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m2pt5
May 18, 2005

THAT GOD DAMN MOSQUITO JUST KEEPS COMING BACK


sexual rickshaw posted:

Saint's Row 2:

Do the side missions, mainly because you're required to to build up respect to do the main missions. But there's plenty of neat unlockables for completing each activity to level 6, mainly infinite ammo for each weapon type.

It's a good idea to do the skydiving activity ASAP, since the reward is really useful. (You have to land on a specific car when you do it, which is spawned when you trigger the activity. The reward is immunity to fall damage.)

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Smooglepoot
May 20, 2009


In Arcanum I just used molotov coctails for groups of enemies and it made dungeons easy enough for me.

Another tip: If you use that necromancy spell to raise and control the dead, don't use it on something that is several levels higher than you and you can't easily kill. It WILL break the spell and attack you. You should also frequently save in multiple slots.

SiKboy
Oct 28, 2007

Oh no!



Echoes posted:

Anything I should know before I dive into Fallout 3, it's my first time playing this kind of game.

Okay, this is gonna be a wall 'o text, which I will try to keep spoiler free.

First up, things that are in the manual, but you would be amazed how many people dont know about. Your pip-boy has a built in torch. On the Xbox you turn it on and off by holding down B. When you are hacking computers, move the cursor around and if it highlights a matching open and closed bracket select that, it will either eliminate a wrong answer or replenish your guesses. If you are drinking from a water source you can hold down the button to keep drinking instead of repeatedly pressing the button. You can fast travel to locations you have already discovered through the pip-boy map. VATS exists. That last one is because a couple of people in the "times you missed a vital game mechanic" thread somehow missed it, despite it being part of the manditory tutorial section.

Oh, and if you get a book that goes to your inventory, you can read it to gain a skill point. I was an idiot and didnt figure that out for like 5 hours playtime.

Secondly, general hints about the game.

1) Dont try to be a jack of all-trades. If you try to do melee AND energy weapons AND big guns AND small guns you will spread yourself too thin. Pick maybe 2 combat skills to specialise in. Small guns are the most powerful/plentiful near the begining of the game, energy weapons take over around the two thirds mark.

2) I would NOT recommend either unarmed or melee for your first play through. If you want to give either of them a go, you NEED to also boost stealth to get close enough to enemies, and you NEED a back-up combat skill (most people go explosives) because there are the occasional enemies that you just cant reach.

3) The tutorial starts with you as a baby, but you dont need to worry about any decisions you make until Amata wakes you up with news about your dad. At that point, if you want to have all options open to you, try to get out of the vault WITHOUT killing the overseer, and looting everything you can carry on the way. If you do kill him its not a huge deal, but a later quest has fewer possible outcomes.

4) On your way out of the vault, you may want to grab the medicine bobblehead from your dads desk. If you dont, you only get one other chance to get it in the game. If you are wanting to get all the bobbleheads, you NEED to get that one either during the initial escape or the trouble on the home front quest. The only other permanently missable one is in raven rock. You only get one chance to get that one.

5) The game autosaves just before you leave the vault, and lets you change all your skills and stats, how you look, everything. If you want another playthrough, just load that save and make changes and off you go.

6) Lockpicking and Science are both important if you want all the loot. Speech lets you bypass a few minor bumps, and get better rewards, but isnt vital. Similarly Barter. Repair is important, unless you are running an unarmed character.

7) It is possible to sequence-break the main quest. If you want to see all of it, there are a couple of places you do not want to go into if you find them through randomly exploring, before a quest directs you to them. DO NOT go into; the rivet city science lab, Caseys garage or Galaxy News Radio. Obviously once a quest tells you to go there, you can.

8) If you are thinking about getting the DLC for it, the general consensus in the Fallout 3 thread boils down to: Broken Steel is great (and extends the main storyline, without this the end of the story is game over, with this you can get back to the wasteland after completing the story). Point lookout is also great for high-level characters. The Pitt is decent. Operation anchorage is linear and pretty much just combat, but with fantastic rewards. Mothership Zeta is frankly missable.

9) Dont bother taking the perks that give you +10% experience (swift learner). There is more than enough content in the game to have you hitting the level 20 (30 with broken steel) level caps without them. Similarly, I personally find the perks that give you +5 to 2 skills to be a waste of time. On the other hand, the perks that give extra skill points every level or everytime you read a book (Educated and Comprehension) are well worth taking as soon as possible.

10) You can stash things in containers and come back for them later, however most containers arent secure and the stuff you put in them may vanish. The only secure containers are in your house. There are only 2 houses in the game you can obtain, and you can only get one or the other, not both. Which one you get depends on your resolution of the "Power of the Atom" quest. Personally for a first playthrough I would recommend saving the town to get a house there, but whatever floats your boat. If you decide to go the other way, remember to loot the place before you do it. Including the strength bobblehead in Lucas Simms house. If you blow it up, its gone. You can get his key by pickpocketing him or by killing him and looting the corpse

Lastly, if you are wanting to break the game over your knee and make it your bitch:
Get the Operation Anchorage expansion. It scales to your level, I've run a level 5 character through it before without significant problems. The rewards for this mission include a laser sniper rifle, power armour training, power armour that doesnt degrade and the chinese stealth suit, otherwise known as the easy mode armour. You can also do the quest in rivet city to find the runaway robot ridiculously early, get his gun (the best energy weapon for about 75% of the game) and then the reward for turning him in.

If you come across frosted sugar bombs, pre-war books or scrap metal, stockpile them until you find the characters who will buy each off you for signicant amounts of caps.

If you have a lot of patience you can leave the vault, go up the hill to the barn behind the vault enterance which is a random encounter spot. Reload until you get a good random encounter (either the one where you find a wounded deathclaw and a wastelander with the dart gun schematics, or the crashing alien ship).

m2pt5
May 18, 2005

THAT GOD DAMN MOSQUITO JUST KEEPS COMING BACK


SiKboy posted:

Oh, and if you get a book that goes to your inventory, you can read it to gain a skill point. I was an idiot and didnt figure that out for like 5 hours playtime.

Save them until you can take the Comprehension perk (at level 4 I think) and each skill book will give you 2 points instead.

Edit: Also, Mothership Zeta adds possibly the most useful consumable item to the game. (Alien Epoxy repairs your currently equipped weapon by an amount dependent on your Repair skill, I think it maxes out at 30%. This is fantastic for unique weapons, like the Firelance.)

m2pt5 fucked around with this message at 21:11 on Nov 28, 2009

Olaf The Stout
Oct 16, 2009

FORUMS NO.1 SLEEPY DAWGS MEMESTER


The thing no one has mentioned about KOTOR is that it's a loving breeze. I went through on the hardest difficulty without knowing a damned thing about D&D rules or any sort of min-maxing and did fine. The only hint I wish I would have had is this:

Force speed also increases your movement speed.

Olaf The Stout fucked around with this message at 09:52 on Nov 29, 2009

HaroldofTheRock
Jun 3, 2003



Pillbug

homerlaw posted:

What should I know about Dead Space for the PC

You upgrade your stuff with nodes. Rather than use them all up, though, it is a good idea to keep at least one on you at all times. There are multiple rooms that are locked off and the only way you can get into them is by using a node. These rooms are not mandatory, but have some extra supplies or money inside. Anyway, 99% of the time, the stuff you get in the room includes either another node or enough money to buy another one in addition to some other items.

Excalibur_Z
Oct 2, 2004


sexual rickshaw posted:

Anything I should know about Eternal Sonata?

Don't do the bonus dungeon near the end of the game. I found it to be an immense dungeon crawl with little in the way of payoff. There's not much to say beyond that because the battle system is constantly evolving (up to 6 times) and you have to adapt throughout the game. The story is mostly crap unfortunately.

stratdax
Sep 14, 2006



SiKboy posted:


7) It is possible to sequence-break the main quest. If you want to see all of it, there are a couple of places you do not want to go into if you find them through randomly exploring, before a quest directs you to them. DO NOT go into; the rivet city science lab, Caseys garage or Galaxy News Radio. Obviously once a quest tells you to go there, you can.

The way I usually play these games is to do all the optional quests first before proceding with the main quest. The quest I'm currently working on is the Wasteland Survival Guide, and I have to go to Rivet City. In fact, I'm already there.

I have the "Following in his Footsteps" quest - the next step is for me to go to Galaxy News Radio.

I talked to the Doctor at Rivet City looking for more history to Rivet City (the Optional quest for Moira), and that completed the Following in his Footsteps quest (but I didn't get the achievement). How much of the main quest did I just miss? If the next stop after GN Radio was going to be Rivet City anyway, then I don't care. But if not, I'll load an earlier save and leave Rivet City until the main quest directs me to there. Is it worth it to do the Galaxy News Radio?

ONE YEAR LATER
Apr 13, 2004

Fry old buddy, it's me, Bender!


Oven Wrangler

If you had gone to GNR first you'd be asked to fix the radio transmitter before Three Dog would tell you about your dad. He tells you to head to Rivet City. You can still go and do that quest if you want and continue on but I'd suggest reloading because you miss out on a cool scripted event if you go yo GNR after already going to Rivet City.

stratdax
Sep 14, 2006



ONE YEAR LATER posted:

If you had gone to GNR first you'd be asked to fix the radio transmitter before Three Dog would tell you about your dad. He tells you to head to Rivet City. You can still go and do that quest if you want and continue on but I'd suggest reloading because you miss out on a cool scripted event if you go yo GNR after already going to Rivet City.

Alright then, will do. My last save was from like 2 minutes before I talked to the doctor anyway, and I can fast travel to the Metro station, so I don't need to put much effort in.
Cool scripted event = I'm in.

Thanks!

stratdax fucked around with this message at 23:50 on Nov 28, 2009

SiKboy
Oct 28, 2007

Oh no!



stratdax posted:

The way I usually play these games is to do all the optional quests first before proceding with the main quest. The quest I'm currently working on is the Wasteland Survival Guide, and I have to go to Rivet City. In fact, I'm already there.

I have the "Following in his Footsteps" quest - the next step is for me to go to Galaxy News Radio.

I talked to the Doctor at Rivet City looking for more history to Rivet City (the Optional quest for Moira), and that completed the Following in his Footsteps quest (but I didn't get the achievement). How much of the main quest did I just miss? If the next stop after GN Radio was going to be Rivet City anyway, then I don't care. But if not, I'll load an earlier save and leave Rivet City until the main quest directs me to there. Is it worth it to do the Galaxy News Radio?

Not much. Three dog was going to tell you to go talk to Dr Li. If memory serves all you've really done is made a fight outside GNR slightly harder and changed the reward for the GNR quest (instead of telling you to talk to dr Li, he gives you a key to his secret stash).

I wouldnt bother reloading to be honest. I'm not sure if the achievement will unlock when you talk to threedog eventually, so if you are bothered about that (and dont intend another playthrough) you might want to just load an earlier save, go talk to threedog, get the acheivement and then resume your current game.

The other good news is that you are now past the point where you can sequence break the quest any further as far as I remember.

Oh, and to mention again, if there are any sidequests you want to do and you dont have broken steel, get them all done before you follow the giant robot (you'll know it when it happens) Without the expansion the game ends when you finish that quest, and shortly after you follow him is the point of no return for the mission.

Edit: Beaten! I assumed you had done more stuff since talking to dr li, if its 2 minutes, then go for it.

SolidSnakesBandana
Jul 1, 2007

Infinite ammo


Phenotype posted:

stuff about Arcanum

I'm not one to tell people what they should or shouldn't like, but you are doing something terribly, terribly wrong. It's been too long since I've played it to figure out what, but Arcanum is one of the best games I've ever played, easily up there with Baldur's Gate 2 in terms of RPGs.

KingShiro
Jan 10, 2008

EH?!?!?!


Excalibur_Z posted:

Don't do the bonus dungeon near the end of the game. I found it to be an immense dungeon crawl with little in the way of payoff. There's not much to say beyond that because the battle system is constantly evolving (up to 6 times) and you have to adapt throughout the game. The story is mostly crap unfortunately.

But if you want the extra character then you have to do it, and there are some good items too. The bonus dungeon is also good for level/money grinding if you need either. I recommend getting the maps off of Gamefaqs though so you can get all the treasures and don't get lost.

abagofcheetos
Oct 29, 2003

by FactsAreUseless


Captain Novolin posted:

On the south part of the first island, there is a playground. Ram a car into one of the swingsets and keep going.
The swingsets near the basketball courts? The fence surrounding them seems to be indestructible.

Leper Residue
Sep 28, 2003

To where no dog has gone before.


Nocturne Sabre posted:

I'm not one to tell people what they should or shouldn't like, but you are doing something terribly, terribly wrong. It's been too long since I've played it to figure out what, but Arcanum is one of the best games I've ever played, easily up there with Baldur's Gate 2 in terms of RPGs.

Seriously. It is a great game, and if you followed the advice in this thread (of which there was a lot of) you should be fine. If you keep dying in the first few levels, maybe you should stop and figure out what you're doing wrong instead of raging that you can't steamroll everything. Try different methods of doing things.

A Real Happy Camper
Dec 11, 2007

These children have taught me how to believe.


abagofcheetos posted:

The swingsets near the basketball courts? The fence surrounding them seems to be indestructible.

There are two sets, and you should be able to drive into the playground and then ram them (possibly running over a few people in the process)

Phenotype
Jul 24, 2007

You must defeat Sheng Long to stand a chance.



Bluetooth human being posted:

Seriously. It is a great game, and if you followed the advice in this thread (of which there was a lot of) you should be fine. If you keep dying in the first few levels, maybe you should stop and figure out what you're doing wrong instead of raging that you can't steamroll everything. Try different methods of doing things.

I'm really not sure what I'm doing wrong, though. Should I just pump melee and dodge early on, even though I planned to be more of a mage? That still wouldn't explain why my companions do so little damage and keep missing, though. They're level 7-8, and fighting level 3 zombies--shouldn't that be a steamroll, at least in similar numbers? Is there some way to issue commands to my party that I'm missing? I'm not sure what to do other than reroll. What's a good thief-mage build, then? Or a good combat magic tree to invest in besides the one that starts with Harm? I struggled a bit, but made it through the first few combat areas just fine. I just don't have much in the way of options right now.

Excalibur_Z
Oct 2, 2004


KingShiro posted:

But if you want the extra character then you have to do it, and there are some good items too. The bonus dungeon is also good for level/money grinding if you need either. I recommend getting the maps off of Gamefaqs though so you can get all the treasures and don't get lost.

Oh yes, that's true. The items and extra character are a nice reward. I was more speaking of whether it's worth it to do, and by that time in the game I just wanted it to be over because battles mostly devolved into countless Harmony Chains. I should have mentioned that in my post.

Jokymi
Jan 31, 2003

Sweet Sassy Molassy


Foul Fowl posted:

Don't level up at all until you become a Jedi. There's a hard cap of 20 levels in the game, and a level 20 jedi is more powerful than a 8 soldier/12 Jedi, especially if you're planning to play one of the classes that focus on force powers. I don't know if you can make some weird builds with sneak attacks or anything, but this is true in general.
I'm going to recommend you not do this, especially on your first playthrough. Not only will it make the first portion of the game unnecessarily difficult and frustrating, Jedi levels are not really any more powerful than non-Jedi ones. Pretty much the only real advantage to taking that path is getting more Force powers, and you'll still probably be able to take pretty much anything you'd need either way. This is usually at the cost of feats and skills you can get by advancing normally in your original class.

Echoes
Aug 27, 2008


SiKboy posted:

Okay, this is gonna be a wall 'o text, which I will try to keep spoiler free.

First up, things that are in the manual, but you would be amazed how many people dont know about. Your pip-boy has a built in torch. On the Xbox you turn it on and off by holding down B. When you are hacking computers, move the cursor around and if it highlights a matching open and closed bracket select that, it will either eliminate a wrong answer or replenish your guesses. If you are drinking from a water source you can hold down the button to keep drinking instead of repeatedly pressing the button. You can fast travel to locations you have already discovered through the pip-boy map. VATS exists. That last one is because a couple of people in the "times you missed a vital game mechanic" thread somehow missed it, despite it being part of the manditory tutorial section.

Oh, and if you get a book that goes to your inventory, you can read it to gain a skill point. I was an idiot and didnt figure that out for like 5 hours playtime.

Secondly, general hints about the game.

1) Dont try to be a jack of all-trades. If you try to do melee AND energy weapons AND big guns AND small guns you will spread yourself too thin. Pick maybe 2 combat skills to specialise in. Small guns are the most powerful/plentiful near the begining of the game, energy weapons take over around the two thirds mark.

2) I would NOT recommend either unarmed or melee for your first play through. If you want to give either of them a go, you NEED to also boost stealth to get close enough to enemies, and you NEED a back-up combat skill (most people go explosives) because there are the occasional enemies that you just cant reach.

3) The tutorial starts with you as a baby, but you dont need to worry about any decisions you make until Amata wakes you up with news about your dad. At that point, if you want to have all options open to you, try to get out of the vault WITHOUT killing the overseer, and looting everything you can carry on the way. If you do kill him its not a huge deal, but a later quest has fewer possible outcomes.

4) On your way out of the vault, you may want to grab the medicine bobblehead from your dads desk. If you dont, you only get one other chance to get it in the game. If you are wanting to get all the bobbleheads, you NEED to get that one either during the initial escape or the trouble on the home front quest. The only other permanently missable one is in raven rock. You only get one chance to get that one.

5) The game autosaves just before you leave the vault, and lets you change all your skills and stats, how you look, everything. If you want another playthrough, just load that save and make changes and off you go.

6) Lockpicking and Science are both important if you want all the loot. Speech lets you bypass a few minor bumps, and get better rewards, but isnt vital. Similarly Barter. Repair is important, unless you are running an unarmed character.

7) It is possible to sequence-break the main quest. If you want to see all of it, there are a couple of places you do not want to go into if you find them through randomly exploring, before a quest directs you to them. DO NOT go into; the rivet city science lab, Caseys garage or Galaxy News Radio. Obviously once a quest tells you to go there, you can.

8) If you are thinking about getting the DLC for it, the general consensus in the Fallout 3 thread boils down to: Broken Steel is great (and extends the main storyline, without this the end of the story is game over, with this you can get back to the wasteland after completing the story). Point lookout is also great for high-level characters. The Pitt is decent. Operation anchorage is linear and pretty much just combat, but with fantastic rewards. Mothership Zeta is frankly missable.

9) Dont bother taking the perks that give you +10% experience (swift learner). There is more than enough content in the game to have you hitting the level 20 (30 with broken steel) level caps without them. Similarly, I personally find the perks that give you +5 to 2 skills to be a waste of time. On the other hand, the perks that give extra skill points every level or everytime you read a book (Educated and Comprehension) are well worth taking as soon as possible.

10) You can stash things in containers and come back for them later, however most containers arent secure and the stuff you put in them may vanish. The only secure containers are in your house. There are only 2 houses in the game you can obtain, and you can only get one or the other, not both. Which one you get depends on your resolution of the "Power of the Atom" quest. Personally for a first playthrough I would recommend saving the town to get a house there, but whatever floats your boat. If you decide to go the other way, remember to loot the place before you do it. Including the strength bobblehead in Lucas Simms house. If you blow it up, its gone. You can get his key by pickpocketing him or by killing him and looting the corpse

Lastly, if you are wanting to break the game over your knee and make it your bitch:
Get the Operation Anchorage expansion. It scales to your level, I've run a level 5 character through it before without significant problems. The rewards for this mission include a laser sniper rifle, power armour training, power armour that doesnt degrade and the chinese stealth suit, otherwise known as the easy mode armour. You can also do the quest in rivet city to find the runaway robot ridiculously early, get his gun (the best energy weapon for about 75% of the game) and then the reward for turning him in.

If you come across frosted sugar bombs, pre-war books or scrap metal, stockpile them until you find the characters who will buy each off you for signicant amounts of caps.

If you have a lot of patience you can leave the vault, go up the hill to the barn behind the vault enterance which is a random encounter spot. Reload until you get a good random encounter (either the one where you find a wounded deathclaw and a wastelander with the dart gun schematics, or the crashing alien ship).


Oh wow, thanks for all this! Started playing and this stuff is super helpful!

Scabscar
Sep 30, 2008


MY FANTASYS.zip posted:

Since the wiki is not working, I need some advice for Resident Evil Umbrella Chronicles, Trauma Center Second Opinion, Far Cry 2, and Phantom Brave We Meet Again.

Trauma Centre

There's not much to say beyond practice. A lot. This should help, though:

- The Nozomi missions are less operations than they are puzzles, and should be treated as such.

- You can inject stabilizer anywhere on the patient, and on harder difficulties you should be doing so every spare moment you have.

- Always remember to smear gel onto stitches before applying the bandage; this is easy to forget because it doesn't cost any vitals, but it breaks your chain and can be really frustrating.

- Deftera bounces off gel; if you're quick you can use this to hem them in.

- When fighting Savato, under no circumstances use the Healing Touch until the game tells you to. Use it beforehand, and you won't be able to finish the mission.

- For the same boss, you'll notice that it makes a gigantic star-shaped cut at intervals that are easy to figure out. Make sure vitals are above 30 when this happens on harder difficulties.

Good luck!

Funkyboss
Feb 24, 2002


Thanks to the God of War collection, I'm finally getting to play these games for the first time. I'm starting with the first one, and while it's a pretty straightforward beat-em-up, what's the best way to upgrade? Should I focus on the blades, since I use them the most? Or should I just upgrade whatever I can as soon as I can? Or is there some magic ability that completely destroys everything at a certain level? Any other tips?

ahobday
Apr 19, 2007



Funkyboss posted:

Thanks to the God of War collection, I'm finally getting to play these games for the first time. I'm starting with the first one, and while it's a pretty straightforward beat-em-up, what's the best way to upgrade? Should I focus on the blades, since I use them the most? Or should I just upgrade whatever I can as soon as I can? Or is there some magic ability that completely destroys everything at a certain level? Any other tips?

Poseidon's Rage is the first ability you get, and also extremely powerful. If you want to gently caress poo poo up, upgrade that. Upgrading your blades is also important, of course, since you don't want to be just chipping away at later enemies.

I don't think there's any upgrade path that will severely gently caress you over, however, so just do what you feel like.


For your second play-through, if you get to it, you can have a lot of fun by getting infinite magic, using this glitch:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yOHvvp6Xshg

It'll take you a few tries to get the jumps right, but I did it pretty quickly so it's not too hard.

Part way through the game there's a large hall, with two holes in the walls, on opposites sides. Unlimited harpies come out of these holes until you stop them. If you have infinite magic, you can get as many red orbs as you want here by standing in a corner and holding down Medusa's Gaze.

The harpies stop giving out red orbs from attacks pretty quickly, but if they're petrified and then fall to the ground, you get three orbs each time one dies, and they keep on coming as long as you need them to.

I can't remember how long I stood there (It was a while), but I upgraded everything I had and got enough to upgrade everything I would get later in the game, I believe.


Note that I have NO clue whether or not these things work in the God of War collection (That's the HD version on the PS3, right?).

hirvox
Sep 8, 2009


Centipeed posted:

Poseidon's Rage is the first ability you get, and also extremely powerful. If you want to gently caress poo poo up, upgrade that. Upgrading your blades is also important, of course, since you don't want to be just chipping away at later enemies.
The blades are also important because they don't have a mana meter limiting you. While you have plenty of mana for cannon fodder enemies, there are certain events where you are assaulted by a large number of enemies and can run out, like the Cerberus puppy zerg and Multi Man Melee versus yourself. That said, you can get an emergency boost of health by doing the quicktime event against a minotaur, and a boost of mana by doing the same to the medusa. You'll be invulnerable while doing it, so if you see the QTE icon, rush in.

Like in many other games, the normal enemies aren't much of a threat, but getting swarmed can hurt, especially on the harder difficulty levels. Dodge, round'em up and wail away with the appropriate AoE attacks.

Vizrt
Oct 1, 2009

Grass grows, birds fly, sun shines, and brotha', I hurt people.


Just picked up a DS lite and Pokemon Platinum. I haven't played through a pokemon game since original generation Red/Blue (messed about with Crystal some, but didn't play much). The wiki seems to be down at the moment, and I checked through the thread and saw a reply for Diamond/Pearl.

So, what should I know before starting Platinum? Charging up the DS now, then going to fire it up. I read the OP for pokemon here in games, and all the changes seem pretty daunting(as well as the thread). Am I going to miss much if I play through without consulting a guide? Anything I can miss the first time around? Any other advice/tips welcome.

I'm also looking around for a good site that has wild pokemon listings for each route/location for if I do decide to play without a guide.

Recycling Centerpiece
Apr 28, 2005

Turn around


Grimey Drawer

Vizrt posted:

So, what should I know before starting Platinum? Charging up the DS now, then going to fire it up. I read the OP for pokemon here in games, and all the changes seem pretty daunting(as well as the thread). Am I going to miss much if I play through without consulting a guide? Anything I can miss the first time around? Any other advice/tips welcome.

If you don't plan on doing any kind of competitive battling, just do whatever. Use whatever you think looks cool or strong, and don't worry too much about picking "correct" moves or Pokemon.

The "Special" stat has been divided into Special Attack and Special Defense. Moves are no longer type-bound, meaning that Fire moves etc aren't all Special anymore. There are 2 new types, Steel and Dark.

Everybody's got an "Ability" now, like the starters will increase Fire/Water/Grass damage if they're at low health, and Gastly etc Levitate because they're ghosts and so on.

For casual playing, that's pretty much all you need to know about the changes. You don't need to worry about the invisible stats or min/maxing or anything like that. It's a kids' game, just have fun with it. There may be some missable things but I doubt they really matter if I can't remember them specifically.

Astfgl
Aug 31, 2001



Phenotype posted:

Arcanum stuff

Three things first:

1. Are you playing with turn-based or real-time combat? You can switch between the two with spacebar. On the whole, real-time is usually easier just because it's easier for you to run away and heal if things turn ugly. Still, if you're playing as a mage it may sometimes make sense to fight in turn-based mode at first, so you can keep better control of your fatigue/stamina.

2. Honestly, when I start the game I try to avoid combat for the first 15-20 levels. If you hit up Shrouded Hills -> Dernholm -> Black Root -> Tarant -> Ashbury, there should be more than enough quests for you to get there without fighting, even with a party of 2-3 people. It's not until after that that I explore the Schuyler's dungeon and progress the main plot. Just make sure that you're using those levels to pump up your combat skills.

3. If you stick with the game, you'll find the combat difficulty can get kinda steep as you progress from stage to stage. If you decide to play to the next big dungeon, the Black Mountain Clan, here's some tips: you should be at LEAST level 20, your entire party should be wearing metal armor, you’ll need to be able to take some heavy hits, you’ll need to be able to heal yourself a lot, and you’ll need at least apprentice level in repair, OR lots of weapons, OR the ability to teleport out of a dungeon with an Exit scroll to get your equipment fixed by someone else.

And the rest of the questions:

Phenotype posted:

I'm really not sure what I'm doing wrong, though. Should I just pump melee and dodge early on, even though I planned to be more of a mage?

Yes. In general, you should always pump whatever combat stat (melee, throwing, firearms, etc. + Dodge) you plan on using for the rest of the game. And like I said in my earlier post, if you're going the melee route you'll want AT LEAST a strength of 8 starting out, and you'll want to up that to at least 12 ASAP.

Remember that skills have both a rank (i.e., how many character points you invest to make the red bar increase) which governs skill checks, and a level (either nothing, Apprentice, Expert or Master) which provides unique skill bonuses. So for instance, Melee Apprentices have their speed with a melee weapon increased by 5, and Masters can never critically fail with a melee weapon. Most NPCs that you meet, like guards, shopkeepers, soldiers, bartenders, and even people on the street, can train you as an Apprentice in one or two skills for about 100 gold. Expert training is usually done by someone who would need that skill (so Blacksmiths can usually train Experts in Pick Locks and Repair, Bartenders train Experts in Gamble and Haggle, Diplomats and Whores train Experts in Persuasion, etc.) and they charge more than Apprentice trainers. There's only one Master trainer per skill, and there's almost always a complicated quest involved in receiving the training, and sometimes a large fee.

So as soon as you put any points into combat skills, start looking for people to train you. The guards in Shrouded Hills (and any city, really) can train you as an Apprentice in most combat skills, and there are expert trainers in Dernholm or Black Root, I think. Same for thief skills like Pick Locks and Persuasion.

Phenotype posted:

That still wouldn't explain why my companions do so little damage and keep missing, though. They're level 7-8, and fighting level 3 zombies--shouldn't that be a steamroll, at least in similar numbers?

Your companions aren't terribly great fighters. Virgil's good for healing, and that's about it. Magnus is a little better, but not so hot. If your character isn't a super fighter, then the zombies below the Schuylers' are going to cause some problems. Also, if you're looking to gather a large party because you have weak combat skills, you'll need a high Charisma. The character page will tell you how many party members you're allowed to have.

If you want to pick up someone who packs a punch, look for:
- Sogg Mead Mug, Shrouded Hills Inn - You'll need 9 Charisma to get him, but he's a powerful fighter.
- Worthless Mutt, Ashbury - Mutt's being kicked to death by a gnome, so the first time you travel to Ashbury you should run to the east side of the inn to save him.
- Gar, HT Parnell's, Tarant - You'll need 2 ranks of Persuasion to get Gar, and a decent (8+) intelligence as well. He can deal some serious damage, and the fact that he's human-sized instead of orc-size just means it'll b easier to find armor for him.

Phenotype posted:

Is there some way to issue commands to my party that I'm missing?

You can click on their portraits and select from the list, or press the corresponding function keys to achieve the same effects. Commands are pretty basic, though, like "Stay Close" or "Wait here" or "Spread Out." No contingencies or anything where you can say "In situation X, do Y and not Z."

The party AI for Arcanum is honestly very weak. Your companions won't do much other than attack the enemies with the weapon in their inventory that does the most damage. In the case of mages, this means that sometimes they won't cast any spells at all, and other times they'll cast high-level spells on insignificant foes. In the case of warriors, it means they'll often try to wield weapons that are cursed or too heavy for them, just because they have the highest damage rating. So you have to manage their inventories closely to make sure they're fighting as effectively as they can.

Phenotype posted:

I'm not sure what to do other than reroll.

Re-loading is always a viable option. That's why you should quicksave heavily in dungeons and quickload if you die.

Phenotype posted:

What's a good thief-mage build, then? Or a good combat magic tree to invest in besides the one that starts with Harm? I struggled a bit, but made it through the first few combat areas just fine. I just don't have much in the way of options right now.

Honestly, a thief build works better with a tech focus than a magic. Pick Locks is a better skill than Unlocking Cantrip, because the Cantrip will wake up sleeping marks who will attack you on sight. Techs will also usually have high Perception scores (because of Firearms) which partners well with Prowling/Spot Traps.

But if you're devoted to magic:
- Black Necromantic is always a good offensive school. Harm and Create Undead are pretty effective when you're still weak.
- Conveyance is essential for a lot of people because of Teleport, but I've never found it that worthwhile. Still, if you go this route Disarm can be very useful.
- Force is another good offensive school, with a lot of variety.
- Phantasm is the most obvious choice, as it has Invisibility. Blur Sight and Phantasmal Fiend are also pretty good.
- Summoning is the third good offensive school, but I always find myself investing in one of the other two as back up in case the enemy breaks through my summons.
- Temporal works best with a mid- to large-sized party, but the slow effects are great.

As for the non-tech skills, you'll want:
- Spot Traps - not necessary, but you may as well if you have the points
- Pick Locks - again, way better than Unlocking Cantrip, especially for a dedicated thief, and not just someone unlocking doors in dungeons
- Repair - get this skill to at least Expert level, as there are enemies in the game that will TEAR through your armor, and this can return it to perfect health without any additional items.
- Persuasion - put points in this with a high Charisma. If you're not playing with Charisma, then don't bother, but combined with a high Intelligence (which you'll need as a mage), you can make life a lot easier on yourself.

Astfgl fucked around with this message at 01:08 on Dec 2, 2009

Phenotype
Jul 24, 2007

You must defeat Sheng Long to stand a chance.



Thanks for the Arcanum tips. I spent a much more fruitful day running dialogue quests in the first few towns, and spending some time with the manual and strategy guide. I think the biggest thing I was missing was that Int seems pretty useless in terms of boosting spellpower. Buying more spells makes all my spells generally stronger, which seems a little counterintuitive, but spell damage is based on magic affinity, not Int and Will.

Did I miss anything too good by pissing off Magnus? I talked amiably to the Schuylers instead of killing them, and he refused to work with me again.

Astfgl
Aug 31, 2001



Phenotype posted:

I think the biggest thing I was missing was that Int seems pretty useless in terms of boosting spellpower. Buying more spells makes all my spells generally stronger, which seems a little counterintuitive, but spell damage is based on magic affinity, not Int and Will.

Int governs how many active spells you can have at once, and not much else in terms of magic, I believe. It's handy to have for a lot of dialogue encounters, though. And very useful for tech characters.

The reason that buying MORE spells makes all your spells stronger is that the magic/tech slider controls the effectiveness of your skills. The more magic skills you put points in, the farther the slider goes in that direction, and the more powerful your magic skills are. Same with tech stuff, so the more schematics you know the more damage your guns do.

What mages really need to focus on is their Fatigue/Constitution/Willpower scores, so that they can cast and maintain a lot of spells. If you're playing as a thief, it's entirely realistic that you won't be able to put many points in Intelligence.

Phenotype posted:

Did I miss anything too good by pissing off Magnus? I talked amiably to the Schuylers instead of killing them, and he refused to work with me again.

Not really. He's one of the more vocal companions in the game and he's got a pretty satisfying questline, but it's not something you'd notice on your first run through, and he's not a great fighter.

Remember, though, that you can always make nice with the Schuylers and then kill them afterwards for that experience, too. It won't get Magnus back, but that's no reason not to do it.

Dr Snofeld
Apr 30, 2009


Lets gently caress Bro posted:

Dragon Quest 8?

You'll have to grind a couple of levels right at the start or else you'll get wiped out easily in the first dungeon.

As far as skill points, split them between the character's unique skill, one weapon, and a few in Fisticuffs (switching weapons mid-fight doesn't cost a turn, so a few Fisticuffs techs can come in handy). I'd check a guide for the numbers needed to get a new tech.

Hero's weapons are all pretty good, if I had to choose I'd pick Swords.

Yangus should specialise in Axes, because of their critical hit techs. The stealing techs for the other weapons have ridiculously low success rates.

Jessica should go either Staves or Whips. She doesn't have the strength for Knives to be effective. Staves can be used like regular items to cast attack magic, and grant increased MP and MP regeneration at later levels. No matter what you pick, put 3 points in Staves for the incredibly useful Acceleratle spell.

Angelo doesn't get as many bonuses from Staves as Jessica, he'd be better off with Bows or Swords. He gets the fewest natural skill points so give all your skill seeds to him.

Don't neglect alchemy! First thing you make once you unlock it should be the Thief's Key, which opens some locked chests. Check bookshelves and talk to NPCs for recipe hints.

That's all I can think of at the moment.

Octagon N
Aug 21, 2007


Just picked up Mirror's Edge off Steam for $5 (how could I not?). I've heard about a good deal of trial and error combat or something like that, but what do I need to know?

hirvox
Sep 8, 2009


Octagon N posted:

Just picked up Mirror's Edge off Steam for $5 (how could I not?). I've heard about a good deal of trial and error combat or something like that, but what do I need to know?
Hit the disarm button when you see the enemy gun light up in red. If you fumble the timing, the enemy will rifle-butt you and fill you with lead. You can use some of your rechargeable bullet time to make the timing trivial, but you usually only have enough for one enemy. If you don't have any bullet time available, you can skip the disarm and kick/punch the enemy into submission. A crotch shot is usually a good way to start your combo.

A Real Happy Camper
Dec 11, 2007

These children have taught me how to believe.


Octagon N posted:

Just picked up Mirror's Edge off Steam for $5 (how could I not?). I've heard about a good deal of trial and error combat or something like that, but what do I need to know?

Wall jumping will make a number of jumping puzzles ridiculously easy. Combat is kinda iffy, and some parts come down to trial and error (cargo ship, I'm looking at you.)

Binowru
Feb 14, 2007

I never set out to be weird. It was always other people who called me weird.

Requesting info on Crackdown for the 360. Also, I own and have played Gears of War 2 a lot, and I just got Gears 1. Any huge differences I should know about, gameplay wise?

Pocket Billiards
Aug 29, 2007
.

Binowru posted:

Requesting info on Crackdown for the 360. Also, I own and have played Gears of War 2 a lot, and I just got Gears 1. Any huge differences I should know about, gameplay wise?

Crackdown

The orbs make a ringing kind of sound which lets you locate them by ear.

When targeting enemies, you can use the right stick to target body parts for head shots, taking out legs, etc you can also do this to vehicles to target the fuel tank to make them explode.

Vehicles drive like poo poo at first because you aren't levelled up. You can level up by running over enemies in your car.

This game is fun as gently caress and screwing around almost always rewards you with something. I love it.

Waffle!
Aug 6, 2004

I Feel Pretty!




Binowru posted:

Requesting info on Crackdown for the 360. Also, I own and have played Gears of War 2 a lot, and I just got Gears 1. Any huge differences I should know about, gameplay wise?

Fundamentally no, but Gears 2 has much better polish. The magnum is still great for headshots, and the Hammerburst is the way to go on Insane. Berserkers can be killed easily by softening them up with the Hammer of Dawn and then grenade tagging them. Stay out of the dark, and don't expect any help from Dom in the fight against RAAM. Bow/Sniper usually works best against him.

elf help book
Aug 5, 2004

It's not a dream, or a lie.
I know my sister is alive out there.


Crackdown

Go into options and turn on Small Speaker mode, it'll make the orb sounds easier to hear.

Woffle
Jul 23, 2007



Binowru posted:

Requesting info on Crackdown for the 360. Also, I own and have played Gears of War 2 a lot, and I just got Gears 1. Any huge differences I should know about, gameplay wise?

I had read somewhere on here not to bother gathering agility orbs but I found this advice to be bunk. Whenever I opened up an island i spent a little while hunting for them and had more fun when it came to actually hunting down bosses because I could do all sorts of neat poo poo.

Perhaps because of that, I never drove anywhere after the beginning of the game. I found it almost always faster and more fun to just run.

Also, this game rocks.

PJOmega
May 5, 2009


God of War 1 posted:

If you want to get (near) infinite orbs without requiring infinite magic (and feeling much more badass for doing so)...

No plot spoilers below.
There is a triple (double on easy) minotaur battle right after you kill the Medusa to receive Medusa's Gaze. In this area you have infinite magic (indeed it is the only area you will have infinite magic without the other trick). The minotaurs only stop spawning when you kill them while they are stoned. Poseidon's Rage can hit all three minotaur at once, and once upgraded you can empty your entire magic pool into a casting of Poseidon's Rage. A once upgraded Poseidon's Rage can inflict 1,000 hit combos, which reward you with 1400+ red orbs per trick.

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Scalding Coffee
Jun 26, 2006

You're already dead


How should I begin ruling the world in Evil Genius?

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