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HUNDU THE BEAST GOD
Sep 14, 2007

everything is yours


Well yeah, that just means there needed to be like actual clinical trials and not just flying by the seat of your pants based on hunches, which is how it became such a clusterfuck to begin with. It was a story of negligence and lack of oversight and I think they reacted in pretty much the only way they could've ethically.

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Baron Bifford
May 24, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 2010 days!


You may be right for practical reasons. There's a bit in the documentary about how a second wave of thalidomide babies occurred in Brazil despite warnings against taking it during pregnancy. The Brazilian women could not read the English warning labels! It shows that thalidomide simply should not be distributed except through highly controlled programs. If such gaffes could happen then it was prudent to pull it off the market altogether until they had a system in place.

Baron Bifford
May 24, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 2010 days!


McDowell posted:

Do you mean this in a good way or a bad way? Obama indirectly mentioned 'The Power of Nightmares' narrative in his last presser - starting that the group that planned 9/11 has more or less been defeated but that al qaeda groups have 'metastasized'.
In a good way, I suppose. I like astonishing claims, though I was skeptical of this one for a good while. I still am undecided.

HUNDU THE BEAST GOD
Sep 14, 2007

everything is yours


Yeah, I mean, DDT has a legitimate use - that doesn't mean it was wrong for it to be banned. Controlled, judicious and knowledgeable application of something incredibly dangerous (and the key here is poorly understood) cannot be underestimated because if you arrogantly assert that your product is perfectly safe without having the data to back that up, clearly the consequences of that carelessness can present themselves quite dramatically.

Wrageowrapper
Apr 30, 2009

DRINK! ARSE! FECKIN CHRISTMAS!

I just binged through a documentary series about the New Zealand land wars. It was really fascinating and quite well researched. The host claims that these wars saw the first implementation of modern trench warfare in the world. It was also a place and time that saw the country try to develop its own King movement to replace tribalism and even the rise of several new religious cults.

For those who liked the documentary series about the French Indian war that was either posted here or in this threads predecessor you will like this one as well.

Its in 5 parts and you can see the first part here.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0sPMhqz-cc

Its nice to see a historical documentary from a region that has very little coverage in that area. Does anyone have any other recommendations of history documentaries from countries that we dont tend to hear much about?

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Sever Clear (netflixs) was a pretty good documentary about one persons tour in Iraq.

Severe Clear is based on the memoir by First Lieutenant Mike Scotti as well as video footage shot by him and other members of 1st Battalion, 4th Marines on the outset of the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Directed by Kristian Fraga (“Anytown, USA”) and featuring a original score by Cliff Martinez (“Traffic”, “Narc”, “Solaris”) the film offers an unflinching look at the uncertainty, disorder and chaos of war from the remarkable perspective of one Marine. The film is released under the title “This is War” in the United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Australia and Israel.

Severe Clear was awarded Special Mention for Cinematic Excellence at the 2009 International Rome Film Festival, the Jury Prize at the Salem Film Fest and the 2009 Barrymore Award. Severe Clear was also featured as part of the 2009 International Documentary Association’s DocuWeeks Showcase and was an official selection at the SXSW, Big Sky, Lone Star, Palm Beach, San Diego and St. Louis Film Festivals.

The film has been critically acclaimed by The New York Times, Variety, The Hollywood Reporter and IFC.com and recently featured on CNN, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, Newsweek, Men’s Journal, Interview Magazine, Filmmaker Magazine, indieWIRE, NBC and more.

Unless
Jul 24, 2005

I art





McDowell posted:

Have you seen his blog? http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/adamcurtis/

Sadly I don't know of anything on par with Century of the Self - but http://thoughtmaybe.com/ has lots of stuff in a similar vein.

Thank you.

Great electronic music documentaries.

Modulations: Cinema for the Ear - 1998

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cveYosINMQM

Great job covering history of electronically synthesized music and the culture that has emerged from it.

Synth Britannia - 2009

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXm8O5cKrhI

British Synth Pop history from the BBC!

Maestro - 2003

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Nf6I35i8yk

New York City's club scene post-disco.

murphyslaw
Feb 16, 2007
It never fails


e: I'm totally blind. Found what I was looking for two pages ago; nevermind!

murphyslaw fucked around with this message at 06:06 on Aug 19, 2013

fish_cola
Apr 18, 2009


I'm pretty sure I haven't seen this in the thread--I recently started watching The British Empire in Colour and I love it. The film is entirely old school color footage from the British Empire in the 30s, 40s, 50s, and tells the story of the empire's step-by-step disintegration around the world, from India to Palestine to Africa.

It's impossible to tell a story that spans so many decades and countries and wars without making a bunch of politically fraught editorial decisions, but I think they do a pretty decent job of stating different perspectives, including British imperialists and native peoples. I'm fascinated by British history of this period, and the combination of color film and primary source documents read by people doing great accents was pretty perfect. The series is three parts, each about an hour long, and it's all on youtube. Here's the first part:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1OX0rnnYAM

mod sassinator
Dec 13, 2006

I was living a doritos and mt dew incel life locked in my room. Then covid happened and I could pretend I was some sort of special hero for that. Now I spend all day worrying that could get ruined.I guarantee the post next to this message is me talking in baby talk while hyping up fake doomer news.

Unless posted:

Thank you.

Great electronic music documentaries.

Modulations: Cinema for the Ear - 1998

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cveYosINMQM

Great job covering history of electronically synthesized music and the culture that has emerged from it.

Synth Britannia - 2009

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXm8O5cKrhI

British Synth Pop history from the BBC!

Maestro - 2003

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Nf6I35i8yk

New York City's club scene post-disco.

Great stuff--I'd add this BBC doc on the radiophonic workshop to the list too. It's a great look at the very early electronic music pioneers from the 60's and 70's. My favorite part is breaking down Delia Derbyshire's Dr. Who theme into all it's component tape loops so you can see how it was made.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFznOcOOSec

Pilli
Jul 3, 2011

Dogs have owners,
cats have staff


fish_cola posted:

I'm pretty sure I haven't seen this in the thread--I recently started watching The British Empire in Colour and I love it. The film is entirely old school color footage from the British Empire in the 30s, 40s, 50s, and tells the story of the empire's step-by-step disintegration around the world, from India to Palestine to Africa.

It's impossible to tell a story that spans so many decades and countries and wars without making a bunch of politically fraught editorial decisions, but I think they do a pretty decent job of stating different perspectives, including British imperialists and native peoples. I'm fascinated by British history of this period, and the combination of color film and primary source documents read by people doing great accents was pretty perfect. The series is three parts, each about an hour long, and it's all on youtube. Here's the first part:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1OX0rnnYAM

Oooooooooh, goodie! :woop: Thanks so much for posting this. Been to India for quite a few months, and I found the British imprint there to be palpable still, so it will be absolutely interesting to go back in time other than through books. I too am fascinated by British history of this period, so bonus to learn about their ruling in countries other than India.

Unless
Jul 24, 2005

I art





mod sassinator posted:

Great stuff--I'd add this BBC doc on the radiophonic workshop to the list too. It's a great look at the very early electronic music pioneers from the 60's and 70's. My favorite part is breaking down Delia Derbyshire's Dr. Who theme into all it's component tape loops so you can see how it was made.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFznOcOOSec

I was going to link this one, but the video has been edited with a shadowy figure in all of the interview scenes that creeped me out so much I could barely pay attention. Great feature, otherwise.

El Gallinero Gros
Mar 17, 2010



Haerc posted:

Anyone know of any docs similar to Century of the Self? I've already watched all of Adam Curtis' other docs.

Do I have a treat for you. Adam made some shorts for Charlie Brooker (a fine doc maker, columnist and TV writer in his own right).

All of Charlie's shows, TV Ruined Your Life, Screenwipe, and Newswipe are up on youtube with Brooker's blessing due to music rights preventing them from being show on TV again.

He made:

Charlie Brooker's Screenwipe S4, E3: TV news reporters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBfeZQDo9o8

Charlie Brooker's Newswipe (season unknown): The rise of "Oh, Dear" ism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUSsEqOXYbw

Charlie Brooker's Newswipe, S2, E4: Paranoia and moral panics (this is the one where he says we've all become Richard Nixon, and is the best of the 3) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ygyucuDeuk

Because I like the cut of yer jib, here's TV ruined Your Life, an examination by Brooker of how TV has corrupted various concepts of Humanity:

Fear https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQBwNyJDHsw

The Lifecycle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1tVQmVj00k

Aspiration https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D12FGiGegfc (My favorite, especially when he rails on My Sweet 16 and Cribs)

Love https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cm5pf1uRyYE

Progress https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4vICxegQCs

Knowledge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7T4YTtMxbzk

Brooker also did a 6 episode run of Newswipe this year, very good. All on Youtube.

Paper Jam Dipper
Jul 14, 2007

by XyloJW


I loving love Charlie Brooker. If he wants to get addicted to cocaine and beat up a priest or something he's more than welcome to in my mind.

fenix down
Jan 12, 2005



El Gallinero Gros posted:

Because I like the cut of yer jib, here's TV ruined Your Life, an examination by Brooker of how TV has corrupted various concepts of Humanity:
Thanks for sharing, these are funny/sad.

nocal
Mar 7, 2007


I finally watched I Think We're Alone Now, about two superfans of 80s mall-pop sensation (?) Tiffany. One is a very high functioning man with autism who has stalked poor Tiffany since the 80s. The other is an intersex alcoholic who had a traumatic brain injury.

I work with people with special needs, and this movie stirred a lot of emotions in me. I read complaints somewhere that these two were manipulated for the film, that they're being made fun of, etc. I didn't see that; it was basically a straight-up doc with no commentary (unless you count some music cues).

It was, overall, less about special needs or obsession or whatever. I think the saddest part was just recognizing that their feelings were human. Sure, taken to an outlandish degree -- but isn't that satire? The movie is a satirical take on desire itself.

nocal
Mar 7, 2007


And since I don't recall posting this, a few months back I watched The Great Happiness Space. It's about Japanese "host" clubs (IIRC), which are basically identical to the infamous hostess clubs: patrons pay for companionship in a bar. It's culturally kind of unique, but there's a certain allure to it, where you kinda sorta pay for extended foreplay. There is a significant, sad twist: most of the female patrons are prostitutes, and pay a *lot* of money for, essentially, false male friendships.

Watch it back to back with I Think We're Alone Now if you want to feel extreme self-hate about have natural human desires. I actually liked both of them, though!

zenintrude
Apr 7, 2008

Where we're going,
we won't need eyes to see.


nocal posted:

And since I don't recall posting this, a few months back I watched The Great Happiness Space. It's about Japanese "host" clubs (IIRC), which are basically identical to the infamous hostess clubs: patrons pay for companionship in a bar. It's culturally kind of unique, but there's a certain allure to it, where you kinda sorta pay for extended foreplay. There is a significant, sad twist: most of the female patrons are prostitutes, and pay a *lot* of money for, essentially, false male friendships.

This is one of my favorite docs despite being depressing as hell.

Paper Jam Dipper
Jul 14, 2007

by XyloJW


I watched Whore's Glory the other day.

I still want to visit Thailand for being absolutely gorgeous but wow I do not want to visit anything in Thailand that has to do with "entertainment".

Hormones
May 9, 2009


I watched "Serving Life" on Netflix last night. It's about inmates who volunteer in their prison's hospice and take care of and stand vigil over dying inmates. It was really great.

shock.wav
May 25, 2009


West of Memphis

ahem...HOW THE HELL WAS THIS ALLOWED TO CONTINUE FOR 18 YEARS?????

That is all.

zenintrude
Apr 7, 2008

Where we're going,
we won't need eyes to see.


shock.wav posted:

West of Memphis

ahem...HOW THE HELL WAS THIS ALLOWED TO CONTINUE FOR 18 YEARS?????

That is all.

See: Paradise Lost

Dr.Caligari
May 5, 2005

"Here's a big, beautiful avatar for someone"


West of Memphis is really a great glimpse into seeing how our justice system works "Well they admitted to it, so we've got our killers :smuggo:" Without even considering they, you know, got out of prison for admitting their guilt

I saw all of the Paradise Lost series also, and after all of that I don't feel I'm sure of anything. One thing it did illustrate well is how a show can steer its audience. There were at least 2 or 3 times when I was convinced I knew who did it. But my thoughts are: Someone 'passing thru' did it. If you remember, the crime scene was by a well populated highway/truck stop..

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Shooting Robert King

Shooting Robert King will take you on an incredible, visceral journey that spans 15 years, 3 tragically brutal wars and across one of the most singularly astonishing lifetimes of modern history. From childhood to adulthood this is the complete story of one man's passionate quest to fulfill his dream of winning the Pulitzer Prize. It is a quest that will cost him more than he could ever know and one that will take him to the very brink of death, time and time again. From war-torn Bosnia to Chechnya, Iraq and more you'll witness first hand the tragic true horror of the worlds worst modern conflicts, all through the lens of a man who knew no boundaries. Shooting Robert King is a film that must be seen to be believed.

Well worth 90 minutes of your life, incredible footage and an excellent story about a war photographer.

HUNDU THE BEAST GOD
Sep 14, 2007

everything is yours


Dr.Caligari posted:

West of Memphis is really a great glimpse into seeing how our justice system works "Well they admitted to it, so we've got our killers :smuggo:" Without even considering they, you know, got out of prison for admitting their guilt

I saw all of the Paradise Lost series also, and after all of that I don't feel I'm sure of anything. One thing it did illustrate well is how a show can steer its audience. There were at least 2 or 3 times when I was convinced I knew who did it. But my thoughts are: Someone 'passing thru' did it. If you remember, the crime scene was by a well populated highway/truck stop..

Watching the first one again after I hadn't really seen it since it aired, it leapt out at me that right at the start, they just straight up show you three uncensored nude corpses of some eight year olds. That threw me, big time. That and the fact that there's like 12 million dollars worth of Metallica songs just as ambient soundtrack.

Hormones
May 9, 2009


Last night I watched two great ones on Netflix.

The Weird and Wonderful Whites of West Virginia. It followed three generations of the White family who were pretty notorious to... well, everyone around. Drugs, alcohol, fights, jail, weapons, attacks, everything.

Happy. About what people around the world do to be happy. It was so beautiful and had me smiling throughout. A serious pick-me-up!

Hannibal Rex
Feb 13, 2010


I'm not up to date on the thread, so apologies if this has already been mentioned before;

Killers in Eden is a documentary about how several generations of killer whales cooperated with fishermen on the Southeast coast of Australia to hunt other whales, for a period of more than 100 years.

appleskates
Feb 21, 2008

Find your freedom in the music.
Find your Jesus, find your Kubrick.


I watched a really good doc on Netflix over the weekend: Beauty is Embarrassing. It's a profile of the artist Wayne White. You probably know him (if at all) from either his puppetry/set design on Pee-Wee's Playhouse or as the guy who paints words on top of thrift store paintings. It's a very sweet portrait of how an artist is nurtured and grown by a supportive family environment. I highly recommend it.

Baron Bifford
May 24, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 2010 days!


Hormones posted:

Happy. About what people around the world do to be happy. It was so beautiful and had me smiling throughout. A serious pick-me-up!
Do the songs "Don't Worry Be Happy" and "Oh Happy Days" feature in the doc?

Hormones
May 9, 2009


Baron Bifford posted:

Do the songs "Don't Worry Be Happy" and "Oh Happy Days" feature in the doc?

Thankfully, no.

Dr.Caligari
May 5, 2005

"Here's a big, beautiful avatar for someone"


Hormones posted:

Last night I watched two great ones on Netflix.

The Weird and Wonderful Whites of West Virginia. It followed three generations of the White family who were pretty notorious to... well, everyone around. Drugs, alcohol, fights, jail, weapons, attacks, everything.

If you haven't seen it, make sure to check out where it started: The Dancing Outlaw and the inferior, Dancing Outlaw II: Jesco goes to Hollywood

nollek
Jun 13, 2007

We speak for Earth


ChocNitty posted:

This is a pretty good documentary about Andre the Giant:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pxck08l_aFc

I know this is from a couple pages back and about 4-5 years before the time I watched wrestling as a kid in the 90s. But god drat. This was a good documentary.

Edit: I also watched,

Ropes4u posted:

Sever Clear (netflixs) was a pretty good documentary about one persons tour in Iraq.

Severe Clear is based on the memoir by First Lieutenant Mike Scotti as well as video footage shot by him and other members of 1st Battalion, 4th Marines on the outset of the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Directed by Kristian Fraga (“Anytown, USA”) and featuring a original score by Cliff Martinez (“Traffic”, “Narc”, “Solaris”) the film offers an unflinching look at the uncertainty, disorder and chaos of war from the remarkable perspective of one Marine. The film is released under the title “This is War” in the United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Australia and Israel.

Severe Clear was awarded Special Mention for Cinematic Excellence at the 2009 International Rome Film Festival, the Jury Prize at the Salem Film Fest and the 2009 Barrymore Award. Severe Clear was also featured as part of the 2009 International Documentary Association’s DocuWeeks Showcase and was an official selection at the SXSW, Big Sky, Lone Star, Palm Beach, San Diego and St. Louis Film Festivals.

The film has been critically acclaimed by The New York Times, Variety, The Hollywood Reporter and IFC.com and recently featured on CNN, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, Newsweek, Men’s Journal, Interview Magazine, Filmmaker Magazine, indieWIRE, NBC and more.
on Netflix. Some pretty incredible foreshadowing inside the early fight for Baghdad just years after 9/11. Thanks man. That one was pretty amazing.

nollek fucked around with this message at 03:50 on Aug 26, 2013

Baron Bifford
May 24, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 2010 days!


I recommend the documentary Gypsy Child Thieves, which shows how a certain section of the Roma population run rings of professional child beggars and pickpockets. It's horrifying stuff and may sadly reinforce your prejudices against these people.

Goon Danton
May 24, 2012

Don't forget to show my shitposts to the people. They're well worth seeing.



I didn't have any luck in the Recommendation thread, so I figured I'd try here: does anyone know any good documentaries about how pre-industrial people built and made things? Construction, boat-building, metalwork, whatever. I love learning about people using relatively basic technology in clever ways. The closest I've found so far was a youtube series called Debunking Ancient Aliens, which was exactly what I wanted right up until it goes off the loving deep end and starts ranting about Nephilim.

Baron Bifford
May 24, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 2010 days!


Try the BBC series Worst Jobs in History (YouTube). Lots of very icky things there. My favorite is how they made purple dye. In the age before modern chemistry they couldn't figure anything better than rotting clams.

You might like to watch this doc on Machu Picchu. The city's walls are made of large stones that fit perfectly together, and use no mortar. It was built by people who hadn't even discovered the wheel, yet the feat still awes modern engineers.

Baron Bifford fucked around with this message at 10:30 on Aug 28, 2013

cloudchamber
Aug 6, 2010

You know what the Ukraine is? It's a sitting duck. A road apple, Newman. The Ukraine is weak. It's feeble. I think it's time to put the hurt on the Ukraine

Nolanar posted:

I didn't have any luck in the Recommendation thread, so I figured I'd try here: does anyone know any good documentaries about how pre-industrial people built and made things? Construction, boat-building, metalwork, whatever. [/spoiler]

There's a Norwegian film called Kon-Tiki about a group of people attempting a voyage from Peru to Polynesian on a raft, which they created using technology only available to pre-colombian societies.
http://vimeo.com/49401742

Baron Bifford
May 24, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 2010 days!


mod sassinator posted:

It's a good channel, but really overplays World War II, modern weapons, etc. programming to get ratings these days. Many years ago History Channel (and TLC, The Learning Channel) used to play all kinds of neat and obscure science and history documentaries. I remember watching great science shows like Connections, Newton's Apple, Invention, and others. Now it's all about reality TV and Hitler documentaries.
Thank God we have YouTube and torrents. But even the docs themselves aren't always top quality, going for sensationalism rather than detail and balanced views.

BBC documentaries remain the best on TV. They on their own justify my TV license.

Paper Jam Dipper
Jul 14, 2007

by XyloJW


For those who enjoy Connections and James Burke, there's an awesome YouTube channel for him: https://www.youtube.com/user/JamesBurkeWeb

internet celebrity
Jun 23, 2006



College Slice

I watched Resurrect Dead last night and it was great. Are there any other unsolved mystery documentaries that I should watch, preferentially available on Netflix?

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Goon Danton
May 24, 2012

Don't forget to show my shitposts to the people. They're well worth seeing.



Baron Bifford posted:

Try the BBC series Worst Jobs in History (YouTube). Lots of very icky things there.

You might like to watch this doc on Machu Picchu. The city's walls are made of large stones that fit perfectly together, and use no mortar.


cloudchamber posted:

There's a Norwegian film called Kon-Tiki about a group of people attempting a voyage from Peru to Polynesian on a raft, which they created using technology only available to pre-colombian societies.
http://vimeo.com/49401742

Thank you both! These look like exactly what I was looking for. I actually knew about the Kon-Tiki project, but I didn't realize there was a movie (I figured it was a book).

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