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ZenMastaT
Apr 4, 2005

I dun shot my dick off

God drat that is some fine looking stuff. Wish I had half your talent when it comes to painting, hell I'd settle for half your girlfriends talent. What kind of diorama scene are you thinking of?

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lilljonas
May 6, 2007

We got crabs? We got crabs!

ZenMastaT posted:

God drat that is some fine looking stuff. Wish I had half your talent when it comes to painting, hell I'd settle for half your girlfriends talent. What kind of diorama scene are you thinking of?


(with Caen sign altered, of course)

+



That, and some tuft and snow for that Christmas feel. My biggest fear when shopping for the Miniart diorama kits online was which ones would have enough room to fit a tank!

Edit: anyone with experience of making icicles?

lilljonas fucked around with this message at 20:58 on Dec 13, 2009

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008




Nap Ghost

lilljonas posted:

Edit: anyone with experience of making icicles?

If you carefully heat up a bit of sprue, you could stretch it when it melts or you could use hot glue since the drips will set if you're careful - I've seen people do that to make drool for 40k 'nid monsters.

Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something


For icicles I would take a bit of monofilament and weight it so it hung straight. Then I'd drop some 5 minute epoxy in layers onto it to build up an icicle shape. You can do this without the monofilament, but it's easier with as it gives the glue something to grab onto.


And as someone mentioned dioramas earlier, it can actually be more economical, and you'll get better results ,with scratchbuilding. If you want to tackle this subject, I recommend two books.

The first is How To Build Dioramas, by Shepherd Paine. Shep is a master at dioramas, and this book will give you a good overview of the sorts of materials and methods you'll need to start building dioramas. It covers everything from tools, to materials, to electrical, to even advanced special effects and visual trickery. Even if you're not into building a diorama, this books stands on it's own as an excellent account of the work of Paine. Tons of photos and lots of interesting info.

The second is Advanced Terrain Modeling, by Richard Windrow. Windrow is another master of the art, and gets into more detail with this book. While Paines book is a general overview of the tools and techniques of diorama building, Windrows books really goes into the nitty gritty of how he builds his scenes. There's so much detail and so many photos of each of his builds that you could essentially use it as project guide to recreate his works. He gives you paints to use, mixing rations, secret materials for convincing detail, household objects that can recreate objects in miniature, the works.

Obviously there are tons of books out there on building dioramas and miniature scenes, but these two I think are the best to start anyone off into that area of modeling.

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

That T-34 looks great. Nice to see some activity in here!

Up next for me:

http://www.tamiyausa.com/product/item.php?product-id=61093

I'm planning to do some weathering on it such as the 'salt crust' method I mentioned earlier in the thread; WWII Japanese planes generally looked very beat up and didn't get repainted much at all.

ZenMastaT
Apr 4, 2005

I dun shot my dick off

So I find this on a shelf at a local model ship that seems to have a lot of old out of print stock sitting around (Including that discontinued Italeri Pavelow III mentioned earlier):

http://www.oldmodelkits.com/index.php?detail=14145&newlist=1&page=49

The box doesn't seem to have any painting recommendations though. Any ideas?

Here's a link to a ridiculous Huey build in progress over at ARC also:

http://www.arcforums.com/forums/air/index.php?showtopic=188853

ZenMastaT fucked around with this message at 19:32 on Dec 14, 2009

Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something


ZenMastaT posted:

So I find this on a shelf at a local model ship that seems to have a lot of old out of print stock sitting around (Including that discontinued Italeri Pavelow III mentioned earlier):

http://www.oldmodelkits.com/index.php?detail=14145&newlist=1&page=49

The box doesn't seem to have any painting recommendations though. Any ideas?

Olive drab wil be your friend here. Seriously though, besides research in the internet, if you have a local library near you, you can probably find some books on choppers and war that will have a lot of photos that will likely serve you better than what you can find online.

Kerro
Nov 3, 2002

Did you marry a man who married the sea? He looks right through you to the distant grey - calling, calling..

How viable are the super cheap airbrush/compressor kits for just laying down solid colour? The only reason I'd really want an airbrush is for that purpose i.e. I don't need it for detail work. I assume the super-cheap airbrush+compressor kits on ebay suck, but I don't know in what way do they suck - can they still paint a solid coat okay or are they likely to not work at all? I'm thinking of this or this sort of thing.

I have a hard time making sense of the different types of airbrushes/compressors available at different price points.

Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something


Most people don't use the airbrush for detail work, particularly on the type of vehicles models seen in this thread. Most people get the most use out of their airbrush laying down primer coats and base-colour coats. Beyond that, typically on vehicles the airbrush can be used for light dust coats, spattering effects, camo and even just as an air source so they can blow paint off of a brush for different effects. If you were painting a large bust or figural model of a superhero or something, an airbrush can be used for a lot more because details aren't as small and things like shadows can be laid down delicately with an airbrush.

I wouldn't recommend the cheap airbrush and compressor kits, as it'll just frustrate you and be a waste of money overall. Sure, you won't get brush marks a brush will impart, but you'll end up with a whole new set of problems related to crappy airbrushes. Uneven coats due to compressor pulsing, constant clogs, rusting, bent needles, random unwanted spattering; the list goes on from there. The compressor you linked to is woefully small too, with no tank for storage. The thing will need to be on constantly while in use, and that'll get annoying fast. It also looks like it may not be adjustable, and the 50psi it puts is really too much for model work, even basic base coating. And if you want to do light dust coats or touch up, no way, as that stuff you might be working down at 5-8psi. I can't speak to whether Sealey is a good brand, but I've personally never heard of them. The airbrush in the second one is suspect as well, as they don't list the brand, and I don't care for that bottom-feed/top-feed combo as well. Top quality brands are one or the other, so this just seems like one more thing on the airbrush to mess up.

If you can, save some money and invest in a quality airbrush and a quality compressor (or tank of C02 as I use). It'll serve you far, far better in the long run. And if you don't end up liking what you're using, airbrushes hold their value well so you can sell it online for virtually the same price as you purchased it at.

Wibbleman
Apr 19, 2006

Fluffy doesn't want to be sacrificed



Kerro posted:

How viable are the super cheap airbrush/compressor kits for just laying down solid colour? The only reason I'd really want an airbrush is for that purpose i.e. I don't need it for detail work. I assume the super-cheap airbrush+compressor kits on ebay suck, but I don't know in what way do they suck - can they still paint a solid coat okay or are they likely to not work at all? I'm thinking of this or this sort of thing.

I have a hard time making sense of the different types of airbrushes/compressors available at different price points.

If you can find it, just get the basic Tamiya set eg. It should come with a AC adapter pretty much everywhere (but the right kind is a stupidly easy to get and quite cheap anyway). It will last forever, is easy to clean, and most people keep using it for base coats even after getting better brushes.

Bobx66
Feb 11, 2002

We all fell into the pit


Does anyone have any experience with the compressors avliable at Hobby Lobby? I'm gonna go buy one with that 40% off coupon.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



If all you're after is laying down a basecoat, see if you can find a spraycan in the colour you're after. Much cheaper if that's all you're after.

Kerro
Nov 3, 2002

Did you marry a man who married the sea? He looks right through you to the distant grey - calling, calling..

Thanks for the airbrush advice - the Tamiya kit looks like it could be a decent option for what I'm after. I've been using spraycans up til now but have been pretty dissatisfied with them - which may be partly the way I'm using them, but the uneven pressure and small can sizes has made it pretty hard to get a decent gloss coating. They're definitely cheaper in the short term but I figured if I could get a relatively inexpensive airbrush then it wouldn't take too long to pay itself off.

I'll hold off for now though - I'd like to follow Bloody Hedgehog's advice and save to get a decent one, but sadly this is only one of many hobbies and I find it hard to justify the cost right now. Thanks for warning me off the ebay ones though - I don't really feel that inclined to deal with new headaches :)

EvilMuppet
Jul 28, 2006

Bork Bork Bork


Kerro posted:

Thanks for the airbrush advice - the Tamiya kit looks like it could be a decent option for what I'm after. I've been using spraycans up til now but have been pretty dissatisfied with them - which may be partly the way I'm using them, but the uneven pressure and small can sizes has made it pretty hard to get a decent gloss coating. They're definitely cheaper in the short term but I figured if I could get a relatively inexpensive airbrush then it wouldn't take too long to pay itself off.

I'll hold off for now though - I'd like to follow Bloody Hedgehog's advice and save to get a decent one, but sadly this is only one of many hobbies and I find it hard to justify the cost right now. Thanks for warning me off the ebay ones though - I don't really feel that inclined to deal with new headaches :)

What are you painting? Model cars?

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

Bobx66 posted:

Does anyone have any experience with the compressors avliable at Hobby Lobby? I'm gonna go buy one with that 40% off coupon.

Look around for the same or a similar compressor online before you buy. Hobby Lobby's prices on anything related to airbrushing are comically inflated, and that 40% coupon may only get you in the neighborhood of still a bit more expensive.

A few years back their coupons and weekly discounts stacked, but they stopped that recently. The manager was pissed when I was able to walk out with an Iwata Eclipse for $70 instead of $240 because of that loophole.

Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something


There's actually a really awesome online store where I got my airbrush, and they have really low prices of AB's and compressors. Damned if I can remember it though. Maybe someone else here knows about it. It had a very simple layout, black background, and they specialized in art products, specifically airbrushes.

EDIT: Found it. Dixie Art.

Bloody Hedgehog fucked around with this message at 01:29 on Dec 20, 2009

fret logic
Mar 8, 2005
roffle


Where can you get that 40% coupon?

edit: nm sorry

Kerro
Nov 3, 2002

Did you marry a man who married the sea? He looks right through you to the distant grey - calling, calling..

EvilMuppet posted:

What are you painting? Model cars?

Yep. Just finished this most recent project, but I hosed up the paintjob on it several times trying different brands of rattle cans and lost a lot of the surface detail unfortunately. The last attempt would've been a great finish if not for the dust in our house. I'm still pretty happy with it since I haven't done a kit in about 10 years before this.





ZenMastaT
Apr 4, 2005

I dun shot my dick off

How do you guys usually mix acrylic paints? I'm using a toothpick but some of the paints come out a bit watery. Others seem to come out fine with the same duration of stirring though. I'm using Tamiya and Model Master acrylics and it seems like the lighter colors are more problematic (white, yellow etc).

Also how do you usually go about masking off areas? Tamiya tape shaped with an X-Acto knife is what I've been trying but it seems like the acrylic paint can kind of seep underneath it on occasion making the painstaking masking effort useless.

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

Some paint will come out too thin or a goopy mess right out of the bottle, not much that can be done about it other than letting some of the solvent evaporate or adding thinner. If you really want to see an unholy mess, open up a jar of Model Master Light Flesh Base acrylic. After it's properly thinned, that tiny bottle could fill a pint Mason jar with paint.

I use a long scrap of the trees the parts were molded on hammered flat on one end for mixing. Makes matching a mixed paint color to the plastic color much easier if that's something you're trying to do as well. Build a couple of models without tossing out any length of scrap under a few inches and you've got a lifetime supply of the drat things.

I use a 50/50 mix of dish soap and white glue as a liquid mask. No seepage under it like you get with tape. I actually do use tape (Scotch) for this stuff to mask straight lines though. It just works better than a six foot $10 roll of masking tape.

TheFuglyStik fucked around with this message at 09:54 on Dec 22, 2009

localized
Mar 30, 2008


I love Christmas. I received a paint set that includes all 93 of the bottled tamiya paints, and a tamiya model of the 1977 Martini Racing Porsche 935. I am kind of disappointed with the kit in that it has no engine at all. At least it has lots of decals so it will look pretty when its done. I was thinking about doing a tank next, since I have all of these flat camouflage colors to work with. Any suggestions?

Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something


Dragon are probably the best tank kits you'll find in local hobby shops. Italieri makes some nice stuff as well. For online stores, add in AFV Club as they make really excellent quality kits. Just buy what strikes your fancy though. Lately I've been on a kick for kit subjects that aren't as well known or popular as the typical tanks that dominate the hobby.

For christmas I got a Tamiya Sd.KFZ.232 Panzerspahwagen 8-Rad, as well as a Bronco Land-Wasser-Schlepper. Perfect to scratch my odd vehicles itch.

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008




Nap Ghost

Charity shop near me had a whole bunch of relatively cheap good-as-new model kits for some reason.



Guess I'll be busy.

localized
Mar 30, 2008


Does anyone know what Tamiya Thinner is? I have heard that you can just use lacquer thinner, but I don't want to screw something up.

Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something


Thinner is thinner, no matter who makes it. Larger companies like Tamiya like to put big warnings on the bottles that say things like "Caution: Only use with Tamiya paints!", as if adding a few drops to some Vallejo paint will cause it to burst into flames, horribly scarring you and making you slightly more of a social wallflower than the typical modeler already is. The thinner you're probably thinking of is acrylic thinner, as Tamiya paints are acrylics. They do make a lacquer thinner, but that stuff if harder to find in stores, and the only lacquer paints they make are in a rattle can I believe. And enamels aren't something that Tamiya does, so that's out.

Acrylics are thinned with water or alcohol. Name brands are typically a water/alcohol mixture with some surfactants to stop the paint drying to quickly and allow it to flow better. Water is obvious of course, and you can always pick up bottles of Isopropyl alcohol at the pharmacy.

Enamels are thinned with white/mineral spirits. Although you can buy generic bottles of the stuff, thinning enamels can be more finicky than other paints so it's best to buy a name-brand thinner specifically formulated for hobby enamels.

Lacquer is generally thinned with a Xylene or Toluene based solvent. Again, because of the difficulty with this paint, and the difficulty in getting Xylene/Toluene, it's best just to get a ready-made hobby lacquer thinner.

Oils are best thinned with Turpentine based solutions. You can obviously get Turpentine just about anywhere, but it's better to buy a less caustic and less smelly product like Turps or Turpenoid. These are Turpentine substitutes that are formulated for the artist community so you don't huff yourself to death while using them.

In the end though, don't worry about matching a certain brands thinners with their same paints, just make sure you match the right thinner to the right type of paint. Tamiya's acrylic thinner will work just as well with Polly-Scale and Vallejo paints as it will with Tamiya's own stuff. The nice thing about multiple thinner types is that you could lay down a coat of acrylic paint, and then do certain effects with an enamel paint, and the enamel thinner won't harm the acrylic paint in the least. BUT, big but here, be careful with the more caustic solvent based thinners as they can start to eat the plastic model itself if applied on the bare plastic.

localized
Mar 30, 2008


Bloody Hedgehog posted:

Thinner is thinner, no matter who makes it. Larger companies like Tamiya like to put big warnings on the bottles that say things like "Caution: Only use with Tamiya paints!", as if adding a few drops to some Vallejo paint will cause it to burst into flames, horribly scarring you and making you slightly more of a social wallflower than the typical modeler already is. The thinner you're probably thinking of is acrylic thinner, as Tamiya paints are acrylics. They do make a lacquer thinner, but that stuff if harder to find in stores, and the only lacquer paints they make are in a rattle can I believe. And enamels aren't something that Tamiya does, so that's out.

Acrylics are thinned with water or alcohol. Name brands are typically a water/alcohol mixture with some surfactants to stop the paint drying to quickly and allow it to flow better. Water is obvious of course, and you can always pick up bottles of Isopropyl alcohol at the pharmacy.

Enamels are thinned with white/mineral spirits. Although you can buy generic bottles of the stuff, thinning enamels can be more finicky than other paints so it's best to buy a name-brand thinner specifically formulated for hobby enamels.

Lacquer is generally thinned with a Xylene or Toluene based solvent. Again, because of the difficulty with this paint, and the difficulty in getting Xylene/Toluene, it's best just to get a ready-made hobby lacquer thinner.

Oils are best thinned with Turpentine based solutions. You can obviously get Turpentine just about anywhere, but it's better to buy a less caustic and less smelly product like Turps or Turpenoid. These are Turpentine substitutes that are formulated for the artist community so you don't huff yourself to death while using them.

In the end though, don't worry about matching a certain brands thinners with their same paints, just make sure you match the right thinner to the right type of paint. Tamiya's acrylic thinner will work just as well with Polly-Scale and Vallejo paints as it will with Tamiya's own stuff. The nice thing about multiple thinner types is that you could lay down a coat of acrylic paint, and then do certain effects with an enamel paint, and the enamel thinner won't harm the acrylic paint in the least. BUT, big but here, be careful with the more caustic solvent based thinners as they can start to eat the plastic model itself if applied on the bare plastic.

Thanks.

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

With regard to mixing paints, I got a Badger Paint Mixer and never looked back. It's cheap, runs off two AA batteries, and mixes the gently caress out of any paint.

Quick Google search turned it up for $6.38 at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Badger-Airbrush-Paint-Mixer/dp/B000BROV02

localized
Mar 30, 2008


Powdered Toast Man posted:

With regard to mixing paints, I got a Badger Paint Mixer and never looked back. It's cheap, runs off two AA batteries, and mixes the gently caress out of any paint.

Quick Google search turned it up for $6.38 at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Badger-Airbrush-Paint-Mixer/dp/B000BROV02

That looks like it would be really easy to replicate with a Dremel tool.

Wibbleman
Apr 19, 2006

Fluffy doesn't want to be sacrificed



Bloody Hedgehog posted:

And enamels aren't something that Tamiya does, so that's out.

hrrmmm.. Tamiya would like to disagree with you there :)

http://www.tamiya.com/english/products/list/enamel_gloss/kit80001.htm
http://www.tamiya.com/english/products/list/enamel_flat/kit80301.htm

The Tamiya thinners tend to include some other stuff as well, usually flow agents and retarders. The Mr Color leveling thinner also does this. Your standard white spirt thinner may need additional additives depending on your local weather conditions (ie in summer you will want some retarder in there, in the winter usually not so much unless your air is really dry).

But you usually can't beat the gallon jugs of white spirits from your local hardware shop on price.

I would recommend getting small amounts of what you can, and find out what works best for you.

Bloody Hedgehog
Dec 12, 2003

Gotta nuke something



Tamiya! :argh:

Dammit, I was looking at their Tamiya USA site, which is laid out like poo poo, and it doesn't mention anything about enamels on it. The site you linked is laid out much better and features a lot more product than the other one as well.

Why the hell does a company have two completely different english websites for their products?

localized
Mar 30, 2008


I bought this nice Tamiya Leopard kit, but I haven't gotten around to putting the finishing touches on my Martini 935 yet...

Plus I thought this thread needed a bump.

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008




Nap Ghost

localized posted:

Plus I thought this thread needed a bump.

It did, I have been too busy with wargaming miniatures to finish my Merkava

So has anyone tried printing their own decals on that decal paper you can get? I'm getting a printer soon and the idea of custom decals is somewhat appealing...

lilljonas
May 6, 2007

We got crabs? We got crabs!

Danger - Octopus! posted:

It did, I have been too busy with wargaming miniatures to finish my Merkava

So has anyone tried printing their own decals on that decal paper you can get? I'm getting a printer soon and the idea of custom decals is somewhat appealing...

I have some decal paper that I bought some three years ago, but don't have a printer and all the printers I have access to at university and such are of piss poor quality and would make for horrible decals. :(

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

The results are never as good as you expect once you get the decal on the model. That inkjet film is extremely fragile and very hard to keep from loving up. I say save the money and have custom waterslides made somewhere for roughly the same price.

Generator
Jan 14, 2008



Ooo, just found this thread. Fun!

I am currently working on this:
German Rescue Helicopter

I haven't made any proper Airfix/Revell stuff for years, so it has been fun not getting gluey finger prints on the windows this time :)

The hull so far.

Click here for the full 1024x768 image.



Crappy pic taken through the window to prove that I did bother to paint everything that you can't see!

Click here for the full 1024x768 image.


Wish I had a picture of the desk in the back, took ages to do and I can't even see it now :(

Granite Octopus
Jun 24, 2008



Wow, that looks awesome.

I'm following this thread just to see what everyone else is doing. I'm terrified just contemplating trying to work with that much transparent plastic. I'd mess it up in a second :(

mister crabby
Sep 7, 2009


Danger - Octopus! posted:

So has anyone tried printing their own decals on that decal paper you can get? I'm getting a printer soon and the idea of custom decals is somewhat appealing...

I've tried inkjet and color laser decal paper, and the best result was printing solid black from the laser. Colors on both were transparent, and not much good unless the decal is being placed over white or near-white paint.

If you can track down an Alps Micro Dry printer, that's the best for decal printing. It can print white ink and metallics, but they're drat near impossible to find now, and those that are around sell used for a high price.

PowerCosmic
Feb 11, 2010


Cool thread! Are Gundam model kits welcome here? If so, I'll have to start taking some pictures and sharing.
I come from a studio arts background; yet, I've never tried painting model kits. I would really love to start.

Dr. Despair
Nov 4, 2009


39 perfect posts with each roll.



Well I'm glad I found out about this thread. I've built a few things, and while most of it isn't really amazing, I still have fun doing it. Most of the following is hand painted (the stug III, Skyline, and Porsche are exceptions though). I have a paasche, but it doesn't get much use.


Click here for the full 1024x768 image.
Except for 1/32 scale planes. Ugh. (I'm not a fan of airbrushing, so bigger things can get to be a pain, thankfully only the navy Phantom is mine, would have gone crazy doing 3 of them).

Tanks are pretty sweet for that same reason though.


Click here for the full 1021x368 image.


I rebuilt this turret 4 times, since I kept dropping it. :ohdear:


Click here for the full 1024x768 image.


Cars, motorcycles, and mechs are pretty fun too though.


Click here for the full 1024x768 image.


Wish I could find a nicer Flanker kit though.


Click here for the full 932x512 image.


I'm working on a Zvezda KA-58 right now, but I'm still trying to decide how to paint it to look cool... flat black just isn't exciting enough.

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PowerCosmic
Feb 11, 2010


Mr. Despair posted:

Well I'm glad I found out about this thread. I've built a few things, and while most of it isn't really amazing, I still have fun doing it. Most of the following is hand painted (the stug III, Skyline, and Porsche are exceptions though). I have a paasche, but it doesn't get much use.

Don't sell yourself short. Those are some sweet paintjobs, man!

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