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El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Post 9-11 User posted:

drat. Thanks for the info, though. No need to rack my brain for a solution and your explanation is plausible.

Hand-painting unmounted weapons is the pits (I used pins instead of magnets, the weapon platform mini makes this easy).

Try using either Army Painter (Skeleton Bone) or Montana Gold (Elm). I thing both of those are close matches.

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Karnegal
Dec 24, 2005

Is it... safe?


Does anyone have a link to a good guide for painting fur? I've got a unit of Raptors I want to paint for my legion army and they're the first unit I've painted with fur since like 2002

Iris of Ether
Sep 29, 2005

Valkyrie is not amused

Sulecrist posted:

Edit: what's everyone's painting music? When I'm not listening to audiobooks or podcasts, it's almost always a The Roots album or the JC Superstar soundtrack.

TV shows on Netflix for awhile, though now that we're not doing that, I've mostly been sneaking in my basecoating time during my Skype tabletop gaming sessions.

dexefiend
Apr 25, 2003

THE GOGGLES DO NOTHING!


What are Skype tabletop sessions?

Magres
Jul 14, 2011


Not positive it's what Iris means, but I play tabletop games over Skype with my friends a fair bit. We do lots of very silly oneshots, and I tend to do model assembly while we play

BlackIronHeart
Aug 1, 2004

The Oath Breaker's about to hit warphead nine Kaptain!


I've been trying to get my RPG group to do Skype on days when the snow is really bad and I wanna sit around without pants on but no luck so far. Being able to clean up models would be really nice!

Signal
Dec 10, 2005



Ryoshi posted:

What do people use for masking when airbrushing a model?

I've actually had really good luck using silly putty. It's easy to form into the shapes you need it, although it will droop a bit if you leave it too long.

Commissar Canuck
Aug 5, 2008

They made fun of us! And it's Stanley Cup season!



Future is great and oil washes are awesome, thanks thread! Now does anyone have a good guide on painting projected light? I'm using a cheapo A-wing model to practice these new techniques and thought trying to paint the engine glow would add a nice effect.

Reynold
Feb 14, 2012

Suffer not the unclean to live.

So I've got this 40k Imperial Knight that I'm wanting to put some transfers for mechanicum stuff onto, and while I follow the procedure for using microset/sol, I have been told that I will have better results when applying over a glossy surface. Most of my models end up getting hit with dullcote when completed, so I've never bothered to get any gloss varnish. So my question is, are the results from applying transfers over gloss that much better that I should bother with it? Or should I just go about my business as usual of dullcote>transfers>dullcote?

krushgroove
Oct 22, 2007

Disapproving look


Decals & transfers always go best on a glossy surface, after which you can use matte varnish as much as you want. I would put the gloss on where you plan to put decals, use the microsol/set, put another layer of gloss to help protect the decal, then do your weathering if you're doing that, then gloss, then finish with a matte coat.

Sydney Bottocks
Oct 15, 2004

Eh.



Sulecrist posted:

Edit: what's everyone's painting music? When I'm not listening to audiobooks or podcasts, it's almost always a The Roots album or the JC Superstar soundtrack.

As of late it tends to vary between stuff I've already seen a million times before (like MST3K episodes, classic UK sitcoms from the 1970s and 1980s, and movies like "Alien" and "Escape from New York"), and various YouTube videos (mostly Red Letter Media stuff like the "Previously Recorded" archived livestreams, and Doctor Faust's Painting Clinic videos).

Weirdo
Jul 22, 2004

I stay up late



Grimey Drawer

Sydney Bottocks posted:

As of late it tends to vary between stuff I've already seen a million times before (like MST3K episodes, classic UK sitcoms from the 1970s and 1980s, and movies like "Alien" and "Escape from New York"), and various YouTube videos (mostly Red Letter Media stuff like the "Previously Recorded" archived livestreams, and Doctor Faust's Painting Clinic videos).

Sounds pretty close to my own playlists. MST3k has a new hulu-type website and some of the Rifftrax collection are on Hulu as well.

I really enjoy working with some background noise on, and I think it comes from growing up in a loud, raucous household .

BlackIronHeart
Aug 1, 2004

The Oath Breaker's about to hit warphead nine Kaptain!


I like to listen to Twitch gaming steams while painting, though that can get distracting when something hilarious happens.

Slimnoid
Sep 6, 2012

Does that mean I don't get the job?


BlackIronHeart posted:

I like to listen to Twitch gaming steams while painting, though that can get distracting when something hilarious happens.

See: Vinesauce.

Fyrbrand
Dec 30, 2002



Grimey Drawer

I often work in silence but then I have nearly 3 year old twins so silence is amazing when I can get it. If I have something playing it's usually a podcast or something I've seen before on Netflix. Currently nearly done with TNG for example.

Iris of Ether
Sep 29, 2005

Valkyrie is not amused

dexefiend posted:

What are Skype tabletop sessions?


Magres posted:

Not positive it's what Iris means, but I play tabletop games over Skype with my friends a fair bit. We do lots of very silly oneshots, and I tend to do model assembly while we play

Yup, though technically it's been Roll20 or Google Hangouts.

Monster w21 Faces
May 11, 2006

"What the fuck is that?"
"What the fuck is this?!"


What's my best bet for sealing Agrellan Earth?

Slimnoid
Sep 6, 2012

Does that mean I don't get the job?


Monster w21 Faces posted:

What's my best bet for sealing Agrellan Earth?

I can't imagine anything particularly fancy is needed, so probably just regular ol' varnish. If it comes off for some reason, watered-down PVA ought to do the trick.

Monster w21 Faces
May 11, 2006

"What the fuck is that?"
"What the fuck is this?!"


I've had fixant for charcoal drawings suggested too.

Chance II
Aug 6, 2009

Would you like a
second chance?


I finally got around to mixing up my own washes using the Les's wash recipes and I'm pretty happy with the result. The biggest thing I was afraid of going in was that the wash would leave a sheen but the sepia wash I tried looks fine and will probably replace the pot of Devlan Mud I've been hording.

BULBASAUR
Apr 6, 2009






Soiled Meat

I found that Sepia + Black or just strait up Burnt Umber is pretty close to delvin mud. Welcome to making your on washes!

Chance II
Aug 6, 2009

Would you like a
second chance?


Thanks! I have a bunch of different colored inks from a project back in university and I'm looking forward to experimenting a little.

GaistHeidegger
May 20, 2001

"Can you see?"


Had a painting hiatus for a bit after finally finishing the big red dragon mini, then rounded on a greatsword-toting barbarian gal from Bones--Deenah. I can now in retrospect say that I have a new appreciation for the distinction of a detailed metal miniature versus Bones plastic--at least when it comes down to gleaning detail off of a comparatively 'skinny' model. In a nutshell, I got a bit frustrated with this one.

Here's the unpainted Bones figure and what I presume to be a painted metal fig--since the model details appear a lot sharper.



I'm mostly going off of the scabbard detailing, distinct boot laces, more fully formed rocks for the base and slightly 'thicker' proportions when I'm figuring the one on the right is originally a metal / pewter fig. I think it having separate distinct fingers instead of a blobby flipper-hand and having much sharper edges are the main cues.

In any event, after going about the last several figs with my old hat of tanned flesh + some highlighting + flesh wash, I wanted to try for a fairer complexion using highlight and shadow tones instead and I also wanted to attempt to do black hair with some highlighting as well. I filed and cut mold lines (though ended up missing a particular one that stands out pretty readily in the end) primed black and went about base-coating such as it was:



It hadn't really been my intention to follow color from the painted example, but I dug the red anyway and it fit the motif in general. I was fairly happy with how the mouth and teeth turned out--and it's gotten a lot more natural feeling applying layers progressively, etc; I think the initial bones plastic coupled with the primer ultimately softened / obscured some of the subtler details before I got started painting.



Using 'fair' skin was challenging and the difference seems so subtle to me that I have a hard time noticing the shifting between areas; that being said, I started with fair skin shadow for the base coat, fair skin for first highlighting and then fair skin highlight for final highlighting. Is it better to go with shadow and work your way up or start at the middle and then shadow / highlight from there? The main example with the skin is her left arm, since there was a pretty 'easy' transition between the underside / body-facing portion of her arm -> middle -> highlighting about the bicep and muscle... which is not especially photogenic under white light. D'oh.

For the hair, after all the other base coating was done I touched up black on spots where the primer had been nicked by other painting, then tried using a dark / deep blue followed by a very slight bit of wolf grey; I did a small amount of black wash after that then another light pass of deep blue. It likely doesn't look like much, but this is the first time I've tried anything of the sort with a figure's hair that wasn't 'base coat and wash'

Went about highlighting and shadowing in what spots I felt confident enough in what is my current approach, which essentially amounts to a dab of linen white + base color for highlighting and some 'layering' of a strong dark wash in shadowed areas of equipment and the like. I think the axe handle turned out pretty solid as a result. Some red wash about cloth coupled with some darker washes for shadowing in places and I elected not to do any washing on any skin sections this time around.

For the stone, I based stone grey, applied a soft brown / mud wash, revisited with some stone grey, applied a darker wash, stone grey and so it went. Finally, did some silver edge highlighting on armor and the sword, axe, etc. and came back with another round of satin varnish to try to dial down and seal. Transferred to a 1" acrylic base and added some light basing material and snapped some shots before the glue was done turning transparent--but this is basically the end result in and out of white light:



I'm mostly happy with how it turned out, but I desperately want to up my game when it comes to detailing metal specifically. The greatsword highlighting and such in the Reaper example utterly boggles me and floors me; I'm also way jealous whenever I look at the edging and gradient in metal for most of the figs posted in this thread. I'm still pretty gun-shy on painting skin and highlighting / shadowing / washing in general--but the main thing I want to improve on next is getting away from all armor and weapons on my figures boiling down to 'basecoat dark metal, highlight light metal, wash, possibly touch up light metal.'

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


GaistHeidegger posted:

Had a painting hiatus for a bit after finally finishing the big red dragon mini, then rounded on a greatsword-toting barbarian gal from Bones--Deenah. I can now in retrospect say that I have a new appreciation for the distinction of a detailed metal miniature versus Bones plastic--at least when it comes down to gleaning detail off of a comparatively 'skinny' model. In a nutshell, I got a bit frustrated with this one.

Here's the unpainted Bones figure and what I presume to be a painted metal fig--since the model details appear a lot sharper.



I'm mostly going off of the scabbard detailing, distinct boot laces, more fully formed rocks for the base and slightly 'thicker' proportions when I'm figuring the one on the right is originally a metal / pewter fig. I think it having separate distinct fingers instead of a blobby flipper-hand and having much sharper edges are the main cues.

In any event, after going about the last several figs with my old hat of tanned flesh + some highlighting + flesh wash, I wanted to try for a fairer complexion using highlight and shadow tones instead and I also wanted to attempt to do black hair with some highlighting as well. I filed and cut mold lines (though ended up missing a particular one that stands out pretty readily in the end) primed black and went about base-coating such as it was:



It hadn't really been my intention to follow color from the painted example, but I dug the red anyway and it fit the motif in general. I was fairly happy with how the mouth and teeth turned out--and it's gotten a lot more natural feeling applying layers progressively, etc; I think the initial bones plastic coupled with the primer ultimately softened / obscured some of the subtler details before I got started painting.



Using 'fair' skin was challenging and the difference seems so subtle to me that I have a hard time noticing the shifting between areas; that being said, I started with fair skin shadow for the base coat, fair skin for first highlighting and then fair skin highlight for final highlighting. Is it better to go with shadow and work your way up or start at the middle and then shadow / highlight from there? The main example with the skin is her left arm, since there was a pretty 'easy' transition between the underside / body-facing portion of her arm -> middle -> highlighting about the bicep and muscle... which is not especially photogenic under white light. D'oh.

For the hair, after all the other base coating was done I touched up black on spots where the primer had been nicked by other painting, then tried using a dark / deep blue followed by a very slight bit of wolf grey; I did a small amount of black wash after that then another light pass of deep blue. It likely doesn't look like much, but this is the first time I've tried anything of the sort with a figure's hair that wasn't 'base coat and wash'

Went about highlighting and shadowing in what spots I felt confident enough in what is my current approach, which essentially amounts to a dab of linen white + base color for highlighting and some 'layering' of a strong dark wash in shadowed areas of equipment and the like. I think the axe handle turned out pretty solid as a result. Some red wash about cloth coupled with some darker washes for shadowing in places and I elected not to do any washing on any skin sections this time around.

For the stone, I based stone grey, applied a soft brown / mud wash, revisited with some stone grey, applied a darker wash, stone grey and so it went. Finally, did some silver edge highlighting on armor and the sword, axe, etc. and came back with another round of satin varnish to try to dial down and seal. Transferred to a 1" acrylic base and added some light basing material and snapped some shots before the glue was done turning transparent--but this is basically the end result in and out of white light:



I'm mostly happy with how it turned out, but I desperately want to up my game when it comes to detailing metal specifically. The greatsword highlighting and such in the Reaper example utterly boggles me and floors me; I'm also way jealous whenever I look at the edging and gradient in metal for most of the figs posted in this thread. I'm still pretty gun-shy on painting skin and highlighting / shadowing / washing in general--but the main thing I want to improve on next is getting away from all armor and weapons on my figures boiling down to 'basecoat dark metal, highlight light metal, wash, possibly touch up light metal.'

http://www.coolminiornot.com/articles/1649-metallics
I mentioned this like a page ago.

If you want to see some crazy well highlighted metallics look at his work:
http://www.coolminiornot.com/277892?browseid=11223446
http://www.coolminiornot.com/189893?browseid=11247644
http://www.coolminiornot.com/172884?browseid=11247644
http://www.coolminiornot.com/156826?browseid=11247644

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

"Real life is messy, inconsistent, and it's seldom when anything ever really gets resolved."



Well I went ahead and ordered 2 kits of the metalizing powder, not sure when it will be here, but I'll try to steal/borrow a camera to show the results.

http://www.c1-models.com/detail/c1-...-buffing-powder

Also went ahead and bought Vallejo's metalizing mixture for paints. I heard white was difficult but I'll do some test runs with it, otherwise high gloss black on the Necrons and then use the powder to make them chrome.

Probably should pick up some weathering powder, specifically rust anyone got a good recommendation?

Hollismason fucked around with this message at 19:42 on Feb 13, 2015

GaistHeidegger
May 20, 2001

"Can you see?"



Sorry I missed these before, but thank you--these look frigging gorgeous. I need to nab a fistful of knights and go to town.

One of my biggest hurdles with metallics right now is getting smooth applications down; thinning to layer non-metallic colors is easy enough now but I frequently seem to end up with streaking on metals.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

"Real life is messy, inconsistent, and it's seldom when anything ever really gets resolved."



You can use a buff cloth to shine metals actually and that may get out the streaks. Let me look up the recommended size and I'll post the product I use.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cI0636tX8TU

Depending on the colour there are some metallics that work with in Airbrushes, but their mostly associated with the model vehicle crowd, not miniatures that's actually when I started researching this whole how to do actual chrome thing I started looking at the different Airplane model manufacturers etc. and that was how I came across the metalizing buff powder.

The only thing I learned was that if you do it, make sure to thin the poo poo out of it and use a high gloss. Also it can gently caress up your airbrush if you don't clean it.

Most of the airbrush metal stuff is enamel, which requires Turpentine to clean your brushes with.

I picked up some from just a Hobby shop and while it does take like forever to dry it comes out pretty well.

Metals are a difficult thing for me as well, but that's my current " Get better at doing this" project.

Hollismason fucked around with this message at 23:33 on Feb 13, 2015

Post 9-11 User
Apr 14, 2010




These are a bit shiny because I ran out of flat varnish. My camera phone blows, but you may be able to discern how all the bone elements are: (wow, I actually don't remember, Averland Sunset or Taucept Aucher) washed with Devlann Mud, then highlighted with $1 hobby store bone (this one is called "Buttermilk" from Americana). Highlights are just fine lining with, "Slate Grey" from the same company.

1) This took weeks to do: planning is everything! I'm out of practice so rather than being a smart person that sprayed the models white or bone and brushed on the black, I did all of the bone by hand. This takes several coats of paint and countless touchups to do. The much smarter method is to spray or even brush the bone into place and ink/wash the dark areas, it's over so much more quickly and the results are silky smooth.

2) The GW basing kit is great! A gift from my brother, it has sand, pebbles, rocks, and static grass. I have been told that static grass must be charged somehow to get it to stand up, turns that painting on white glue then sprinkling on the grass is all it takes.

It's the first painting I've done in at least a year, Now to paint the guns on the weapon platform (all individual, which is a pain) and move on to some terrain.

I cannot stress it enough: keep it simple when painting troops. They are numerous, they suck, and the fun for me is in lavishing lots of tiny details onto characters.

Slimnoid
Sep 6, 2012

Does that mean I don't get the job?


Post 9-11 User posted:

I have been told that static grass must be charged somehow to get it to stand up, turns that painting on white glue then sprinkling on the grass is all it takes.

All you have to do is rub the grass through whatever plastic baggy it's being held in and that'll do the trick. It's kind of like a balloon, where it needs some static electricity to get it going.

Despite the photo quality, those look pretty good! I've always enjoyed stark contrasting colors like that, as it makes them really pop out on the table. The basing is neutral enough to where it compliments them and helps with the contrasting scheme, too.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


In an effort to paint more, I've decided on a standard of "table ready, move on"

Looking in the picture, I missed a few spots which I'll touch up, and I can't paint teeth and nails for poo poo, but otherwise would you be put off if I demo'd a game with these guys?

Ensign Expendable
Nov 11, 2008

Lager beer is proof that god loves us


Pillbug

Do a nice thick wash over them, I think it will add a very nice cartoony effect, especially with the skin colour you went with.

Sulecrist
Apr 5, 2007

Better tear off this bar association logo.


signalnoise posted:

In an effort to paint more, I've decided on a standard of "table ready, move on"

Looking in the picture, I missed a few spots which I'll touch up, and I can't paint teeth and nails for poo poo, but otherwise would you be put off if I demo'd a game with these guys?



First, great job getting these guys to this point. This is exactly what you should be doing right now. Once you get them based they will be fine for a demo.

I think if you're willing to do just one more thing before you move on, it should be to quickly darken some areas. It looks like you already used a full wash, and I understand if you don't feel up to doing lots of small bright details at this stage, but doing the opposite might help bring out the features a little more. Assuming you have done a full, heavy wash already, consider targeted dark washes on areas like necks, eye sockets, and armpits.

Otherwise, great job. I know it's hard to focus on fundamentals and volume, but I agree that's the best thing for you right now, especially since you want to start running demos. You can always come back and do teeth and eyes and nails later--no need to worry about doing them now.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


Ehh?



I really wish I could remember whatever green I put on the dude in the second pic

signalnoise fucked around with this message at 15:50 on Feb 14, 2015

Doctor Zero
Sep 21, 2002

Would you like a jelly baby?
It's been in my pocket through 4 regenerations,
but it's still good.


Much better, no? Now matte that poo poo before God strangles a hobo.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


Doctor Zero posted:

Much better, no? Now matte that poo poo before God strangles a hobo.

Done, and they look great now! I'll post one last pic once I get them all based

Southern Heel
Jul 2, 2004



I finally finished my Khador Man-of-War squad:



Honestly the leader was painted well before the rest but was so time-consuming and lacklustre that I speed-painted the remainder and they came out alright. I hate playing with unpainted figures so getting them to the table looking passable was more important than going for something out of this world. Should I add the boiiler-glow to the gratings of the troops?

I've got Black Ivan and a Juggernaut almost completed too; one in white-washed winter camo and one in camo brown. German colors and Polish motifs, on Russian-themed spacemans.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


Hollismason posted:

You can use a buff cloth to shine metals actually and that may get out the streaks. Let me look up the recommended size and I'll post the product I use.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cI0636tX8TU

Depending on the colour there are some metallics that work with in Airbrushes, but their mostly associated with the model vehicle crowd, not miniatures that's actually when I started researching this whole how to do actual chrome thing I started looking at the different Airplane model manufacturers etc. and that was how I came across the metalizing buff powder.

The only thing I learned was that if you do it, make sure to thin the poo poo out of it and use a high gloss. Also it can gently caress up your airbrush if you don't clean it.

Most of the airbrush metal stuff is enamel, which requires Turpentine to clean your brushes with.

I picked up some from just a Hobby shop and while it does take like forever to dry it comes out pretty well.

Metals are a difficult thing for me as well, but that's my current " Get better at doing this" project.

When I want streak free chromey metals I just reach for this stuff as a base coat



Anything better than that is not worth my time.

signalnoise fucked around with this message at 16:57 on Feb 15, 2015

w00tmonger
Mar 9, 2011

F-F-FRIDAY NIGHT MOTHERFUCKERS


Southern Heel posted:

I finally finished my Khador Man-of-War squad:



Honestly the leader was painted well before the rest but was so time-consuming and lacklustre that I speed-painted the remainder and they came out alright. I hate playing with unpainted figures so getting them to the table looking passable was more important than going for something out of this world. Should I add the boiiler-glow to the gratings of the troops?

I've got Black Ivan and a Juggernaut almost completed too; one in white-washed winter camo and one in camo brown. German colors and Polish motifs, on Russian-themed spacemans.

These are legit

QuasarInfinity
Mar 13, 2003

I routinely spend all of my money on Warhammer models.

Southern Heel posted:

I finally finished my Khador Man-of-War squad:



Honestly the leader was painted well before the rest but was so time-consuming and lacklustre that I speed-painted the remainder and they came out alright. I hate playing with unpainted figures so getting them to the table looking passable was more important than going for something out of this world. Should I add the boiiler-glow to the gratings of the troops?

I really like the black armor. Especially on the leader.
The boiler glow looks good, but I'm not sure where it would be coming from. Like, I think that guy's body is supposed to be in there, and if it's glowing that brightly he might have a serious problem.

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Southern Heel
Jul 2, 2004



Good point, I guess it works better if they're enclosed animated suits (hence the eye-slit glow on the rest).

I decided to throw caution to the wind and finish up the jacks and caster. Like the rest, German colors with Polish markings:


Sorscha: I painted the OSL while drunk in a dark room so it's not great, but probably by best to date.

Destroyer: I should have used straight perpendicular lines on the ice-axe to give it that frosted effect instead of lighting, but it's magic so whatever. I used the dab-method with foam to get the speckled effect. Normally one would paint white and then speckle the basecoat, to give the impression of whitewash being wiped and chipped off, but I undercoated with black instead. I think this is alright, I like the streaks.

Black Ivan: I went for a Skeleton-hussar freehand on the shoulderpad but most of it is hidden by his FAT rear end. It's a little monotone in this brown so I did some battle damage and went for a glowing power-fist style effect on the claw.

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