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dietcokefiend
Apr 28, 2004
HEY ILL HAV 2 TXT U L8TR I JUST DROVE IN 2 A DAYCARE AND SCRATCHED MY RAZR

Mr.Peabody posted:

I don't know if this stuff is a repost yet, but it's relevant. You'd be surprised how weak metal containers are against gas pressure. Here's a train tanker that someone made the mistake of sealing after the interior was steam cleaned. The air inside cooled, and the pressure difference.. well..



Yea well poo poo like air pressure differences build up. What do you want, 4 foot thick metal walled train cars or something?

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trouser chili
Mar 27, 2002

Unnngggggghhhhh


Detroit Q. Spider posted:

You want to keep a TV for more than 7 years?


They cost of lot of money, yes. I don't even own a television that's less than 7 years old.

trouser chili fucked around with this message at 16:13 on Jan 31, 2011

Sponge!
Dec 22, 2004

SPORK!


trouser chili posted:

They cost of lot of money, yes. I don't even own a television that's less than 7 years old.

Mine's 22 this year...

shy boy from chess club
Jun 11, 2008

It wasnt that bad, after you left I got to help put out the fire!



Sponge! posted:

Mine's 22 this year...

I have a 27 inch RCA my mom bought new in 1990. I just replaced it with a plasma two weeks ago (it was cheap) so the RCA is going out in the shop where I can groan at Joe Elmore's terrible puns from the safety of under my truck.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Huge_Midget posted:

Except if you want the best picture quality available, you aren't going to find it on an LCD. Oh yeah, I also like being able to look at my TV from any angle and have the picture look the same. My 2 year old Pioneer Kuro Elite still has a better picture than anything you can buy today for under $20,000. As for EM interference, sure maybe if you bought a "Sorny" or "Samung" TV you might have some, but the well made brands don't have any. The FCC certifications exist for a reason.

I can't speak to high dollar LCDs, but DLP has every bit of picture quality and viewing angle of plasma at a better price per inch ratio. The tradeoff being the packaging. Except when the bulb goes, it's a few hundred instead of a new TV.

No plasma on the market is properly shielded from RF egress, part 15 be damned. You can hear them on a HF receiver from 3 or 4 blocks away, particularly in the 7mhz range.

meltie
Nov 9, 2003

Not a sodding fridge.

Mr.Peabody posted:

I don't know if this stuff is a repost yet, but it's relevant. You'd be surprised how weak metal containers are against gas pressure. Here's a train tanker that someone made the mistake of sealing after the interior was steam cleaned. The air inside cooled, and the pressure difference.. well..



Seen it before, but *blammo!* Amazing what pressure can do.

eddiewalker
Apr 27, 2004


Mr.Peabody posted:

I don't know if this stuff is a repost yet, but it's relevant. You'd be surprised how weak metal containers are against gas pressure. Here's a train tanker that someone made the mistake of sealing after the interior was steam cleaned. The air inside cooled, and the pressure difference.. well..



Yea, it's been posted before, but it's still cool. Here's a video that was posted with it last time:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WJVHtF8GwI&NR=1

INCHI DICKARI
Aug 23, 2006

by FactsAreUseless


Pretty sure the youtube of that incident was actually posted in the thread while back. I seem to recall they taped it for a demo of what not to do. Id post it but I'm on my mobile.

Edit: gently caress way to read the thread

The Rocket Salad
Sep 1, 2004

lol what

I think my folks may have the high-score for tube TVs.

EightBit posted:

CRT tv's may "work" for 20 years, but the picture gets so dim over such a period (unless you bought one with some ungodly amount of getters in the tube) that it becomes very difficult to watch.
My parents bought an RCA XL-100 about a month before I was born, nearly 26 years ago. Here's a picture of awesome electronic success.


Click here for the full 600x800 image.


Still going strong.

open24hours posted:

Afterward, the screen looked a bit like the one in this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kfRiZe09S90
At the end when he reaches in to check the TV:

Marty: What, is it hot?
Doc: No, cold! drat cold!

anonumos
Jul 14, 2005

Fuck it.

I want to point out that 1 atmosphere of pressure is not hard to deal with. The space station is rather flimsy compared to a submarine.

D C
Jun 19, 2004

1-800-HOTLINEBLING
1-800-HOTLINEBLING
1-800-HOTLINEBLING


trouser chili posted:

They cost of lot of money, yes. I don't even own a television that's less than 7 years old.

I feel bad because I already want to replace my 3 year old 42" LG.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


The ISS is at maybe half a bar.

ijustam
Jun 20, 2005



"How many atmospheres of pressure can the ship withstand?"
"Well, it's a space ship so I estimate anywhere between 0 and 1."

Sponge!
Dec 22, 2004

SPORK!


Yeah but have you ever snapped the nipple on a 27" crt tube before and listened to how long it took to fill the void? Vacuum is pretty damned empty...

ApathyGifted
Aug 30, 2004
Tomorrow?

Skyssx posted:

The ISS is at maybe half a bar.

The ISS is pressurized to a standard sea level 14.7 psi (1.013 bar), with the 78/21 N2/O2 mix just like the normal Earth atmosphere. There's a joint docking airlock which is pressurized at only 10.2, where astronauts going out on an EVA spend the night beforehand to help purge nitrogen from their blood (so the time spent pre-breathing when they suit up gets cut down.).

The Space Shuttle is also at 14.7 psi, but they drop it down to 10.2 about a day ahead of any EVA's for the same purpose.

The spacesuits are only 4.2 psi, which would normally be fatal to people, but in this case it's a pure oxygen atmosphere so it's plenty of O2 to breathe. The only reason this is done is because any pressure you get in a space suit makes it harder to move due to the constant volume problem. This low pressure is also pretty much the only reason that astronauts are required to do pre-breathing to purge nitrogen from their blood.

We really need to get on the ball with the tensile-pressure spacesuits so we can end the time-consuming, expensive-to-accomodate pre-breathing process.

BlackShadow
May 31, 2009



The Rocket Salad posted:

At the end when he reaches in to check the TV:

Marty: What, is it hot?
Doc: No, cold! drat cold!

No surprises there, since microwaves work by exciting water molecules in food to generate friction (and therefore, heat). There's no water in those TV units, so there's no reason it should increase in temperature.

The Rocket Salad
Sep 1, 2004

lol what

I was going to thank you for pissing on my Back to the Future joke, but then I got thinking - what about the electrolyte in the caps? Wouldn't get the case too hot, I suppose, but maybe it'd get warm in the vicinity of the HT board or whatever.

NitroSpazzz
Dec 8, 2006

You don't need style when you've got strength!




Yesterday morning I got a call from work that two of our computer cabinets had went down. Lucky me being on call I dragged my rear end out of bed and went in.

Out supercomputer cabinets are liquid cooled with radiators above and below the computer modules. The r134a from these radiators is cycled back to a heat exchanger which uses chilled water to control the temp of the refrigerant. The whole system (4 cabinets and 1 heat exchanger) is charged with ~250 pounds of r134a.

Each one of these heat exchangers has a large electric motor to cycle the refrgerant through the system. These motors are completely sealed with an external j-box for all electrical connections. The J-box is flooded with silicone. This is a very heavy duty motor and is a bitch to replace.

When I got there this is what I saw:



The black stuff on the floor is assumed to be bearing material or plastic from inside the pump. A bearing in the motor failed allowing the pressurized r134a to run through the pump and into the j-box. The j-box isn't made to handle pressure and pushed the gasket out. The entire refrigerant charge and j-box silicone escaped through a pinhole size leak, we are guessing in less than 45 seconds...wish I could have been there to hear it. I walked in to find a oil slick (silicone) with little black pools of water (condensation+bearing). Ended up taking 10 hours to clean up, swap the pump, start refilling the system then notice the reservoir is contaminated. Hell of an initiation for my first week on call.

Today we pumped it back out, changed the filters and started filling it again.

NitroSpazzz fucked around with this message at 23:21 on Jan 31, 2011

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


loving balls! At least in IT you never have to deal with biological material.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

Skyssx posted:

loving balls! At least in IT you never have to deal with biological material.

This seems... optimistic.

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

BlackShadow posted:

No surprises there, since microwaves work by exciting water molecules in food to generate friction (and therefore, heat). There's no water in those TV units, so there's no reason it should increase in temperature.
This is rather common misconception, but Microwaves don't act on water in particular, they'll heat any material, they're just most efficient on dipole molecules like water, fat, and sugars. It's perfectly possible to melt glass in a microwave.

mutt2jeff
Oct 2, 2004
The one, the only....

Insert joke about Harbor freight tools.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



NitroSpazzz posted:

Out supercomputer cabinets are liquid cooled with radiators above and below the computer modules. The r134a from these radiators is cycled back to a heat exchanger which uses chilled water to control the temp of the refrigerant. The whole system (4 cabinets and 1 heat exchanger) is charged with ~250 pounds of r134a.
Holy hell, the A/C on an Excursion only uses about 1.5 pounds. It's a good thing nobody was standing next to it when this happened, they most likely would have suffocated.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





I wanna know how much kW you're running in a cabinet to justify an A/C setup like that in there, holy poo poo.

pienipple
Mar 20, 2009

That's wrong!


Fucknag posted:

Holy hell, the A/C on an Excursion only uses about 1.5 pounds. It's a good thing nobody was standing next to it when this happened, they most likely would have suffocated.

42 ounces on an Excursion, 68 with the auxilliary AC. That's still fuckall compared to 250 pounds though.

Coasterphreak
May 29, 2007
I like cookies.

IOwnCalculus posted:

I wanna know how much kW you're running in a cabinet to justify an A/C setup like that in there, holy poo poo.

You're probably looking at a Cray cabinet or something roughly equivalent.

Fats
Oct 13, 2006

What I cannot create, I do not understand

Fun Shoe

Huge_Midget posted:

My 2 year old Pioneer Kuro Elite still has a better picture than anything you can buy today for under $20,000.

Really? You'd think Eizo and the other guys who make $5,000 computer monitors would offer some plasma models if they were so good.

eames
May 9, 2009



Fats posted:

Really? You'd think Eizo and the other guys who make $5,000 computer monitors would offer some plasma models if they were so good.

Heís talking about large screens for movies, not calibrated desktop monitors. And heís right, LED TVs have not matched the IQ of the old high-end Pioneer plasmas yet, even though they are much more "modern" from a technological standpoint. Feel free to open a thread in the A/V arena if you donít believe it.

NitroSpazzz
Dec 8, 2006

You don't need style when you've got strength!




Coasterphreak posted:

You're probably looking at a Cray cabinet or something roughly equivalent.

Good guess. This is on a the Cray XT5 supercomputer JaguarPF (PetaFlop). The cabinets idle at 8-10kW and run between 22-30kW most of the time. Now take into consideration JaguarPF has 200 of these cabinets, Kraken in front had 88 cabinets and is currently being upgraded to 100 cabinets.

So with both systems at idle we are pulling 3000kW, at an average running load of 25kW we are pulling 7500kW...and that is just for the cabinets. That doesn't include the chillers in the room circulating air or the 72 heat exchangers keeping the cabinets from overheating. drat just realized we have around 18000 pounds of r134a in that room.

teh jhey
May 23, 2004

Kitty needs more souls.

Thanks, I feel so much less bad for leaving the bathroom light on overnight now.

NitroSpazzz
Dec 8, 2006

You don't need style when you've got strength!




teh jhey posted:

Thanks, I feel so much less bad for leaving the bathroom light on overnight now.

Yeah the power our systems draw is a bit insane. Also forgot to mention the 132 XT4 cabinets of Jaguar and Athena upstairs, 14 XT6 cabinets of GEAE/NOAA, 5 single cabinet test/development systems and all the disk/storage to handle the system.

It is a hell of a sight and if anyone is ever in East Tennessee it would be worth looking into what it takes to get a tour of ORNL.

Beach Bum
Jan 13, 2010


I would read the hell out of a [Tell] thread about your work with these systems.

Sponge!
Dec 22, 2004

SPORK!


Beach Bum posted:

I would read the hell out of a [Tell] thread about your work with these systems.

EPA 609 cert checking in. I too would like more details.

InterceptorV8
Mar 9, 2004

Loaded up and trucking.We gonna do what they say cant be done.

NitroSpazzz posted:

drat just realized we have around 18000 pounds of r134a in that room.


Do you have breathers in case of a major failure of system...like the one that happened?

Sponge!
Dec 22, 2004

SPORK!


InterceptorV8 posted:

Do you have breathers in case of a major failure of system...like the one that happened?

Heh, in a fire scenario that *is* a lot of phosgene now that I think of it...

NitroSpazzz
Dec 8, 2006

You don't need style when you've got strength!




Beach Bum posted:

I would read the hell out of a [Tell] thread about your work with these systems.

Sponge! posted:

EPA 609 cert checking in. I too would like more details.
I had wondered if there would be any interest in something like this. I'll see about writing something up. I'll try to track down all the numbers (cpus, cores, memory, storage, etc). Also need to check in to see if there is anything I can't talk about. Looks like I'll be bringing the camera to work one of these days.

InterceptorV8 posted:

Do you have breathers in case of a major failure of system...like the one that happened?
I'm not 100% sure on this but I believe we have breathers (manually triggered) for emergencies. Otherwise with the massive amount of air circulated per hour slow/little leaks of a couple pounds a week are kind of ignored.

edit: Got the ok will start working on it as time allows.

NitroSpazzz fucked around with this message at 16:38 on Feb 1, 2011

Landerig
Oct 27, 2008

by Fistgrrl


EightBit posted:

CRT tv's may "work" for 20 years, but the picture gets so dim over such a period (unless you bought one with some ungodly amount of getters in the tube) that it becomes very difficult to watch.

I own two color TV's from the year 1976. A Chromacolor II, and a Monkey Wards (Sharp rebadge) set. Both CRT's are still very bright and strong, and both sets probably have a good 50,000+ hours on them by now.

Now if you're basing your experience on a 1990's Zenith or late 1990's RCA, or an early-mid 00's JVC, Yes, those CRT's fail quickly. Most modern CRT's are cheap junk designed for a short life.

Sponge!
Dec 22, 2004

SPORK!


Landerig posted:

I own two color TV's from the year 1976. A Chromacolor II, and a Monkey Wards (Sharp rebadge) set. Both CRT's are still very bright and strong, and both sets probably have a good 50,000+ hours on them by now.

Now if you're basing your experience on a 1990's Zenith or late 1990's RCA, or an early-mid 00's JVC, Yes, those CRT's fail quickly. Most modern CRT's are cheap junk designed for a short life.

Hey my zenith is 1989 and the tube is in awesoeme shape. Granted it does blow three somponents on the flyback board very 4-5 years, but they're $6 and some soldering to fix.

shy boy from chess club
Jun 11, 2008

It wasnt that bad, after you left I got to help put out the fire!



Sponge! posted:

Hey my zenith is 1989 and the tube is in awesoeme shape. Granted it does blow three somponents on the flyback board very 4-5 years, but they're $6 and some soldering to fix.

My RCA has been losing the v-hold during some scene changes. Its very short and hardly noticeable but I'm sure it will only get worse. Is that something that is easy to fix where I could just send you the pc board? It has no external controls for it like the old ones.

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Sponge!
Dec 22, 2004

SPORK!


Kylie Sven Opossum posted:

My RCA has been losing the v-hold during some scene changes. Its very short and hardly noticeable but I'm sure it will only get worse. Is that something that is easy to fix where I could just send you the pc board? It has no external controls for it like the old ones.

Direct connection to the cable line or you using a box?

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