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Modern Day Hercules
Apr 26, 2008


I don't really get why speed is even an issue if you're not going to track the car. How often would you ever get to take it over 80 miles an hour? Let alone like 100 which I think any modern car can do pretty easily. Seems like you're paying more for nothing if you prioritize speed on a car you're just going to commute in or whatever.

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Leperflesh
May 17, 2007






He's not really talking about top speed so much as rate of acceleration. How well a car accelerates has a lot to do with how fun it feels to drive, if you want a sporty car. You put your foot down and get pressed into your seat and that's fun.

That said, only the most anemic cars these days have such poor acceleration that you can't (say) safely get up to speed on a short freeway onramp. Once you pass that threshold, you're talking more about fun than safety. For some folks that's a big factor and for others it doesn't matter at all.

One thing to bear in mind when comparing cars is power-to-weight rather than just pure power (how many horsies/how much torque).

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

Modern Day Hercules posted:

I don't really get why speed is even an issue if you're not going to track the car. How often would you ever get to take it over 80 miles an hour? Let alone like 100 which I think any modern car can do pretty easily. Seems like you're paying more for nothing if you prioritize speed on a car you're just going to commute in or whatever.

It's about acceleration, not speed. Also, you can have fun in a car off the track, say on a curvy mountain road.

Slo-Tek
Jun 8, 2001

WINDOWS 98 BEAT HIS FRIEND WITH A SHOVEL

nm posted:

It's about acceleration, not speed. Also, you can have fun in a car off the track, say on a curvy mountain road.

James May contends, and I agree, you have a lot of fun driving a car at the edge of it's performance, when the wheels are losing grip, when the engine has no more oomph to give.

If you have a nice car, you only experience this on the track. However, with a minivan and skinny tires, you can terrify yourself real good on a roundabout.

I loved driving my 78 Microbus, because anything past 45 miles made a huge edge of performance racket, it was tippy, it was sloppy, and everything was happening 18" from your face. Admittedly, the 0-45 in 12 seconds wasn't as much exhilaration, but still it was a fun drat car to actually be driving in, rather than an appliance experience.

Disgruntled Bovine
Jul 5, 2010



Do I really need to explain why I would want a car that accelerates well and handles well if I don't plan to track it? I am fully aware it's not a logical desire, but who ever said desires have to be logical? I have no doubt that in many people's eyes buying anything beyond a car that can drive highway speeds safely is a waste of money but I'd like something more than that. This is an advice thread so I appreciate that you share your opinion regarding this, but that doesn't mean that I will agree with you. I know what I want in a car, I'm just looking for help in making the wisest decision I can with the stipulations I made in my original post.

I also have seen the episode where James May contended that you can have the most fun driving a car at its limits, and perhaps I want to try that with this car once I've had it for a while and gotten used to having a car with some performance. However the car I have driven since I got my license is one which easily reaches its limit and has no more to give when accelerating into the highway and has difficulty maintaining 80 mph when that highway takes much of an uphill route. I want something that will not strain to do these things, and which has more to give if I want it. If I can afford it what's wrong with that?

Disgruntled Bovine fucked around with this message at 04:09 on Jul 15, 2012

Throatwarbler
Nov 17, 2008

Oct 3, 2016 00:06: SO I'm also in 1st year classes and it's going pretty well I think.

Dec 9, 2016 15:46: Well I just took my first law school final exam. I think I've made a huge mistake.

nm posted:


Any idea if the cooling systems are better than BMWs of the past?

The E60 started in 2002, it's "of the past". For that reason they have oddly terrible side impact crash ratings for a car that went up to 6 figures ("Marginal" on IIHS, worse than a Cobalt).

Throatwarbler fucked around with this message at 04:45 on Jul 15, 2012

Black Jasper
May 8, 2009


Please help me look for a new ride.

Budget: $15-20k
New/used: Lightly used, preferably less than 5 years old
Body style: SUV or wagon
Proposed use: Daily driver. Must be able to fit 2 child carseats comfortably. I ski 20+ days a year, so I want something powerful enough to get me to the mountains whenever mother nature dumps a foot of fresh powder.

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

2006-2009 Subaru Outback.

Your choice as to the NA 2.5 or the 3.0 H6. I think the 2.5 will be fine, particularly in stick form, but the 3.0 will provide more oomph.
I'm not sure I'm recommending the turbo (2.5XT) as they can be a little troublesome, but the NA 2.5 or H6 are basically flawless.
Avoid the 2005 if you can. The 2006+ has much improved side airbags and is safer. )(The 2006+ is among the safest cars sold). I'd probably look for one with ESP if you're not fairly familiar with snow driving and/or plan to use all seasons.

You could also sneak into a 2010 2.5 NA Outback, but you won't be able to do the bigger engine. It is more fuel efficient (CVT only) and larger inside.

Crosby B. Alfred
May 20, 2006
Cosby B. Alright

How do you guys feel about...

1 - Pre-owned Certified Cars, I'm looking at 2009+ Audi A4s, A3s or maybe even a A4 Avant - it's the Wagon of the A4. Or hell maybe even a BMW 3 Series.

2 - Electric Cars - Personally, I find the Lexus CT200h to be quite appealing. Same goes for the Honda Insight.

Ramrod Hotshot
May 30, 2003



I went to a dealership to buy a used car yesterday and had a terrible experience. To make a long story short, the salesman only wanted to know how much money I had and seemed bored and disinterested when I asked basic questions about the condition of some of the car's components. There was no way for them to prove that anything under the hood was in good condition, other than me physically bringing a mechanic out to their dealership to check it out, which would obviously be ridiculously expensive if it's even possible. So in a weird way, I feel like if I buy from a private seller I'd be dealing with a more honest person and getting more assurance that I'm buying a decent car.

So, if I go that route, what's the etiquette, if you will, about getting a car being sold by a private seller checked out? Do you ask them if they will drive to a mechanic of your choosing and then hand you the report a few days later? Do I offer to go with them? Or do I offer to take the car myself and leave them some kind of collateral? Should I expect them to already have an inspection report and hope it's legit? It seems to me that getting the car checked out professionally is pretty much a requirement for buying from a private seller but I can see how it would be problematic.

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

Tab8715 posted:

How do you guys feel about...

1 - Pre-owned Certified Cars, I'm looking at 2009+ Audi A4s, A3s or maybe even a A4 Avant - it's the Wagon of the A4. Or hell maybe even a BMW 3 Series.
They're a warranty. The certification should not replace a PPI.
On Germans they can be a decent idea, as they can get pricey when things break. Note that they will probably cost more than a normal used car, even accounting for repairs.
BMW PPI warranty is considered pretty good. I'm not sure Audi's is as good.

quote:

2 - Electric Cars - Personally, I find the Lexus CT200h to be quite appealing. Same goes for the Honda Insight.
There are hybrids, not electric cars.
Honda's hybrid systems are not very good. Toyotas (incl lexus) are the gold standard.
Consider the Volt too. It is shockingly good if you have access to a plug. Ignore the right wing hyperbole on them, they are proving to be reliable and the technology is really cool. Great incentives on them right now. If you don't drive more than 40mi a day, you will basically never buy gas.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007






Ramrod Hotshot posted:

I went to a dealership to buy a used car yesterday and had a terrible experience.

Yeah, that happens sometimes. If the salesman is not willing to put any effort into actually helping you want a car, then gently caress him: he doesn't get a sale.

When I was car shopping last year I went to at least a dozen different dealerships. I met a couple guys like you describe, but I also met several salespeople who actually put effort into the sale.

"Proving" the car is in good condition isn't really possible. A dealership should certainly give you access to the carfax or equivalent, and they certainly should allow you to have the vehicle independently inspected. That's really the best you can do.

quote:

So, if I go that route, what's the etiquette, if you will, about getting a car being sold by a private seller checked out?

Some private sellers will be dicks about it. Others are open to having the car inspected. Typically you'd make arrangements in advance with a mechanic that is local to the car seller, and then arrange with the seller to take the car to the mechanic. You both go, you pay the cost, and then you can either buy the car on the spot, or say no, or whatever.

There is an expectation that if you're at the point of having it inspected you're on the verge of buying. I think you generally would agree on a price beforehand, and indicate that you're ready to buy at that price unless there are problems revealed by the inspection that you weren't already told about. If there are problems, you can re-negotiate: the seller can agree to fix, you can agree on a lower price, or you can reject the purchase.

Personally I think it's wise to look for the right car, at both dealerships and private parties, and then make your final purchase based on the car itself rather than who happens to own it. But I like to keep my options open. There's definitely advantages and disadvantages to each class of sellers.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

SHUT
THE
FUCK
UP!
BIIITCH!




Proposed Budget: Under $1000, cheaper the better
New or Used: Used
Body Style: Truck or small old 4x4
How will you be using the car?: Just a second vehicle to go camping in, or toss my kayak and bike in and drive down to my usual portage point, approx 100 miles round trip
What aspects are most important to you?Reliability would be nice, but since it is a second vehicle, not as important as being easy to work on. I've never really tooled around in a car before, so something easy to work on would be a plus.

I ran across a 89 Ford Ranger 5sp with the 2.0 I4, 2WD only, as well as a 92 Toyota (hilux I think) 5speed. Both of these are under $800, which would be great. Is there anything I should be looking out for? I'm guessing clutch, frame rust, and timing belt/chain?

Also, I live in WI.

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

Casu Marzu posted:

Proposed Budget: Under $1000, cheaper the better
New or Used: Used
Body Style: Truck or small old 4x4
How will you be using the car?: Just a second vehicle to go camping in, or toss my kayak and bike in and drive down to my usual portage point, approx 100 miles round trip
What aspects are most important to you?Reliability would be nice, but since it is a second vehicle, not as important as being easy to work on. I've never really tooled around in a car before, so something easy to work on would be a plus.

I ran across a 89 Ford Ranger 5sp with the 2.0 I4, 2WD only, as well as a 92 Toyota (hilux I think) 5speed. Both of these are under $800, which would be great. Is there anything I should be looking out for? I'm guessing clutch, frame rust, and timing belt/chain?

Also, I live in WI.
The Toyota is probably all rust, especially if you can get it for that price.
A good condition Toyota Pickup (They were not Hiluxes in the US), is pretty solid, but $800 in Wisconsin tells me it won't be.
Ford rangers are pretty simple.
In both cases, iron oxide would be my primary concern.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

SHUT
THE
FUCK
UP!
BIIITCH!




Yeah, that's what I figured.





This is what I'm looking at with the Ranger. The rear gate looks like there's some bad rust already, but for that kind of money, I guess I shouldn't be too picky. My thought is if the underbody looks fine, this might be a decent buy. The guy is asking a soft $750, so I could probably offer quite a bit less.

Applebees Appetizer
Jan 23, 2006



Casu Marzu posted:

Proposed Budget: Under $1000, cheaper the better
New or Used: Used
Body Style: Truck or small old 4x4
How will you be using the car?: Just a second vehicle to go camping in, or toss my kayak and bike in and drive down to my usual portage point, approx 100 miles round trip
What aspects are most important to you?Reliability would be nice, but since it is a second vehicle, not as important as being easy to work on. I've never really tooled around in a car before, so something easy to work on would be a plus.

I ran across a 89 Ford Ranger 5sp with the 2.0 I4, 2WD only, as well as a 92 Toyota (hilux I think) 5speed. Both of these are under $800, which would be great. Is there anything I should be looking out for? I'm guessing clutch, frame rust, and timing belt/chain?

Also, I live in WI.

Better set your standards way low at that budget. Especially a 4x4. In fact, you should just forget about 4x4 because a 2WD truck with good snow tires and a few bags of sand in the bed will be fine and a hell of a lot cheaper than a 4x4. less parts to break/maintain as well. I would take the Ranger if it has less rust.

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

Have you considered a road trip south? Strikes me that you might do better with something older, but in better condition, in a rust free state.

Buying cars from the 80s that we're garage queens in the northern states is tetanus inducing.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

SHUT
THE
FUCK
UP!
BIIITCH!




Yeah, honestly I just caught the bug for a small truck in the last week or two. I have a lot of reading to do and I'd definitely be up for taking a trip a couple states south to pick up a nice older truck.

oneof3steves
Oct 25, 2007

Sgulp

Proposed Budget:
15,000-20,000 ish
New or Used:
Either, probably used.
Body Style:
Sedan or small wagon, We have a small garage so nothing huge, our current 1999 outback barely fits,
How will you be using the car?:
We're having a baby in the next two weeks, and conveniently our outback has decided to call it quits. We don't drive very far, my wife drives the 2 miles to work and back daily, apart from that it's to the grocery, or other little trips around town. Rarely anything more than 20 minutes.
What aspects are most important to you?
Reliability, cost of ownership, safety (Minnesota roads).

Haven't ever properly bought a car as we got our current one when my wife's dad died, I'm pretty open to anything. Cursory Research suggests:
Ford Fusion
Toyota Camry
Honda Accord
Mazda 6

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007






I would expect any truck under $1000 to have serious pre-existing mechanical problems.

The thing is, people use (especially) light trucks for work. Any decent running truck is gonna be worth a grand or (usually) more.

Twice now I've had random dudes pull up outside my house while I was working outside and offer cash in hand for my '92 S-10, regardless of its condition (it's rusty and has over 200k on the original engine and has numerous other problems too).

Add in 4x4 and I think you're reallly pushing it. I'd expect a truck that is going to immediately need $1k+ of repairs to put it in reasonable running order, and that's not including significant issues with rust.

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

So in talking to my girlfriend more about her ideal car it's sounding more like she wants a crossover. She likes the ride height of an SUV a lot better as well as having more space for moving things around and throwing her bike/snowboard/etc. in the back.

I'm making a short list of SUV crossovers for her to check out and based on your guys recommendations the Hyundai Tucson (potentially Santa Fe) and the Kia Sorento (possibly Sportage) are on that list...

I'm also putting the new Honda CRV, VW Tiguan, and Mazda CX-5 on that list but I'm hoping some crossover wizard can tell me if there's a compelling reason to leave any of them off of that list and/or elevate one way above the others?

Any major reliability concerns or anything else to be cognizant of going into this?

Thwomp
Apr 9, 2003

BA-DUHHH



Grimey Drawer

oneof3steves posted:

Proposed Budget:
15,000-20,000 ish
New or Used:
Either, probably used.
Body Style:
Sedan or small wagon, We have a small garage so nothing huge, our current 1999 outback barely fits,
How will you be using the car?:
We're having a baby in the next two weeks, and conveniently our outback has decided to call it quits. We don't drive very far, my wife drives the 2 miles to work and back daily, apart from that it's to the grocery, or other little trips around town. Rarely anything more than 20 minutes.
What aspects are most important to you?
Reliability, cost of ownership, safety (Minnesota roads).

Haven't ever properly bought a car as we got our current one when my wife's dad died, I'm pretty open to anything. Cursory Research suggests:
Ford Fusion
Toyota Camry
Honda Accord
Mazda 6

I'd shy away from the Mazda 6 (it's a weird clone/semi-clone of the Fusion) since I've already heard bad things about it. The rest of your midsize sedans are all good options for reliable driving applicances and can be had in your price range used. I also always heard good things about the 2008+ Chevy Malibu.

MMD3 posted:

So in talking to my girlfriend more about her ideal car it's sounding more like she wants a crossover. She likes the ride height of an SUV a lot better as well as having more space for moving things around and throwing her bike/snowboard/etc. in the back.

I'm making a short list of SUV crossovers for her to check out and based on your guys recommendations the Hyundai Tucson (potentially Santa Fe) and the Kia Sorento (possibly Sportage) are on that list...

I'm also putting the new Honda CRV, VW Tiguan, and Mazda CX-5 on that list but I'm hoping some crossover wizard can tell me if there's a compelling reason to leave any of them off of that list and/or elevate one way above the others?

Any major reliability concerns or anything else to be cognizant of going into this?

Someone previously mentioned the Tiguan as being perpetually in the shop. I'd agree with that.

Really, the crossover segment is getting more specialized players, each doing something a bit better than its competitors.
2013 Ford Escape - Technology dodads and fuel economy.
2013 Mazda CX-5 - Fuel economy and driving feel.
Hyundai Tuscon/Kia Sportage - Value and warranty.
Chevrolet Equinox - Interior room.
2013 Honda CRV - One of only a couple of real general players. It's does everything well enough.
Dodge Journey - See CRV. General player.

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

What bad things about the Mazda 6?
It is a solid car.

Unzip and Attack
Mar 3, 2008

USPOL May

Thank you for the previous feedback on the Audi - I decided not to go with it. I have been looking at the Chevy Equinox. I get GM discount from my dad, but am also ok with buying used. Any good or bad opinions on this vehicle? Anything I should look out for or avoid?

Throatwarbler
Nov 17, 2008

Oct 3, 2016 00:06: SO I'm also in 1st year classes and it's going pretty well I think.

Dec 9, 2016 15:46: Well I just took my first law school final exam. I think I've made a huge mistake.

nm posted:

What bad things about the Mazda 6?
It is a solid car.

Made by UAW communists.

I think it has worse than average ratings because the speed 6 gets lumped with it in the surveys.

quote:

Thank you for the previous feedback on the Audi - I decided not to go with it. I have been looking at the Chevy Equinox. I get GM discount from my dad, but am also ok with buying used. Any good or bad opinions on this vehicle? Anything I should look out for or avoid?

The GMC Terrain is the same vehicle. Together they are the best sellers in the segment. Dealers can'tkeep them in stock. The current year GMC Terrain can be had with the 3.6l.

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

Thwomp posted:

I'd shy away from the Mazda 6 (it's a weird clone/semi-clone of the Fusion) since I've already heard bad things about it. The rest of your midsize sedans are all good options for reliable driving applicances and can be had in your price range used. I also always heard good things about the 2008+ Chevy Malibu.


Someone previously mentioned the Tiguan as being perpetually in the shop. I'd agree with that.

Really, the crossover segment is getting more specialized players, each doing something a bit better than its competitors.
2013 Ford Escape - Technology dodads and fuel economy.
2013 Mazda CX-5 - Fuel economy and driving feel.
Hyundai Tuscon/Kia Sportage - Value and warranty.
Chevrolet Equinox - Interior room.
2013 Honda CRV - One of only a couple of real general players. It's does everything well enough.
Dodge Journey - See CRV. General player.

as far as the 2013 ford escape... what kinds of tech dodads are they offering that others don't have already? any real breakthroughs? It looks like their mileage is 21/30 which is about in line with the other compact crossovers, seems to be about the same as the CRV and CX-5

Applebees Appetizer
Jan 23, 2006



Mazda offers the CX-5 with their new SkyActiv engine that gets 35mpg hwy with a manual transmission and 2wd.

http://images.mazdausa.com/MusaWeb/displayPage.action?pageParameter=modelsMain&vehicleCode=CX5#/performance/gas_savings

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

SHUT
THE
FUCK
UP!
BIIITCH!




Thanks for talking me out of getting a beater truck. After more thinking, it may be more reasonable for me to look into selling my 06 Cobalt coupe and search for something that can hold my kayak/bike and such.

So, small trucks or wagons that are fairly reliable and can handle going off on gravel roads, etc? Cheaper the better. Doesn't need to be fast.

Thinking maybe $6-7k range.

Thwomp
Apr 9, 2003

BA-DUHHH



Grimey Drawer

MMD3 posted:

as far as the 2013 ford escape... what kinds of tech dodads are they offering that others don't have already? any real breakthroughs? It looks like their mileage is 21/30 which is about in line with the other compact crossovers, seems to be about the same as the CRV and CX-5

They are pimping their new automatic lift gate which you can activate by waving a foot under the bumper while you've got the keys in your pocket. Handy if you've got hands full of stuff.

Aside from that, Sync with MyFord Touch (voice commands, touch screen controls, customizable displays), park assist (semiauto-parallel parking), and blind spot alerts.

Again, a lot of this stuff is offered on other Fords but a lot of it is still better than what most other crossovers offer. Oh and the small ecoboost engine option will return 23/33.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




Casu Marzu posted:

Thanks for talking me out of getting a beater truck. After more thinking, it may be more reasonable for me to look into selling my 06 Cobalt coupe and search for something that can hold my kayak/bike and such.

So, small trucks or wagons that are fairly reliable and can handle going off on gravel roads, etc? Cheaper the better. Doesn't need to be fast.

Thinking maybe $6-7k range.

Subaru Forester or Impreza Outback always a good choice. Perhaps a used 4Runner or Nissan XTerra if you want something more hard core off roading.

Gravel roads you can drive anything on. I drive a 2011 BMW 128 on gravel roads.

Under 15
Jan 6, 2005

Mr. Helsbecter will you please stop shooting I am on the phone



Proposed Budget: $10,000 - $12,000
New or Used: Less than four years old or so
Body Style: Little economy car
How will you be using the car?: I'm looking for some suggestions for a long distance driver now that I've started to log a ton of miles. I've basically stopped driving over 60, so I am comfortable with something a little pokey.

A second question, which might be more interesting - I've got enough money on hand to pay cash for whatever I buy. I don't have much of a credit history, though; I never really got in the habit of using a credit card, or loans in general. Several people have told me I should get a loan, even though I have the money, just to build up credit. Paying money in financing only for that reason is heartbreaking, though... does anyone think it would be worth it? I don't see myself applying for any mortgages any time soon.

MrKatharsis
Nov 29, 2003

feel the bern


If you're paying cash for a car and you're not applying for a mortgage, you don't need a credit score. Your instincts are right.

reflex
Aug 9, 2009

I'd rather laugh with the mudders than cry with the saints. The mudders are much more fun. Hoorah.


Under 15 posted:

Proposed Budget: $10,000 - $12,000
New or Used: Less than four years old or so
Body Style: Little economy car
How will you be using the car?: I'm looking for some suggestions for a long distance driver now that I've started to log a ton of miles. I've basically stopped driving over 60, so I am comfortable with something a little pokey.

A second question, which might be more interesting - I've got enough money on hand to pay cash for whatever I buy. I don't have much of a credit history, though; I never really got in the habit of using a credit card, or loans in general. Several people have told me I should get a loan, even though I have the money, just to build up credit. Paying money in financing only for that reason is heartbreaking, though... does anyone think it would be worth it? I don't see myself applying for any mortgages any time soon.

Just get a credit card and start using it as a two-step debit card when you buy gas.

1) Swipe credit card for $xx.xx amount
2) Transfer $xx.xx to credit card when you get home (or if you have a transfer limit on your savings or chequings or whatever do it weekly or monthly).

Getting financing just 'cause is silly.

reflex
Aug 9, 2009

I'd rather laugh with the mudders than cry with the saints. The mudders are much more fun. Hoorah.


When I'm buying a used car from a guy (private citizen) should I base my budget on the book's wholesale price or retail price?

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



reflex posted:

When I'm buying a used car from a guy (private citizen) should I base my budget on the book's wholesale price or retail price?

KBB offers a private party sale price. The only thing you should observe is that dealers will mark up the same car over what it would sell for private party. Statistically, people who go to dealers to buy used cars will pay that markup.

So go by the private party value if you see one. But really, it's whatever you can negotiate out of the deal.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Also keep in mind that depending on the car model/year and your region, KBB can range from vaguely informative to hilariously useless. Every car I've ever bought or sold I've both paid and received much higher than KBB retail value. But used car prices are higher than national average across the board where I live, especially for anything with any sort of enthusiast following or "brand tax".

Guinness fucked around with this message at 18:13 on Jul 18, 2012

El Ste
Aug 22, 2010



Proposed Budget: Under about $18,000
New or Used: New
Body style: 4-door sedan
Usage: Daily commuting to and from classes and work, occasional road trips
Aspects important: Cost of ownership (preferably not incredibly expensive to repair, something that doesn't cost an insane amount in insurance monthly) and MPG

I know that doesn't leave out a lot of options but this is a pretty novel experience to me and my ignorance knows no bounds! Cheers.

Thwomp
Apr 9, 2003

BA-DUHHH



Grimey Drawer

El Ste posted:

Proposed Budget: Under about $18,000
New or Used: New
Body style: 4-door sedan
Usage: Daily commuting to and from classes and work, occasional road trips
Aspects important: Cost of ownership (preferably not incredibly expensive to repair, something that doesn't cost an insane amount in insurance monthly) and MPG

I know that doesn't leave out a lot of options but this is a pretty novel experience to me and my ignorance knows no bounds! Cheers.

For a sedan, you'll probably be able to get into a decently equipped subcompact (Sonic, Versa, Fiesta, Accent, Rio), a base Fit, or a base/spartan compact.

Of those choices, the Accent (Hyundai) and Rio (Kia) return the best MPG on paper. They also come with great warranties. The rest all hover a few ticks lower on the MPG scale (some offer special packages/engines for better MPG). Combined mileage for all them them sits somewhere around 30-33 MPG.

Most of the players in this segment are all pretty new models so insurance will be ever so slightly higher but the Sonic is the only one to get a 5-star overall safety rating so it might get an offsetting discount.

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

Mazda 3 skyactiv

But the hatch not the sedan because sedans are dumb in that class.

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Thwomp
Apr 9, 2003

BA-DUHHH



Grimey Drawer

nm posted:

But the hatch not the sedan because sedans are dumb in that class.

I should've mentioned this too. You should really consider a hatch because most of them are really much better than their sedan counterparts in both function and looks.

In fact, the Sonic was designed as a hatch first and the sedan design came after. The Versa hatch, while kinda old at this point, is a really a nice design and can be had pretty cheap (especially with the new sedan out) if you don't mind the slightly lower safety ratings.

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