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Lascivious Sloth
Apr 26, 2008



yep

What was the deal with the guy in the last chapter coming back? And who/what is wit?? Can someone explain what is known about those two in spoilers. I guess he was a knights radiant that had been sent back by ??? and this is to say that the knights radiant are going to start reappearing? Is Wit bad or good?

Lascivious Sloth fucked around with this message at 22:46 on Dec 12, 2011

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ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

Bees?
You want fucking bees?
Here you go!
ROLL INITIATIVE!!



Lascivious Sloth posted:

yep

What was the deal with the guy in the last chapter coming back? And who/what is wit?? Can someone explain what is known about those two in spoilers. I guess he was a knights radiant that had been sent back by ??? and this is to say that the knights radiant are going to start reappearing? Is Wit bad or good?

The guy at the end is the last Herald. Remember in the prologue when the Heralds gave up their duty, but one had died in the fight, and such was stuck wherever it was the Heralds wait for the next Desolation? That Herald is the at the end.

Wit is Hoid, a character who's appeared in every Sanderson thus far. He's able to traverse the Shadesmar (that weird place Shallan went with the symbolheads) to get from one world to another. He has some further agenda, as yet unknown.

ConfusedUs fucked around with this message at 23:23 on Dec 12, 2011

Algid
Oct 9, 2007




No, he was the last herald, presumably once a regular human, but now regularly reconstituted from some sort of hell like limbo where they're held in reserve to fight in each desolation. They seem to be linked to the almighty.

The knights are the 10 orders each founded by one of the heralds, which survived long past the point where the other 9 heralds gave up. Then the knights also disbanded for some reason.

edit: I guess I'll spoiler the second part, but the first is literally all from the prologue, which is like 3 pages long (and free).

Algid fucked around with this message at 23:04 on Dec 12, 2011

subx
Jan 12, 2003

If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes should fall like a house of cards. Checkmate.

Cicero posted:

What does that say in the upper left? Expanse of the densities?

That's what it reads as to me

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

Bees?
You want fucking bees?
Here you go!
ROLL INITIATIVE!!



Algid posted:

No, he was the last herald, presumably once a regular human, but now regularly reconstituted from some sort of hell like limbo where they're held in reserve to fight in each desolation. They seem to be linked to the almighty.

The knights are the 10 orders each founded by one of the heralds, which survived long past the point where the other 9 heralds gave up. Then the knights also disbanded for some reason.

edit: I guess I'll spoiler the second part, but the first is literally all from the prologue, which is like 3 pages long (and free).

You're right. I had the wrong title for the guy!

Clockwork Gadget
Oct 30, 2008

tick tock


ConfusedUs posted:

Wit is Hoid, a character who's appeared in every Sanderson thus far. He's able to traverse the Shadesmar (that weird place Shallan went with the symbolheads) to get from one world to another. He has some further agenda, as yet unknown.

Wit is also suspected to be the writer of the letter in the chapter beginnings of the later parts of Way of Kings, and the entire letter reveals a lot about Sanderson's overarching meta-verse that hasn't been seen outside annotations and Q&A's if at all, like more information about the "gods" of the various worlds (Shards), and the existence of a "17th Shard" which seems to be an organization of people who also travel between worlds. Some pretty heavy stuff!

Sanderson has been fairly vocal about a lot of information about Wit and the "Cosmere" in articles and annotations and Q&A's and stuff, and if you've read all the books, or don't care about getting spoilered on parts of their plots, I'd recommend reading about some of it on some of his collected fansites. :O

Anyway, I was looking through Alloy of Law again, and one thing that stuck out at me that I didn't pay attention to the first time reading the Ars Arcannum was one of the new types of Feruchemical metalminds can be used to store and tap "Investiture", which seems to be Brandon's general term for all the "magic" in his Cosmere works (the use of Aons in Elantris, surgebinding in WoK, bio-chroma in Warbreaker, etc.). So by storing Investiture are Feruchemists storing their power to store? Not really super important or revelatory, but still really interesting!

Clockwork Gadget fucked around with this message at 23:42 on Dec 12, 2011

Democratic Pirate
Feb 17, 2010



Sanderson owns because people are all like "drat the Stormlight Archives will be ~10 huge books? That's a big series" and he pulls out the "yeah but since all my books are in the same cosmere it's more like a 20 book series."


that he'll write in the next 5 years because goddamn

Lascivious Sloth
Apr 26, 2008



Thanks for the explanation about the heralds, wit and knight radiant. I find it harder to remember/take-in those details when 'reading' an audiobook compared to a book.

Who was the elfish women smashing stuff in some palace and what was the deal with that? Was it just a way to introduce or expand on the dark magic?

This is my first Sanderson novel. Does a lot of the WoK magic, universe etc. relate to his other books? Or just this Shadesmar?

Knowing what wit is now makes a lot of sense, especially in the things he was saying about having many names and some call him 'Hoid' etc.

Superstring
Jul 22, 2007

I thought I was going insane for a second.



This is the first time Shadesmar has appeared or been mentioned if I recall.


The best part of reading Sanderson books is how each of the different series work differently and are independent enough to feel like they're completely separate. If I hadn't come online and seen people talk about it I wouldn't have known. Then you can go back and start recognizing pieces of connectivity between them and it's like whoa.

Algid
Oct 9, 2007




Lascivious Sloth posted:

Who was the elfish women smashing stuff in some palace and what was the deal with that? Was it just a way to introduce or expand on the dark magic?
No idea really. It could be some sort of magic system I guess. The other interlude chapters seem to have a lot of those, there's observation controlling spren, the guy with the inverted shadow, healing factor, and tattoos, the weird wish granting deity that Dalinar dealt with, and possibly lucky fish.

Judging from the covers and the story, there's supposed to be at least 10 magic systems tied to the knights/heralds, and possibly another ten tied to whatever agents Odium fields in the desolations. Surgebinding is just one magic system associated with one order of the knights, soulcasting seems to be another, and then there's whatever magic allows teleportation, and a group that seems to control fire (or possible just somehow burns stone).

McGrady
Jun 27, 2003

The greatest lurker of all the lower class lurkers.

College Slice

Some have theorized that the woman destroying the artwork of the female herald is in fact that herald herself, attempting to hide her identity.

Clockwork Gadget
Oct 30, 2008

tick tock


McGrady posted:

Some have theorized that the woman destroying the artwork of the female herald is in fact that herald herself, attempting to hide her identity.

This is a neat theory, but it's not really TWIST-y enough for a Sanderson novel. imo.

BananaNutkins
Aug 26, 2004

I'll split you open and I don't even like coconuts.


I think its another magic system based on destroying things of beauty. Probably some kind of chaos magic.

Natural Joe
Dec 27, 2006


One of the things that interests me most in the way of kings is the gem that casts a black light that Szeth was given by Gavilar. Of all the things I have picked up on after re reading, that is the one that makes me think 'what the hell is up with that'

egg tats
Apr 3, 2010


Clockwork Gadget posted:


Anyway, I was looking through Alloy of Law again, and one thing that stuck out at me that I didn't pay attention to the first time reading the Ars Arcannum was one of the new types of Feruchemical metalminds can be used to store and tap "Investiture", which seems to be Brandon's general term for all the "magic" in his Cosmere works (the use of Aons in Elantris, surgebinding in WoK, bio-chroma in Warbreaker, etc.). So by storing Investiture are Feruchemists storing their power to store? Not really super important or revelatory, but still really interesting!

This isn't really spoiler-worthy, since it doesn't have to do with any of the books, but I'm assuming that a Feruchemist could store his ability to store powers, so rather then spending all his time at 80% weight he could spend all his time storing his ability to store, and then burn it all for a multiplier on his rate of storage. It would probably be a lot better for storing, say, health, since an hour of sickness would be much more healing then on someone not tapping investiture.

Alternatively, it's a way to let Feruchemists collect the various magics they can do (which,like Aons, would normally only work on their world).

veekie
Dec 25, 2007

Dice of Chaos


senae posted:

Alternatively, it's a way to let Feruchemists collect the various magics they can do (which,like Aons, would normally only work on their world).

Or, a Mistborn Feruchemist storing his allomancy and then burning it. Then add duralumin. Fwoosh.

Rabbi
Nov 20, 2002



I just finished The Alloy of Law, and I was super disappointed. I loved The Way of Kings and the Mistborn trilogy, but I had to force myself to finish reading this one. I'm gonna spoiler the whole part about why I didn't like the book because it's all very spoilery:

The protagonist, Waxillium, is a rich cop that is a homicidal rear end in a top hat. He slaughtered a ton of people in this book who Sanderson tries to otherize as criminals/"Vanishers", but in contrast to that he took the time to show us that one of them was naive in the interview scene with Wayne. Some of them were probably starving and just stealing to feed their families, and then that rear end in a top hat rich cop blew up a train car they'd stolen and used his magic to start slaughtering them. Or before that their boss shot someone and then the rear end in a top hat used his magic to throw a whole room into confusion then started killing them indiscriminately. Sanderson tried to write in that some of them were "itchy to kill" or something at that rich person dinner party, which is a pretty bullshit hook to try to make the characters seem evil. He didn't even show them actually being evil. They shot back in both cases of course, because this magic cop with super natural aim is a homicidal maniac, so what other choice did they have?

I kept hoping that Sanderson would do a twist and Miles would actually be the hero of the story. The only person Miles killed was that rich, retired cop who was shouting about how he was going to hunt Miles down and hang him and he wouldn't rest until he did. If someone said that to me I'd consider killing them too, and I sure didn't have any sympathy for a retired cop, especially as corrupt and ineffective as it's implied the constabulary are. I guess it was implied that Miles killed the criminals he caught in the Roughs, but poo poo Wax has no qualms with slaughtering otherwise innocent train robbers so why would he care that Miles was killing people that Wax had no problem otherizing as "criminals."

I guess to be fair I'm brushing over the fact that they kidnapped I believe 5 women which would make them supposedly horrible monsters. But again for all we know the Vanishers are just trying to eat, and Mr. Suit could have told them that the women were all returned after being interrogated about a family secret.


I guess overall I just really didn't like the protagonist, and that made the whole book painful to read. It seems like Sanderson wants this to be a screen play for an action flick where we're not supposed to question that bad guys are bad because they're wearing masks and have beedy eyes. Or that the good guy is good because inspiring music plays when his action sequences kick in. This didn't work for me at all in a book though, especially by an author that has me expecting nuance.

soru
Apr 27, 2003

The Red God has his due, sweet girl, and only death may pay for life.


You understand that the only character you're sympathetic to was a sociopath, right?

Rabbi
Nov 20, 2002



soru posted:

You understand that the only character you're sympathetic to was a sociopath, right?
Dunno man, Miles seems pretty level headed and reasonable compared to the homicidal maniac Wax.

MajorBonnet
May 28, 2009

How did I get here?


veekie posted:

Or, a Mistborn Feruchemist storing his allomancy and then burning it. Then add duralumin. Fwoosh.

Or allowing anyone access to allomancy or feruchemy? They are storing the power.

Especially since feruchemists now only have access to one power in general instead of all, the ability to store the power of feruchemy/allomancy is probably most useful if you can then pass that stored ability to someone else.

EDIT: This might also give them the ability to recreate mistborn and full feruchemists. By wearing metalminds that have stored investiture.

MajorBonnet fucked around with this message at 14:02 on Dec 16, 2011

wellwhoopdedooo
Nov 23, 2007

Pound Trooper!

If you gloss over the backstory and main story segments that make the badguy bad, ignore the intentional moral ambiguity, and invent not even implied backstories for the henchmen where they're just doing it to feed their staving families, sure, you can invert just about any story.

Rabbi
Nov 20, 2002



wellwhoopdedooo posted:

If you gloss over the backstory and main story segments that make the badguy bad, ignore the intentional moral ambiguity, and invent not even implied backstories for the henchmen where they're just doing it to feed their staving families, sure, you can invert just about any story.
What backstory? What main story segments that make the vanishers bad? How did moral ambiguity come across in the story in regards to Wax's actions?

At least about the Vanishers it's pretty clear that they're being manipulated. The guy Wayne interviews talks about how he was recruited; I think he was like a 16-18 year old kid? Since that's one of two vanishers we're introduced to why would we assume anything but all of them are naive young kids that were recruited into something they hardly understood?

edit: So if he wanted to make the story seem morally ambiguous he could have had a scene where Wax had a tiny bit of remorse for slaughtering ~100 people. If he wanted to make the bad guys seem bad he could have had them shoot into the room at the rich people party before Wax sprung into action. ANYTHING could have been done to show them actually being evil. The Vanishers on the last mission weren't even kidnapping anyone, they were just robbing a train. Weren't there new recruits there? Did every last one of them deserve bullets to the brain? I don't know how this isn't as blatant to everyone else. Wax almost seems like an unhero, but he wasn't written like that.

Rabbi fucked around with this message at 14:39 on Dec 16, 2011

thecallahan
Nov 15, 2004

Since I was five Tara, all I've ever wanted was a Harley and cut.


Last I checked robbing a train was bad, how are they innocent? If you don't want to be shot at, don't be a criminal. And the Vanishers were about to start shooting and murdering people at the party, Wax and Wayne just beat them to the punch. Why do you think the cop deserved to be shot for telling a criminal he was going to do his job? I'm a bit confused at that reasoning. And you seem to forget in that last firefight they had Wax's fiance and that gunsmith, just because they were already kidnapped doesn't mean they should be forgiven for the act

I know you're not trolling but it really feels like you are, no one else I've heard talk about the book has this same view as yours and I'm just at a loss for words for it.

Rabbi
Nov 20, 2002



thecallahan posted:

Last I checked robbing a train was bad, how are they innocent? If you don't want to be shot at, don't be a criminal.
Robin Hood would have stolen from these rich people's trains too..

The thing is, we know that the main reason people become criminals is because they're destitute. No one chooses a life living in dirty warehouses with a constant risk of death for the fun of it. I would expect Sanderson to understand this and to write it in with some depth. The depth isn't there though, instead of being presented with straight up villains or with morally complex PEOPLE we're presented with invisible face "vanishers" that are as disposable as battle droids. Logically (at least for me) these people aren't inherently evil. When Sanderson tried to write it in that they just wanted to start shooting people for no reason it felt hamfisted as gently caress. What motivation is there for that if we follow that these were mostly young adults that were recruited?

Maybe I had too high of hopes for Sanderson. I probably wouldn't have bothered writing words if most other authors had written this.

subx
Jan 12, 2003

If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes should fall like a house of cards. Checkmate.

Rabbi posted:

Robin Hood would have stolen from these rich people's trains too..

Except that the general idea of Robin Hood is that he gives it back to the poor. These people were in it only for themselves, or their bosses. Also they all had guns. Do you sympathize with people that rob convenient stores with guns? Lots of people struggle to feed their family and don't resort to that.

Anyways, this whole book is very obviously wild-west style setting. Back then law keeping definitely (even just stealing) had a more shoot-first ask questions later attitude.

I guess you basically agree with Miles opinion that all rich people (or people in power) are terrible and we need to get rid of them?

IRQ
Sep 9, 2001

SUCK A DICK, DUMBSHITS!



Rabbi posted:

instead of being presented with straight up villains or with morally complex PEOPLE we're presented with invisible face "vanishers" that are as disposable as battle droids.

They basically are battle droids. You're agonizing over fictional redshirts in a pulpy steampunk western. They aren't morally complex, they're barely even people, and that's all they're meant to serve as.

Nothing in your analysis is inherently wrong, but it's just not necessary. Your take on this book sort of necessitates you being some kind of ultra-pacifist who can't consume tv, movies, most video games, and many books because people die who probably didn't deserve to. And if that IS you, ok, that's fine, but I don't see how you made it through Sanderson's other books or got into the fantasy genre in the first place.

And I really can't understand why you'd expect more of Sanderson. There's really not a lot of depth and nuance in his writing, unless you consider well laid plot twists to be deep.

Rabbi
Nov 20, 2002



subx posted:

Except that the general idea of Robin Hood is that he gives it back to the poor. These people were in it only for themselves, or their bosses. Also they all had guns. Do you sympathize with people that rob convenient stores with guns? Lots of people struggle to feed their family and don't resort to that.

Anyways, this whole book is very obviously wild-west style setting. Back then law keeping definitely (even just stealing) had a more shoot-first ask questions later attitude.

I guess you basically agree with Miles opinion that all rich people (or people in power) are terrible and we need to get rid of them?
I don't sympathize with someone who robs a convenience store for drug money, but I feel terrible for people whose life is so lovely they have to rob a convenience store for $200 so that they can eat or pay medical bills or buy their kid a Christmas present or whatever. It doesn't matter though, if they were part of a gang called the "convenience store robbers" Wax would shoot them all in the head immediately on sight.

Miles didn't necessary believe that all rich people or people in power were terrible. I don't think Sanderson told us if he believed that or not. He thought the current system was bad, but he sounded like he should personally have been a dictator? I didn't sympathize with Miles; I kept hoping Sanderson would MAKE us sympathize with him since I wasn't sympathizing with Wax at all.

Rabbi
Nov 20, 2002



IRQ posted:

They basically are battle droids. You're agonizing over fictional redshirts in a pulpy steampunk western. They aren't morally complex, they're barely even people, and that's all they're meant to serve as.

Nothing in your analysis is inherently wrong, but it's just not necessary. Your take on this book sort of necessitates you being some kind of ultra-pacifist who can't consume tv, movies, most video games, and many books because people die who probably didn't deserve to. And if that IS you, ok, that's fine, but I don't see how you made it through Sanderson's other books or got into the fantasy genre in the first place.

And I really can't understand why you'd expect more of Sanderson. There's really not a lot of depth and nuance in his writing, unless you consider well laid plot twists to be deep.
Yeah, I really never have a problem with things like this usually. I think the thing that really bothered me was when Sanderson chose to humanize one of the vanishers with the interrogation scene. If he wanted to keep them as battle droids he shouldn't have exposed one to be a naive young kid. Because in that light the protagonist looks terrible.


Anyways I'll drop it; I just posted because it seemed so obvious to me that I thought other people would agree. I've liked everything else I've read by Sanderson, so I'll keep reading and I'll probably read the next book in this series regardless.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

Bees?
You want fucking bees?
Here you go!
ROLL INITIATIVE!!



It reads more like you have a deep-seated hatred of authority in general and police in specific, and are projecting those feelings onto the novel.

Cartoon Man
Jan 31, 2004

Nyah hah hah hah hah!



gently caress the police, occupy Elendel.


Remember, Brandon cranked this poo poo out in about a week or two after he finished Way of Kings and before starting Towers of Midnight. In fact, I think most of it was written on an airplane to the UK for a book tour. Originally he only wrote this as an exercise and stopped after the ballroom shootout scene. His publisher begged him to finish it so they could sell it. (I think.) The book is not his best writing, but its pretty drat entertaining for something he cranked out in between two 400,000 word monstrosities.

Cartoon Man fucked around with this message at 17:06 on Dec 16, 2011

subx
Jan 12, 2003

If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes should fall like a house of cards. Checkmate.

Rabbi posted:

I don't sympathize with someone who robs a convenience store for drug money, but I feel terrible for people whose life is so lovely they have to rob a convenience store for $200 so that they can eat or pay medical bills or buy their kid a Christmas present or whatever. It doesn't matter though, if they were part of a gang called the "convenience store robbers" Wax would shoot them all in the head immediately on sight.

You have to be a bit fair here to Wax, come on. He didn't shoot anyone until one of the party-goers was shot. The situation was obviously about to escalate, and he took action. At what point should he have started shooting? Should he have waited until 5 more people were shot? 10? At some point he has to fight back (or just run and hide, and that would make for a pretty terrible hero), and in order to protect the most innocent lives he acted before they shot more people. He was trying very hard to be passive, and then put in a terrible position and had to do something.

And I'm not sure how someone (unarmed) basically shaking their fist and saying "YOU'LL PAY FOR THIS!" (Very unobvious reference to Robin Hood: Men in Tights, since you brought up Robin Hood, haw haw) is grounds for being shot.

IRQ
Sep 9, 2001

SUCK A DICK, DUMBSHITS!



Rabbi posted:

Yeah, I really never have a problem with things like this usually. I think the thing that really bothered me was when Sanderson chose to humanize one of the vanishers with the interrogation scene. If he wanted to keep them as battle droids he shouldn't have exposed one to be a naive young kid. Because in that light the protagonist looks terrible.


Anyways I'll drop it; I just posted because it seemed so obvious to me that I thought other people would agree. I've liked everything else I've read by Sanderson, so I'll keep reading and I'll probably read the next book in this series regardless.


Yeah it was just a naive kid, but that naive kid was still willing to shoot some people just hours before. I see your point about having the vanisher dude be portrayed as sympathetic, I just really didn't mind the whole thing. But that's a ways into the book and you clearly weren't liking Wax/Wayne up to that point anyway so I have to think that one instance isn't what put you off.

And there's no need to drop it. This is a forum for sperging about books, keep going.

Reveilled
Apr 19, 2007

Take up your rifles


A lot of Miles' grievances with the rich and powerful of Elendel hit pretty close to home for me, and I did find myself feeling conflicted about the story as a result. I liked Wax, but I felt throughout the novel that he was fighting for the bad guys, while Miles was a crazed villain with possibly noble cause.

The problem with Wild West stories with this sort of complexity is that the Lawman gets to decide who is a bad guy, and whether it is therefore acceptable to bring them to justice. And in those stories where the bad guy is protected by an evil authority figure like a corrupt mayor or something, then we generally consider it acceptable for the Lawman to break the law in the interests of upholding justice. Which is what Miles feels he is doing, and I do sympathise with that point of view even if I don't like Miles as a person.

My impression of the story was that Wax felt he was fighting to uphold the law, while Miles felt he was fighting to uphold Justice, and while the story was obviously written with Miles as a villain, you could very easily write a mirror image of the story where Miles is the rugged freedom fighter and Wax is the good cop fighting for a corrupt reigime. I wasn't expecting a twist like that, but I think it might have been a more interesting story to be honest.

IRQ
Sep 9, 2001

SUCK A DICK, DUMBSHITS!



I think that was intentional. The story did invert a lot of what you as a reader have been trained to expect. I mean, if the complaint is that Sanderson didn't do enough with Miles, I agree. There really should have been more to that conflict, for both of them. Neither should really have been comfortable doing what they were doing, but aside from Wax bristling at high society bullshit early on, the book never really went there.

subx
Jan 12, 2003

If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes should fall like a house of cards. Checkmate.

IRQ posted:

I think that was intentional. The story did invert a lot of what you as a reader have been trained to expect. I mean, if the complaint is that Sanderson didn't do enough with Miles, I agree. There really should have been more to that conflict, for both of them. Neither should really have been comfortable doing what they were doing, but aside from Wax bristling at high society bullshit early on, the book never really went there.

Well it was a pretty short story by modern fantasy standards, so I think he did well with the length he wrote.

Kwyndig
Sep 23, 2006

Heeeeeeey




senae posted:

This isn't really spoiler-worthy, since it doesn't have to do with any of the books, but I'm assuming that a Feruchemist could store his ability to store powers, so rather then spending all his time at 80% weight he could spend all his time storing his ability to store, and then burn it all for a multiplier on his rate of storage. It would probably be a lot better for storing, say, health, since an hour of sickness would be much more healing then on someone not tapping investiture.

Alternatively, it's a way to let Feruchemists collect the various magics they can do (which,like Aons, would normally only work on their world).

This is actually explained in the Treatise Metallurgical in the Mistborn RPG. Nicrosil Feruchemy allows the user to tap the deepest recesses of the self and store/convert other energies into a kind of universal power called 'investiture'. So you could store the energy from Harmony/Preservation in the form of the mists or Ruin from the Well of Ascension and channel it into something else (like, say, Gold and Atium metalminds, and become immortal, although that's not how the Lord Ruler did it.) Or just use it as a kind of lossy conversion from one metalmind to another.

Now, whether this explanation is fully canon or just some kind of abstraction for the RPG I have no idea.

That book also mentions what the hell you would use Larasium alloys for (making specific metal Mistings). Although that really only sounds useful if you already had some other kind of power that would work well with it.

Oovee
Jun 21, 2007

No life king.

About Alloy of Law: in the prologue where Wax's girlfriend is killed, others already mentioned about how the killer was possibly burning atium, but I also got the feel from that scene, especially with the killers comments about how "someone else moves us, all puppets etc." is that he was being controlled Ruin style.. And during the final Miles fight Harmony does say "I have done something to help, I sent you", so did Harmony use the killer to sever Wax's uhh "attachments" so that he'd go to Elendel and stop the greater evil? Do more good than harm :ohdear:

wellwhoopdedooo
Nov 23, 2007

Pound Trooper!

Oh that would just be the most bad-rear end thing ever.

blue squares
Sep 28, 2007

Dallas Mavericks
Dallas Stars


Just started Way of Kings. I'm about 25% of the way through. Really like all the characters, very intrigued by Syl. Awesome start.

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Just-In-Timeberlake
Aug 18, 2003

iSheep krew represent


blue squares posted:

Just started Way of Kings. I'm about 25% of the way through. Really like all the characters, very intrigued by Syl. Awesome start.

The ending is righteous. I was on the elliptical doing cardio when I read it and noticed my legs were going top speed it was so badass.

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