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FlashBewin
May 17, 2009


Figured i'd come in here and post my 2 cents worth.
I bought an Iwata BCR and a compressor (also Iwata) that i don't remember the name of right now. I got the both of them as a set for $190, which i thought was pretty cool. The Compressor itself, online, was $200.
Anyway, i got into it because i *really* wanted to try my hand at painting the miniatures from the Starship Troopers miniatures game. The game itself failed, but i was able to buy a crapload of the figures kits for cheap.

I have to admit that i absolutely love the Warrior Bugs. they take about 15 seconds to put together and they really are just a joy to paint.

I'm not great at painting. I have Carpel Tunnel syndrome and i have a hard time getting a real fine spray pattern, considering they don't make a .03 needle for my AirBrush.

I bought a Flames Of War Tank, but it was too small for me to really put much effort into it. I have a couple of models that i havn't put together yet, but i have a P-51 Mustang from Tamiya that i use a test for different paint colors.

My camoflage pattern is terrible, but maybe, JUST MAYBE, i can offer a gem of advice for anyone who needs it.

For stencils, honestly, go to Office Max/Office Depot/favorite Office supply warehouse, and buy those plastic sheets that teachers used to use with the Overhead Projectors. I bought a box of 100 sheets for $18, and they are honestly one of the best investments i've made so far.

As far as paints go, i use Vallejo Acrylics. The colors mix okay although the guy at the local Riders Hobby told me to use a 50/50 mix of paint and water, althought that was bad advice.

I'm working on a Mitchell 2-engine bomber but i'm not happy with the way its going. I think i'm going to shift away from Tamiya, it seems like the majority of their models are warped/edges don't meet right. I considered buying one of the various flavors of joiners/Green stuff/whatever you want to use to close gaps, but i'd rather buy quality models that don't need it.

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Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something


FlashBewin posted:

As far as paints go, i use Vallejo Acrylics. The colors mix okay although the guy at the local Riders Hobby told me to use a 50/50 mix of paint and water, althought that was bad advice.

For airbrush use, don't use water. Go to an art store and get some Liquitex Airbrush Medium. It'll thin like water, but it also has paint adhesives added so it won't reduce the paints ability to coat and stick to the model like water would do. For thinning paints to be brushed on, Liquitex also makes some thinners, but an even better alternative is a product called Floetrol. You can find this at hardware and paint shops, as it's a paint conditioner for household paint. It comes in a fairly large bottle for cheap, so one bottle will likely last you forever. Not only will it thin, it makes brush painting go on far smoother with fewer visible brush strokes. A nice thinning ratio is one part Floetrol, one part soapy water, and 3 parts paint.

EvilMuppet
Jul 28, 2006

Bork Bork Bork


FlashBewin posted:

Figured i'd come in here and post my 2 cents worth.
I bought an Iwata BCR and a compressor (also Iwata) that i don't remember the name of right now. I got the both of them as a set for $190, which i thought was pretty cool. The Compressor itself, online, was $200.
Anyway, i got into it because i *really* wanted to try my hand at painting the miniatures from the Starship Troopers miniatures game. The game itself failed, but i was able to buy a crapload of the figures kits for cheap.

I have to admit that i absolutely love the Warrior Bugs. they take about 15 seconds to put together and they really are just a joy to paint.

I'm not great at painting. I have Carpel Tunnel syndrome and i have a hard time getting a real fine spray pattern, considering they don't make a .03 needle for my AirBrush.

I bought a Flames Of War Tank, but it was too small for me to really put much effort into it. I have a couple of models that i havn't put together yet, but i have a P-51 Mustang from Tamiya that i use a test for different paint colors.

My camoflage pattern is terrible, but maybe, JUST MAYBE, i can offer a gem of advice for anyone who needs it.

For stencils, honestly, go to Office Max/Office Depot/favorite Office supply warehouse, and buy those plastic sheets that teachers used to use with the Overhead Projectors. I bought a box of 100 sheets for $18, and they are honestly one of the best investments i've made so far.

As far as paints go, i use Vallejo Acrylics. The colors mix okay although the guy at the local Riders Hobby told me to use a 50/50 mix of paint and water, althought that was bad advice.

I'm working on a Mitchell 2-engine bomber but i'm not happy with the way its going. I think i'm going to shift away from Tamiya, it seems like the majority of their models are warped/edges don't meet right. I considered buying one of the various flavors of joiners/Green stuff/whatever you want to use to close gaps, but i'd rather buy quality models that don't need it.

Er.. all models need some greenstuff, doesn't matter how well they are made.

Pagan
Jun 3, 2003



Bloody Hedgehog posted:

For airbrush use, don't use water. Go to an art store and get some Liquitex Airbrush Medium. It'll thin like water, but it also has paint adhesives added so it won't reduce the paints ability to coat and stick to the model like water would do. For thinning paints to be brushed on, Liquitex also makes some thinners, but an even better alternative is a product called Floetrol. You can find this at hardware and paint shops, as it's a paint conditioner for household paint. It comes in a fairly large bottle for cheap, so one bottle will likely last you forever. Not only will it thin, it makes brush painting go on far smoother with fewer visible brush strokes. A nice thinning ratio is one part Floetrol, one part soapy water, and 3 parts paint.

Future Floor Wax is almost the same thing. It's an acrylic medium that helps paint flow and stick without diluting it's coating ability as much as water. Think of mixing water with your paint as creating a suspension; acrylic medium creates an actual solution. Around here, a huge bottle of Future costs around $9 and lasts a long time. It also makes a great gloss coat when sprayed by itself.

EvilMuppet posted:

Er.. all models need some greenstuff, doesn't matter how well they are made.

Yeah, but warping and huge gaps is a different story. Although, I haven't had many problems with Tamiya; they've always struck me as pretty high quality. Why don't you post some pix of the problem areas, so we can tell you if it's a genuine problem or just part of the model building experience!

localized
Mar 30, 2008


Gordon_The_Fish posted:

I'm looking at getting into model shipbuilding using wooden kits. A few others have posted about this, so I was wondering what sort of tools and other stuff I'd need to buy alongside a beginner's kit in order to get started. Any ideas?

You should get an "Everything you need" kit from Model Expo or an Ensign Skillbuilder kit from Blue Jacket . The kits from both manufacturers include paint, glue and tools so you don't need to buy anything else, and the instructions and plans from both companies are probably the best you can buy.

Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something


Pagan posted:

Future Floor Wax is almost the same thing. It's an acrylic medium that helps paint flow and stick without diluting it's coating ability as much as water. Think of mixing water with your paint as creating a suspension; acrylic medium creates an actual solution. Around here, a huge bottle of Future costs around $9 and lasts a long time. It also makes a great gloss coat when sprayed by itself.

Future is good, but as you said, it will always bump up the gloss factor of the paint your using. The Liquitex medium is pretty flat, and not much more expensive than Future, and comes in a decent sized bottle.

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008




Nap Ghost

Can anyone suggest any WW2 German armour camo schemes that you can paint convincingly without an airbrush? The usual ones that I've seen all have very soft edges that you'd need an airbrush for, but were there any with a hard edged pattern?

Pagan
Jun 3, 2003



Danger - Octopus! posted:

Can anyone suggest any WW2 German armour camo schemes that you can paint convincingly without an airbrush? The usual ones that I've seen all have very soft edges that you'd need an airbrush for, but were there any with a hard edged pattern?

Part of the problem you're going to run into there is the scale modeler's mindset of the "right" way to do the paintjob. In the later stages of the war, troops were given buckets of paint and brushes, and did whatever the gently caress they could in the field. So you had everything from paint applied too thick by brushes, to guys thinning the paint so much so that it was almost like a wash.

In the early part of the war, they had time to do paint jobs in the factory, so you've got very different levels of quality, but scale modelers love airbrushing and drybrushing, so even if the "real thing" wouldn't have looked like that, everyone knows that you drybrush to show weathering!

http://www.soldatini.miniatures.de/mimetica-invernale-carri-armati.html

http://modelbuilder.freeyellow.com/buildups.htm

Both of those show some cool winter type camo. You can also get soft feathered edges by drybrushing carefully, or stippling.

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008




Nap Ghost

Pagan posted:

In the early part of the war, they had time to do paint jobs in the factory, so you've got very different levels of quality, but scale modelers love airbrushing and drybrushing, so even if the "real thing" wouldn't have looked like that, everyone knows that you drybrush to show weathering!

http://www.soldatini.miniatures.de/mimetica-invernale-carri-armati.html

http://modelbuilder.freeyellow.com/buildups.htm

Both of those show some cool winter type camo. You can also get soft feathered edges by drybrushing carefully, or stippling.

You make a good point about the way scale modelers do things. I really like that overpainted winter camo look. I'd imagine it's hard to make it look good, and not like you just hosed up painting the model though!

Lets Play Arson
Aug 5, 2007


Another paint question here. I'm making a remote control Matilda Frog flame tank out of plywood, and i've really got no idea how i'd go about painting it in a convincing way. I'm going to go with this scheme since I like how it looks. I'm also hoping to keep away from airbrushes since i'm on a tight budget.

Pagan
Jun 3, 2003



Danger - Octopus! posted:

You make a good point about the way scale modelers do things. I really like that overpainted winter camo look. I'd imagine it's hard to make it look good, and not like you just hosed up painting the model though!

One of the pix I used, as a reference for my IG tanks, is this Abrams.



But I realized that the weird spattering of the mud looks so . . . odd, that if I did it on a scale model, people would think I'd done it wrong. It's kinda crazy that modelers have such a set idea of how something SHOULD look, that you can make something look so much like the real thing (the "prototype" in modeler parlance) that it looks "wrong."

On the other hand, the crushed fenders and the mud built up in the road wheels is why I like that picture a lot. It's a good example of how in even the driest deserts, you still get mud and gunk built up on everything.

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

Warping and edge meeting problems with models is a bit of a sore subject, but I can at least comment on the brands I've dealt with.

Generally speaking, you get what you pay for. There's a reason why Revell models are so cheap, and it's because they are by and large total crap. The exception to this would be the Made in Germany Revell models, which can be the total opposite and yet still be a bargain. I really don't understand it.

Tamiya varies widely. Some of their molds are very old, and it shows. The engineering on their newer models is much better, and it also seems that they do better with larger models such as the 1:32 scale aircraft.

The best models I've ever bought are, by far, Hasegawa. Their engineering is superb, the molds are crisp and free of flash and ejector pin marks for the most part, and they put in an incredible amount of detail in even 1:72 models. Next after Hasegawa I would place Trumpeter and Academy, both of which are higher quality in larger molds-again, 1:32 aircraft. Lastly, but still pretty good would be Italeri, who has been putting out some kick-rear end re-engineered kits lately that even come with nice little reference photo books.

I don't have much experience with the eastern European brands, but from reading reviews it seems that you can get a lot of bang for your buck from some of the Russian makers, who also have models of some off the wall subjects that you just don't see from anyone else. When it comes to armor, my friends swear by Dragon as the gold standard, and I figure that since they include turned metal barrels on their tanks that's probably a good sign.

Ultimately it depends on how you feel about the subject. If you really have a passion to build something, working with a difficult (read: crappily manufactured) kit can be a labor of love. In some cases you may have to settle for low quality molding because it's the only company that makes the model. Vacu-form models are a total pain in the rear end. Resin is frustrating and unforgiving. Photo etch is fiddly. And yet, when you're done and you have a beautiful piece of work to look at...it's all worth it.

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008




Nap Ghost

I find that the various review sites online such as Armorama and so forth, or sites that detail builds are really great for telling you what a kit is like before you buy it. That way you'll know if you're buying a Tamiya kit that's been around for decades, or if it's a brand new set of sprues in the box.

Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something


Powdered Toast Man posted:

When it comes to armor, my friends swear by Dragon as the gold standard, and I figure that since they include turned metal barrels on their tanks that's probably a good sign.

I can attest to Dragon being kick rear end. Sometimes their stuff is almost too-detailed. You open the box and are just ".... oh gently caress, this is going to take for-loving-ever to assemble."

I think I've mentioned it before, but their most complex model I've worked on was a Panzer IV. Over 1000 pieces, including several variant pieces that let you choose between 3 different Panzer IV's to build. Saying that, some of their PE is a little on the crappy side. It just seems more fragile than a lot of other PE kits. Their stowage clamps in particular are just useless, and I've had much better luck with 3rd party clamp sets.

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

Bloody Hedgehog posted:

I can attest to Dragon being kick rear end. Sometimes their stuff is almost too-detailed. You open the box and are just ".... oh gently caress, this is going to take for-loving-ever to assemble."

I think I've mentioned it before, but their most complex model I've worked on was a Panzer IV. Over 1000 pieces, including several variant pieces that let you choose between 3 different Panzer IV's to build. Saying that, some of their PE is a little on the crappy side. It just seems more fragile than a lot of other PE kits. Their stowage clamps in particular are just useless, and I've had much better luck with 3rd party clamp sets.

Yeah, I think I could get into armor if it wasn't for all that business with the tank tracks. It just looks like a tedious pain in the butt.

Vaporware
May 22, 2004

Still not here yet.

I remember when I built the tamiya RC Sherman I spent about a week or so of afternoons putting those links together.

Wibbleman
Apr 19, 2006

Fluffy doesn't want to be sacrificed



Bloody Hedgehog posted:

I can attest to Dragon being kick rear end. Sometimes their stuff is almost too-detailed. You open the box and are just ".... oh gently caress, this is going to take for-loving-ever to assemble."

I think I've mentioned it before, but their most complex model I've worked on was a Panzer IV. Over 1000 pieces, including several variant pieces that let you choose between 3 different Panzer IV's to build. Saying that, some of their PE is a little on the crappy side. It just seems more fragile than a lot of other PE kits. Their stowage clamps in particular are just useless, and I've had much better luck with 3rd party clamp sets.

Dragon went through a big change about 10 years ago, they went from being pretty much garbage kits with terrible fit issues and instructions being horribly horribly wrong. To what they are now, in that detail wise quite often they will spank tamiya, they are not as well engineered as tamiya's kits, and don't compete on price with tamiya anymore (they are both loving expensive). And the super kits (the tiger 1 3 in 1, and most of the panzer IV kits) are stupidly complicated. The Smart kits are fantastic though. The Photo etch on the kits tends to be on the absurd side though, with some of the bits impossible to make accurately.

But here is a great example of someone taking one of the premium ed kits and going completely mental.

Crazy superdetailed build here

Pagan
Jun 3, 2003



Wibbleman posted:

But here is a great example of someone taking one of the premium ed kits and going completely mental.

Crazy superdetailed build here

That is insane. Just, seriously insane. It looks good in the end, but god drat.

That, and the large scale space marine, make me ask a question. If you're going to go through and superdetail and replace the vast majority of the pieces, why even buy a kit in the first place?! Not only did he buy the kit, but it looks like he bought both a Verlinden AND a Dragon detailing kit, along with even more stuff. And he doesn't use ANYTHING from the Verlinden upgrade; just pix to show how much it sucks, and he uses very little from the dragon upgrade kit. The vast majority of the work is done by hand, scratchbuilding.

So why spend between $200 and $300 for kits and upgrades when you're going to end up doing it all from scratch anyway?

Wibbleman
Apr 19, 2006

Fluffy doesn't want to be sacrificed



Pagan posted:

That is insane. Just, seriously insane. It looks good in the end, but god drat.

That, and the large scale space marine, make me ask a question. If you're going to go through and superdetail and replace the vast majority of the pieces, why even buy a kit in the first place?! Not only did he buy the kit, but it looks like he bought both a Verlinden AND a Dragon detailing kit, along with even more stuff. And he doesn't use ANYTHING from the Verlinden upgrade; just pix to show how much it sucks, and he uses very little from the dragon upgrade kit. The vast majority of the work is done by hand, scratchbuilding.

So why spend between $200 and $300 for kits and upgrades when you're going to end up doing it all from scratch anyway?

well theres also a guy (watanabe Super crazy here) on that site that bought a 251/x kit and decided that it was crap, and fabricated the whole thing out of brass. Its just a special kind of crazy I guess.

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008




Nap Ghost


I love how he does all that work for parts that aren't even going to be visible, but he'll know it's there. I have heard stories about judges at scale modelling/painting events using dentists mirrors on long handles to peek inside hatches.. but daaaamn.

I'm currently spending most of my time with GW stuff, but am sitting around 3/4 done with a Merkava II kit. The ball and chain assembly is driving me absolutely insane, because it just won't stick so I am tempted to leave it off, even though it's a fairly defining feature, unless I can get a way of doing it that works and doesn't drive me mad.

Other than that, I've got a 1/24 Kubelwagen kit that I got because it was on sale and I really like Kubelwagens. I keep thinking about starting it because I figured the large size would make it fun but even the box is intimidating...

Danger - Octopus! fucked around with this message at 23:15 on Oct 3, 2009

FlashBewin
May 17, 2009


I went to a somewhat-local Hobby store earlier today. It was a bit of a drive, not that that stopped me from blowing $100.
My question is this, Is there a reccomended Website-store to buy Models and miniatures? I saw some of the WH40k, which i had never paid much attention to, that i would LOVE to paint. Except that the store i went to...i'm convinced had a 150% markup. Seriously. Who would pay $120 for a miniature... of ONE thing?
Also, looking for an Online store that sells Vallejo Air Model, since my REAL local store just got bought out by some POS company that only sells R/C stuff.
I need me some paints and new models

Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something


This is my current list of online companies that I go to for product. There's models and supplies in there, and their may be some Warhammer shops as well. They're all fairly good companies, but if I had to pick one as the go to guys, it would be Great Models. They carry everything.

Saying that, I encourage you to buy local if you can. It will usually end up cheaper in the end, since you won't have to pay for shipping. Besides, even if it's a little more expensive to buy locally, it's still superior to have a place you can quickly go out and pick up stuff rather than having to order in your supplies and then wait every time you run out. As for the price of the Warhammer model you saw, it was probably correct. Warhammer stuff is pretty pricey, and their premium stuff through Forge World is crazy expensive.


Accurate Armour
Blast Models
Build-A-Rama
CMK Kits ESHOP
e-HOBBYLAND
Firestorm Models
Friendship Models
Great Models
HobbyBuy
HobbyLink Japan
Internet Hobbies
Legends Hobbies
LuckyModel
Megahobby
Michigan Toy Soldier
Mig Productions
Military Miniatures Warehouse
Mission Models
PanzerShop
Roll Models
Scenic Express
Sculpting Studio
Sprue Brothers
Squadron
TankRats AFV Depot
The Barrel Store
The Small Shop
Tiger Models
Udisco
Warzone Hobbies

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008




Nap Ghost

For people ordering from the UK, I have had very good experiences with Models For Sale.

minstrels
Nov 15, 2009


After getting back into scale modeling a few weeks ago, I built this Harrier:



It's not done very well, but I hope to improve in the future. Currently got an Airfix 1/72 Hawker Typhoon half-built, and a Tamiya 1/72 Spitfire to start next.

Kerro
Nov 3, 2002

Did you marry a man who married the sea? He looks right through you to the distant grey - calling, calling..

Danger - Octopus! posted:

For people ordering from the UK, I have had very good experiences with Models For Sale.

Having ordered from these guys as well now, they definitely seem pretty good.

I've been having a go at one of the Trumpeter kits, a Pontiac Bonneville convertible. Quite a nice kit apart from some really fiddly fittings that don't quite align which is always immensely frustrating. It's also the first time I've tried adding the wiring to the engine after finding some useful links online - but still very much a work in progress:



I've been having some real problems with painting the body though. I've tried using Humbrol acrylic sprays and more recently Hycote acrylic sprays, and both have the same problem - the paint when it sprays on always has quite a 'gritty' kind of texture to it, it's really far from smooth and this is after putting down and sanding several primer coats. I can smooth it out then polish it no problem, except that I have to sand it a lot to get it smooth and the amount of sanding always means that I end up sanding through to the primer coat on the raised detail, which is hopeless. I don't remember ever having this problem with enamel sprays, but I can't really find many enamel sprays for sale any more - at least not in any kind of range of colours. Is there a trick to using acrylics that I'm not aware of, other than warming up the can and making sure it's well shaken?

Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something


The "trick" these days is you basically need an airbrush to make it look perfect. The finish won't be perfect straight out of the airbrush, but the initial finish will be far smoother so you won't need to sand and buff as much. Rattle-cans are convenient, but you'll never get as nice a finish as with an airbrush and a gentle buff. Enamel sprays were nice too, but the enamel is a lot thicker than an acrylic and you lose a lot of detail when you use them.

I stay away from cars because getting a perfect finish on those things is an art unto itself.

Kerro
Nov 3, 2002

Did you marry a man who married the sea? He looks right through you to the distant grey - calling, calling..

Bloody Hedgehog posted:

The "trick" these days is you basically need an airbrush to make it look perfect. The finish won't be perfect straight out of the airbrush, but the initial finish will be far smoother so you won't need to sand and buff as much. Rattle-cans are convenient, but you'll never get as nice a finish as with an airbrush and a gentle buff. Enamel sprays were nice too, but the enamel is a lot thicker than an acrylic and you lose a lot of detail when you use them.

I stay away from cars because getting a perfect finish on those things is an art unto itself.

Yeah - I figured an airbrush would do a much nicer job but can't really justify getting one just yet.. maybe if I stick with it. I guess the thicker spray was why the enamels I used gave a good finish - I don't particularly remember losing detail but I imagine you're right. Certainly not mirror-smooth like some people manage to achieve (how?) but decent enough. I don't miss having to wait a week or more after spraying to be able to do anything though!

Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something


I don't know the particulars, but a lot of people who do vehicles and want an amazing finish buy specialized complete paint kits. They come with specialized paints that are formulated to have the smallest pigment particles possible, as well as purpose made clear-coats, buffing agents, chrome treatments, the whole deal. The type of thing you'd see buried back in the classifieds of a modeling mag, called something like "The System" or "Jims Super-Pro-Finish Concoction", sold by some fume-addled balding white-guy from Omaha.

You best bet is probably find a forum where there are a lot of model-car enthusiasts. I'm more into the War/Sci-Fi/Fantasy stuff, so I couldn't even tell you where those forums would be.

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

I've had good luck getting the still wet look like you'd want on a car with a pretty ghetto method, but it works. Still not perfect and still a fair bit of work, but I've had good luck with it.

1) Start by filling microscratches from sanding during surface prep with crayon wax and buffing it before priming. The primer still sticks so long as you buff off excess wax with 2000 grit sandpaper, and the part is slick as glass.

2) Primer sealer works better than regular primer since it doesn't fill in or round out details.

3) Wet sand it all with the same 2000 grit paper.

4) Airbrush as normal with gloss paint. Matte paint is far more likely to get orange peel and leave little paint boogers all over the place.

5) After I'm happy with the base coat, I mix up three parts Future Floor Polish and one part Simple Green and use it for the gloss coat, with a day of curing allowed between the three or four coats I use.

6)Let the last coat cure for at least two more days, then polish it with wax, toothpaste, or whatever you normally use, buffing it off with standard copy paper or a microfiber cloth.

The biggest factors in how I've gotten it to turn out are the number of coats in the gloss (the more coats the better up to a certain point), and letting it cure for at least a day between coats. Just don't go past four coats unless you want your model to look like it's covered in ice.

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

TheFuglyStik is definitely on the right track, but painting cars perfectly is a pain in the rear end no matter how you do it.

Bear in mind, though, that even a cheap airbrush will give you far more control and better results than a spray can. I've seen Japanese guys drain the propellant and drill a hole in a spray can to get the paint out so they can airbrush it just because that particular paint was only available in a can...

Vaporware
May 22, 2004

Still not here yet.

wow, that's hardcore. I saw a kaiju painter's workshop on a toy blog I follow and I tried to imagine being as hardcore about painting as this guy (goto-san). Obviously some of it is being a slovenly artist, but the product is so nice.

The serious vinyl guys/"urban designers" talk about paints that we can't get over here due to safety laws. Are there painter's forums? I guess there would be, I never thought to go looking for info about special paints / techniques. The factories in china that paint toys and stuff probably keep their master painter's techniques and paint formulas under wraps what with the crazy competition over there.

I haven't gotten into my airbrush because you absolutely need ventilation to do anything with them, and I haven't rigged it yet.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Vaporware fucked around with this message at 19:31 on Nov 17, 2009

No Pun Intended
Jul 23, 2007

DWARVEN SEX OFFENDER

ASK ME ABOUT TONING MY FINE ASS DWARVEN BOOTY BY RUNNING FROM THE COPS OUTSIDE THAT ELF KINDERGARTEN

BEHOLD THE DONG OF THE DWARVES! THE DWARVEN DONG IS COMING!


Anyone know anyone who makes aircraft in 1/100 or close to it?

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008




Nap Ghost

No Pun Intended posted:

Anyone know anyone who makes aircraft in 1/100 or close to it?

Italeri make a few 1/100 aircraft. That's a bit of an odd scale though, isn't it?

You can get quite a lot of aircraft in 1/144 scale from various manufacturers, if that would be close enough?

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

Tamiya also makes some 1:100 sets, I believe. Revell/Monogram makes a series of 1:100 kits, but they are low-quality pre painted snap together junk. On the other hand, if you were dedicated I suppose you could modify them to look better, which is what this hobby is all about!

No Pun Intended
Jul 23, 2007

DWARVEN SEX OFFENDER

ASK ME ABOUT TONING MY FINE ASS DWARVEN BOOTY BY RUNNING FROM THE COPS OUTSIDE THAT ELF KINDERGARTEN

BEHOLD THE DONG OF THE DWARVES! THE DWARVEN DONG IS COMING!


Thanks - I'll look into Those. Yes it is an odd scale for aircraft but it is for my Flames of war 101st Airborne which are 15mm / 1/100.

1/144 is what FoW uses to represent your aircraft on the table, but they would be too small for having up close on some sort of display base.

Buffalo
Dec 4, 2008


Any 1/700 ship modellers here? I used to build model cars, tanks, and some planes when I was younger but recently got started on 1/700 WW2 ships during the summer.

I have not tried using photo etch yet because a lot the kits cost as much as the model itself. So far I've built and painted an IJN Shikinami(SP?) destroyer, IJN Suzuya aircraft cruiser, IJN Kinu light cruiser, and the HMS Ark Royal carrier OOB (The kit was so terrible I couldn't justify painting it)

Thinking of building a Z-Class german destroyer or the HMS Rodney battleship next.

I would post some pictures but I cannot find the PC cord for my camera phone, maybe when I find it. So does anyone else have interest in these that would care to share some tips and ideas?

Shachi
Nov 1, 2004

I'm a simple man. I like pretty, dark-haired women and breakfast food.

So I'm looking at getting back into scale modeling. I used to do it a lot when I was in high school and really enjoyed it. Back then I was into WWII era aircraft.

I'd probably be doing much of the same but I'd like to get into more modern aircraft and possibly naval at some point.

I find myself in a dilemma here. Back then I just knew to put the glue on the pieces and stick em together and do some brush painting. Now, wanting to get into this on a more advanced or perhaps professional level I've learned a lot more about the techniques and equipment required just from reading this thread and the flood of information I've delved into after being inspired by this thread (good job btw).

Anyways back to my dilemma, I'm starting to realize how pricey this whole new hobby is going to be just to jump into it. I realize it's more of a one time cost and then just maintenance once I have the tools I need, but it's a bit expensive none-the-less.

So far I'm understanding that beyond the basic tools ie. Touch-n-flow, x-acto knives, green stuff or modeling putty, cement, and paint. I should invest in an airbrush and compressor. Not to mention a nice mag/lamp or 'Third-hand' and some other minor stuff.

I've pretty much settled on getting a Iwata Revolution brush and possibly an Iwata Sprint Jet or Smart Jet compressor. Is this good for starting out? Am I starting at too high of a level. Is there some sort of middle ground I can reach?

My only other concerns are that I've never used an airbrush and that I might just be completely inept at using one. That or I'll decide that I don't enjoy the hobby as much as I used to and then end up having sunk $300 bucks into a bunch of stuff that'll sit packed away somewhere.

Hobby Lobby is having some nice sales tomm. (Black Friday) and I was thinking of going and maybe getting a few things then.

Assuming I do go through all this, where is a good place to start? I'm not a complete novice but is maybe a 1/72 Revell or something still a good place to start since I'm basically trying to get my proverbial plane off the ground after being grounded for so long.? Or is that too low of a level that I'll just be disappointed with?

Edit: Also what about the Iwata Silver Jet. It's a bit cheaper and I realize it has a lot less features but would it be that bad?

Edit2: I know that the Silver Jet doesn't have a tank. Can one of you explain using a T-valve and external tank in more detail or link me somwhere. Or even a better tank-less comp. That is if it's actually cost effective.

Shachi fucked around with this message at 07:26 on Nov 27, 2009

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Shachi posted:

So I'm looking at getting back into scale modeling.

Good man.

Shachi posted:

I've pretty much settled on getting a Iwata Revolution brush and possibly an Iwata Sprint Jet or Smart Jet compressor. Is this good for starting out? Am I starting at too high of a level. Is there some sort of middle ground I can reach?

My only other concerns are that I've never used an airbrush and that I might just be completely inept at using one. That or I'll decide that I don't enjoy the hobby as much as I used to and then end up having sunk $300 bucks into a bunch of stuff that'll sit packed away somewhere.

Edit2: I know that the Silver Jet doesn't have a tank. Can one of you explain using a T-valve and external tank in more detail or link me somwhere. Or even a better tank-less comp. That is if it's actually cost effective.

I have that brush, the CR. It's a brilliant staring point because it's sturdy & does everything a good brush needs to. I'm not sure about that exact compressor but a tank is worth getting. If you run a line from the compressor into the tank, then out through a filter/dryer/regulator to your airbrush you'll basically have the same kit. I'd say that brush is the middle ground, considering cheaper means dropping down to a non-brand or replica brush or single action etc. In the world of crazy-nano-tank-building-men-with-beards brushes easily go up to £300 & are pieced together from different needles/etc to get a certain range of abilities. Enjoy your brush, get stuck in & practice, if/when you feel the brush is holding you back, do some research. Until then, have fun.

Shachi
Nov 1, 2004

I'm a simple man. I like pretty, dark-haired women and breakfast food.

^^^

Thanks for the info man. I think I might go out today and get one then. The deals are really nice.

Also anyone have any good forums or sites that teach techniques like enamel washing etc.? I've drooled over that stuff Narita-san does for days but there is a lot he doesn't quite explain with his Engrish.

Also I'm pretty interested in WH 40k but not the table top game it self. I play the PC games a lot and would be more interested in doing pieces for a diorama more than I would for actual use. Is there anyone else who does this or is this just a travesty?

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Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008




Nap Ghost

Shachi posted:

Also I'm pretty interested in WH 40k but not the table top game it self. I play the PC games a lot and would be more interested in doing pieces for a diorama more than I would for actual use. Is there anyone else who does this or is this just a travesty?

I have spent a lot of money on GW in the last two years. I play so infrequently it isn't even funny - I spend a lot more time painting and gluing than I do gaming, for sure. I enjoy painting (not very well) more than I enjoy the actual gaming really.

While their vehicles leave something to be desired next to proper scale models, their actual figures (well the recent ones) are nicer sculpts than a lot of other 28mm stuff. Also, check out this thread

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