates due to a bug that causes them to do twice the damage they should be doing with it.

The loyalty missions are the meat of the game and you should absolutely do all of them -- there's no need for urgency and skipping loyalty missions (although there is one exception here -- after the penultimate storyline mission, the one that grants you the last missing party member from your roster, a very unique party member, you will know it when it happens) you will be limited to a window of 1 - 2 missions (depending on circumstances) you can do before attending the final mission, otherwise Bad Things will happen).

DLC-wise, you will want to get Lair of the Shadow Broker, Overlord and Arrival (all of these are story DLCs) and Kasumi which only features a single mission, but also a really useful (and funny) character as well as the above mentioned SMG.

A Real Happy Camper
Dec 11, 2007

These children have taught me how to believe.


I'm about 20 minutes into Yakuza 4, anything I should know/do/can miss?

Count Chocula
Dec 25, 2011

WE HAVE TO CONTROL OUR ENVIRONMENT
IF YOU SEE ME POSTING OUTSIDE OF THE AUSPOL THREAD PLEASE TELL ME THAT I'M MISSED AND TO START POSTING AGAIN


What's a decent starting build for Dragon's Dogma: Dark Arisen? I just ordered the game and don't want to screw up. I'm thinking Ranger for my character and wizard for my Main Pawn?

Mzbundifund
Nov 5, 2011

I'm afraid so.


Those are fine classes. You can't really screw up your build since you can respec at any time, and there's tons more sidequests than you need to do to get decently levelled for the main stuff. The only thing to keep in mind for down the road is your pawns can't eventually become any of the hybrid classes, so if you want a hybrid class you'll have to be that yourself while your main pawn will just become a straight-up sorcerer. As far as I know there's no missable content, so feel free to try builds out, and if you want to see a specific skill in action before you buy it, just hire another pawn with it.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Mzbundifund posted:

Those are fine classes. You can't really screw up your build since you can respec at any time, and there's tons more sidequests than you need to do to get decently levelled for the main stuff. The only thing to keep in mind for down the road is your pawns can't eventually become any of the hybrid classes, so if you want a hybrid class you'll have to be that yourself while your main pawn will just become a straight-up sorcerer. As far as I know there's no missable content, so feel free to try builds out, and if you want to see a specific skill in action before you buy it, just hire another pawn with it.

Is it safe to say that if you're playing on Easy difficulty, you can avoid the side quests and still get through the game just fine, or is some amount of grinding (which I would define to include doing side quests you don't want to do purely for the sake of leveling your character) inevitable even on a lower difficulty?

I basically just want to take the Nier approach to sidequests, but I'm wondering if skipping them when they look boring is ultimately shooting myself in the foot in some way.

Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


No, it really isn't. The Nier approach is pretty much the right way to do things. Just take some time to explore and do whatever you feel is interesting and you should be powerful enough to handle the game. I've never really found myself grinding in Dragon's Dogma, unless you count expeditions out to see what's over yon hill and fighting a ton of monsters along the way.

Fergus Mac Roich
Nov 5, 2008



Soiled Meat

Ainsley McTree posted:

Is it safe to say that if you're playing on Easy difficulty, you can avoid the side quests and still get through the game just fine, or is some amount of grinding (which I would define to include doing side quests you don't want to do purely for the sake of leveling your character) inevitable even on a lower difficulty?

I basically just want to take the Nier approach to sidequests, but I'm wondering if skipping them when they look boring is ultimately shooting myself in the foot in some way.

You can skip them if you want especially on easy, but you should grab all the random notice board quests(except escorts unless you plan to do them) because you will complete them as you go for lots of money and experience. If you have to grind on normal or easy you are doing something wrong and know that the game is best played with regular vocation changes; once you pay the small cost for a class change, that class is open to you forever. Changing classes a lot is both the most fun way to play and the best way to make a powerful character.

SpazmasterX
Jul 13, 2006

Wrong about everything XIV related
~fartz~


Captain Novolin posted:

I'm about 20 minutes into Yakuza 4, anything I should know/do/can miss?

You'll eventually be able to pool everyone's inventories. But if you run through and grab a bunch of locker keys as Akiyama, you're gonna lose access to all that neat stuff while you can't use him.

Akiyama's combat style is fast and emphasizes using HEAT actions. Prioritize abilities that build his HEAT faster, like with taunting. He also gets an ability that makes him stronger when he's drunk. Be drunk all the time.

Saejima's combat style is slow and hard to get used to at the start because of how different it is from Akiyama's. You want to charge his attacks to do as much damage as possible, and get abilities that affect that along with ones that make him combo faster.

Tanimura's combat style is about countering, and most of his moves revolve around it. He also encounters a lot of enemies that use guns during the game, so you'll want to give him armor that defends against that.

Kiryu is an all around fighter, and has the special ability to go into Red HEAT mode. Make sure you know which mode his HEAT actions are in so you don't get confused.

Nothing can be missed. In the final chapter, you can switch between all the characters to do their side stories and such.

Stelas
Sep 6, 2010



SpazmasterX posted:

Nothing can be missed. In the final chapter, you can switch between all the characters to do their side stories and such.

To add onto this: Akiyama's sidestories can't be missed, but gaining access to some of them once you reach a certain point in the game involves going to his office and 'reminiscing' in his chair. It's worth mentioning because it's not immediately obvious.

owl_pellet
Nov 20, 2005

show your enemy
what you look like




Mzbundifund posted:

Those are fine classes. You can't really screw up your build since you can respec at any time, and there's tons more sidequests than you need to do to get decently levelled for the main stuff. The only thing to keep in mind for down the road is your pawns can't eventually become any of the hybrid classes, so if you want a hybrid class you'll have to be that yourself while your main pawn will just become a straight-up sorcerer. As far as I know there's no missable content, so feel free to try builds out, and if you want to see a specific skill in action before you buy it, just hire another pawn with it.

Most of this is true but the part about there being no missable content is not. There is a shitload of missable sidequests and the requirements for keeping them available to you are so opaque that you will want to use a guide if you are a completionist and want to do everything in one playthrough.

As for the classes, you can always pick up pawns that have what you and your main pawn lack. I ran my guy as a sword and board warrior most of the time with my main pawn being a mage. I didn't upgrade her to a sorcerer ever because they can't heal IIRC. Then for my pickup pawns I usually did some type of archer and a two hander warrior type.

Barudak
May 7, 2007



Count Chocula posted:

What's a decent starting build for Dragon's Dogma: Dark Arisen? I just ordered the game and don't want to screw up. I'm thinking Ranger for my character and wizard for my Main Pawn?

One thing I personally found was I had a lot, lot more fun playing as anything but the wizard because a lot of that job is waiting through cast times and healing. Its the perfect job for your personal attendent since they can be trained to do exactly what you want while you get all the glory of climbing onto ogres and stabbing them with flaming swords.

Random Hajile
Aug 25, 2003



I love pawns that know how to get a cyclops' helmet off. They let me focus on grabbing the mage pawn to stop the chain-lightning long enough for them to actually do it.

Random Hajile fucked around with this message at 18:04 on May 10, 2013

Artix
Apr 26, 2010

He's finally back,
to kick some tail!
And this time,
he's goin' to jail!


So I ordered a copy of Yu-gi-oh: Duelist of the Roses based on it apparently being a completely unhinged strategy game, similar to Falsebound Kingdom. The only thing I know about it is "Use Pumpking." Any thoughts?

Technetium
Oct 26, 2006

TRILOBITE TECHNICIAN
QUITE POSSIBLY GAY



Decided I might start playing New Vegas. I've completed the Tutorial kill geckos mission and ended up installing a bunch of mods including highres textures. Anything else I should know? I assume there's no danger of savegame glitches anymore because that's what stopped me in the first place. Played...twenty or thirty hours of Fallout 3 so I'm familiar with the games if nothing else.

Mods:

Head Hit Keyboard
Oct 9, 2012

It must be fate that has brought us together after all these years.

Technetium posted:

Decided I might start playing New Vegas.

On the mods front, get rid of Mission Mojave and start over your playthrough, it breaks far more than it fixes. Also consider dropping EVE since it's known for crashing a lot.

As for the actual game, focus on your non-weapon skills, especially speech. Speech will open up the majority of the game's conversation choices. I'd say Sneak and Medicine are the next most important though it's up for debate. Barter is by and large a waste of skill points.

If you plan on doing the DLC and you've specced in guns, be ready to pick up a melee weapon regardless of your skill anyway. Dead money and Old World Blues both are very unfriendly to gun users, especially OWB.

As far as non-standard ammo goes, AP is for Deathclaws, Hollow Points are for Cazadores, using special ammo against nearly anything else is a kind of a waste.

Gynovore
Jun 17, 2009

Forget your RoboCoX or your StickyCoX or your EvilCoX, MY CoX has Blinking Bewbs!

WHY IS THIS GAME DEAD?!

Technetium posted:

Decided I might start playing New Vegas. Played...twenty or thirty hours of Fallout 3 so I'm familiar with the games if nothing else.


Did you finish Fallout 3? Personally I'd say to play the heck out of FO3 before starting NV. If anything it will make you appreciate how much better NV is.

As for the differences... in FO3 you got more perks than you could possibly use, and skill points were practically shoveled your way. Here, you get half as many perks, and much fewer skill points. Choose perks wisely, and start INT at 9. Of course, just like FO3, default difficulty is so easy that even a gimmick build can succeed.

In FO3, you are practically forced to play Small Guns in the first half and Energy Weapons the second. Here, all weapon types are viable for the whole game.

Speech is no longer a roll of the dice. There are many dialog checks for skills other than speech. In particular, Barter is no longer poo poo.

After the first playthrough, do it again with max difficulty, hardcore, and the JSawyer mod. That will put hair on your chest.

Panic! at Nabisco
Jun 6, 2007

it seemed like a good idea at the time


I finally got around to buying Disgaea 4: A Promise Unforgotten, and Disgaea games are always full of poo poo you wish you knew when you started. Tips?

Taerkar
Dec 7, 2002

kind of into it, really



Wrong thread somehow.

Taerkar fucked around with this message at 02:25 on May 12, 2013

NET WT 30 OZ
Apr 12, 2003

YES


Anything I should know before playing S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Call of Pripyat for the first time? It seems like a pretty complicated setting.

Burning Mustache
Sep 4, 2006

Zaeed got stories.
Kasumi got loot.
All I got was a hole in my suit.


NET WT 30 OZ posted:

Anything I should know before playing S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Call of Pripyat for the first time? It seems like a pretty complicated setting.

Unlike the other two STALKERs, you don't really require any mods on your first playthrough, and that goes double for all the large super mods, so I'd advise against going with any of those for now.

The gun gameplay in the series is pretty unique, challenging and unforgiving, but also very fun!
Use cover a lot and lean around corners. Lean, then strafe until you can see your enemies, pop off a burst / single shot and return behind cover again.

Grenades can be a bitch to throw but they're also fairly effective, though that goes both ways!

CoP in particular has you fighting against mutants a lot, and shotguns with buckshot really shine against them, so it's always a good idea to carry a shotgun in your second weapon slot and bring a couple of dozen buckshot rounds.

Skadovsk, the abandoned ship you get to right away, is your major hub for the first area where you can acquire new supplies and store your gear. The upper deck has a room with mattresses and a blue footlocker, which you can use to store all of your stuff in without fear of it being stolen.

Economy-wise you can make lots of money hunting for artifacts.
You'll start out with an artifact detector that you can bring up by pressing Z (by default, IIRC). Walking around in anomaly fields (although sometimes artifacts will also spawn in completely random places) will allow you to detect the precious artifacts. The first detector you get is pretty difficult to use, it just generates a beeping noise that becomes more frequent the closer you get to an artifact -- once you're right next to one (and the artifact becomes visible which will allow you to pick it up) it will be a constant BEBEBEBEBEBEBEBEP noise. Later detectors show you the direction where the artifact is relative to you or even its position on a small screen, so if you can get your hands on a better detector, do so right away!

Once you've picked up some artifacts, head over to the barman in Skadovsk and talk to him. He will have quests asking for specific artifacts which gives pretty decent money, even more than just selling the artifacts to him directly. Do not accept the quests unless you own the artifact in question though, as they are time-limited and you're not guaranteed to find that specific type of artifact within the limit. Instead, hang on to artifacts if you don't absolutely need money right away, and wait until he's asking for the one's you have in stock to maximize profits.

Oh yeah, and artifacts get spawned every time a blowout happens, so it's worth to do a run around all the anomaly fields after one.

You can also sell the loot acquired off fallen enemies. Crappy pistols and sawed-off shotguns have rather lovely weight / value ratios, but some of the later assault rifles can net you quite some cash, especially if they're in decent condition. Grenades and anti-radiation drugs have a pretty decent weight / value ratio.

The mechanic at Skadovsk can repair and upgrade your gear. He will give you a better price if you give him a certain kind of Ukranian delicacy ...

Burning Mustache fucked around with this message at 07:41 on May 12, 2013

fuckpot
May 20, 2007

Lurking beneath the water
The future Immortal awaits

Team Anasta


Head Hit Keyboard posted:

Barter is by and large a waste of skill points.
This is true, but if you want to do a non-combat run barter is useful due to the high amount of barter skill-check speech things that are in the game.

AlMac
Oct 5, 2003

Peter Serafinowicz says I'M THE BEST

I bought Race Driver GRID for XBOX 360 during a mega-sale a little while ago and now I want to scream. I've never been THIS bad at a game before. I have everything on the easiest, most basic settings and I'm still lucky to even finish a race at all. I just can't seem to get any sort of grip on the controls. Admittedly I've never played a "proper" racing game before (although this one is supposed to be quite arcadey). I didn't think it'd be quite so face-smashingly frustrating, though.

Most games involve me smashing out at the first corner, slightly clipping the edge of the road and spinning out, or driving so slowly and carefully that I can't even see the rest of the pack.

Does anyone have any total beginner tips for this game? I really want to like it but I feel like maybe I just fundamentally don't get this type of racer. Should I just chalk it up to experience and go back to Mario Kart?

ahobday
Apr 19, 2007



AlMac posted:

I bought Race Driver GRID for XBOX 360 during a mega-sale a little while ago and now I want to scream. I've never been THIS bad at a game before. I have everything on the easiest, most basic settings and I'm still lucky to even finish a race at all. I just can't seem to get any sort of grip on the controls. Admittedly I've never played a "proper" racing game before (although this one is supposed to be quite arcadey). I didn't think it'd be quite so face-smashingly frustrating, though.

Most games involve me smashing out at the first corner, slightly clipping the edge of the road and spinning out, or driving so slowly and carefully that I can't even see the rest of the pack.

Does anyone have any total beginner tips for this game? I really want to like it but I feel like maybe I just fundamentally don't get this type of racer. Should I just chalk it up to experience and go back to Mario Kart?

My favourite racing games are Burnout, but I loved GRID as well, so I appreciate that they're very different.

I think the most important thing is that you can't take corners too quickly. There's a light in the bottom left corner which changes colour as you approach a corner. If it's red or yellow, you're approaching the corner too fast. So slow down until it's green, take the corner slowly, and then accelerate out of it.

AlMac
Oct 5, 2003

Peter Serafinowicz says I'M THE BEST

Centipeed posted:

There's a light in the bottom left corner which changes colour as you approach a corner.

Wow, I totally didn't notice that. I'm going to fire it up and see if it helps. Thanks!

Male Man
Aug 16, 2008

Im, too sexy for your teatime
Too sexy for your teatime
That tea that you're just driiinkiing


NET WT 30 OZ posted:

Anything I should know before playing S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Call of Pripyat for the first time? It seems like a pretty complicated setting.

The basics are covered, but:

Just like real life, handguns are entirely poo poo at pretty much everything except being small and lightweight. You'll be better off with two longarms equipped. I like having a highly accurate rifle in an intermediate cartridge for humans and an automatic shotgun for mutants, but other combinations may work for you.

Upgrading equipment is important. Do it regularly.

Unlocking later upgrades requires tools. You're intentionally not told exactly where to find them, but you can ask around for hints. What they boil down to is "look in the kinds of buildings where somebody may have kept tools". If you get frustrated with hunting for them, there's always the Internet.

Unlike some other shooters, managing your weapons' firing modes and alternate ammunition is important. Find those buttons and learn them early.

Know your factions' preferred weapons. If you're going to be shooting a lot of dudes with 5.56mm rifles, bring a 5.56mm rifle.

Kalenden
Oct 30, 2012


Any advice for HoMM 5 that isn't in the wiki?

Erdos
Dec 31, 2005


I borrowed a vita to play Soul Sacrifice, but there's no wiki entry. It doesn't seem like it's really possible to miss anything since you can replay missions, but anything I should know?

Fruits of the sea
Dec 1, 2010


Final Fantasy Tactics (iOS version)

There's already a really comprehensive list of advice on the wiki, but a lot of it seems to rely on the reader already having some knowledge of the game.

Will I be screwed if I just jump into the game and look up stuff as I go? The tutorial is hella boring, but is there anything in particular I should check out?

Internet Friend
Jan 1, 2001



Fruits of the sea posted:

Final Fantasy Tactics (iOS version)
Will I be screwed if I just jump into the game and look up stuff as I go? The tutorial is hella boring, but is there anything in particular I should check out?
Keep a series of three or four save files because there are story events that can lock you into a series of battles without the ability to go and grind. As long as you don't get caught in that trap, you can't really screw yourself since you can always change jobs & grind away any mistakes.

I don't know how you get to it on the iOS version, but when using a skill that requires time to charge you can bring up a turn list that will show you who gets to act before it goes off which is absolutely crucial to use. On other versions you press right on the D-Pad on the skill menu. Figure out how to get to that.

al-azad
May 28, 2009





To be more exact, keep a second save before entering a castle. Castle fights are almost always a succession of battles.

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008




Nap Ghost

I've just got to the first proper mission in Dishonored - will I be able to return to this area later in the game, or do I need to collect all the runes and bone charms at this point?

Enigma
Jun 10, 2003
Raetus Deus Est.



Danger - Octopus! posted:

I've just got to the first proper mission in Dishonored - will I be able to return to this area later in the game, or do I need to collect all the runes and bone charms at this point?

Some missions use the same areas as a previous mission, but you won't be able to collect runes and charms you missed. Any runes/charms in an area that you don't collect are lost once you end a mission or sleep at the base, I'm pretty sure.

PRL412
Sep 11, 2007

... ... MINE

I'm actually halfway through Hitman: Absolution but I feel like I'm missing something.

I get that Instinct kind of replaces a map with important icons, but the meter runs out quickly and having to throw noisy objects everywhere is getting monotonous.

Any tips?

RillAkBea
Oct 10, 2008



PRL412 posted:

I'm actually halfway through Hitman: Absolution but I feel like I'm missing something.

I get that Instinct kind of replaces a map with important icons, but the meter runs out quickly and having to throw noisy objects everywhere is getting monotonous.

Any tips?

What I like to do is just run around a level like a madman, trying to find all the important spots and passages before I attempt it for real. As long as you don't activate any checkpoints you score will be back to zero when you restart.

That said unless you're going for a perfect no-kills, suit-only, unspotted run, there are a lot of things you can do without damaging your score too much, for example: Headshot + Body Hidden - Non-Target Kill = 0 points.

As far as instinct goes, unless you're going suit-only, it's best to save it for that move that disguises you unconditionally.

Fruits of the sea
Dec 1, 2010


Gothic 2: Night of the Raven or gold edition

The expansion adds a huge area full of mid-level creatures. In a game where every bit of experience counts, this is huge. Unfortunately it isn't clear how to get there, so it's easy to struggle through a large part of the game before discovering the expansion content and being completely over levelled. So:
-after returning to Khorinis for the second time, prioritise the missing persons quest above everything else (except joining a faction since the reward is an armour upgrade).

-eventually you will be sent on a trip across the island, and will have to pass through a temple containing some really tough critters. Just keep running, "friends" will kill them, and the area on the other side contains tons of easy XP.

Internet Friend posted:

Keep a series of three or four save files because there are story events that can lock you into a series of battles without the ability to go and grind. As long as you don't get caught in that trap, you can't really screw yourself since you can always change jobs & grind away any mistakes.

I don't know how you get to it on the iOS version, but when using a skill that requires time to charge you can bring up a turn list that will show you who gets to act before it goes off which is absolutely crucial to use. On other versions you press right on the D-Pad on the skill menu. Figure out how to get to that.

al-azad posted:

To be more exact, keep a second save before entering a castle. Castle fights are almost always a succession of battles.

Thanks, going to dive in today. I generally go full grognard with turn-based tactics games, but just don't have the patience to read the manuals these days.

Count Chocula
Dec 25, 2011

WE HAVE TO CONTROL OUR ENVIRONMENT
IF YOU SEE ME POSTING OUTSIDE OF THE AUSPOL THREAD PLEASE TELL ME THAT I'M MISSED AND TO START POSTING AGAIN


Technetium posted:

Decided I might start playing New Vegas. I've completed the Tutorial kill geckos mission and ended up installing a bunch of mods including highres textures. Anything else I should know? I assume there's no danger of savegame glitches anymore because that's what stopped me in the first place. Played...twenty or thirty hours of Fallout 3 so I'm familiar with the games if nothing else.

Mods:

Ignore the advice in the Wiki and play Hardcore. It's doable on your first play through (I just beat it).. Max Speech, whatever the Lockpick skill is, and Science, plus a weapon. Ignore Charisma. If you want to bump your stats early, get a high Luck, gamble, and buy upgrades at the New Vegas clinic. Every problem has a non-violent solution if you want it.

Get the DLCs and do them in this order: Honest Hearts, Dead Money, Old World Blues, Lonesome Road.

Join the New Vegas thread to chat with one of the developers and get more help.

Count Chocula fucked around with this message at 08:56 on May 13, 2013

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Thanqol
Feb 15, 2012

because our character has the 'poet' trait, this update shall be told in the format of a rap battle.


Kalenden posted:

Any advice for HoMM 5 that isn't in the wiki?

Move fast in the campaigns. Mobs scale up just as fast as your stuff, or faster.

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