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ultimateforce
Apr 25, 2008

SKINNY JEANS CANT HOLD BACK THIS ARC


Roflex posted:

Do I really want to know what counts as a non-critical part in an airplane engine?

Leg room?

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el topo
Apr 11, 2008

by Fistgrrl


rscott posted:



We make the big green thing.

Radar, I assume?

Sponge!
Dec 22, 2004

SPORK!


el topo posted:

Radar, I assume?

Radome... Specifically a pressure rated radome...

MrChips
Jun 10, 2005

FLIGHT SAFETY TIP: Fatties out first

Biscuit Hider

Sponge! posted:

Radome... Specifically a pressure rated radome...

Front pressure bulkhead, to be precise.

And behind the wingbox, the pressure bulkheads are probably the most critical pieces of structure in any airliner.

Cocoa Crispies
Jul 20, 2001

Vehicular Manslaughter!



Pillbug

MrChips posted:

Front pressure bulkhead, to be precise.

And behind the wingbox, the pressure bulkheads are probably the most critical pieces of structure in any airliner.
What about the on-board wifi?? Huh?!

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







Why did they go with a pressurized radome on the 787 as opposed to the conventional way?

Nerobro
Nov 4, 2005

Rider now with 100% more titanium!


there is no way that's the radome. that's just the forward pressure bulkhead. A vital component none the less. The color doesn't indicate that it's radar transparent, just that it's coated in anti-corrosion paint. The radar set will be mounted forward of that. Airliner radars are remarkably small.

rscott
Dec 10, 2009


Nerobro posted:

there is no way that's the radome. that's just the forward pressure bulkhead. A vital component none the less. The color doesn't indicate that it's radar transparent, just that it's coated in anti-corrosion paint. The radar set will be mounted forward of that. Airliner radars are remarkably small.

This guy knows what's up. The forward pressure bulkhead is important for two reasons, 1) it's a pressure bulkhead, and 2) It's engineered to act like a trampoline when it gets hit by a bird!

ultimateforce
Apr 25, 2008

SKINNY JEANS CANT HOLD BACK THIS ARC


Wanna jump on that bulkhead.

wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


rscott posted:

2) It's engineered to act like a trampoline when it gets hit by a bird!

I'm picturing a bird hitting that at speed and then the various bits being propelled forward in a spray of mashed bird bits.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Roflex posted:

Do I really want to know what counts as a non-critical part in an airplane engine?
There's quite a lot of stuff that, while it may cause an engine shutdown if it fails, isn't territory by default.

We make fasteners - something that's holding a cowling on, or attaching random oddments together isn't that critical, and these are made to what most people mean when they talk about "Aerospace spec" for fasteners in terms of quality, traceability and so on. You know which company made it, and with a bit of detective work you could narrow it down a hell of a lot, but you would not necessarily be able to get right back to individual manufacturing batches.

You also have the "If this breaks, we be hosed" things like tierods that hold together a sandwich of multiple rotating components, and the controls for these are on another level entirely. You want to know who fitted the collet to the lathe that did this operation on this batch? Fair enough, that's what you're paying us for, just give us the number on it.

They take this poo poo seriously, too. I get purchase orders occasionally from people which have a note on them basically saying "FFS, don't buy material from _______", and when you look the company up, it turns out the entire upper management were indicted for falsification of certification. Doing that deliberately, and getting someone killed because of it somewhere down the line, can be a life imprisonment and eight-figure fine booby prize.

Hell, the other day we had to have a customer rep come in so we could show him our entire system for control and documentation, simply because one company we occasionally buy from sent out one batch of material with the incorrect heat treat on it, and a less careful manufacturer than us went and made some parts which were then stretching under load. The HT was correct to what was on the material docket, that was fine, but the customer had ordered something else and not checked it properly. The parts were only spotted when one tech putting in one fastener noticed it was showing more bare threads than the others when torqued up.

Needless to say, getting off an end user or major supplier's poo poo list is rather hard work, so you don't gently caress around. Nothing makes you popular like being the guy who gets to tell the Director that nope, that $40,000 worth of parts is going in the bin, and yep, you are going to start again from scratch. A tenth of a thou is as good (well, bad) as a mile.

Holy poo poo . Here's a picture of a turbine that was lonely and wanted a cuddle:

rscott
Dec 10, 2009


Yeah, we've had issues with parts having voids in welds you could hardly see with the naked eye fail inspection and have to be completely reworked. And per the spec, you only get one chance to rework the material, after that, you have to scrap the parts. Airplane QA is srs bsns.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


My favorite at the bottom end was always nicks on lock wire. "You see that bit there where you scratched the wire pulling it through the fastener? Yep, do it again."

helno
Jun 19, 2003
hmm now were did I leave that plane

I do repair work at a nuclear facility. We use UTC (uniquely tracked commodity) numbers for anything that handles ore than 15 psi. So when I get a new pressure gauge not only do I log the numbers for the gauge but also for the Swagelok nut and the two individual ferrules that are inside of it.

If I felt like looking into it far enough you can find out from procurement engineering what mine the iron ore to make the steel came from on what would be a 5 cent part anywhere else.

DJ Commie
Feb 29, 2004

Stupid drivers always breaking car, Gronk fix car...


Skyssx posted:

My favorite at the bottom end was always nicks on lock wire. "You see that bit there where you scratched the wire pulling it through the fastener? Yep, do it again."

I never understood safety wire being solid core at all.

CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!


Pillbug

Skyssx posted:

My favorite at the bottom end was always nicks on lock wire. "You see that bit there where you scratched the wire pulling it through the fastener? Yep, do it again."

I hate safety wire....

Nuevo
May 23, 2006




Fun Shoe

Baby Hitler posted:

I never understood safety wire being solid core at all.

Maybe so it's either there or not? With braided/twisted cable you could snap a few strands, causing the bolt/whatever to loosen without visible outward signs? Maybe?

User Error
Aug 31, 2006


My friend's dad used to be a tool and die maker at Boeing, years and years ago. The attention to detail has stuck with him. He knows his poo poo, but it can be frustrating working with him.

"For fucks sake, it's a car hauler not an F-16. 2 Thousandths is a perfectly acceptable gap!"

Beach Bum
Jan 13, 2010


chem42 posted:

My friend's dad used to be a tool and die maker at Boeing, years and years ago. The attention to detail has stuck with him. He knows his poo poo, but it can be frustrating working with him.

"For fucks sake, it's a car hauler not an F-16. 2 Thousandths is a perfectly acceptable gap!"

F-16 was made by General Electric

DJ Commie
Feb 29, 2004

Stupid drivers always breaking car, Gronk fix car...


Boat posted:

Maybe so it's either there or not? With braided/twisted cable you could snap a few strands, causing the bolt/whatever to loosen without visible outward signs? Maybe?

Cable doesn't tie up the same way, safety wire pliers woudn't effectively twist braided/stranded wire probably. The adjustments on my old Case crawler's diesel pump are cabled shut and then have lead ferrules.

BloodBag
Sep 20, 2008

WITNESS ME!





Beach Bum posted:

F-16 was made by General Electric

General Dynamics

E: also, from my memories growing up on an AFB, they were referred to as 'Lawn Darts' and all the NCO guys would say how much better the Phantom II was.

BloodBag fucked around with this message at 10:14 on Jun 10, 2010

Beach Bum
Jan 13, 2010


PurpleFender posted:

General Dynamics

E: also, from my memories growing up on an AFB, they were referred to as 'Lawn Darts' and all the NCO guys would say how much better the Phantom II was.

OH gently caress I really busted that one up. I guess I got confused because they used to be Electric Boat Company.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



rscott, are those domes hydro-formed?

rscott
Dec 10, 2009


Cakefool posted:

rscott, are those domes hydro-formed?

I believe so.

Coasterphreak
May 29, 2007
I like cookies.

InitialDave posted:

You also have the "If this breaks, we be hosed" things like tierods that hold together a sandwich of multiple rotating components, and the controls for these are on another level entirely. You want to know who fitted the collet to the lathe that did this operation on this batch? Fair enough, that's what you're paying us for, just give us the number on it.

They take this poo poo seriously, too. I get purchase orders occasionally from people which have a note on them basically saying "FFS, don't buy material from _______", and when you look the company up, it turns out the entire upper management were indicted for falsification of certification. Doing that deliberately, and getting someone killed because of it somewhere down the line, can be a life imprisonment and eight-figure fine booby prize.

Hell, the other day we had to have a customer rep come in so we could show him our entire system for control and documentation, simply because one company we occasionally buy from sent out one batch of material with the incorrect heat treat on it, and a less careful manufacturer than us went and made some parts which were then stretching under load. The HT was correct to what was on the material docket, that was fine, but the customer had ordered something else and not checked it properly. The parts were only spotted when one tech putting in one fastener noticed it was showing more bare threads than the others when torqued up.

Needless to say, getting off an end user or major supplier's poo poo list is rather hard work, so you don't gently caress around. Nothing makes you popular like being the guy who gets to tell the Director that nope, that $40,000 worth of parts is going in the bin, and yep, you are going to start again from scratch. A tenth of a thou is as good (well, bad) as a mile.
Haha, that's my father. He runs the NDT division at a local manufacturing plant that mostly does parts for helicopter jet engines. I am always amazed when he explains how much paperwork he has to do if he doesn't want to lose his job/license/freedom, in addition to making sure everyone else does it too (always an adventure in backwoods NC).

ApathyGifted
Aug 30, 2004
Tomorrow?

Coasterphreak posted:

(always an adventure in backwoods NC).

GE perhaps? Although the only engine work they do that I know of is in the RTP, which is hardly backwoods. When I think aerospace and backwoods NC I think Kearfott, actually, but their Black Mountain facility is only motion systems as I recall.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Coasterphreak posted:

Haha, that's my father. He runs the NDT division at a local manufacturing plant that mostly does parts for helicopter jet engines. I am always amazed when he explains how much paperwork he has to do if he doesn't want to lose his job/license/freedom, in addition to making sure everyone else does it too (always an adventure in backwoods NC).
If I was an NDT guy, I'd be so tempted to get one of those UV tattoos...

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

InitialDave posted:

If I was an NDT guy, I'd be so tempted to get one of those UV tattoos...

please explain

Poing
Jul 24, 2001

Gaze into my eyes...

Beach Bum posted:

OH gently caress I really busted that one up. I guess I got confused because they used to be Electric Boat Company.
Electric Boat is division of GD. I worked there once upon a time.

INCHI DICKARI
Aug 23, 2006

by FactsAreUseless


Hey so just crossposting this, tried to start my parts car up. Taking all bets.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yYhtmJWe7E

CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!


Pillbug

14 INCH DICK TURBO posted:

Hey so just crossposting this, tried to start my parts car up. Taking all bets.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yYhtmJWe7E

Its like hearing the car screaming 'kill me....'

You Am I
May 20, 2001

I will decide who posts John Howard pictures in this thread and the circumstances in which they post.


14 INCH DICK TURBO posted:

Hey so just crossposting this, tried to start my parts car up. Taking all bets.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yYhtmJWe7E
In your case? Crankcase full of spiders

oxbrain
Aug 18, 2005

Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the mothership.


It'll be fine. Just change the oil before your next road trip.

Captain Crunk
Jun 19, 2005
Lurking for 2 years...

Cross-posting from the Saab thread as I don't know if people go in there often.

My turbo after 125K miles:

Click here for the full 1500x1125 image.


Had ~1/2" shaft play as well. Good carnage no doubt.

CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!


Pillbug

Captain Crunk posted:

Cross-posting from the Saab thread as I don't know if people go in there often.

My turbo after 125K miles:

Click here for the full 1500x1125 image.


Had ~1/2" shaft play as well. Good carnage no doubt.

Mmmm, metal bits NOM NOM

dietcokefiend
Apr 28, 2004
HEY ILL HAV 2 TXT U L8TR I JUST DROVE IN 2 A DAYCARE AND SCRATCHED MY RAZR

Splizwarf posted:

please explain

If I had to guess he is referring to a lot of the dye-based penetrating chemicals they use to non-destructively test parts that help locate cracks under UV light. Having a UV tattoo in that field would be a bit of an inside joke.

Lowclock
Oct 26, 2005


Captain Crunk posted:


How does this even happen? Just gets that weak after tons of heat cycles? Sucking up rocks and poo poo?

Tactical Bonnet
Nov 5, 2005

You'd be distressed too if some pile of bones just told you your favorite hat was stupid.

World's first turbocharged vacuum cleaner?

DJ Commie
Feb 29, 2004

Stupid drivers always breaking car, Gronk fix car...


Lowclock posted:

How does this even happen? Just gets that weak after tons of heat cycles? Sucking up rocks and poo poo?

Its definitely Foreign Object Damage. Notice the sharp cuts into the blades, rather than a dulling of edges (dirt over time).

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Seizure Meat
Jul 23, 2008

by Smythe


CommieGIR posted:

I hate safety wire....

Same here. I worked for like two years in an aircraft refurbish shop right out of high school, and landing gear is the bane of my existence.

In a close second is the scar-inflicting pitot tube.

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