Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



The_Fuzzinator posted:

I've given though to getting a "slightly used" 2010 or 2009, i'm not worried about depreciation of the car because i plan on driving it for quite a while.

If that's the case, you only stand to save more by getting a used one and running it as long as you can.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Arzakon
Nov 24, 2002

"I hereby retire from Mafia"
Please turbo me if you catch me in a game.


The 2009/2010 cars that you see that are $4-5K below new price are usually 40-60K mile specimens. There is no way I'm buying a car that has been driven 25K miles a year on average to save a few thousand dollars. On high end vehicles the depreciation is there, but on your driving appliances until you get a little further out than 2 years I just don't see the savings. Especially on something you want to drive for a long time, and don't plan on driving to death. Those 40-60K miles would last me 4-6 years.

Also, financing. If you are going to be financing most of the $10-20K you will probably save $1-2K by taking advantage of 0-2% financing on your $15,000 vehicle instead of paying whatever the going rate is on used vehicles.

By all means if you find a 2009 with 20-25K miles on it for $10K jump on it, I just don't see those out there at all.

cfae203
Feb 17, 2011


Okay.

Situation. Piece of poo poo Pontiac- about 12-13 years old, fair condition, 160K miles, and in need of monthly/bi-monthly maintenance.
Character. College student 5 months from graduating with a guaranteed 40-50K job coming at me. Currently have no dollars. Credit Score. EH
Plot. In need of used reliable car which I was planning on getting in 5-6 months. Making a drive somewhere across the country for new job would have required it anyways (little POSP wouldn't have made it). I currently drive <5-6 miles a day so we are able to work for the present but POSP is going to get abandoned if I can figure this out. Looking for something around 10,000 bucks, with less than 50-60,000 miles.

I have been going on the notion that sometime in my past I have seen on TV "Buy a car, No Interest, No Payment for 6 months!".. (link 6 month convenience to above). I have a terrible knowledge of how financing works and am looking for some guidance.
Does this really exist? & if so is it legitimate and not something that can screw you over in the long run?
If this isn't something thats feasible for a consumer who wants a used car with mediocre credit, then would it be possible to get a loan for 60 months and once able to make better payments refinance it to a shorter pay-off window (24-36)?
I get it. I know nothing of loan processes. Help me dammit.

Zeta Taskforce
Jun 27, 2002



cfae203 posted:

Okay.

Situation. Piece of poo poo Pontiac- about 12-13 years old, fair condition, 160K miles, and in need of monthly/bi-monthly maintenance.
Character. College student 5 months from graduating with a guaranteed 40-50K job coming at me. Currently have no dollars. Credit Score. EH
Plot. In need of used reliable car which I was planning on getting in 5-6 months. Making a drive somewhere across the country for new job would have required it anyways (little POSP wouldn't have made it). I currently drive <5-6 miles a day so we are able to work for the present but POSP is going to get abandoned if I can figure this out. Looking for something around 10,000 bucks, with less than 50-60,000 miles.

I have been going on the notion that sometime in my past I have seen on TV "Buy a car, No Interest, No Payment for 6 months!".. (link 6 month convenience to above). I have a terrible knowledge of how financing works and am looking for some guidance.
Does this really exist? & if so is it legitimate and not something that can screw you over in the long run?
If this isn't something thats feasible for a consumer who wants a used car with mediocre credit, then would it be possible to get a loan for 60 months and once able to make better payments refinance it to a shorter pay-off window (24-36)?
I get it. I know nothing of loan processes. Help me dammit.

Can I try to translate the dramatic screenplay into a question?

Is ďI have no money, poor credit, but I have a job lined up in a 6 months when I graduate. Iíve seen advertisements from dealers with no money down, no payments for 6 months, we finance everyone, and was wondering if that was legit?Ē a fair translation?

I have not seen many deals like that for awhile. I think offers like that were during happier times in the economy when the big banks were still trying to push debt on us. I remember Mitsubishi was offering something like that widely about 5 years ago and they ended up being burned and burned hard. Many people a year later found they couldnít pay, and the cars they repossessed had highly depreciated and the loan balances did not. Considering that cars go down in value, to the extent someone would offer it now, they would likely require strong credit. I donít think anyone would offer that on a used car.

Why canít you nurse your car along for another 6 months and when it comes time to move, fly out or rent a UHAUL and drive there with your stuff, and then buy a car in your new destination when you actually have a paycheck?

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


cfae203 posted:

Okay.

Situation. Piece of poo poo Pontiac- about 12-13 years old, fair condition, 160K miles, and in need of monthly/bi-monthly maintenance.
Character. College student 5 months from graduating with a guaranteed 40-50K job coming at me. Currently have no dollars. Credit Score. EH
Plot. In need of used reliable car which I was planning on getting in 5-6 months. Making a drive somewhere across the country for new job would have required it anyways (little POSP wouldn't have made it). I currently drive <5-6 miles a day so we are able to work for the present but POSP is going to get abandoned if I can figure this out. Looking for something around 10,000 bucks, with less than 50-60,000 miles.

I have been going on the notion that sometime in my past I have seen on TV "Buy a car, No Interest, No Payment for 6 months!".. (link 6 month convenience to above). I have a terrible knowledge of how financing works and am looking for some guidance.
Does this really exist? & if so is it legitimate and not something that can screw you over in the long run?
If this isn't something thats feasible for a consumer who wants a used car with mediocre credit, then would it be possible to get a loan for 60 months and once able to make better payments refinance it to a shorter pay-off window (24-36)?
I get it. I know nothing of loan processes. Help me dammit.

With a lovely credit score and a first time buyer you are going to have a super high interest rate unless you have a cosigner. Ive also never heard of no payments for 6 months and no interest deals are usually for preferred credit buyers on new cars at major dealerships. How can your car require monthly maintenance? there is only so much required to make the car move.

If you cant get someone to cosign for you you will get a high interest loan. If you do this you need to make sure there is no prepayment penalty and then pay it off as quickly as possible. Another option would be to stay in the pontiac and save up some cash to buy a better used car.

NOTinuyasha
Oct 17, 2006

 


The Great Twist

The_Fuzzinator posted:

I'm trying to decide on a new car, between the Ford fiesta and Honda fit. I currently am driving a '95 VW Jetta with ~105k miles on it that has a problem that my family mechanic basically told me it would be more to fix it than the car is worth. the Jetta i drive now is as far as i can tell on it's last legs due to the problems it's having it won't be able to pass inspection. is there anything that anyone has heard about either car? I've been having trouble finding many complaints about either car. from what i understand sticker price is going to be between 15k- 18k depending on which car i go with. I'm not worried about depreciation in value because i plan on driving what ever new car i get for as long as possible.

The Fiesta is really narrow, and made worse by the massive center console. That being said it's fine for a lot of people and I loved the sedan. Also, I test drove the new Elantra, which was a bit roomier and gets marginally better mileage (29/40 as opposed to 28/37), but the dealer claimed they were having trouble keeping them in stock. Only two were on the lot, neither of which were configured the way I liked.

Tomorrow I'm gonna test drive the Cruze Eco, with the 1.4L turbo/6-speed manual, which gets the best mpg (28/42) while maintaining a larger interior, comparable to that of a midsized car. That comes at a premium, though...

The_Fuzzinator
Oct 8, 2007

I know now why you Cuddle. But it's something I can never do.


Finally got out to test drive cars, ended up driving a Nissan Versa, Ford fiesta, fusion and focus. of all four of those i liked the versa tons more than any of the others. the Ford dealer i was at also was absolutely desperate to get me to sign today. knocking the Focus down to 14,600 from 18,103. Nothing gave as much space as the versa did for me. Even though on paper all the numbers are ~1 inch of each other the versa was so much spacious feeling. Getting a loan through my families credit union. Nissan dealer said based on what me and my mom think our credit scores are that we might be able to score their 1.9% apr 72 month or 0% apr 60 month rates.

BloodBag
Sep 20, 2008

WITNESS ME!





The_Fuzzinator posted:

Finally got out to test drive cars, ended up driving a Nissan Versa, Ford fiesta, fusion and focus. of all four of those i liked the versa tons more than any of the others. the Ford dealer i was at also was absolutely desperate to get me to sign today. knocking the Focus down to 14,600 from 18,103. Nothing gave as much space as the versa did for me. Even though on paper all the numbers are ~1 inch of each other the versa was so much spacious feeling. Getting a loan through my families credit union. Nissan dealer said based on what me and my mom think our credit scores are that we might be able to score their 1.9% apr 72 month or 0% apr 60 month rates.

What'd you think of the fiesta?

The_Fuzzinator
Oct 8, 2007

I know now why you Cuddle. But it's something I can never do.


Taco Box posted:

What'd you think of the fiesta?

The fiesta drove and handled well, but Holy poo poo it was a lot narrower than i expected, and on the 4-door sedan i drove they might as well of not even put a back seat in, because only midgets and amputees would fit.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







I do not recommend a 72-month car loan. Unless you feel you really have the discipline to pay it off much faster. Even the 60 month is bad, except that it's at 0%, in which case, OK (but still pay it in four years or less if you possibly can).

The reason is because the car will depreciate as soon as you buy it, and the longer the term of the loan, the longer you spend "underwater" on the car. If you do decide to do this, make sure your auto insurance (which you of course will get a comprehensive policy on, including uninsured motorist) has "gap coverage" - e.g., if your car is totaled, the insurance company will pay it off, even if the car's present value is lower than what you still owe.

$14.6k for a new Focus sounds like a great deal to me, but if you liked the Versa so much better, go for it.

dennyk
Jan 2, 2005

Cheese-Buyer's Remorse


Leperflesh posted:

I do not recommend a 72-month car loan. Unless you feel you really have the discipline to pay it off much faster. Even the 60 month is bad, except that it's at 0%, in which case, OK (but still pay it in four years or less if you possibly can).

The reason is because the car will depreciate as soon as you buy it, and the longer the term of the loan, the longer you spend "underwater" on the car. If you do decide to do this, make sure your auto insurance (which you of course will get a comprehensive policy on, including uninsured motorist) has "gap coverage" - e.g., if your car is totaled, the insurance company will pay it off, even if the car's present value is lower than what you still owe.

There is absolutely no reason to pay off a 0% loan early. A long-term loan can be bad if it costs you more in interest due to the length of the loan term or if you are only getting it for that term because you can't really afford whatever you're buying and need your payments to be as low as possible. If you can afford the car under reasonable loan terms (a decent down payment and a 36-48 month loan at a typical interest rate), however, then there's no reason not to do as long a term and as low a down payment as possible for a 0% loan and put your down payment and the money you save on each monthly payment into a savings account to earn some interest on it. Just keep that money around for the life of the loan term and you won't have to be concerned about being upside-down on the loan itself; if something happens and the car gets totaled, you have those funds to make up the difference. (Gap insurance might still be a good value depending on how much you expect the car to depreciate and what the premiums will cost you, though.)

I definitely wouldn't do the 1.9% 72-month term over the 60-month 0%; there's no advantage to voluntarily paying more interest just to get a slightly lower monthly payment.

sanchez
Feb 26, 2003


Leperflesh posted:



$14.6k for a new Focus sounds like a great deal to me, but if you liked the Versa so much better, go for it.

It's a new old focus remember, not the 2012 model. They'll be trying to dump them at any price.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







dennyk posted:

There is absolutely no reason to pay off a 0% loan early.

Which is why I said, right there in the quote, "except that it's a 0% loan, in which case, OK".

However: I think the great majority of people lack the financial discipline to figure out how much they save each month from not paying interest and put it into savings or investment.

What actually happens is the dealer tries to get them to give them a maximum monthly payment they can afford, and then sells them the most expensive car they can at really really long loan terms to get the payment down.

And yes, there is a reason to pay a car down faster than 72 months even at 0% interest: a lack of gap coverage on the insurance. Or, conversely, the added expense of gap coverage. If a 48-month loan plus a good down payment would get you right-side-up on the car by the 12th month but a 72-month loan keeps you upside-down for two years, then that's an extra year you have to pay for gap coverage. Depends on how much that extra cost is, whether that's worth it to someone, and I'm not saying it's a massive expense or anything, but it's not zero dollars either.

sanchez posted:

It's a new old focus remember, not the 2012 model. They'll be trying to dump them at any price.

Yeah, that's a good point. Still seems a decent price for an unused car, but I haven't gone and looked for used 2010 models to compare (there probably aren't all that many out there).

Saltin
Aug 20, 2003
Don't touch

dennyk posted:

There is absolutely no reason to pay off a 0% loan early.

There is if your money could be earning a return. There is also the intangible of cash flow, which matters quite a bit when it comes to lifestyle.

Leperflesh posted:

The reason is because the car will depreciate as soon as you buy it, and the longer the term of the loan, the longer you spend "underwater" on the car.

If you cannot afford to put 20% cash down on a new car you intend to finance, you can't afford it and shouldn't buy it. You never want to be upside-down on a car, even as soon as you drive it off the lot.

The longest amortization period you should accept on financing is exactly equal to the length of the warranty the manufacturer is giving you. You never want to be in a position where you owe on the car and are exposed to repair costs too.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Leperflesh posted:

Yeah, that's a good point. Still seems a decent price for an unused car, but I haven't gone and looked for used 2010 models to compare (there probably aren't all that many out there).

It doesn't seem like a good deal to me, but only because I heard that they were going for $10k in the worst of the recession. Not sure how much pricing recovered on small cars since then.

Zeta Taskforce
Jun 27, 2002



You want to approach 0% deals with a great deal of skepticism, if at all. There is a psychological tendency to view it as free money and to buy more car than you otherwise would. Interest is not the biggest expense of owning a car, and with a more expensive car, your taxes, your insurance, your depreciation, and probably repairs will all be higher. However, even if you donít overbuy, you will still be paying full retail for whatever car you decide to get. Forget about finding out what wholesale is, or the invoice price the dealer paid and negotiating from that. They are taking a loss on the financing in order to move metal. They will make sure they make it up elsewhere.

Rates are so low if you obtain your own financing, you really donít save that much on payment between 0% and 5% for any given amount borrowed. But you will actually save a lot of money if you are able to negotiate a better price and obtain your own financing and need to finance less. Finally, 0% makes you complacent about paying it off early because you get this ďfree moneyĒ mentality. It still is a payment, it still works against your debt to income ratio, it is still debt. You would be a fool to borrow against your car to invest in the stock market, which means the only safe option is a bank making 1%. Youíre naÔve to think you are pulling one over the system by getting an extra 1% out of it.

kimbo305 posted:

It doesn't seem like a good deal to me, but only because I heard that they were going for $10k in the worst of the recession. Not sure how much pricing recovered on small cars since then.

Exactly. Expect to overpay if you go for their incentive financing.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


0% captive finance offers used to be a much better deal when interest rates are higher. They lure you in with 0% but what they're really doing is giving the captive finance company the 2,000 dollar rebate you could take instead of the promo financing offer.

Say you're buying a car with an MSRP of 18K. They're advertising 0% for 60, or 2K cash back.

18K for 60 @ 0% is 300 a month

16K for 60 @ 2.9% is ~287 a month. It's actually a better deal to take the rebate in this case. My local CU is running 2.8% on new purchases right now.

But if interest rates were higher, like back in the day at say 6.9%, then taking the financing is a better deal.

You have to run the numbers. I'm not sure what's up with Ford, but I managed to snag invoice + rebate + promo financing at a motivated dealer. Shop around. I paid 5K under sticker for the car.

The Wormy Guy
May 7, 2002


This is probably the best place to post this.

I have a monthly car payment of $329, and I have been paying $350 even for the last four months. When I look at my payment history, why has my principal balance paid been $302, $306, $275, $301. Shouldn't it slowly be increasing? And don't most banks apply the excess amount directly to principal? I guess I'm just wondering if something happened in that third month and is there anything I can do to prevent that, or is it all just some crazy formula determined by the bank.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





I've only dealt with one bank for auto loans but they expressly state that any amount paid over the required payment goes towards next month's payment, not principal balance (unlike a mortgage, where it does). If I wanted to go after principal I'd need to send them a separate payment specifically for it.

LorneReams
Jun 27, 2003
I'm bizarre

Interest accrues daily. Think of a bowl that slowly fills will your interest amount owed every day....when you make a payment, that amount will first be applied to fees, then interest, and then principle.

You can see that what day they apply the payment to your account would make a difference. Shorter months will accrue less interest and longer months will accrue more.

this is also why the last payment will always say something like "Call for last payment amount" because it can change and be off either direction.

The Wormy Guy
May 7, 2002


LorneReams posted:

You can see that what day they apply the payment to your account would make a difference. Shorter months will accrue less interest and longer months will accrue more.

Ahh that makes sense now. The third month I had paid about a week later than the other, then the fourth I paid at around the same time of the month as the third. So pushing my timeline back a week made that third month 5 weeks long instead of the regular 4.

EDIT: So I guess to make it work like how I think it should work, I should set up auto payments on the same day every month.

Fuschia tude
Dec 26, 2004

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2019



The Wormy Guy posted:

Ahh that makes sense now. The third month I had paid about a week later than the other, then the fourth I paid at around the same time of the month as the third. So pushing my timeline back a week made that third month 5 weeks long instead of the regular 4.

EDIT: So I guess to make it work like how I think it should work, I should set up auto payments on the same day every month.

Or divide by the number of days between payments to get a principle-paid-per-day value.

LorneReams
Jun 27, 2003
I'm bizarre

Or not give a poo poo because it all works out in the end...this is not a mortgage.

NOTinuyasha
Oct 17, 2006

 


The Great Twist

I just put a deposit on a new 2011 Elantra Limited, only paid $100 above invoice (~$20,100 plus $720 destination), 2.9%/48 months. I'm 20 with a 640 credit rating, $4000 down and had my grandfather co-sign. The insurance comes out to $160 a month.

Other cars I test drove :

-Fiesta, really narrow thanks to a big center console and narrow wheelbase, terrible rear seats
-Cruze, higher price, annoying styling, GM resale value
-Mazda3, higher price, crappy fuel economy, way too common

I didn't bother with the Corolla/Civic/Fit since all seem to be end of lifecycle for 2011.

The Hyundai dealer wasn't pushy at all, but the Elantra seems a bit difficult to pin down, they didn't have any on the lot except for the one I test drove, which was sold the next day. I wanted a specific color anyway, so it's getting shipped in this week :)

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


Not a bad deal. Nice Down Payment so you shouldn't ever be upside down on it. Hyundai is making a really solid car these days, should last you as long as you take care of it. Follow the recommended maintenance schedule and you'll be fine.

Being 20 and having a car payment sucks, but it should be manageable for you.

Zeta Taskforce
Jun 27, 2002



NOTinuyasha posted:

I just put a deposit on a new 2011 Elantra Limited, only paid $100 above invoice (~$20,100 plus $720 destination), 2.9%/48 months. I'm 20 with a 640 credit rating, $4000 down and had my grandfather co-sign. The insurance comes out to $160 a month.

Other cars I test drove :

-Fiesta, really narrow thanks to a big center console and narrow wheelbase, terrible rear seats
-Cruze, higher price, annoying styling, GM resale value
-Mazda3, higher price, crappy fuel economy, way too common

I didn't bother with the Corolla/Civic/Fit since all seem to be end of lifecycle for 2011.

The Hyundai dealer wasn't pushy at all, but the Elantra seems a bit difficult to pin down, they didn't have any on the lot except for the one I test drove, which was sold the next day. I wanted a specific color anyway, so it's getting shipped in this week :)

You did good, worked out well for you, but if your grandfather was here, I would have given him the same advice I give everyone. Never ever cosign a loan for anyone.

NOTinuyasha
Oct 17, 2006

 


The Great Twist

skipdogg posted:

Being 20 and having a car payment sucks, but it should be manageable for you.

I won't actually start paying it off in advance until I have at least a year's worth of payments saved up as a safeguard, but the base payments are something like an eighth of my income. I've watched friends crash and burn with much larger payments and way less cash coming in.

ass is hometown
Jan 11, 2006

I gotta take a leak. When I get back, we're doing body shots.


I was pointed to this thread from the General Small Question Thread.

I have a 2007 Nissan X-terra. It was great for the car I wanted 2 years ago when I bought it, but it does not have the best gas mileage and the size is a lot bigger than I need (when I bought it by daughter needed to sit in the back seat, but she is old enough now for something with one row).

The specifics are it just rolled to 70,000 miles, The major problems are still under warranty. I still owe $12,000 on it over the next 3 years.

What options do I have for selling it and buying a small Truck?
Will I have to swallow my loss and hope to sell it for whatever I could get for it (I will probably just keep it till I paid it off)?
What kind of benefit would I be looking at to trade it in for the new vehicle I'm looking for?

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


What small truck? You really arn't going to get a huge increase in gas mileage with any truck over your x-terra.

As far as selling it, go on craigslist or ebay and see what they are going for. Then sell it and buy what you want. If its not worth $12,000 then you will need to come up with the difference or ask the bank to convert the difference to an unsecured personal loan.

edit: If you just want a different vehicle thats fine, but dont delude yourself into thinking buying a new truck that gets 24mpg over your xterra that gets 22mpg is going to make a difference, especially if you are going for a more expensive .vehicle

Don Lapre fucked around with this message at 05:42 on Mar 11, 2011

Nocheez
Sep 5, 2000

Can you spare a little cheddar?


Nap Ghost

A lot of not smart people freak out when gas prices start to rise, and do foolish things. If you have to take a $1,500 hit on selling your truck and then pay taxes on buying a new vehicle which will likely be about the same amount, step back and think of how much fuel $3,000 will buy. At $4 a gallon it's 750 gallons, and that's about a year's worth of driving in your current vehicle. On top of that, you'll have a new car payment, and it will still require fuel.

Zeta Taskforce
Jun 27, 2002



Ridonkulous posted:

I was pointed to this thread from the General Small Question Thread.

I have a 2007 Nissan X-terra. It was great for the car I wanted 2 years ago when I bought it, but it does not have the best gas mileage and the size is a lot bigger than I need (when I bought it my daughter needed to sit in the back seat, but she is old enough now for something with one row).

The specifics are it just rolled to 70,000 miles, The major problems are still under warranty. I still owe $12,000 on it over the next 3 years.

What options do I have for selling it and buying a small Truck?
Will I have to swallow my loss and hope to sell it for whatever I could get for it (I will probably just keep it till I paid it off)?
What kind of benefit would I be looking at to trade it in for the new vehicle I'm looking for?

I popped your numbers into Kelly Blue Book, and if your truck is in at least average shape, you do have equity. You would be able to sell it without bringing money into the deal or the hassle of getting another loan to release the title. That said, Don Lapre and Nocheez are 100% correct. It seems like you are using high gas prices to rationalize your desire for a new truck. You have a history of doing this exact thing. I donít have kids, but I imagine that there were other vehicles on sale 2 years ago that would have adequately and safely held your daughter in place. You bought this in 2009 when gas prices were cheap, but the price spike of 2008 should have been fresh in your memory. Its not like it should be a surprise that gas might cost $3.50/gallon someday. Honestly, you sound like the wife of one of our BFC superstars who discovered that Honda products were the only true cure for her back pain.

My advice is to just get what you want since you have no intention of trading this in for a small, fuel efficient car of a similar age.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


People love to lose their poo poo over gas prices. My car has a 15 gallon tank. The difference between 3.00 gas and 3.50 gas is $7.50 a tank. I spend more money than that on combo # 3 when I go to lunch.

I only fill up every 2 weeks. $7.50 x 26 fillups a year is less than 200 bucks a year. Chump change compared to the rest of my spending habits, especially when taken out over a year.

ass is hometown
Jan 11, 2006

I gotta take a leak. When I get back, we're doing body shots.


Nocheez posted:

A lot of not smart people freak out when gas prices start to rise, and do foolish things. If you have to take a $1,500 hit on selling your truck and then pay taxes on buying a new vehicle which will likely be about the same amount, step back and think of how much fuel $3,000 will buy. At $4 a gallon it's 750 gallons, and that's about a year's worth of driving in your current vehicle. On top of that, you'll have a new car payment, and it will still require fuel.

I'm really just getting tired of driving an SUV.
I'm sorry if I tried to rationalize, but thanks for the advice.

Saltin
Aug 20, 2003
Don't touch

skipdogg posted:

People love to lose their poo poo over gas prices. My car has a 15 gallon tank. The difference between 3.00 gas and 3.50 gas is $7.50 a tank. I spend more money than that on combo # 3 when I go to lunch.

The best is people who will drive 10 miles to save 10 cents a gallon, and there are so many people at that station they wait in line for 20 minutes idiling when they get there.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Ridonkulous posted:

I'm really just getting tired of driving an SUV.
I'm sorry if I tried to rationalize, but thanks for the advice.

But a smallish truck will have virtually the same ride quality as the body-on-frame Xterra?

Zeta Taskforce
Jun 27, 2002



Saltin posted:

The best is people who will drive 10 miles to save 10 cents a gallon, and there are so many people at that station they wait in line for 20 minutes idiling when they get there.

What about the ones who after they are done filling up the tank, they go in and buy a Redbull that probably works out to $26/gallon to fill up their personal tank?

Magic Underwear
May 14, 2003




Young Orc

Zeta Taskforce posted:

What about the ones who after they are done filling up the tank, they go in and buy a Redbull that probably works out to $26/gallon to fill up their personal tank?

You might be good with numbers and all but those words don't make any god damned sense.

Zeta Taskforce
Jun 27, 2002



Magic Underwear posted:

You might be good with numbers and all but those words don't make any god damned sense.

Might have been too cleaver with my wording. My point is that people will cry when they have to buy a gallon of gas for $3.50, but as it turns out, gas is the cheapest liquid that a gas station sells. However no one minds when they pay $1.49 for 12 fluid ounces of their favorite beverage.

Throatwarbler
Nov 17, 2008

Oct 3, 2016 00:06: SO I'm also in 1st year classes and it's going pretty well I think.

Dec 9, 2016 15:46: Well I just took my first law school final exam. I think I've made a huge mistake.

How did people have kids before SUVs? :monocle:

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

T0MSERV0
Jul 24, 2007

You shouldn't expect to defeat him, he is designed to be a war machine.


Zeta Taskforce posted:

Might have been too cleaver with my wording. My point is that people will cry when they have to buy a gallon of gas for $3.50, but as it turns out, gas is the cheapest liquid that a gas station sells. However no one minds when they pay $1.49 for 12 fluid ounces of their favorite beverage.

Hell, that's nothing. Check this out: http://www.cockeyed.com/science/gallon/liquid.html

Highlights:
Water is basically free/gallon out of the tap. Make it Evian and it's $6.40. Red Bull is $30.69, Liquid Paper is $198.40, Black Printer Ink is $2701.52, and at the top of the list is Scorpion Venom at $38,858,507.46.

Funny how crazy the prices get when they get put in perspective.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply