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XIII
Feb 11, 2009


Dutchbag posted:

just went into the skateshop yesterday and dropped cash on a girl deck, venture trucks, and spitfire wheels.

I've had a couple girl boards and they've been some of my favorites! Good choices

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donJonSwan
Dec 6, 2004
Scum Pirate

Girl is my go-to brand as well.

Seriously though, if your town is lacking spots (you'll find out soon enough that this isn't true) build some of your own.

There are a lot of good sites out there with free ramp plans.

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


A couple years ago the people who run the ASA High School Tour gave me a deck signed by some skating/bmx pros. I don't really care about the signatures but what i do care about is maybe putting some grip tape trucks and wheels on it and letting my daughter roll around on it. Does the type of deck it is matter? If so, how can I tell brandname/materials/etc.?

donJonSwan
Dec 6, 2004
Scum Pirate

Decks generally have their name or logo somewhere on the board. If you don't know brands or professional riders names it can be kind of hard to tell.

The type of deck it is won't matter for her, but avoid Target or Walmart completes like the plague. Everything they've got is trash and the trucks/wheels they come with are dangerously shoddy.

Take the board into a local skate shop and have them grip it and throw some components on it. Try to avoid the mall shops if possible, the people who work there rarely know what they're doing.

donJonSwan fucked around with this message at 00:54 on Feb 20, 2010

XIII
Feb 11, 2009


Has anyone ever tried any of the boards from zazzle.com? I know they're probably not the highest quality, but I'm wondering if they're decent. Rob Dyrdek has some designs on there, so I'm thinking they must be passable. I haven't skated much in a couple years, and I've been wanting to get back into it, so I'm trying to decide if I want to design my own on zazzle and try it out, or if I want to go with my standard Girl deck.

DJ Tanuki
Aug 4, 2005
Begins with b and ends with rick!

I've always wanted to learn and this thread inspired me to get out there!
I'm a pretty small woman, 5 feet tall and about 95-100 pounds. I was thinking of just borrowing my cousin's old deck to start with but I'm wondering if my height and weight would impact what kinds of gear I would use. Any advice? I'm a complete beginner but I'd like to learn how to ride around and try some tricks eventually.

donJonSwan
Dec 6, 2004
Scum Pirate

DJ Tanuki posted:

I've always wanted to learn and this thread inspired me to get out there!
I'm a pretty small woman, 5 feet tall and about 95-100 pounds. I was thinking of just borrowing my cousin's old deck to start with but I'm wondering if my height and weight would impact what kinds of gear I would use. Any advice? I'm a complete beginner but I'd like to learn how to ride around and try some tricks eventually.

Just try and stay on the board as long as possible. The type of board it is doesn't matter when you're just starting.

I wouldn't worry about the type of setup it is until you plan on buying one for yourself.

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


DJ Tanuki posted:

I've always wanted to learn and this thread inspired me to get out there!
I'm a pretty small woman, 5 feet tall and about 95-100 pounds. I was thinking of just borrowing my cousin's old deck to start with but I'm wondering if my height and weight would impact what kinds of gear I would use. Any advice? I'm a complete beginner but I'd like to learn how to ride around and try some tricks eventually.

As a fellow beginner let me give you some things I've had to learn (very painfully) over the last week.

1. Just stand on the loving thing inside on your carpet, or outside on the grass. Feel how loose or tight the trucks are. Watch how the board moves when you lean your body.
2. Learn what it feels like to keep your center of gravity low and, what it feels like to me, over the center of the trucks.
3. Have a helmet you can use. Beyond the obvious head protection, it's also a psychological safety net. I worried less about totally going tits-up wiping out once I got a brain bucket.
4. Once you feel like you can balance on the thing standing still, go out and ride. Feel comfortable going over slight unevenness in the pavement without feeling like you have to bail. Get to where you can really build speed with good, hard kicks so you can coast.
5. Your feet are going to hurt. That's one thing I REALLY didn't anticipate: how much a foot workout riding around would be. I say this as someone who runs and lifts weights in Vibram FiveFingers, so my feet and calves are pretty strong. Even still...

I've really gotten a lot of pleasure out of just riding around this week, and don't really feel like it's something I'll lose interest in. I just like it. *shrug* It's also a nice way to get to some of the closer places around my apartment without getting in my car.

Shania Twain
Aug 25, 2008


To the dude looking for spots. Check out http://www.skatr.us/search, poo poo's so cash.

For the guy who wants to learn switch, I think the easiest place to get comfortable riding switch is on a mini at first. You just kind of have to do it on the street and eat it a bunch, but on a mini I started doing fakie rocks, then nose stalls and then moved up to dropping in switch. It helped me out a lot

Mincher
May 12, 2008


Shania Twain posted:

To the dude looking for spots. Check out http://www.skatr.us/search, poo poo's so cash.

For the guy who wants to learn switch, I think the easiest place to get comfortable riding switch is on a mini at first. You just kind of have to do it on the street and eat it a bunch, but on a mini I started doing fakie rocks, then nose stalls and then moved up to dropping in switch. It helped me out a lot

Wow, Shania Twain gives advice on skating switch. The world is a weird place.

I'm gonna head up to the local park, it's designed for carving but i'm sure I can skate the tranny to get used to switch. Cheers!

Edit: I'm considering putting together a site like that for UK people to collect spots/parks.

Mincher fucked around with this message at 23:37 on Feb 21, 2010

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


How much do "real" skateboarders bother keeping their decks clean? My grip tape is getting kind of grimy but it still grips so I'm meh about it. Also, wheel & truck maintenance, do I need to do much if they're still moving?

Finally, it feels like my trucks have gotten looser/more agile since I first bought the board (when it was new). Is this normal or do I need to make sure my board isn't just going to fall apart one day?

SHIT POST MALONE
Feb 4, 2005

I was born down. You know this.


RobotEmpire posted:

How much do "real" skateboarders bother keeping their decks clean? My grip tape is getting kind of grimy but it still grips so I'm meh about it. Also, wheel & truck maintenance, do I need to do much if they're still moving?

Finally, it feels like my trucks have gotten looser/more agile since I first bought the board (when it was new). Is this normal or do I need to make sure my board isn't just going to fall apart one day?

Some people are super anal about not getting their grip wet and, in the long-run, that's going to make your deck last longer. If you keep it dry it keeps dirt from getting wet and mud-welding itself to the spaces between the grip texture. Personally, I've never re-gripped a board and by the time the grip has run its course, so has the deck.

As far as the trucks go, they will break in after initial use. If they're loose tighten them.

Also: I assume you mean regular decks and not longboards. I have no clue about longboarding.

donJonSwan
Dec 6, 2004
Scum Pirate

Don't loosen your trucks too much. If your hanger falls off while you're riding it'll get messy real quick.

You can find softer bushings at most good skate shops.

Mincher
May 12, 2008


RobotEmpire posted:

How much do "real" skateboarders bother keeping their decks clean? My grip tape is getting kind of grimy but it still grips so I'm meh about it. Also, wheel & truck maintenance, do I need to do much if they're still moving?

Finally, it feels like my trucks have gotten looser/more agile since I first bought the board (when it was new). Is this normal or do I need to make sure my board isn't just going to fall apart one day?

If you want to clean it, one good tip I came across is using a toothbrush and some soap to clean the dirt off.

Alternatively, ignore it. It'll still ride the same.

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


donJonSwan posted:

Don't loosen your trucks too much. If your hanger falls off while you're riding it'll get messy real quick.

You can find softer bushings at most good skate shops.

I didn't deliberately loosen them. Maybe I'm just getting more comfortable on the board and can lean farther/harder on the longboard so it feels like it's more agile.

soggybagel
Aug 6, 2006
The official account of NFL Tackle Phil Loadholt.

Let's talk Football.

If you're grip tape gets really dirty and has crap on it then just rip off the old tape and put on new stuff. A new roll of grip is cheap and worth it.

Wungus
Mar 5, 2004



I started skateboarding around Christmas, with the desire to make sure that I've popped my first ollie on a skateboard by 25. Riding basically every day (and falling off a bunch) has done wonders; there's still two months to go and I landed my first ever ollie this afternoon

Dutchbag
Jun 13, 2006


Theres actually a skatepark here that was just built, and officially opens this next weekend. I got to skate at it already and sprained my wrist! I'm on way.

edit: Oh yeah, I should have mentioned that I live in a dorm on a campus (so construction is out of the question for me, unless i team up with some friends at their house) that is terrible for any type of skating that isn't longboarding. Lots of lose an uneven bricks as well as terrible cement with cracks and big gaps. But I did find a really fresh spot where they just put a new building.

Dutchbag fucked around with this message at 05:47 on Mar 1, 2010

Dim, Tired, and Elderly
Mar 25, 2004

ur ded

RobotEmpire posted:

I didn't deliberately loosen them. Maybe I'm just getting more comfortable on the board and can lean farther/harder on the longboard so it feels like it's more agile.

What kind of trucks do you have for your longboard? If you have Gullwings that have the kingpin located on the outside then you should loosen them a little bit, especially if you're getting more comfortable on the board.

craisins
May 17, 2004

A DRIIIIIIIIIIIIVE!


Just bought this skateboard at a store (in the mall, don't crucify me). It's a 7.8" enjoi with Thunder trucks and Spitfire wheels, some better bushings (kreds?). I'm a big guy (by big I mean fat)...5'8", like 270lbs. The guy at the store told me it would be fine for my weight, now after reading some of what you guys said, I'm starting to doubt it. Right now I'm just standing on it on the carpet in my living room doing turns on the back wheels, feebly attempting ollies (I got two inches off of the ground, hooray!) and trying to balance as if I were doing a manual. Couldn't find a helmet in my size, but that's definitely something I'm going to get before going outside.

Plan on visiting the local skatepark (Shelter Skatepark, Albany, NY) once I get a chance during beginner's hours.


The red/white trucks match the red panda and the blue wheels match the blue panda.

Should I be worried about my weight on a 7.8" board? I have about a size 10 shoe, if that has any relevance. Thanks guys, I'm bookmarking this thread.

soggybagel
Aug 6, 2006
The official account of NFL Tackle Phil Loadholt.

Let's talk Football.

Don't take this the wrong way but you're a bit heavier. If you land hard in the center of the board or the lips you could be in a bit of trouble. Boards are pretty drat sturdy though so I wouldn't honestly worry too much about weight until you start going down stair sets.

Mincher
May 12, 2008


soggybagel posted:

Don't take this the wrong way but you're a bit heavier. If you land hard in the center of the board or the lips you could be in a bit of trouble. Boards are pretty drat sturdy though so I wouldn't honestly worry too much about weight until you start going down stair sets.

Yeah, I would say don't try for stairs or big gaps til you've shed a few. Saying that though, bigger guys get silly fast speed when carving bowls so you may wanna try that for a great adrenaline rush.

You should also just push around getting from A to B, keeping your ollies low (jump cracks etc) and trying the odd shuv-it & manual. You'll learn loads of board control, balance and build up your muscles.

As you start to feel fitter, become more adventurous. Don't stop pushing!

Mincher
May 12, 2008


loving nollies. How, just how?!?!

I spent about 2 hours at the park trying to get them whilst rolling. Standing still, they're a piece of piss. When I try them moving though, they spin like a nollie shove. :/

One day...

craisins
May 17, 2004

A DRIIIIIIIIIIIIVE!


Thanks for the tips guys. I realize I'm a heavy dude. And probably won't even be doing an ollie for at least 2 months. I'm not too stable on the board yet and haven't even touched it to asphalt.

Either way, here's a skateboard design I came up with using the zazzle.com skateboard template. You may recognize it from the NES game Bad Dudes.


lovely lovely lovely IMAGE COMPRESSION
Click the image for a not terribly pixelated image.

donJonSwan
Dec 6, 2004
Scum Pirate

Get out there and roll dude. Find a nice basketball court and just cruise around in circles, keep an eye out for pebbles.

Omar Salazar gets me so loving stoked.

Dutchbag
Jun 13, 2006


What are the best online resources for learning about new tricks? I've just been looking up random videos on youtube but its pretty hit or miss.

Mincher
May 12, 2008


Dutchbag posted:

What are the best online resources for learning about new tricks? I've just been looking up random videos on youtube but its pretty hit or miss.

Trickipedia Tuesdays on the Berrics is good for watching pros execute tricks. There's no direct teaching involved though so you have to analyze it all yourself.

Here: http://theberrics.com/trickipedia.php

There's also the option of asking people what they're doing at the park. Just be honest about being a beginner and people will gladly show you loads of cool things.

Dutchbag
Jun 13, 2006


Mincher posted:

There's also the option of asking people what they're doing at the park. Just be honest about being a beginner and people will gladly show you loads of cool things.

Thanks for the link. I've been doing the latter method so far and it works great. I got over being worried about looking like a newb pretty quickly and was honest about it. I just like to have stuff to watch when I can't be out skating.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

I always seem to forget about this thread

leica posted:

Hey DELETED, what were the bushings that everyone likes again? I'm ready to swap out the stock bushings on my crackedskulls already.

I'm over a month late, but Venom and Reflex both make some nice bushings. Sabre bushings are supposed to be good but I haven't tried them yet. I run a mix of Venom and Reflex barrels, they're really nice.


RobotEmpire posted:

I am the most obnoxious longboarding old person ever. I ride it literally everywhere.*

I noticed that the tip of my board's tail is starting to splinter. How do I fix this, or do I? Also, holy gently caress my feet get loving tired from steering back and forth. Is there a good shoe that combats this?

I'm glad I was in pretty good shape before I started skateboarding, otherwise I would totally quit. It's definitely a workout steering that little fucker around, plus having good core strength is key for actually making those tight turns.

Finally, I spend like $25 on a pro-tec helmet. Hope it doesn't suck.

*I am 30 years old

Are the plys of the deck separating? If so you can squirt wood glue in there and then clamp it down nice and tight with c-clamps or a vice. You can try softer bushings which require less force to turn, but if it's the shape of the deck that's causing it you'll either want to change decks or build up the foot strength. If your deck has a lot of concave it can tend to work against your foot's arch and that can be painful for a while. Shoes are important though. When my shoes are old and worn, my feet start killing me after a bit of skating.

RobotEmpire posted:

How much do "real" skateboarders bother keeping their decks clean? My grip tape is getting kind of grimy but it still grips so I'm meh about it. Also, wheel & truck maintenance, do I need to do much if they're still moving?

Finally, it feels like my trucks have gotten looser/more agile since I first bought the board (when it was new). Is this normal or do I need to make sure my board isn't just going to fall apart one day?

With longboarding, keeping your grip clean is a good idea once in a while. It will wear down and lose it's grip over time though. If it gets muddy or wet, I'll give it a quick once over but there are more important maintenance points. Your trucks probably feel looser because the bushings are getting worn. That, or your kingpin nut is getting worn (unlikely if you don't mess with it much). It's a good idea to go over your board once in a while and make sure everything is tightened properly and in good shape. The most important maintenance bit is probably bearings, since longboards tend to see more harsh conditions in regards to dirt and debris than a street setup. I think I posted a writeup earlier in this thread about cleaning bearings. All of the nuts on a board are nylock, which means they have a nylon ring in the nut that the threads of the bolt cut into. This keeps the nut from backing off, so if you mess with them enough it's a good idea to replace them. I've had axle nuts wear out and start backing off while riding, not good. Make sure your mounting bolts are tight, but don't overdo it, they can snap if you overtighten them. I get most of my skate stuff from Mile High Skates (http://www.milehighskates.com/), they have great customer service and it's owned and operated by skateboarders. You can get all the hardware you need there.

Also, when adjusting your trucks, do it the right way. The kingpin nut should be tightened until there is no slack between the nut/washers/bushings/hanger. The bushings should not be squished out too far, if they are you are getting too tight. The right way to do it is to get the right bushings (they come in different durometers). Picking the right bushing comes down to your weight and personal preference. Stock bushings tend to suck anyway, so it's good to replace them. Read up on the different types of bushings (cones, barrels, etc.) and how they perform. https://www.silverfishlongboarding.com is a good place to start.

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


Thanks, that's a grip of good information.

Mincher
May 12, 2008


Today was spent carving the hell out of the park, bombing hills and landing switch ollies!

I'm actually still buzzing from an excellent day of skating!

Sirkus
Jun 5, 2006


Mincher posted:

Today was spent carving the hell out of the park, bombing hills and landing switch ollies!

I'm actually still buzzing from an excellent day of skating!

I'm stoked for you! I've actually started to skate before I've gone out, just to get that buzz on.

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


lol, wow, was looking at some skating websites today and I just realized I skate goofy-footed. Am I the Chosen One?

Anyway, what are the benefits of diff longboard shapes? I've got the uhm.. I dunno what the style is called but it's a Sector 9 Gremlin deck. No tail or anything, just grooves lathed into the wood for wheel clearance. Pretty narrow. What's up with the ones that are shaped like the one on the right:



The reason I ask is because my loving feet hurt so god drat bad after about 10 or so minutes of riding. Someone mentioned a wider board would help but I just wanted to get some kind of confirmation.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

RobotEmpire posted:

lol, wow, was looking at some skating websites today and I just realized I skate goofy-footed. Am I the Chosen One?

Anyway, what are the benefits of diff longboard shapes? I've got the uhm.. I dunno what the style is called but it's a Sector 9 Gremlin deck. No tail or anything, just grooves lathed into the wood for wheel clearance. Pretty narrow. What's up with the ones that are shaped like the one on the right:



The reason I ask is because my loving feet hurt so god drat bad after about 10 or so minutes of riding. Someone mentioned a wider board would help but I just wanted to get some kind of confirmation.

The one on the right has wheel cutouts, which are just reliefs cut into the deck so the wheels can clear when you turn. A wider board might help, but there's 2 things in play here: Your shoes and the shape of the board. Good shoes are pretty important, but if the deck isn't right for your feet then that's where your problem is. If you look at your board from the front, you'll see the concave profile. You can have a board with no concave, which means it's flat, or you can have a board with a lot of concave such as a speedboard for high-speed downhill riding. There is a whole range of concave styles in between, of course. The deeper the concave, the better your feet stay locked in when you're carving or cornering (it also helps get a little more leverage over the trucks when you turn). However, this shape is the opposite of the shape of the arches of your feet, which means that your arch wants to flatten out some. This can be quite painful since it stretches the muscle, tendons and ligaments in your foot. I would start with the cheapest solution, which is a set of insoles that support your arch better. I know when my insoles/shoes are hammered because my feet will start hurting like no other.

Is it both feet, or just one? If it's just your pushing foot, you might want to look at how you're pushing and/or footbraking. If you're just using the ball of your foot, this will also stretch your arches and cause pain. You want your foot flat on the pavement.

I'm not too familiar with your deck, but if you're just cruising around and not doing anything too crazy (IE keeping speeds under 30-40mph) then a flexier deck with less camber may be what you're after. http://www.krackedskulls.com/ is a an independent builder, and they make great cruising/carving decks. I recommend them all the time because they're of good quality and pretty inexpensive. $135 plus shipping will get you one hell of a board. They're also drop-through decks, which means you're a little closer to the ground. That results in easier and more efficient pushing since your feet are closer to the ground as well. The turning won't be as sharp/quick as a top-mounted (conventional) deck, and you are limited in your truck selection though.

donJonSwan
Dec 6, 2004
Scum Pirate

Echo'ing the Kracked Skull recommendation, and reiterating what was said on the last page....

Get a pair of real skate shoes.

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


donJonSwan posted:

Echo'ing the Kracked Skull recommendation, and reiterating what was said on the last page....

Get a pair of real skate shoes.

I realize this may make me sound like a huge rear end in a top hat, and I don't intend to be, but I guess I don't understand what makes "skate shoes" so special. Is there a kind of insole or something they've got?

soggybagel
Aug 6, 2006
The official account of NFL Tackle Phil Loadholt.

Let's talk Football.

Do your feet start hurting in response to you pushing off or just from the act of your feet riding on the board?

donJonSwan
Dec 6, 2004
Scum Pirate

RobotEmpire posted:

I realize this may make me sound like a huge rear end in a top hat, and I don't intend to be, but I guess I don't understand what makes "skate shoes" so special. Is there a kind of insole or something they've got?

They're flat, which gives you more surface area and stability which may translate to less strain.

Just seems kinda arrogant to look at shoes that have been developed over 30 years for a sport and assume their use is purely aesthetic.

You're also using a lot of crazy new muscles that you don't need for running or other activities, so it may just be harsh DOMS.

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


soggybagel posted:

Do your feet start hurting in response to you pushing off or just from the act of your feet riding on the board?

Feet riding the board. Like, intolerably bad. I'm riding in adidas and old-style running shoes (super flat and thin soles. onitsuka tigers). Either way it's like god drat this poo poo hurts so much it's really unpleasant.

I don't mean to sound arrogant about it, I just know a little about foot anatomy and shoes, and not sure how skating shoes would alleviate the problem. I'm all about doing away with the foot pain, believe me.

edit: Wow, I do sound like a smug gently caress about the shoes. Sorry. I know you know what you're talking about.

RobotEmpire fucked around with this message at 22:23 on Mar 8, 2010

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donJonSwan
Dec 6, 2004
Scum Pirate

No stress dude.

I had a nasty bout of plantar bursitis that really freaked me out a month or so ago. Learning which stretches hit that part of my foot (toe curls, calf raises) killed it pretty quickly.

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