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Throatwarbler
Nov 17, 2008

Oct 3, 2016 00:06: SO I'm also in 1st year classes and it's going pretty well I think.

Dec 9, 2016 15:46: Well I just took my first law school final exam. I think I've made a huge mistake.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou posted:

I have a 2003 PT Cruiser with 69,500 miles that I got from my in-laws in 2009. My wife doesn't drive at all, so it's our only car. It was essentially a free car for me, but over the last two years, it has become less and less reliable. I've spent thousands on repairs, including TWO alternators, multiple oil leaks, and more. Last week, I spent over $1,300 on it (including the second replacement alternator) after getting stranded again -- either the third or fourth time in the last year.

I realize it's time to replace it, but I've never gone car shopping before, so I'm intimidated by the whole process. My first car was a 1977 Toyota Corolla that my parents bought new, the year before I was born, that I learned how to drive on in high school. Even after I went away to college in 1996, they gave the Corolla to a friend, who put the engine in an airboat he was building. Then I won a 1996 Honda Civic hatchback in a credit union auction in 1998 and drove it until 2009.

Luckily, I know exactly what I want: a Honda Fit. I've wanted one ever since my Civic started giving me trouble in 2008, before my in-laws hooked me up with the PT Cruiser. I have a 20 mile round trip commute for work (all city streets), and I'd love another small, reliable, fuel-efficient hatchback. My wife has a disability and uses a walker (and sometimes a wheelchair), so a hatchback would work best for us. Plus, I just love the way they look.

The only hang-up is that my father-in-law is pushing hard against getting another smaller car. He wants us to get a Ford Escape (a smaller SUV) and promises to help us pay for it, but I've never been an "SUV guy" and definitely don't want one. He's convinced the Fit will be too difficult for my wife to climb in and out of, but if anything, I think the Escape will be too high for her, and the Fit will be closer in height to our Cruiser. He also argues a smaller car is unsafe, but the Fit ranks highly on the IIHS Top Safety Picks list. Also, I'm not entirely sure the Escape would even fit in our garage, but most importantly, I don't like it.

I want to avoid any unnecessary family drama and just get the Fit, assuming we test-drive one and my wife is comfortable in it. I don't feel like shopping around too much. One local dealership has a certified, pre-owned 2012 Fit with 17,000 miles for $14,000-something, but nobody else has any decent used ones. New ones start at $16,000 and go up to about $20,000, so I'm wondering if that would be a better value.

For what it's worth, between my savings and both of our families offering to help, I'm in a decent position to pay cash for the whole thing, which I would probably rather do than finance whatever we get. Am I making good choices?

You should buy a new Fit. In addition to the used ones being poor value, the newest 2015s are also better in every way, with better engines and transmissions. That being said for the sake of keeping your FIL happy you should at least go and try the Escape out, what he is referring to is a problem that many old people have with low slung cars -once they get in they have a hard time clambering out, sort of like being stuck in a very soft sofa, whereas with a taller riding vehicle they can rotate themselves around and just sort of drop out much more easily. I don't know if this is specifically a problem for your wide. A lot of carmakers now offer "B-segment" SUVs nowadays just for this market - essentially just a car like a Honda Fit except with a slightly taller ride height, Honda's version of this is called the HRV, it's not on the market in the US yet but has been sold in other countries for a while. I think nowadays a lot of people are backpeddling away from SUVs so fast that they are going past the other extreme. Most of the compact crossovers nowadays are really not much different at all from a hatchback or wagon car from the old days, they get similar fuel economy and drive about the same, they're not Wranglers or G-wagens.


theHUNGERian posted:

I've reduced my search to Outbacks and Foresters because they have decent AWD and off-road capability (that meet my needs) at my price range.

Reading around a bit, I've found out that the current line of Foresters have oil consumption issues. Some people (here, and here) argue that it has to do with the piston rings not settling properly during the break-in period, and thus a higher chance of burning oil. Subaru considers adding 1 quart of oil each 1000 miles normal. This is crazy in my opinion, but if I were to buy a Forester and ended up with one that has that kind of oil consumption I am SOL. So while a 2015 Forester 2.5i Premium with only 2k miles is within reach financially (local dealer has one for $23.5k, factory warranty and all) I worry about it being an oil burner.

On the other hand, Outbacks are a bit pricier, so I'd have to settle for something with more miles (older, poorer gas mileage). The upside is that the Outbacks have fewer (but not zero) reports of burning oil. I could save some cash on a 2012 Outback 2.5i with 70k miles that is advertized for $20.8k. 70k miles is a lot, but it would have to be HWY miles, so it would be easier on the engine.

How would you choose? Or are both cars going to be a headache to maintain?

I would have the Outback. It's built in the US, so it will have fewer problems with rust compared to the Japanese built Forester, and based on what you say it seems like the engines might be better built too although I don't know any more about that than you do. Because it's based on a longer wheel base Legacy platform it will also ride and handle bumps better, at the cost of a slightly worse breakover angle which probably won't bother you too much. It seems like people gravitate towards one or the other mostly over individual ergonomic concerns that are different for every person. Do note that the 2012 Outback is from a previous generation and is very different than the new ones.

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VideoTapir
Oct 18, 2005

He'll tire eventually.


Throatwarbler posted:

I would have the Outback. It's built in the US, so it will have fewer problems with rust compared to the Japanese built Forester,

What?

Throatwarbler
Nov 17, 2008

Oct 3, 2016 00:06: SO I'm also in 1st year classes and it's going pretty well I think.

Dec 9, 2016 15:46: Well I just took my first law school final exam. I think I've made a huge mistake.

Bovril Delight posted:

When you say off road, are you talking about a graded dirt road? Any car can handle that. If you're talking something more complex, you're going to gave to trade off something.

The AWD really doesn't seem a requirement for your situation and will only hurt MPG and have more reliability concerns.

Also I'd look up what the closest dealer is to where you'll be. While it won't be terrible to find a shop, something domestic would likely have greater support.

I should point out here that Forester/Outback does have a substantially higher ground clearance than most other vehicles in the class, at 8.7', about the same as a stock 4x4 Silverado/Sierra, and much more than a CRV or RAV4 (oddly enough the CX5 is the one that comes closest). I suspect that Subaru can put more of the body higher up because the boxer engine's low CG compensates somewhat.

I know Subarus are kind of played out in AI because everyone has them and they get uglier with every generation but combined with their 58/42 weight distribution they really are pretty good in snow. :unsmith:



Click the question mark in my AV if you want some sources, it's a pretty well known issue with both Subarus and Mazdas.

Throatwarbler fucked around with this message at 06:15 on Jan 25, 2015

theHUNGERian
Feb 23, 2006



Bovril Delight posted:

When you say off road, are you talking about a graded dirt road? Any car can handle that. If you're talking something more complex, you're going to gave to trade off something.

The AWD really doesn't seem a requirement for your situation and will only hurt MPG and have more reliability concerns.

Also I'd look up what the closest dealer is to where you'll be. While it won't be terrible to find a shop, something domestic would likely have greater support.

For now, yes, it would be graded dirt roads, not boulders. But even on the paved roads I use today I can occasionally hear things bump into the underside of my current car (1997 Sentra) because the roads aren't that well maintained. I do astronomy in my free time, so getting away from light pollution (thus civilization) is a strict requirement. Out there, cell service gets spotty, so if conditions get tough (mud slide, snow, rocks), I need to able to get out of there on my own, thus my request for AWD. TrueDelta doesn't show any issues with the 2010- Outback's AWD. But if you have a reference that does show issues, I'm all ears. The hit in mpg does bother me. But the alternatives seem to be (a) poorer AWD performance for boost in mpg (CR-V) or (b) higher chance of burning oil for boost in mpg (Forester).

Throatwarbler posted:

I would have the Outback. It's built in the US, so it will have fewer problems with rust compared to the Japanese built Forester, and based on what you say it seems like the engines might be better built too although I don't know any more about that than you do. Because it's based on a longer wheel base Legacy platform it will also ride and handle bumps better, at the cost of a slightly worse breakover angle which probably won't bother you too much. It seems like people gravitate towards one or the other mostly over individual ergonomic concerns that are different for every person. Do note that the 2012 Outback is from a previous generation and is very different than the new ones.

I didn't know about the rust issue, thanks. For now, I am not too worried about breakover angles. I know that the 2012 is the previous generation and I am cool with it. There are plenty of happy '12 Outbacks on Truedelta.com.

I am also gravitating towards the Outback even though I'd appreciate the somewhat shorter Forester (easier to park) with its higher mpg. I just feel like the Forester would be a gamble. Even if the dealer knew that that particular car was burning oil (the car was originally bought there), I don't trust that they would disclose it. And if I noticed it, they would just tell me that the engine needs more time to break-in, 1 qt per 1000 miles is Subaru's spec, ... .

Bigass Moth
Mar 6, 2004

I joined the #RXT REVOLUTION.
:boom:
he knows...


Thanks for the advice guys, we'll look into our options and evaluate later on.

Keyser_Soze
May 5, 2009



Pillbug

get her a 4x4 Tahoe/Yukon so she can fit in with the other macho soccer moms and will also be able to see over cars at the stoplight........for yourself get a Subaru WRX wagon with snow tires.

Janitor Prime
Jan 22, 2004

PC LOAD LETTER

What da fuck does that mean



Fun Shoe

Hi AI:

I just bought a new 2015 Jetta for a total cash price of $24,800 and gave a 2,000 dollar deposit and financing for 60mo at 3.5% apr. I think it was a good deal but they also tried to sell me a couple of extras that I wasn't sure were worth it. The first was this XZILON protection which seemed pretty cool but it was an extra $1300 and the second was an extended 5 year warranty for about $2000 I said no, but I wanted to ask your opinion on those two things.

Thanks

Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006

BLITHERING IDIOT AND HARDCORE DURIAN APOLOGIST. LET ME TELL YOU WHY THIS SHIT DON'T STINK EVEN THOUGH WE ALL KNOW IT DOES BECAUSE I'M SUPER CULTURED.


Janitor Prime posted:

Hi AI:

I just bought a new 2015 Jetta for a total cash price of $24,800 and gave a 2,000 dollar deposit and financing for 60mo at 3.5% apr. I think it was a good deal but they also tried to sell me a couple of extras that I wasn't sure were worth it. The first was this XZILON protection which seemed pretty cool but it was an extra $1300 and the second was an extended 5 year warranty for about $2000 I said no, but I wanted to ask your opinion on those two things.

Thanks

Every single dealer installed accessory, including magic protectants, is a scam. Most of them are worthless, and the few that aren't can be done for a tiny fraction of the price at a detailing shop if they happen to be useful for your situation.

Extended warranties on new cars are always ripoffs. There can be some value on used-car aftermarket warranties, but only in exceptional cases (usually, if you're buying the fast and unreliable sport edition of an executive grocery-getter, and they don't differentiate the warranty costs by trim line).

VideoTapir
Oct 18, 2005

He'll tire eventually.


Space Gopher posted:

Extended warranties on new cars are always ripoffs. There can be some value on used-car aftermarket warranties, but only in exceptional cases (usually, if you're buying the fast and unreliable sport edition of an executive grocery-getter, and they don't differentiate the warranty costs by trim line).

My mom had the transmission in her Caravan replaced at least once, I think twice, under an aftermarket warranty. Warranties are great for shitheaps.

APOLLO OHNO-UDIDNT
Jul 22, 2005

you can prob fix that with a little duct tape and a paper clip

*is MacGyver irl*


I have a 2015 Forester and have kept up with the oil burning drama. Current consensus is that it is a possibility (Subaru tried to say 5% or less of the non-turbo engine, obviously some say otherwise) on the 2011-2014 Forester models. It only has hit manual tranny's for 2015, the 2015's with the CVT are not being seen in dealers for this problem. That said, it is still early...

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





Janitor Prime posted:

XZILON protection

Googled "Xzilon protection" and it appears to be German for "Snake Oil". Touch up pens are about $15 at the dealership. It looks like it's marketed as a magic forcefield against spraypaint and market devaluation over time.

I like around the 2:00 mark where they helpfully point out that it protects against "Industrial fallout" with iconic nuclear power plant cooling towers in the background :golfclap:



:lol::lol:

theHUNGERian
Feb 23, 2006



APOLLO OHNO-UDIDNT posted:

... It only has hit manual tranny's for 2015, the 2015's with the CVT are not being seen in dealers for this problem. That said, it is still early...

You might be right. And I am well aware that people typically go to the internet/forums in order to complain, so the numbers are most likely skewed towards those that complain. I am concerned though because some previous models showed increasing consumption with increasing age. So even if the MY15 Foresters don't consume any oil early in their life, I worry that perhaps at 40k miles they will be consuming appreciable levels. I am used to having to add zero oil to my car between 7500 mile intervals and I would like to keep it that way.

Literally Lewis Hamilton
Feb 22, 2005

#JusticeForBreonnaTaylor
#BlackLivesMatter
#StillIRise
#Blessed





theHUNGERian posted:

For now, yes, it would be graded dirt roads, not boulders. But even on the paved roads I use today I can occasionally hear things bump into the underside of my current car (1997 Sentra) because the roads aren't that well maintained. I do astronomy in my free time, so getting away from light pollution (thus civilization) is a strict requirement. Out there, cell service gets spotty, so if conditions get tough (mud slide, snow, rocks), I need to able to get out of there on my own, thus my request for AWD. TrueDelta doesn't show any issues with the 2010- Outback's AWD. But if you have a reference that does show issues, I'm all ears. The hit in mpg does bother me. But the alternatives seem to be (a) poorer AWD performance for boost in mpg (CR-V) or (b) higher chance of burning oil for boost in mpg (Forester).


I didn't know about the rust issue, thanks. For now, I am not too worried about breakover angles. I know that the 2012 is the previous generation and I am cool with it. There are plenty of happy '12 Outbacks on Truedelta.com.

I am also gravitating towards the Outback even though I'd appreciate the somewhat shorter Forester (easier to park) with its higher mpg. I just feel like the Forester would be a gamble. Even if the dealer knew that that particular car was burning oil (the car was originally bought there), I don't trust that they would disclose it. And if I noticed it, they would just tell me that the engine needs more time to break-in, 1 qt per 1000 miles is Subaru's spec, ... .

When you say for now - what would the change be? If you want an SUV, go ahead and get one. If you think you need one because you'll be driving on dirt roads, I'll point to the scores of people who get by just fine on a two wheel drive car on dirt roads every day. You mentioned being out in Death Valley but also are also now mentioning snow, mudslides, etc. The biggest thing you can do is ensure you have proper tires for the conditions, which will go much further toward avoiding getting stuck than AWD will. AWD cars as a rule will have more drivetrain loss and edit: whoops higher lower MPG as a result.

At the end of the day a car purchase has a lot to do with what makes you happy since you'll be driving it, but I think you're fooling yourself by requiring AWD.

Literally Lewis Hamilton fucked around with this message at 00:14 on Jan 26, 2015

plester1
Jul 9, 2004







Bovril Delight posted:

The biggest thing you can do is ensure you have proper tires for the conditions, which will go much further toward avoiding getting stuck than AWD will.

A good demonstration: http://jalopnik.com/heres-irrefutable-proof-that-all-wheel-drive-is-worthle-1671708207

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=STaximkaQxo

theHUNGERian
Feb 23, 2006



Bovril Delight posted:

When you say for now - what would the change be? If you want an SUV, go ahead and get one. If you think you need one because you'll be driving on dirt roads, I'll point to the scores of people who get by just fine on a two wheel drive car on dirt roads every day. You mentioned being out in Death Valley but also are also now mentioning snow, mudslides, etc. The biggest thing you can do is ensure you have proper tires for the conditions, which will go much further toward avoiding getting stuck than AWD will. AWD cars as a rule will have more drivetrain loss and edit: whoops higher lower MPG as a result.

At the end of the day a car purchase has a lot to do with what makes you happy since you'll be driving it, but I think you're fooling yourself by requiring AWD.

As civilization is expanding so is light pollution. So today ("for now") my prime hobby location is accessible by a dirt road. In 10 years, I might have to go to even more remote locations on even tougher roads. But there is no way to plan that far ahead as it is an unknown.

For me the biggest selling point for the Subaru is the high ground clearance. Together with the large cargo room, the Outback is a great fit.

I'll bug AI about proper tires.

Thanks guys.

WHERE MY HAT IS AT
Jan 7, 2011


Proposed Budget: $6000 canadian funbucks
New or Used: Used, given the budget
Body Style: Sedan/Hatch
How will you be using the car?: Daily driver, commuting to either the train station or client sites depending on the day
Do you prefer a luxury vehicle with all the gizmos?: Nope, spartan is probably better so as long as it has A/C, cruise and a stereo all is well. Even cruise could probably not be there and it would be fine.
What aspects are most important to you?: Reliability, safety, fuel efficiency pretty much in that order I guess.

My girlfriend needs a car that's going to last her at least 8 months while she's out on an internship. Typical use case will be either going to the train station about five minutes away from here or a client site. The catch is she won't know where she's going much ahead of time so public transit is pretty much out. She'll probably sell it at the end when she goes back to school so something near the bottom of it's depreciation curve is ideal. The first thing that comes to mind is an older civic since they've been the best selling car here forever so there's hundreds of them for sale and parts are probably dirt cheap. Looking for any other suggestions as to models/years to look at and also poo poo that we should absolutely run away from. She doesn't start work until May 1st so we have time to wait around for the right car to be for sale if we know what to look for.

PreformedSoup
Jun 22, 2011


Git Mah Belt Son posted:

That gen Mazda6 was pretty damned great. It's definitely a solid alternative to the Camrys/Accords/Altimas of the world. It's still a mid-size car, but drat it if it isn't one of the best driving mid-sized cars of recent memory.

The 4cyl is a tiny bit underpowered, but not enough to make you hate it since it's such a great driving car. The V6 Mazda6 is a great drivers car though.

The one consideration to the great handling is that the ride is a bit more firm than others in the class. I personally wouldn't consider it a negative but some might.

It's definitely worth looking into. A V6 might be tough to find in that price range but I'd be willing to bet you'd find plenty of 4cyl.

Another consideration is the 2010-2012 Ford Fusion. It was platform mates with the Mazda6, has great reliability, and used models are plentiful and cheap.

Thanks for the response!

I actually ended up going with a used '13 Mazda6 i Touring, that seemed identical to the '12 in every way. I picked it up for 13.7k and it only had 30k miles on it; Based on some research, this seemed like a decent deal.
The ultimate deciding factor is that it just feels better to drive and I wish I could pinpoint why. The Impalas had more raw power but, in my opinion, lacked personality. It also turns out the one I test drove was a Fleet car so that could be why.

Git Mah Belt Son
Apr 26, 2003

Happy Happy Gators

It's the chassis tuning. I've heard the Mazda6 referred to as a "poor mans bmw 5 series" on more than one occasion. The suspension set up and chassis are just tuned more towards the sporty end of the spectrum than comfort or appliance level so they're a heck of a lot more fun to drive.

Enjoy!

Shifty Pony
Dec 28, 2004

Up ta somethin'




Big Bad Voodoo Lou posted:

I have a 2003 PT Cruiser with 69,500 miles that I got from my in-laws in 2009. My wife doesn't drive at all, so it's our only car. It was essentially a free car for me, but over the last two years, it has become less and less reliable. I've spent thousands on repairs, including TWO alternators, multiple oil leaks, and more. Last week, I spent over $1,300 on it (including the second replacement alternator) after getting stranded again -- either the third or fourth time in the last year.

I realize it's time to replace it, but I've never gone car shopping before, so I'm intimidated by the whole process. My first car was a 1977 Toyota Corolla that my parents bought new, the year before I was born, that I learned how to drive on in high school. Even after I went away to college in 1996, they gave the Corolla to a friend, who put the engine in an airboat he was building. Then I won a 1996 Honda Civic hatchback in a credit union auction in 1998 and drove it until 2009.

Luckily, I know exactly what I want: a Honda Fit. I've wanted one ever since my Civic started giving me trouble in 2008, before my in-laws hooked me up with the PT Cruiser. I have a 20 mile round trip commute for work (all city streets), and I'd love another small, reliable, fuel-efficient hatchback. My wife has a disability and uses a walker (and sometimes a wheelchair), so a hatchback would work best for us. Plus, I just love the way they look.

The only hang-up is that my father-in-law is pushing hard against getting another smaller car. He wants us to get a Ford Escape (a smaller SUV) and promises to help us pay for it, but I've never been an "SUV guy" and definitely don't want one. He's convinced the Fit will be too difficult for my wife to climb in and out of, but if anything, I think the Escape will be too high for her, and the Fit will be closer in height to our Cruiser. He also argues a smaller car is unsafe, but the Fit ranks highly on the IIHS Top Safety Picks list. Also, I'm not entirely sure the Escape would even fit in our garage, but most importantly, I don't like it.

I want to avoid any unnecessary family drama and just get the Fit, assuming we test-drive one and my wife is comfortable in it. I don't feel like shopping around too much. One local dealership has a certified, pre-owned 2012 Fit with 17,000 miles for $14,000-something, but nobody else has any decent used ones. New ones start at $16,000 and go up to about $20,000, so I'm wondering if that would be a better value.

For what it's worth, between my savings and both of our families offering to help, I'm in a decent position to pay cash for the whole thing, which I would probably rather do than finance whatever we get. Am I making good choices?

Even if you are paying cash you may still want to check to see if you qualify for a loan at stupid low interest rates.

Test drive both but in the end you'll be driving the car so get one you want. Be sure to bring along both the walker and the wheelchair to check and see how easy they would be to store. For example the seats in the rear of the fit flip up so you might be able to stash the walker or wheelchair upright in the seat right behind your wife, but it may end up being a pain so be sure to check. The sales people should be all for this when you ask to check: they were actually a touch excited when I brought along my bike to shove in the back to check the Fit because (he said) he would be able to tell anyone asking in the future that he's seen it and yes it would work.

I would say that the Fit will be more economy car feeling then the more expensive Escape but when you are coming from an early 2000s PT Cruiser you really can only go up. My only complaints about my Fit is that it has a relatively small fuel tank and the Bluetooth will automatically start playing when you get in if it was playing when you got out.

Just a warning: You won't get much for the PT Cruiser.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




theHUNGERian posted:

For now, yes, it would be graded dirt roads, not boulders. But even on the paved roads I use today I can occasionally hear things bump into the underside of my current car (1997 Sentra) because the roads aren't that well maintained. I do astronomy in my free time, so getting away from light pollution (thus civilization) is a strict requirement. Out there, cell service gets spotty, so if conditions get tough (mud slide, snow, rocks), I need to able to get out of there on my own, thus my request for AWD. TrueDelta doesn't show any issues with the 2010- Outback's AWD. But if you have a reference that does show issues, I'm all ears. The hit in mpg does bother me. But the alternatives seem to be (a) poorer AWD performance for boost in mpg (CR-V) or (b) higher chance of burning oil for boost in mpg (Forester).


I didn't know about the rust issue, thanks. For now, I am not too worried about breakover angles. I know that the 2012 is the previous generation and I am cool with it. There are plenty of happy '12 Outbacks on Truedelta.com.

I am also gravitating towards the Outback even though I'd appreciate the somewhat shorter Forester (easier to park) with its higher mpg. I just feel like the Forester would be a gamble. Even if the dealer knew that that particular car was burning oil (the car was originally bought there), I don't trust that they would disclose it. And if I noticed it, they would just tell me that the engine needs more time to break-in, 1 qt per 1000 miles is Subaru's spec, ... .

What's wrong with the Impreza Outback Wagony Thing or its successor the CrosstrekXV?

theHUNGERian
Feb 23, 2006



KYOON GRIFFEY JR posted:

What's wrong with the Impreza Outback Wagony Thing or its successor the CrosstrekXV?

Con Impreza: ground clearance (5.9" vs. my current car's 5.8")
Con Crosstrek: height

An important function of this car will be to shield my telescope from heavy winds, so I can take long exposure images ( here's my current work). The taller the car, the better. And while I have no figure of merit, the Outback (previous and current generation) seems like the best fit when all things (height, mpg, reliability, off-road ability, price) are taken into account.

I offered the dealer $18k for a non-CPO 2012 Outback 2.5 limited with 70k miles and a sticker price of $20.7k. I don't have high hopes, but it's worth a shot.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Shifty Pony posted:

Even if you are paying cash you may still want to check to see if you qualify for a loan at stupid low interest rates.

Test drive both but in the end you'll be driving the car so get one you want. Be sure to bring along both the walker and the wheelchair to check and see how easy they would be to store. For example the seats in the rear of the fit flip up so you might be able to stash the walker or wheelchair upright in the seat right behind your wife, but it may end up being a pain so be sure to check. The sales people should be all for this when you ask to check: they were actually a touch excited when I brought along my bike to shove in the back to check the Fit because (he said) he would be able to tell anyone asking in the future that he's seen it and yes it would work.

I would say that the Fit will be more economy car feeling then the more expensive Escape but when you are coming from an early 2000s PT Cruiser you really can only go up. My only complaints about my Fit is that it has a relatively small fuel tank and the Bluetooth will automatically start playing when you get in if it was playing when you got out.

Just a warning: You won't get much for the PT Cruiser.

I figure I won't get much, especially with the CD changer long-since broken. I'll be thrilled if they offer me $3,000, and I know that's optimistic. But it's a 2003 with 70,000 miles, which ought to count for something.

How long have you had your Fit, and what model is it? Are you happy with it? Any problems? Is it comfortable? Did you opt for leather seats or anything like that? I probably won't ever use Bluetooth, but I sure am looking forward to a car I can play CDs in again, or even better, plug my old iPod into.

The Dipshit
Dec 21, 2005

by FactsAreUseless


I had a friend offer the idea of getting a hybrid car, but the Prius doesn't really appeal (ugly ugly ugly), and the Camry is wildly expensive for what you get. Would a ~2011-2012 Fusion hybrid be reasonably similar in terms of car's expected lifetime, since they essentially licensed out Toyota's drive-train? I can find them for about 15k with 20-40k miles on them.

Git Mah Belt Son
Apr 26, 2003

Happy Happy Gators

Big Bad Voodoo Lou posted:

I figure I won't get much, especially with the CD changer long-since broken. I'll be thrilled if they offer me $3,000, and I know that's optimistic. But it's a 2003 with 70,000 miles, which ought to count for something.

Honestly the market for Cruisers is not very good. $3k is very optimistic, if I were throwing a price out for that car with 70k miles, I'd offer a person $1000, no more than $1500. Maybe you'll get a dealer desperate for your sale but I'd budget for $1200-1500 and consider anything else a bonus.

Not ragging on it, just being honest. No one wants PTs anymore, they just sit around and the market reflects that. You can't give them away these days.

VideoTapir
Oct 18, 2005

He'll tire eventually.


http://www.ebay.com/sch/Cars-Trucks...2520miles&rt=nc

1500 from a dealer maybe. Prices are all over the place. If it's in good shape, you might get that 3 grand selling it yourself. Put it up on Craigslist.

19 o'clock
Sep 9, 2004

All is Pipe




Tomorrow morning I am looking at this: http://www.vistacolorado.com/used/GMC/2005-GMC-Yukon-5e439ba90a0a00646468d74fce24062d.htm

If I can get a reasonable payment plan (2.5k down) I am very interested. I am friends with the finance manager there. I am bringing along a mechanic buddy and we are driving to another mechanic's shop to have them take a look at it.

I presently own a 96 Jeep Grand Cherokee. I need to unplug the battery at night or the battery dies (gotta figure out where the draw is), it leaks tranny, leaks oil, needs ball joints, CV joints, drive shaft, tires, and it looks pretty shredded to boot. It was a temporary solution that became a permanent fix.

I am a full time musician with expanding gear needs that require a larger vehicle. This will work perfectly for me space-wise and give me room to expand. Given that I texted the finance manager about the car and am bringing it from one mechanic to another, I am hoping to get everything right. I have searched online and found no meaningful complaints about this model beyond cosmetic issues.

Let me know if anything seems crazy, because I'm doing my best and feel like I'm pretty satisfied.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





19 o'clock posted:

Let me know if anything seems crazy, because I'm doing my best and feel like I'm pretty satisfied.

Well, this:

19 o'clock posted:

If I can get a reasonable payment plan (2.5k down) I am very interested

makes me think you are shopping on monthly payment, which is a great way to get absolutely assraped on the deal.

Throatwarbler
Nov 17, 2008

Oct 3, 2016 00:06: SO I'm also in 1st year classes and it's going pretty well I think.

Dec 9, 2016 15:46: Well I just took my first law school final exam. I think I've made a huge mistake.

19 o'clock posted:

Tomorrow morning I am looking at this: http://www.vistacolorado.com/used/GMC/2005-GMC-Yukon-5e439ba90a0a00646468d74fce24062d.htm

If I can get a reasonable payment plan (2.5k down) I am very interested. I am friends with the finance manager there. I am bringing along a mechanic buddy and we are driving to another mechanic's shop to have them take a look at it.

I presently own a 96 Jeep Grand Cherokee. I need to unplug the battery at night or the battery dies (gotta figure out where the draw is), it leaks tranny, leaks oil, needs ball joints, CV joints, drive shaft, tires, and it looks pretty shredded to boot. It was a temporary solution that became a permanent fix.

I am a full time musician with expanding gear needs that require a larger vehicle. This will work perfectly for me space-wise and give me room to expand. Given that I texted the finance manager about the car and am bringing it from one mechanic to another, I am hoping to get everything right. I have searched online and found no meaningful complaints about this model beyond cosmetic issues.

Let me know if anything seems crazy, because I'm doing my best and feel like I'm pretty satisfied.

Those things really wouldn't be my first choice in vehicles that can carry a lot of things because they can't and were never really designed for it. Have you considered something like a midsize unibody SUV or a minivan? A minivan would probably be best for your needs since it will be able to carry far more stuff and also not be getting 15mpg.

Shifty Pony
Dec 28, 2004

Up ta somethin'




Big Bad Voodoo Lou posted:

I figure I won't get much, especially with the CD changer long-since broken. I'll be thrilled if they offer me $3,000, and I know that's optimistic. But it's a 2003 with 70,000 miles, which ought to count for something.

How long have you had your Fit, and what model is it? Are you happy with it? Any problems? Is it comfortable? Did you opt for leather seats or anything like that? I probably won't ever use Bluetooth, but I sure am looking forward to a car I can play CDs in again, or even better, plug my old iPod into.

Unfortunately 70k miles and 2003 model would count for something if it were not a PT Cruiser. The model just developed a really bad reputation as lovely underpowered unreliable cars and all of them are priced accordingly now. If you drive them a bunch they fall apart. If you don't drive them much they also fall apart. They also became "that car you inherited from your grandparents" so younger drivers will actively avoid them.

The Fit is a 2015 and I have only had it for a month but rather like it. Very comfortable, easy to drive and park around the city, and does fine on the highway and when windy. The engine has to rev high to make power but that's just the nature of a Honda 4-cylinder. The only quality annoyances so far was a slight creak from the dash on cold days and rough roads but pushing around the edges of the trim to reseat it seems to have fixed it

I got the EX model but didn't get the leather. The backup camera and passenger side blind spot cameras are wonderful and I don't think I would get a car without the or at least a blind spot warning system. The infotainment system is fine although I'm not a huge fan of touchscreens and Hondalink is useless. You can just plug your iPod directly in using usb (either near the cup holders or in the center console) and get access to your playlists but that takes the place of a line-in jack (bring it and a usb cable with you if you test drive). No adjustability to the intermittent wipers could be a problem if you live in a place it drizzles or fogs a bunch. If you are taller it might be an issue as the steering wheel doesn't angle up all that much and that could start to obscure indicators on the instrument panel.

19 o'clock
Sep 9, 2004

All is Pipe




IOwnCalculus posted:

Well, this:
makes me think you are shopping on monthly payment, which is a great way to get absolutely assraped on the deal.

How else can I finance it? I suppose I am not aware of any other way to purchase a car besides "cash" or "cash down payment and loan payback."

Throatwarbler posted:

Those things really wouldn't be my first choice in vehicles that can carry a lot of things because they can't and were never really designed for it. Have you considered something like a midsize unibody SUV or a minivan? A minivan would probably be best for your needs since it will be able to carry far more stuff and also not be getting 15mpg.

Compared to my Jeep it's boasting much more room and comfort (I'm 6'6"). I live in a high-alpine environment (Colorado Rockies) and clearance + 4WD are a must. I play gigs that regularly put me up on the mountain. I don't know if I feel comfortable going any smaller?

Edit: I could be wrong about mid-size versus full-size cargo space (I usually pull out/fold down the back seats) but man does my Jeep pale compared to my buddy's Tahoe.

19 o'clock fucked around with this message at 16:44 on Jan 29, 2015

Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006

BLITHERING IDIOT AND HARDCORE DURIAN APOLOGIST. LET ME TELL YOU WHY THIS SHIT DON'T STINK EVEN THOUGH WE ALL KNOW IT DOES BECAUSE I'M SUPER CULTURED.


19 o'clock posted:

How else can I finance it? I suppose I am not aware of any other way to purchase a car besides "cash" or "cash down payment and loan payback."

Even though you'll eventually have a monthly payment, don't shop based on "this car will cost me $x per month, and I can afford that." Whether you're buying cash or finance, negotiate the total price of the vehicle separately from the loan terms. Otherwise, it's way too easy for the salesperson to tack an extra grand onto the purchase price (sweetening the commission end of the deal), and extend the loan by a few more payments.

It's also a good idea to shop around at a local credit union for auto loans before you head down to the car lot. It'll give you a point of comparison, and there's a good chance a CU will be able to beat the dealer's financing options on a used car.

19 o'clock
Sep 9, 2004

All is Pipe




Space Gopher posted:

Even though you'll eventually have a monthly payment, don't shop based on "this car will cost me $x per month, and I can afford that." Whether you're buying cash or finance, negotiate the total price of the vehicle separately from the loan terms. Otherwise, it's way too easy for the salesperson to tack an extra grand onto the purchase price (sweetening the commission end of the deal), and extend the loan by a few more payments.

It's also a good idea to shop around at a local credit union for auto loans before you head down to the car lot. It'll give you a point of comparison, and there's a good chance a CU will be able to beat the dealer's financing options on a used car.

Thanks, I see where you are at.

I'm not worried about the salesperson as it's my friend who I will be dealing with. She is the head of finance at this particular dealership and will be helping me out.

My credit is pretty good (816) so shopping for loans will also be a big part of this. I am going to talk to my friend and while I think about the car and what my mechanic friends say will be speaking with a couple of banks I work with. Will also explore the CU route, too, as my old roommate recommended I do.

VideoTapir
Oct 18, 2005

He'll tire eventually.


19 o'clock posted:

My credit is pretty good (816)

What scoring system is that? I thought 800 was the maximum.

19 o'clock
Sep 9, 2004

All is Pipe




VideoTapir posted:

What scoring system is that? I thought 800 was the maximum.

850 was the theoretical max I thought.

VideoTapir
Oct 18, 2005

He'll tire eventually.


NM, you're right.

Shifty Pony
Dec 28, 2004

Up ta somethin'




19 o'clock posted:

850 was the theoretical max I thought.

According to the notice stuff I got after applying for a car loan Equifax does a range of 250-900, Experian from 250-877, and TransUnion from 253 to 893.

Very few places use a pure FICO score anymore and instead they use some customized scoring system specific to the type of loan being sought (auto, house, etc). That's probably the reason for the strange ranges.

What the hell would you have to do to get a 250 score?

19 o'clock
Sep 9, 2004

All is Pipe




Got them down to 7 on the price. Starting price was 8.9. After tax, title, etc etc I'm out the door at 8.4 with 6k financed. Both mechanics like the car and say that all it really needs are balljoints, and even those are still working well.

Sales guy was grilling me. Hate this confrontational crap. Fingers crossed I made an alright decision today.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

You're a credit to your community!

19 o'clock posted:

Got them down to 7 on the price. Starting price was 8.9. After tax, title, etc etc I'm out the door at 8.4 with 6k financed. Both mechanics like the car and say that all it really needs are balljoints, and even those are still working well.

Sales guy was grilling me. Hate this confrontational crap. Fingers crossed I made an alright decision today.

You poor dumb gently caress. You're going to spend close to 10K on a 10 year old (what 12-14 by the time you pay it off?) gigantic SUV with looming repairs


kinda joking, but i really don't like big SUVs

19 o'clock
Sep 9, 2004

All is Pipe




tesilential posted:

You poor dumb gently caress. You're going to spend close to 10K on a 10 year old (what 12-14 by the time you pay it off?) gigantic SUV with looming repairs


kinda joking, but i really don't like big SUVs

Haha, I'd love to buy something smaller. I truly truly need something with 4WD, ground clearance, and climate controlled cargo space. I routinely transport instruments that cost three times this vehicle's cost. I'm also really tall and it rides me well, so that's a plus. Presently my head is planted in the ceiling of my Jeep while driving.

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VideoTapir
Oct 18, 2005

He'll tire eventually.


If you have tools and a place to work, ball joints are generally something you can do yourself (assuming you don't need to decompress any springs, then you can still do it yourself but it might get dangerous). The more work you're able to do, the broader the range of vehicle purchases you can justify.

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