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tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007


Beach Bum posted:

Would be taking that rotor manufacturer to town for every penny of my expenses including my soiled underwear because

Until the rotor manufacturer states that these were not for racing applications and were not designed to take the heat / stresses of repeated high speed breaking (lame rear end Pun intended )

In good news:
At least it didn't split in 1/2 and turn into a high speed projectile

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Eliptical
Jan 23, 2004
pants are satan spawn

Crossposting from the What did you do to your ride today thread.

My sister had the car for a few weeks at school and mentioned some grinding from the brakes. She drove nearly 200 miles before getting home. When I got the caliper off I was rewarded with this lovely sight.

http://imgur.com/ZxAbJ
http://imgur.com/DjM6w

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007


Eliptical posted:

Crossposting from the What did you do to your ride today thread.

My sister had the car for a few weeks at school and mentioned some grinding from the brakes. She drove nearly 200 miles before getting home. When I got the caliper off I was rewarded with this lovely sight.

http://imgur.com/ZxAbJ
http://imgur.com/DjM6w

Was this on a Malibu? this happened to one of my friends, "my brakes are noisy"
Ok let's replace them.
Hey... Where's your other pad?

JD Brickmeister
Sep 4, 2008

by Y Kant Ozma Post


tater_salad posted:

Was this on a Malibu? this happened to one of my friends, "my brakes are noisy"
Ok let's replace them.
Hey... Where's your other pad?

Things like this really underscore how simple most car brakes are. They can go catastrophically wrong and still function.

Eliptical
Jan 23, 2004
pants are satan spawn

tater_salad posted:

Was this on a Malibu? this happened to one of my friends, "my brakes are noisy"
Ok let's replace them.
Hey... Where's your other pad?

Its off a 1997 Toyota Camry.

Nathan Explosion
Aug 14, 2006
A whole new rainbow of pain!

Geirskogul posted:

But, you see, this was mainly for a Walmart, and it's cheaper to do it the way they did. What, you think they'd spend money doing things properly?

Also, something something about groups of people and it being impossible to shift blame on a group.

I find the idea of the earth opening up and swallowing an entire Wal-Mart followed by a great belch of methane hilarious.

GnarlyCharlie4u
Sep 23, 2007

I have an unhealthy obsession with motorcycles.

Proof


OneStopShop posted:

http://youtu.be/RLB8dmVIlGE

Scary as hell. It would be bad enough to have that happen on the street, but at 190 km/h?

break_rotor.flv

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

Hey bebe





Nathan Explosion posted:

I find the idea of the earth opening up and swallowing an entire Wal-Mart followed by a great belch of methane hilarious.

I can;t imagine a finer episode of South Park or The Simpsons.

dor1
Jun 5, 2011


OneStopShop posted:

http://youtu.be/RLB8dmVIlGE

Scary as hell. It would be bad enough to have that happen on the street, but at 190 km/h?

I suppose its lucky this happened where he had a runoff area.

Rujo King
Jun 28, 2007

I say old chap have you any of the good sort of catnip if you know what I mean... harrumphaarmaammhhhmm


dor1 posted:

I suppose its lucky this happened where he had a runoff area.

The really freaky part was how the center part of the rotor was completely detached from the braking surface. I suppose that failure mode would be far superior than shearing the bolts off or something though.

Rujo King
Jun 28, 2007

I say old chap have you any of the good sort of catnip if you know what I mean... harrumphaarmaammhhhmm


So last night I was reading about WRX turbo engines, and discovered a site devoted to Vanagon owners who use them in their old VWs. Pretty interesting stuff, but you really have to be careful about what you click on over there because holy poo poo.

Here's the picture, try to guess what it is:



Here's a hint: The title of the thread is "The Mouse that killed my engine..."

quote:

When I took the pan off there was thick stringy stuff clogged in the oil pick up that obviously starved my engine of oil. I always had good oil pressure even with the clog in the pick up, but there was enough debris to clog critical oil passages to the crank and rods causing this failure.

The mouse obviously crawled down the crank breather hole. There was a short period of maybe a day or two that I did not have this breather hole covered. Despite all of my meticulous efforts in keeping the engine clean and free of foreign objects, the worst case scenario occurred.

MadScientistWorking
Jun 23, 2010

"I was going through a time period where I was looking up weird stories involving necrophilia..."


Geoj posted:

More of "Horrible structural/engineering failures" but I couldn't find anywhere else on the forum for stuff like this: Why its a good idea to not build a shopping plaza on top of a capped landfill.
I'm always surprised that Boston didn't turn out like that shopping center. The city primarily consists of landfill.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


true, but most of it is at least clean fill, not decomposing garbage... and the actual garbage landfill is all in the back bay (I think?) and has had a lot longer to decompose.

Give us one good earthquake and it'll end up like that, or worse, though.

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



Rujo King posted:

The title of the thread is "The Mouse that killed my engine..."




I bet he regrets removing the cat.

beep-beep car is go
Apr 11, 2005

I can just eyeball this, right?



MadScientistWorking posted:

I'm always surprised that Boston didn't turn out like that shopping center. The city primarily consists of landfill.

Boston also has everyone in the fill part of the city sitting on piles. I believe that the Trinity church has something like 4500 piles that it sits on.

Hugh G. Rectum
Mar 1, 2011



Ola posted:

I bet he regrets removing the cat.

Maybe he should put the catback

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


He had to remove it when he fitted a dog box.

Rujo King
Jun 28, 2007

I say old chap have you any of the good sort of catnip if you know what I mean... harrumphaarmaammhhhmm


Shampoo posted:

Boston also has everyone in the fill part of the city sitting on piles. I believe that the Trinity church has something like 4500 piles that it sits on.

Well, they built my high school on a fault line, and it's doing pretty well. I mean, just look at...



Oh.

But in the school system's defense, the roof must have caved in because of snow, and not because the building was in any way flawed or...

quote:

For more than 10 years leading up to Blacksburg High School's gym roof collapse, school administrators knew of significant structural problems inside the school and, particularly, the gym.

Three separate engineers hired by the school district warned director of facilities Dan Berenato that cracks and settling in the building's foundation must be evaluated more closely or permanently fixed, according to engineering reports from 1999 to 2004.

One engineer noted the possibility of structural failure in the southwest corner of the gym, the same area where the gym roof first started to fall in February this year.

(From The Roanoke Times)

Well how about that. Well at least that old building is gone for good and our 20th reunion will be in a nice new...

quote:

Blacksburg will not get a new high school, the Montgomery County Board of Supervisors decided late Monday night when it rejected its school board's request to replace the damaged building.

(From those commies at the Roanoke Times again)

Jesus Christ.

GnarlyCharlie4u
Sep 23, 2007

I have an unhealthy obsession with motorcycles.

Proof


Rujo King posted:

Jesus Christ.

Yea this was pretty much the most ridiculous thing. I'm still in shock that they're "repairing" it. It's pretty hosed. (NOVA goon here)

Sponge!
Dec 22, 2004

SPORK!


Dear lord wtf am I doing wrong?! These only have like 20K on them.











Something ain't right with #4.

However!

There's no fudge going on with the oil, and there's no oil/fuel in the coolant. I swapped the plugs and wires on Friday after it was running on something less than 4 cylinders for about 50 miles, and she's back to full power and a smooth idle...

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



From Reddit:

kimbo305 fucked around with this message at 08:06 on Nov 16, 2011

Lowclock
Oct 26, 2005


I want to pop them like bubble wrap but I would probably get a steel belt in the face somehow.

opengl128
Sep 16, 2010



kimbo305 posted:

From Reddit:


DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Sponge! posted:

Dear lord wtf am I doing wrong?! These only have like 20K on them.











Something ain't right with #4.

However!

There's no fudge going on with the oil, and there's no oil/fuel in the coolant. I swapped the plugs and wires on Friday after it was running on something less than 4 cylinders for about 50 miles, and she's back to full power and a smooth idle...



How many miles are on the engine? Looks like sludge/ash buildup from burning oil.

Seat Safety Switch
May 27, 2008

MY RELIGION IS THE SMALL BLOCK V8 AND COMMANDMENTS ONE THROUGH TEN ARE NEVER LIFT.



Pillbug

Sponge! posted:

Dear lord wtf am I doing wrong?! These only have like 20K on them.
What car is it? I can't seem to figure it out from a brief stalk of your post history.

flacoman954
Nov 9, 2009


Could be fuel... injector leaking? Smell the fouled plug ..

GnarlyCharlie4u
Sep 23, 2007

I have an unhealthy obsession with motorcycles.

Proof


flacoman954 posted:

Smell the fouled plug ...

I might have to steal this for my new custom title.

Rujo King
Jun 28, 2007

I say old chap have you any of the good sort of catnip if you know what I mean... harrumphaarmaammhhhmm


flacoman954 posted:

Could be fuel... injector leaking? Smell the fouled plug ..

As I once told a coworker after I removed an ice cream machine backsplash, "be careful before you sniff this." Then again, if your spark plug smells like buttermilk-flavored vinegar, you've got bigger problems to worry about.

One of mine looked like that when I replaced them, but I think it was because the last person to do so about 10 years and 100,000 miles ago (!?) failed to tighten it. I actually removed it with my fingers, unlike the other three that needed a healthy dose of elbow grease to begin to move. (At least I'm hoping that was what caused the blackening.)

As I do more and more work on my car, I lose more and more respect for the previous owner. Speakers not even attached to the door? Check. Wires spliced three times in one four-foot run, then attached to the speaker with one or two bent strands? Check. Screws that were too big for the hole being overtorqued until the plastic cracks? Huge loving check. It's like I've rescued a pitbull from a dogfighting club, only without that nice "just saved another living being" feeling. Oh, and I discovered what the owner's mother meant when she said he had an iPod adapter if I wanted it: The little box below the CD unit had a hole drilled in it, and the front two speaker wires and their grounds had some insulation removed for a 1/8" plug to tap into.

I need a fuckologist, because I don't know what.

Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006
BLITHERING IDIOT

Rorac posted:

Why the gently caress.



Seriously, that's all I can think about that.

It's the early 1900s, and you've got a problem: you need a lightweight, small, high-power engine for one of those newfangled "aeroplanes." Unfortunately, gas engines in those days tended to run pretty rough, and needed a big heavy flywheel - not what you'd want to cart around when power-to-weight was critical. Solution: make the engine block the flywheel. As a bonus, they could get to pretty impressive power levels for the day without worrying about cooling problems; spinning the block gets you very good air cooling.

Rotaries had an interesting effect on early fighter tactics, too: that huge gyroscope of a spinning engine block up front made turns... interesting. The Sopwith Camel is one of the most famous examples: the gyroscopic effects were so strong that turns in either direction required left rudder, and while it could make a right turn nearly instantly, left turns were so slow that some pilots just preferred to whip it around 270 degrees to the right if they had to turn in a hurry.

Drheat
Feb 20, 2008


SimulatedWoodgrain posted:

Perhaps, but what good is the fix when the rusted metal that the strut bolts to finishes rotting away and the strut is just flopping around in there. I did some reading and apparently Chrysler has their own repair plate that is hi-strength epoxied in and the rivets are just for clamping power while it sets up. What Chrysler's looks like I don't know but Doorman's looks rather flawed in that regard. I guess if they are concerned about liability why make it in the first place?

The Mopar kit comes with identical pieces and some high strength glue. I installed it on my '96 caravan about 7 years ago at around 200,000 miles. I wasn't so sure about that glue so i put about 20 1/4" self drilling screws in each one. I then coated the underside of the towers with 1 can of spray undercoating per side. the van now has 317,000 miles and the towers are fine so it appeared to work.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Space Gopher posted:

It's the early 1900s, and you've got a problem: you need a lightweight, small, high-power engine for one of those newfangled "aeroplanes." Unfortunately, gas engines in those days tended to run pretty rough, and needed a big heavy flywheel - not what you'd want to cart around when power-to-weight was critical. Solution: make the engine block the flywheel. As a bonus, they could get to pretty impressive power levels for the day without worrying about cooling problems; spinning the block gets you very good air cooling.

Rotaries had an interesting effect on early fighter tactics, too: that huge gyroscope of a spinning engine block up front made turns... interesting. The Sopwith Camel is one of the most famous examples: the gyroscopic effects were so strong that turns in either direction required left rudder, and while it could make a right turn nearly instantly, left turns were so slow that some pilots just preferred to whip it around 270 degrees to the right if they had to turn in a hurry.

Did anyone think to do a twin engine design with the engines spinning opposite directions, or had they moved on to radial engines by the time there was a twin?

Seizure Meat
Jul 23, 2008

by Smythe


MrChips posted:

There's always flywheel explosions, though.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYIdJCvK4uQ (embedding disabled, sorry)

I hate to go back a few pages, but it said "ow".

Shifty Pony
Dec 28, 2004

Up ta somethin'




Mr.Peabody posted:

Did anyone think to do a twin engine design with the engines spinning opposite directions, or had they moved on to radial engines by the time there was a twin?

Anything with two engines was a bomber.

I have read about some pilots who would swap the propeller with a pusher propeller, easily available because many early aircraft used rear facing engines until they figured out how to shoot through a propeller. They would then have their mechanic start the engine in reverse (these were all simple two strokes). This would let them surprise the enemy with an extremely fast turn in exactly the opposite direction than they normally would expect.

I don't know the truth to those stories or how widespread it would have been.

Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006
BLITHERING IDIOT

CaptBubba posted:

Anything with two engines was a bomber.

I have read about some pilots who would swap the propeller with a pusher propeller, easily available because many early aircraft used rear facing engines until they figured out how to shoot through a propeller. They would then have their mechanic start the engine in reverse (these were all simple two strokes). This would let them surprise the enemy with an extremely fast turn in exactly the opposite direction than they normally would expect.

I don't know the truth to those stories or how widespread it would have been.

Most of them weren't two-strokes. Everything about rotaries was wacky, including the valvetrains. One fairly popular design had a conventional exhaust valve on top driven by a pushrod, and an intake valve in the piston held shut by a spring and counterweight. On the exhaust and compression strokes, the counterweight assembly held the valve shut, and on the power stroke the pressure of the burning fuel mixture held it shut, but on the intake stroke the vacuum in the cylinder combined with the counterweight assembly to open the valve and let the air/fuel/oil mixture in from the crankcase.

Here's how the whole thing looked:


And, to get things back on track for this thread - it wasn't terribly uncommon for that valve to stick open. I don't believe that there are any pictures out there, but that's the sort of scenario that makes "rod just hangin' out the side of the block" look positively sedate in comparison.

Space Gopher fucked around with this message at 07:56 on Nov 22, 2011

Shifty Pony
Dec 28, 2004

Up ta somethin'




Space Gopher posted:

And, to get things back on track for this thread - it wasn't terribly uncommon for that valve to stick open. I don't believe that there are any pictures out there, but that's the sort of scenario that makes "rod just hangin' out the side of the block" look positively sedate in comparison.

So an entire crankcase filled with fuel/air mix would have a nice open pathway to spark, possibly at several thousand feet?


Shifting gears, you don't need fuel to cause an horrific mechanical failure. In competitive cycling often times such things as durability and not turning into a whirling spike disc take back seats to shaving 10 grams off of the weight of a component.

One company called Mavic decided they wanted to make carbon fiber wheels so that they may sell them for thousands of dollars. This isn't too odd, other companies had made carbon wheels before. But they looked a bunch like alloy rims with wide slabs of carbon fiber. Mavic decided to cut weight even more and make carbon wheels with a spoked design. They didn't let the fact that carbon fiber in the bare minimum number of small long cylinders isn't exactly good for transverse shear strength stop them. When would that happen when riding?

Oh, right. There are turns in races.


One small wrong bump in a turn would cause the wheels to disintegrate. It mainly happened on the front tire, so the cyclist suddenly found themselves flying over the handlebars toward a bunch of sharp spikes of carbon.

The company then recalled the wheels, "fixed" the problem, said failures wouldn't happen, and anyway added fibers inside each spoke to contain any failures that wouldn't happen.

The next documented failure came at a public race, and happened to a writer for an online cycling site.

BeastPussy
Jul 15, 2003

im so mumped up lmao

CaptBubba posted:

So an entire crankcase filled with fuel/air mix would have a nice open pathway to spark, possibly at several thousand feet?


Shifting gears, you don't need fuel to cause an horrific mechanical failure. In competitive cycling often times such things as durability and not turning into a whirling spike disc take back seats to shaving 10 grams off of the weight of a component.

One company called Mavic decided they wanted to make carbon fiber wheels so that they may sell them for thousands of dollars. This isn't too odd, other companies had made carbon wheels before. But they looked a bunch like alloy rims with wide slabs of carbon fiber. Mavic decided to cut weight even more and make carbon wheels with a spoked design. They didn't let the fact that carbon fiber in the bare minimum number of small long cylinders isn't exactly good for transverse shear strength stop them. When would that happen when riding?

Oh, right. There are turns in races.


One small wrong bump in a turn would cause the wheels to disintegrate. It mainly happened on the front tire, so the cyclist suddenly found themselves flying over the handlebars toward a bunch of sharp spikes of carbon.

The company then recalled the wheels, "fixed" the problem, said failures wouldn't happen, and anyway added fibers inside each spoke to contain any failures that wouldn't happen.

The next documented failure came at a public race, and happened to a writer for an online cycling site.


Weight weenies always make me laugh.

INCHI DICKARI
Aug 23, 2006

by FactsAreUseless


Lowclock posted:

I want to pop them like bubble wrap but I would probably get a steel belt in the face somehow.

I did this to a car tire much similar to that but the entire tire was bulged out to twice its size, no individual bubbles. I figured I'd lean back and poke it real quick with a ream, and the entire sidewall let go much like a soap bubble popping. It pretty neatly knocked me onto my rear end. Front shop came running out thinking something exploded.

jamal
Apr 15, 2003

I'll set the building on fire

I thought the problem with those wheels was that they decided to put the spokes in compression

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

jamal posted:

I thought the problem with those wheels was that they decided to put the spokes in compression

That would be hilarious. That's high-school physics level knowledge.

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KozmoNaut
Apr 23, 2008

Happiness is a warm
Turbo Plasma Rifle


Grimey Drawer

14 INCH DICK TURBO posted:

Front shop came running out thinking something exploded.

Which is an entirely appropriate description of what happened, the way I see it.

There's a reason tractor tires are always inflated inside steel cages.

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