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Jeephand
Nov 5, 2009


Trucks: Independent or Thunder. Get a pair that is closest in length to the width of your deck. TRUE. The main thing about trucks that I look for are low kingpins. If the kingpin sticks out past the axle it's going to hang up on any ledge you try to grind and you're screwed. People ride Ventures as a distant third, but the last time I had a pair of Ventures I had to cut the bushings and lower the kingpin. It was a mess. I just ditched them after a while and went back to Indys. My brother rides Thunder bacause they are the one of the few companies that makes 8.25" trucks and he likes to ride 8.25" boards. I like how Thunders feel, they feel softer than Indys and turn a bit better. Lots of pros take out the factory bushings and replace them with Bones hard bushings. I never got into that. You cant really go budget on trucks, but you can save some $$ by just getting plain silver versions. The colored pro trucks are a marketing gimmick for rich kids to screw around with.

Wheels: 52mm wheels is the standard size for all around skating. Big enough to not get wrecked on every pebble and small enough to avoid wheel-bite. If you want bigger wheels (over 54mm) get riser pads for your trucks or else your wheels will likely jam against your board on sketchy landings and throw you. Durometer measures the hardness of a wheel. 99 duro is standard and good enough for nearly everyone. If you dont trick and just like to ride down the street and cruise around, the softer 85 duro wheels are for you. BRAND DOES NOT MATTER! Nearly every skater swears by SPITFIRE but this is just tradition and brand loyalty and has nothing to do with quality. Urethane is urethane. I am committed to blank wheels made by Mini Logo. They are the same wheels other companies print pictures on and charge you 15 dollars more for. Graphics on wheels wear off in an afternoon of skating and most pros turn the graphics facing in anyway because white looks best. Just watch any skate video and look at the wheels. WHITE.

Decks: Ride an 8 inch wide board. If you're a kid go to 7.5", If you're a big dude with size 12 shoes get an 8.5". The brand you buy is up to you. It doesn't matter all that much until you get lots of experience with different brands and start to develop preferences. Personally, I like very flat boards with a mellow nose and tail. Companies that make flat boards are Foundation, Toy Machine, Girl, Chocolate and Element. The opposite of flat is concave. Boards with serious concave are more curvy and bowed. Some people think a greater concave gives you more control, I think it feels unnatural. Companies that make a more concave deck are Zoo York, Black Label and Zero. BLANK BOARDS ARE FINE. Unless a particular graphic / company/ pro gets you really stoked there's no need to pay for premium boards. Companies offer pricepoint decks if you like the company but want to save cash. Some companies like Almost, Foundation and Element sell decks with wacky gimmicks like BAMBOO plies, CARBON FIBER layers and weird air holes to supposedly lighten and strengthen the deck. These are pricey and not worth it unless someone is buying you a board as a gift. These aren't what the pros ride. 7 ply hard rock Canadian maple is all that really matters. Every few boards I'll get a blank deck and draw some poo poo on it and I end up liking these just as much or more, and save $25. Graphics scrape off in a few days of skating, so don't get too attached to your sweet graphics. They only matter at the point of sale and not a day afterwards.

Online shops: Warehouse Skateboards or Skate Warehouse works for me. I don't use shops because their products cost too much and there are none around my house. Besides, I'm not concerned about 'supporting' anything besides myself. Skateboarding will continue if you don't OMG support your local shop.

Shoes: Vans. Why? Vulcanized waffle sole increases board feel. Plus they are the only company that understands how to arrange shoelace eyelets out of the 'danger zone' so that your laces done break after 10 ollies. the Half Cab is the greatest skate shoe ever invented. I try others from time to time and its always a shoelace changing nightmare. Skating annihilates shoes. Buy Shoo Goo at Walmart and apply it to the spots that look most worn after a day of skating. They'll last 5 times as long. Just dont inhale the fumes.

I think that's all a newb needs to know about gear. Dealing with injuries is a whole other topic but should also be covered in Skating 101. I'm out on a badly rolled ankle so I'll be playing the Skate 3 demo today.

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Merauder
Apr 17, 2003

The North Remembers.

Thats great info, should be added to the OP.

Tactical Grace
Apr 30, 2008


Aight dudes. So hopefully buying a set up this week and was wondering what you guys would recommend as good quality, functional and value for money skating related equipment. I'm talking helmets, shoes and other similar accessories. I'm only asking because my family think that skateboarding is a retarded idea and if I can't get them to spend money on a board then maybe I can get them to spend money on equipment that will stop me dying while on a board.

I heard someone recommend Bern's Macon helmet which looks like hot poo poo, actually I'm orgasming over all their poo poo, is it worth it?

mes
Apr 27, 2006



Tactical Grace posted:

Aight dudes. So hopefully buying a set up this week and was wondering what you guys would recommend as good quality, functional and value for money skating related equipment. I'm talking helmets, shoes and other similar accessories. I'm only asking because my family think that skateboarding is a retarded idea and if I can't get them to spend money on a board then maybe I can get them to spend money on equipment that will stop me dying while on a board.

I heard someone recommend Bern's Macon helmet which looks like hot poo poo, actually I'm orgasming over all their poo poo, is it worth it?

I don't know much about safety equipment but as far as shoes go if you have a skateshop by where you live just try a bunch of poo poo on and see what's that most comfortable for you.

donJonSwan
Dec 6, 2004
Scum Pirate

I really dig the Bern Macon, it fits me better than any other helmet.

For pads, I've got some pro-designed elbow pads and wrist pads. They're loving incredible, but expensive.

187 makes some really good gear for a reasonable price, I'd suggest checking them out.

Mincher
May 12, 2008


Well, my 6/7 year old World Industry bearings have finally become what was described by my other half as 'Dented gravelly donuts'.

Some sweet new Bones Reds will be here, hopefully today!

I'm also starting to get kickflips down. God drat are they a bitch. In fact, it's not the trick. It's the fear that comes with losing a connection to the board as it spins under you.

Rain today, unfortunately.

Applebees Appetizer
Jan 23, 2006



Just got the Khiro bushing kit, and none of the bushings in it are cone shaped.....Is this good or bad?

Also the shop I bought the kit from had these



I am soooooo getting one

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

leica posted:

Just got the Khiro bushing kit, and none of the bushings in it are cone shaped.....Is this good or bad?

Also the shop I bought the kit from had these



I am soooooo getting one

Are they barrels? If you have Randals you'll need an extra flat washer between the baseplate and the bushing since Khiros barrels are just a touch shorter than stock Randal bushings. If you need more info, I can go a little more depth later since I'm on lunch at the moment.

Shania Twain
Aug 25, 2008


About what jeephand said about boards. 8" is loving huge. 8.5" is waaaayy to wide to do anything fun with... for me. I ride a 7.625" and I'm 6'4" with 11.5 shoes. I know it's mostly a preference thing but don't let larger size deter you from trying a thinner board. This was especially true for me while trying to learn flip tricks.

Honestly, dont read a guide about what type of board you should get. If you buy any board and skate it long enough you will know exactly what needs to get fixed. If you have a wide board and you dont like it you will probably come to the conclusion that you need a thinner board. vice versa is true, if you have a thin board and it doesn't feel right, try a wider board and go with it. If you're skating enough for board size to have any impact on your ability you will break that board soon enough to try yet another size. When you get what you want you'll know it.

Express yourself through the ability to express your own opinion of what a "real" skateboarder rides.

Sirkus
Jun 5, 2006


8.5" is fun to carve bowls with. There isn't any right or wrong board size, just whatever feels right.

donJonSwan
Dec 6, 2004
Scum Pirate

Sirkus posted:

8.5" is fun to carve bowls with. There isn't any right or wrong board size, just whatever feels right.

Totally agree.

8" is far from huge, there is a lot more to skateboarding than flip tricks.

Mincher
May 12, 2008


I have size 8 feet and stand at about 5'6" so a 7.75" deck feels perfect for me, being a street skater.

I totally agree though that bigger decks make for excellent carving fun.

Like Sirkus said, it's just whatever feels right for the job.

XIII
Feb 11, 2009


I'm 5'6" and 150lbs and I've always enjoyed 7.75s. Skated a few 7.5s when I was younger and didn't mind them too much.

Wungus
Mar 5, 2004



5'6" crew represent. I just got a brand new deck, an 8" enjoi one, that feels perfect under my feet.

Applebees Appetizer
Jan 23, 2006



DELETED posted:

Are they barrels? If you have Randals you'll need an extra flat washer between the baseplate and the bushing since Khiros barrels are just a touch shorter than stock Randal bushings. If you need more info, I can go a little more depth later since I'm on lunch at the moment.

Yeah, they're all barrels which kinda confused me since I figured a "kit" would come with cones and barrels. The kit came with two pairs of washers, one flat and one "cup" set.

So you're saying I'm going to need additional set of flat washers? I always thought the cup washer went between the baseplate and bushing.......I'm just getting confused now.

mugsyRocko
Jun 17, 2008


Rockin' a new mini logo blank and it's wonderful so far. It's been at least three years since I've ridden a deck that wasn't at least slightly used, since I just got back into skating somewhat recently, so that could be a contributing factor. I'm a small guy (5'7, about 140) but I'm digging the 8 inches of wonderful board width. Now to purchase some trucks that don't leave my board jutting out over my wheels.

edit: I'd also like to add that as long as you're not cropdusting every trick, riding an 8" shouldn't really throw you off as far as hitting flip tricks. If your board has decent pop and you're capable of jumping a foot off of the ground you should be fine. It hasn't given me too much trouble and it's nice for riding transitions.

mugsyRocko fucked around with this message at 06:59 on Apr 23, 2010

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


I guess I'm going to go get this deck I got as a gift from a vendor at work fixed up today. Local skateshop has like a 20% or 40% off sale on the last weekend of the month.

edit: Yeah, so did this. The guy said the bushings would "be a little loose" and "need some breaking in." He wasn't kidding. Wiped out a couple times just going down the street because the side-to-side action goes so deep that it actually hits the wheels and stops the board cold. How do I break these fuckers in faster?

RobotEmpire fucked around with this message at 19:39 on Apr 24, 2010

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


Whew. Riding a short board is a hell of a lot more of a workout than riding a longboard. Also, getting on my 36" flat deck feels weird as gently caress after riding on this curved deck for a couple hours.

edit: Also, they need to make popping ollies much easier. :smith:

RobotEmpire fucked around with this message at 22:02 on Apr 24, 2010

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

leica posted:

Yeah, they're all barrels which kinda confused me since I figured a "kit" would come with cones and barrels. The kit came with two pairs of washers, one flat and one "cup" set.

So you're saying I'm going to need additional set of flat washers? I always thought the cup washer went between the baseplate and bushing.......I'm just getting confused now.

Basically you would assemble it as normal, but you would just put 2 washers against the baseplate before you put the first bushing on.

http://www.randal.com/guides_faq.html
2 washers would go between the baseplate and bottom bushing, assuming your new Khiros are shorter than the stock Randal bottom bushing. I'd personally ditch the cup washers, but that's personal preference. Flat washers, especially with barrels, give you a more linear feel when the bushings compress. With cup washers, the more you lean, the more the bushing pushes against the cup and the more rebound it has. You don't need to shim the bushings, but it will lower your pivot angle if you don't and that'll cause you to lose turn and response.


For RobotEmpire: Bushings get softer with use, not harder. If the kingpin is properly tightened (just enough to keep everything from rattling around) and they're still too loose, then you can take a few steps. Smaller wheels will give you a little more clearance as will thicker riser pads. The other option is stiffer bushings. You can tighten the kingpin up a little more than snug, but don't go too far or you'll risk splitting the bushing and you'll lose some compression and rebound since they're already under pressure.

DELETED fucked around with this message at 23:58 on Apr 24, 2010

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


DELETED posted:

Basically you would assemble it as normal, but you would just put 2 washers against the baseplate before you put the first bushing on.

http://www.randal.com/guides_faq.html
2 washers would go between the baseplate and bottom bushing, assuming your new Khiros are shorter than the stock Randal bottom bushing. I'd personally ditch the cup washers, but that's personal preference. Flat washers, especially with barrels, give you a more linear feel when the bushings compress. With cup washers, the more you lean, the more the bushing pushes against the cup and the more rebound it has. You don't need to shim the bushings, but it will lower your pivot angle if you don't and that'll cause you to lose turn and response.


For RobotEmpire: Bushings get softer with use, not harder. If the kingpin is properly tightened (just enough to keep everything from rattling around) and they're still too loose, then you can take a few steps. Smaller wheels will give you a little more clearance as will thicker riser pads. The other option is stiffer bushings. You can tighten the kingpin up a little more than snug, but don't go too far or you'll risk splitting the bushing and you'll lose some compression and rebound since they're already under pressure.

Dunno man, the turning definitely got tighter the more I rode it today, I can really bear down on either side of the board and it no longer touches the wheels. Not sure.

So, any tips on how to ollie? I watched a lot of videos, got the pop-jump-slide idea but actually feeling how to do it is another thing. trying it on grass for now so I don't wipe out every single time and break my wrists.

mix.lunar
Aug 15, 2007


RobotEmpire posted:

So, any tips on how to ollie? I watched a lot of videos, got the pop-jump-slide idea but actually feeling how to do it is another thing. trying it on grass for now so I don't wipe out every single time and break my wrists.

What helped me a lot with ollies was doing the motions step by step without actually trying to ollie. Like, pushing the tail down, then sliding my foot up. It honestly takes a poo poo ton of effort to ollie when you first try. But it gets easier.

Merauder
Apr 17, 2003

The North Remembers.

For me, and I imagine for most people even if you aren't able to swallow it when you're new... ollies are much easier when I have a decent amount of speed to help keep your balance. When you're standing still you tend to wabble back and forth a bit, whereas when you're moving you are forced into that sweet spot. I think. Makes sense to me, anyway.

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


Merauder posted:

For me, and I imagine for most people even if you aren't able to swallow it when you're new... ollies are much easier when I have a decent amount of speed to help keep your balance. When you're standing still you tend to wabble back and forth a bit, whereas when you're moving you are forced into that sweet spot. I think. Makes sense to me, anyway.


oh yeah I bet a million bucks it's easier moving but right now on this normal board (as opposed to my longboard which I first started skating on) I can barely keep my balance just riding around the block lol.

Wungus
Mar 5, 2004



Ollie into grass. Man, I've got the motion for ollies down perfectly now, rolling down a hill and popping up over the curb and into the grass on the other side.

I can't loving land on my goddamn board because I'm a big stupid retard who can't even land a boneless without the thing flicking out in front or behind if I'm on any kind of surface that lets me roll smoothly. I loving suck so hard at landing on my goddamn board. I've been practicing five to six days a week for a month now at trying to land a drat ollie what the hell is wrong with me.

Mincher
May 12, 2008


Some things that helped me to improve my ollies:

- Jump up AND in the direction you're rolling.
- When you jump, have your shoulders reflect the motion of you leg. This means lift your leading arm up first, followed by your trailing arm.
- Pop from the ankle, not the knee or whole leg. It will make for a cleaner pop and overall nicer motion.

As for improving landings, there are a couple of things you can do:

- Take a run up and jump on the board, trying to aim your feet for the bolts.
- Roll along slowly, stand on the bolts and do a small hippy jump. Again trying to land on the bolts.
- If you ever feel uncomfortable with the speed or motion of the board under you, instantly bend your knees and put your arms out a little. This will make you a load more stable.

As you get more confident, you'll be carving and popping up/down curbs in no time. Good luck!

Wungus
Mar 5, 2004



I'm gunna try taking a runup to my board; I never thought of that and I think it would help a lot. The retarded part is I can land shuvits just fine, both frontside and backside. Admittedly, I move a lot slower when I do it, but I can land them.

Applebees Appetizer
Jan 23, 2006



DELETED posted:

Basically you would assemble it as normal, but you would just put 2 washers against the baseplate before you put the first bushing on.

http://www.randal.com/guides_faq.html

Thanks man, I'll be heading to Home Depot today for some washers. Can't wait to try out better bushings.

Also can someone suggest the best way to clean and re lube bearings and what is the best lube to use? All my boards are going to need bearing maintenance, some of them haven't been touched for years and I never found a good way to take care of them besides just wiping the dirt off......Now that I have a decent set of bearings (oust) I figure I should take care of them :3:


VVVV Sweet thanks

Applebees Appetizer fucked around with this message at 22:11 on Apr 25, 2010

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

leica posted:

Thanks man, I'll be heading to Home Depot today for some washers. Can't wait to try out better bushings.

Also can someone suggest the best way to clean and re lube bearings and what is the best lube to use? All my boards are going to need bearing maintenance, some of them haven't been touched for years and I never found a good way to take care of them besides just wiping the dirt off......Now that I have a decent set of bearings (oust) I figure I should take care of them :3:

For the washers: 0.375" ID; 0.875" OD; 0.064"-0.104" thickness

As far as cleaning bearings:

Materials: Skate tool or 1/2" socket or wrench for wheel nuts, a safety pin or something similar (maybe, see below), rubber/latex gloves (optional), a can of aerosol brake cleaner, carburetor cleaner or throttle body cleaner (they're pretty much the same thing, you can find this at Wal Mart or an auto parts store. I prefer carb cleaner since it's a little less aggressive than brake cleaner, I've seen dye leach from the shields with brake cleaner)

1. Remove the shields. This varies for each bearing depending on the shield type.

-Bones Reds have shields on one side of the bearing only, the side that's in the wheel is open. This makes it easier to clean, you really don't have to disassemble the bearing unless you really want to. To do this, you'll want to dull a safety pin or use the eye of a needle to poke the metal on the inside of the shield, you'll have to go between the ball bearings. Make sure you do not bend the shield or you'll never get it back on. You can try flattening it with a book or something, but it's hit or miss. Be careful taking the bearing cage/crown/retainer out, it's the nylon or metal thing that holds your ball bearings in place. if the balls all go to one side of the bearing, the races will separate and your bearing will fall apart. It's kind of a pain, so I never do it.

-Cheap bearings are usually sealed and packed with grease (like you'd find on a $20 walmart complete). The shields are not replaceable. You can still clean and lube them though. Just use a nail or something to pry one shield off of each bearing. Then you can just orient them like Bones and point the remaining shield towards the outside.

-Bearings with removable metal shields need a thumbtack or safety pin. Around the outer edge of the shield, you should see what's called a C-clip (because it looks like a C). On one end of the C there will be a little lip. Put the tip of your tack into the little lip and pull towards the centerhole of the bearing. The C should kind of curl together more and then come out. Then the shield should come off easily. Keep track of your shields and clips, and don't let them get bent.

2. Use your aerosol solvent (with nozzle tube) to spray the bearing out. The fluid should run out of the bearing clean once all the crap is flushed out. You may want to wear gloves, since the solvent has fun stuff like acetone, xylene, benzene, methyl ethyl ketone, etc. It's bad for you and absorbs into your skin, drying it out and entering your body. You shouldn't have a problem with that little, but it's your call. The balls and races should be nice and shiny now.

3. Let them dry, the solvent will evaporate quickly or you can blow them out with an air compressor.

4. Lubricate. You may notice that your bearing spins faster with no lube. So why would you lubricate them? Well, a bearing's performance without load on it doesn't matter. When you're riding, the bearings have load on them, which changes how they perform compared with no load. Also, unlubed bearings can overheat and seize up. Overheating is more common in downhill but lube is better than no lube. I suggest Bones Speed Cream, a little bottle is a few bucks, and even with very liberal cleaning of several sets of bearings, I still have about half of a year old bottle left. Failing that you can use tri-flo, which is also very nice. Really, anything with oil will work, but Speed Cream and tri-flo are my favorites.

After that, reassemble and enjoy. Oil will come out of freshly cleaned bearings after you ride them for a bit, you can wipe it off or leave it, your call.

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


Whalley posted:

Ollie into grass. Man, I've got the motion for ollies down perfectly now, rolling down a hill and popping up over the curb and into the grass on the other side.

I can't loving land on my goddamn board because I'm a big stupid retard who can't even land a boneless without the thing flicking out in front or behind if I'm on any kind of surface that lets me roll smoothly. I loving suck so hard at landing on my goddamn board. I've been practicing five to six days a week for a month now at trying to land a drat ollie what the hell is wrong with me.

Yeah I can get a couple inches off the ground if I ollie on a patch of grass. I tried popping an ollie on concrete yesterday evening and about went teeth-first into the sidewalk.

SHIT POST MALONE
Feb 4, 2005

I was born down. You know this.


I broke a deck for the first time in I don't know how long. Just doing a simple three flip over a hip and it gave. I've been skating non stop for the last month as the weather in Seattle has been really nice so I guess it was feelin the pressure.

The good news is that three flips are in serious effect now that I can do them with speed and I also get to buy a new setup.

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


Yeah I know how you feel man, I almost got my back wheels off the deck earlier.































:smith:

Mincher
May 12, 2008


I ate poo poo on a hill today.

My hands, knees and back are torn to gently caress.

PAIN. :(

RobotEmpire
Dec 8, 2007


Mincher posted:

I ate poo poo on a hill today.

My hands, knees and back are torn to gently caress.

PAIN. :(

pics or it didn't happen.

SHIT POST MALONE
Feb 4, 2005

I was born down. You know this.


Mincher posted:

I ate poo poo on a hill today.

My hands, knees and back are torn to gently caress.

PAIN. :(

I've only ever done that once in college. Going down Jefferson right outside of Seattle University and I just wobbled the gently caress out and skipped like a hockey puck on my back. I had three big, round, bloody circles where my spine made contact with the pavement.

Never again.

Lurch
Mar 5, 2010

by Lowtax


So after a 7-year absence I started skating again today on my room-mate's unwanted 'fix it and ya can have it' board. It just needed new bearings and I'm proud to say that in a relaxed cruise around the block I only managed to eat bitumen twice. I feel like I've been high-fiving low flying aircraft :(

Wungus
Mar 5, 2004



:woop: did a body varial/180 hippie jump/whatever the gently caress you call it this afternoon in the ten minutes of light I had to skate after work.

I landed it first try :smug: and ate poo poo as I rolled down the hill and my wheel hit a stick :smug: and now my shoulder hurts but my pride is like "gently caress you i'm the bombest"

Now I just gotta do it again. And land an ollie. Then the world's my loving oyster.

boydx
Feb 25, 2006

No school like the old school.

Finally managing to get kickflips thank god.

Also, a new skatepark opened near where I live. Gonna be a good summer!

UFOTacoMan
Sep 22, 2005



It's cool to see you guys getting stoked about things. Learning something new always comes with such a awesome feeling of accomplishment. I can't compare it to anything. It is my favorite feeling.

I rolled my ankle pretty badly last Wednesday. I hope to be skating again in the next couple days. It's pretty cool how you can twist your ankle and end up with a bruise that wraps around the lower side edges of your foot.

Jeephand
Nov 5, 2009


Google up Transworld buyer's guide. It is a list of pros and they explain what they ride. Everyone except Paul Rodriguez and Shuriken Shannon ride over 8" boards. LOTS including Andrew Reynolds and Heath Kirchart ride 8.5" boards. It's rare to see people over 18 ride smaller than 8". Most of the little kids in my local park ride 8". It's not huge, it's pretty much the standard default size.

I rode 7.75 for a long time because I figured 8" would be too big and heavy, but I tried it and it doesn't feel heavier, it just gives you more board to move around on and a slightly bigger surface to catch when you flip. Somehow it just feels more stable under my 10.5 feet.


Of course there's nothing at all wrong with riding smaller, I'm just saying, 8" is not a big board. it's the average midpoint size between 7.5" (small) and 8.5 (large). I'm thinking about bumping up to 8.25 next time. Try 8", you'll see what I'm talking about it.


heres a video me and my brother made: http://www.youtube.com/user/facultyschedule#p/a/u/0/yUZJ3AcOx_8

Jeephand fucked around with this message at 18:28 on Apr 27, 2010

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objectively bad
Nov 11, 2006

ABANDONS HIS FRIENDS


I think I might try get back into skateboarding this summer. I skated for about 3 years when I was younger and while I wasn't that great it was awesome fun. I can remember the day I finally managed a kickflip first attempt after a friend I skated with for a couple of weeks once a year on holiday told me "Stop turning, stay straight" - I'd been trying to land one since the year before.

Soon after I was able to pull off varial kickflips as well, and at my peak I was able to do sort of varial kickflip but the kickflip was actually an underflip, not sure if this is the proper name for it.

I've still got my board, so I just need some shoes, maybe new griptape and some sunshine for motivation.

I tried to get into it about a year ago but found myself exhausted pretty quick and unable to pull anything off, but I'm starting to cycle to work so hopefully I'll be in better shape by the time I give it a go.

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