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NitroSpazzz
Dec 8, 2006

You don't need style when you've got strength!






Ah Ferrari, at least it isn't on fire...yet.

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Seizure Meat
Jul 23, 2008

by Smythe


Couldn't find this thread before for some reason, so crosspostin' a sight I had at work from the terrible images thread. Fits better in here, anyway.

-Zydeco-
Nov 12, 2007




VikingSkull posted:

Couldn't find this thread before for some reason, so crosspostin' a sight I had at work from the terrible images thread. Fits better in here, anyway.



Viggen
Sep 10, 2010

by XyloJW



Its even funnier the second time.

Megillah Gorilla
Sep 22, 2003

One Potato to rule them all,
One Potato to find them,
One Potato to bring them all
And in the darkness bind them.





Bread Liar

Rev. Dr. Moses P. Lester posted:

<seinfeld> Why can't they make the car out of the antenna?

I ask this every time I see a car that's hit a tree while going a million miles an hours and has totally pretzeled itself, but the tree has only lost a tiny bit of bark.

INCHI DICKARI
Aug 23, 2006

by FactsAreUseless


NitroSpazzz posted:



Ah Ferrari, at least it isn't on fire...yet.

nmfree
Aug 15, 2001

The Greater Goon: Breaking Hearts and Chains since 2006


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Itw7C_cALSI

Falken
Jan 26, 2004

Do you feel like a hero yet?


Slavvy posted:

"This petrol engine needs to behave a diesel. What do we do?"
"Replace it with a diesel...?"
"NEIN! Ditch that lovely 'carburettor' setup and stick on this centrifugal gyroscopically stabilised governor instead!"

loving germany. They lost many things in that war, but doing things the extra-complicated way wasn't one of them.
Also there was the staggered road wheels they used on their tanks, and the incredibly difficult to work on engine with the Panther. If you dropped a tool whilst working on one, it's gone forever.

CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!


Pillbug

Falken posted:

Also there was the staggered road wheels they used on their tanks, and the incredibly difficult to work on engine with the Panther. If you dropped a tool whilst working on one, it's gone forever.

Yeah, the interleaved wheels were actually one of the biggest issues in Russia, the mud would freeze inbetween the wheels and freeze the wheels stuck.

They had a neat system for sharing coolant between tanks to warm up the engine blocks in Winter.

Pomp and Circumcized
Dec 23, 2006

If there's one thing I love more than GruntKilla420, it's the Queen! Also bacon.

NitroSpazzz posted:



Ah Ferrari, at least it isn't on fire...yet.

Oh poo poo, I'm having a Tubgirl flashback here.

Humbug Scoolbus
Apr 25, 2008

The scarlet letter was her passport into regions where other women dared not tread. Shame, Despair, Solitude! These had been her teachers, stern and wild ones, and they had made her strong, but taught her much amiss.


Clapping Larry

Maybach was a hand wringing Mad Scientist.

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!



ShittyPostmakerPro posted:

Oh poo poo, I'm having a Tubgirl flashback here.


I don't know which is worse: the reference, or that I know why it fits.

e: quoted wrong post.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Falken posted:

Also there was the staggered road wheels they used on their tanks, and the incredibly difficult to work on engine with the Panther. If you dropped a tool whilst working on one, it's gone forever.

Pretty sure the dropped tool thing was actually the meteor v12 in british tanks, a non-supercharged derivative of the merlin aircraft engine. The service manuals recommended you have every spanner on a lanyard around your wrist so you don't lose it.

The staggered wheels are like, an archetypal example of german engineering practice that persists to this very day. It's a brilliant idea in theory because it offers much better stability and cross-country peformance in a tank that isn't any longer or wider than normal...it just had unanticipated consequences that they didn't expect which made it worse overall.

It's like when you pull apart a german car and find something is fiendishly cleverly designed to be taken apart using a special method, like a little locking grub screw covered by a tilting cap or something, so they only use one part instead of four and it's all so elegant and so much lighter and more efficient...and then the part that allows that to happen is broken.

Poisonlizard
Apr 1, 2007


Slavvy posted:


It's like when you pull apart a german car and find something is fiendishly cleverly designed to be taken apart using a special method, like a little locking grub screw covered by a tilting cap or something, so they only use one part instead of four and it's all so elegant and so much lighter and more efficient...and then the part that allows that to happen is broken.

...and it's buried in the engine compartment so you have to remove half the intake and and a motor mount, then jack then engine up 6 inches and remove 6 pounds of vacuum lines to get to it. Or maybe that's just '90s Mercedes.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Any goons here that work in aircraft maintenance? I attended a little talk at work a couple of weeks ago that talked about how the designers took "maintenance" and "what is humanly possible" and no part exists in isolation" into account when designing systems, fastenings, plumbing, routing etc. It was all very interesting & they showed some cad walkthroughs of an engine mounted on a wing, maintenance doors opening, human arm and recommended tool comes into view, bolts & brackets get removed, parts come out & in again.

Basically is that how it is in real life?

Snowdens Secret
Dec 29, 2008
Someone got you a obnoxiously racist av.


The Navy got big into that around the 1970s or so. Stuff like, if a valve is required to be torqued, the pipes and fittings around it should be arrranged so you can actually fit a torque wrench and adapter in there, and spin it in a reasonable arc with human arms of normal length without three extra elbow joints. This supposedly led to some fairly pioneering efforts in including ergonomics in CAD/CAM. Ships built before this work provided routine examples that would be great for this thread.

One of the early vessels with the ergo work had an example where great effort had gone into making sure human hands could get to a certain fitting to (very rarely) hook a test pipe up. Wonderful, except in the push for human integration they had only modelled the end of the test pipe, not the whole thing; the fitting location and minimum bend radius of the pipe meant it literally didn't fit inside the ship without a massively expensive cut through the pressure hull.

Captain Postal
Sep 16, 2007


Cakefool posted:

Any goons here that work in aircraft maintenance? I attended a little talk at work a couple of weeks ago that talked about how the designers took "maintenance" and "what is humanly possible" and no part exists in isolation" into account when designing systems, fastenings, plumbing, routing etc. It was all very interesting & they showed some cad walkthroughs of an engine mounted on a wing, maintenance doors opening, human arm and recommended tool comes into view, bolts & brackets get removed, parts come out & in again.

Basically is that how it is in real life?

See if you can find the 777 anti collision light example. The 777 was designed from scratch on CAD and they did include a little human figure to see where arms can reach and what can be accessed with what range of motion and what physical strength and so on. They still managed to build the dorsal (or maybe tail) strobe light so the bulb could only be access from inside the dome but outside the pressure hull - so you'd better hope the thing lasts 20-odd years because there is literally no way of accessing it. I think there was something similar with the 787. The system exists but it isn't fool-proof.

(They ended up doing an absurdly expensive retrofit to access it, but after the production line was in full swing)

MrYenko
Jun 17, 2012

#2 isn't ALWAYS bad...


Cakefool posted:

Any goons here that work in aircraft maintenance? I attended a little talk at work a couple of weeks ago that talked about how the designers took "maintenance" and "what is humanly possible" and no part exists in isolation" into account when designing systems, fastenings, plumbing, routing etc. It was all very interesting & they showed some cad walkthroughs of an engine mounted on a wing, maintenance doors opening, human arm and recommended tool comes into view, bolts & brackets get removed, parts come out & in again.

Basically is that how it is in real life?


Captain Postal posted:

See if you can find the 777 anti collision light example. The 777 was designed from scratch on CAD and they did include a little human figure to see where arms can reach and what can be accessed with what range of motion and what physical strength and so on. They still managed to build the dorsal (or maybe tail) strobe light so the bulb could only be access from inside the dome but outside the pressure hull - so you'd better hope the thing lasts 20-odd years because there is literally no way of accessing it. I think there was something similar with the 787. The system exists but it isn't fool-proof.

(They ended up doing an absurdly expensive retrofit to access it, but after the production line was in full swing)

I used to be a line mechanic, and I can confirm that it is light years better on newer airframes than on older ones. That said, there's always Douglas products.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004
Probation
Can't post for 5 hours!


Cakefool posted:

Any goons here that work in aircraft maintenance? I attended a little talk at work a couple of weeks ago that talked about how the designers took "maintenance" and "what is humanly possible" and no part exists in isolation" into account when designing systems, fastenings, plumbing, routing etc. It was all very interesting & they showed some cad walkthroughs of an engine mounted on a wing, maintenance doors opening, human arm and recommended tool comes into view, bolts & brackets get removed, parts come out & in again.

Basically is that how it is in real life?

I've worked on radar/electronics on B1s and it wasn't too bad compared to some stories the older maintenance guy told me. Everything was pretty accessible. Our BAC 111 on the other hand

-Zydeco-
Nov 12, 2007




Cakefool posted:

Any goons here that work in aircraft maintenance? I attended a little talk at work a couple of weeks ago that talked about how the designers took "maintenance" and "what is humanly possible" and no part exists in isolation" into account when designing systems, fastenings, plumbing, routing etc. It was all very interesting & they showed some cad walkthroughs of an engine mounted on a wing, maintenance doors opening, human arm and recommended tool comes into view, bolts & brackets get removed, parts come out & in again.

Basically is that how it is in real life?

I worked avionics on A-10s and I could see how stuff was easy to get to when it was built. In the 70s. Now after so many modifications and additions it's a horrible multi-layered mess in some places. Still wasn't as bad as an F-16.

Godholio
Aug 28, 2002

Does a bear split in the woods near Zheleznogorsk?


Imagine the B-52.

iForge
Oct 28, 2010

Apple's new "iBlacksmith Suite: Professional Edition" features the iForge, iAnvil, and the iHammer.

Some unknown (to me) sport bike engine dropped a valve:



Queen_Combat
Jan 15, 2011


Is it just me or was that cylinder out-of-round before the dropped valve?

Maker Of Shoes
Sep 4, 2006

AWWWW YISSSSSSSSSS
DIS IS MAH JAM!!!!!!


Definitely looks off. Could just be a weird camera angle / lighting though.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

That's a weird looking bike engine, it has separate cast-iron barrels. It would have to be something fairly ancient.

BlackMK4
Aug 23, 2006

wat.

Megamarm

Slavvy posted:

That's a weird looking bike engine, it has separate cast-iron barrels. It would have to be something fairly ancient.

http://www.psychobike.com/forums/ga...pped-valve.html

CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!


Pillbug

Cakefool posted:

Any goons here that work in aircraft maintenance? I attended a little talk at work a couple of weeks ago that talked about how the designers took "maintenance" and "what is humanly possible" and no part exists in isolation" into account when designing systems, fastenings, plumbing, routing etc. It was all very interesting & they showed some cad walkthroughs of an engine mounted on a wing, maintenance doors opening, human arm and recommended tool comes into view, bolts & brackets get removed, parts come out & in again.

Basically is that how it is in real life?

I work aircraft maintenance for E-8C JSTARS and was previously C-130s. Some of their tech orders have very....odd graphics.

I do the same thing Plinkey does, but on different airframes.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.


Air cooled Suzuki, I stand by my statement

Farmdizzle
May 26, 2009

Hagel satan


Grimey Drawer

Captain Postal posted:

The 777 was designed from scratch on CAD

CATIA, to be specific.

Speaking of the 777, enjoy a totally intentional mechanical failure:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ai2HmvAXcU0

tobu
Aug 20, 2004

Bunny-Bee makes me happy!

Farmdizzle posted:

CATIA, to be specific.

Speaking of the 777, enjoy a totally intentional mechanical failure:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ai2HmvAXcU0

154 154 154 154 154 154!

Previa_fun
Nov 10, 2004

Aww, so I had my slant on. Lay off me!


Best 777 test footage: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2OS2pwrZTI

It slices and dices.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


Farmdizzle posted:

CATIA, to be specific.

Speaking of the 777, enjoy a totally intentional mechanical failure:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ai2HmvAXcU0

I was looking for my father-in-law in the crowd, but didn't see him. He was a materials engineer for Boeing for years.

CarForumPoster
Jun 26, 2013


FogHelmut posted:

I was looking for my father-in-law in the crowd, but didn't see him. He was a materials engineer for Boeing for years.

Good story.

Kill-9
Aug 2, 2004

You've got the cutest little baby face...

Had a failure on the way home from work Monday night. Was driving along merrily and heard a couple squeaks from the truck. I thought it was another leaf caught in the heater blower. No, it was the water pump explosively failing. The sound was the engine fan hitting the back of the radiator. The engine got a hell of a good steam cleaning from the coolant blowing out past the failed bearing and I left a smoke/steam trail that blotted out 4 lanes of freeway. The video shows after I was slowing down off the freeway in neutral when I thought the engine died but it was just the belts getting shredded by a loose fan in the engine bay.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sOMoOwDpu8A


Last few seconds show the nice quarter panel and d-pillar that cursedshitbox was nice enough to pull and ship to me. I still need to get that d-pillar recovered. "that's not good..."

MrSaturn
Sep 8, 2004

Go ahead, laugh. They all laugh at first...

Remember, kids, always open up a hood with steam pouring out from under it.

cursedshitbox
May 20, 2012

Your rear-end wont survive my hammering.



Fun Shoe

stay away from the parts stores ones, they kinda suck and are way over priced.
I've had pretty good luck with GMB water pumps.

Viggen
Sep 10, 2010

by XyloJW


MrSaturn posted:

Remember, kids, always open up and stick your face directly over a hood with steam pouring out from under it.

clam ache
Sep 6, 2009


If its only steam blowing out its not gonna do much harm. I mean anyone with half a brain could hear if it was a violent surge coming from under the hood. Now wether they choose to keep using that half a brain and not open the hood is up to them. But ive had this happen numerous times while working at pepboys.
"what do you mean my car needs coolant. The little gauge keeps going to the top and that means its full"

That poor camry never had a chance. There was also a lovely knocking rhythm from the timing belt area.

CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!


Pillbug

MrSaturn posted:

Remember, kids, always open up a hood with steam pouring out from under it.

I always pop the hood and wait 5-10 minutes for the venting steam to get out. I had a bad experience with getting burned by a burst hose.

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EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

SouthsideSaint posted:

If its only steam blowing out its not gonna do much harm. I mean anyone with half a brain could hear if it was a violent surge coming from under the hood.

The steam itself can cause pretty nasty burns on contact, not to mention that there is coolant going everywhere; you absorb ethylene glycol through your skin and lungs, if you can smell it you are slowly being poisoned.

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