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Colton
Mar 30, 2003

Member of the Kevin Smith look-alikes local #45317

My son, Max, is 6 weeks old and ever since he turned 2 weeks old he has been pooping very infrequently. He's down to pooping once a week now. When he does it's normal looking (so we know he's not constipated), there's just a week's worth of poo in one diaper. We know it's getting close to pooping day when he starts being very fussy, straining, and just generally being very unhappy. We've tried karo syrup in a bottle, tummy massage, warm baths, anti-gas drops, colic drops, burping, putting him in his swing.. everything we can think of. Any advice for how we can get Max to work it out of his system more regularly? I read somewhere that at 8 weeks he'll have figured out the basics of pooping and things may resolve themselves, but it really sucks hearing him scream most of the day.

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Lullabee
Oct 24, 2010

Rock a bye bay-bee
In the beehive


nah.

Lullabee fucked around with this message at 22:43 on Mar 21, 2017

Kubricize
Apr 29, 2010


Colton posted:

My son, Max, is 6 weeks old and ever since he turned 2 weeks old he has been pooping very infrequently. He's down to pooping once a week now. When he does it's normal looking (so we know he's not constipated), there's just a week's worth of poo in one diaper. We know it's getting close to pooping day when he starts being very fussy, straining, and just generally being very unhappy. We've tried karo syrup in a bottle, tummy massage, warm baths, anti-gas drops, colic drops, burping, putting him in his swing.. everything we can think of. Any advice for how we can get Max to work it out of his system more regularly? I read somewhere that at 8 weeks he'll have figured out the basics of pooping and things may resolve themselves, but it really sucks hearing him scream most of the day.

Is he breastfed or formula fed? Breastfed babies don't poop as often, my daughter settled down after the first 2 weeks or so to pooping every four or five days, with plenty of pee diapers daily. She would start to get agitated the day of the poop episode but was happy enough to be wrapped up in a baby burrito with her legs froggied into her tummy for the pressure. If we didn't swaddle her, we would lay her on something and gently but firmly press her knees into her belly. I know some peds will say to give diluted prune juice but ours wasn't one of them.

Colton
Mar 30, 2003

Member of the Kevin Smith look-alikes local #45317

He is breastfed. There were a couple of weeks when we supplemented with formula because my wife wasn't producing enough milk, but it's been a week since he had any formula since her boobs caught up with his demand

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



My daughter is 12 weeks this week, and still seems to poop only 1-2 times a week. She only seems to fuss a bit on the day she decides to poop, and then is back to being in a lovely mood immediately afterwards! We don't give her anything to make her poop though.

Randomity
Feb 25, 2007

Careful what you wish,
You may regret it!


Lullabee posted:

Have any of you parents had/known someone with a MamaRoo? It's a bit pricy, but my parents were wanting to get us something *BIG* for the baby, but since we're in a one bedroom, we're just having a pack n play for sleeping and a few items like that. I like that it's settings are more 'natural' (as in, they have a car setting, so on), but we don't have a seller near me, so I can't really go 'test it out' in person.

We have one. She slept in it exclusively for the first few months but now it's just an expensive white noise machine.

SassySally
Dec 11, 2010


I'll be 37 weeks on Thursday and I just found out I'm strep b positive. I wasn't freaking out at the doctor's office because he was really good about how he explained it and how little the risks are if we just get antibiotics in myself and the baby during labor. He also mentioned getting him more antibiotics in the nursery. At the time, I was just relieved that everything would be fine... but after I left, I realized that the hospital we go to is really big on this "sacred hour" thing and that this is the foundation of their breastfeeding program. (I don't know how common a term "sacred hour" is so I'll explain, briefly. Once baby is born, I lay there topless with baby until he decides to latch on himself and they don't remove him even to measure or weigh him until he's decided he's done feeding.) So now I'm concerned that I won't get to do this because he apparently needs to go to the nursery...

Any experience with either strep b or the sacred hour? They made it sound so ridiculously important to getting a baby breastfeeding and I want to have all of the advantages I can on that end because there is no one I know in my community who is near my age (28) who stuck with breastfeeding for any longer than a week.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



I know my local hospital likes to give baby straight to the mother for skin to skin and breastfeeding straight away, but it's not always possible. For myself, I had an emergency C section so they had to clean up and check the baby and weigh her. They even got her put in a nappy, dressed and swaddled before she was put on my chest, while I was being stitched up. My husband then got to hold her for a while, until I was brought into the recovery room, and only then did I get to attempt breastfeeding and cuddle with her properly.

We've done just fine so far, and still breastfeeding at almost 12 weeks; intend to continue until a year. Imo the "sacred hour" concept is less important than the support you get for breastfeeding afterwards.

Here most women bottle feed and most of the midwives weren't so helpful with breastfeeding issues. We only succeeded because I was so determined to make it work despite the pain I had when she fed, and saw a private lactation consultant who found my daughter's tongue tie and made a referral for me to get it fixed, despite most doctors being against fixing it here unless there are speech problems.

Andrias Scheuchzeri
Mar 6, 2010

They're very good and intelligent, these tapa-boys...

My daughter was in the NICU for her first week; I didn't get to even see her for more than a tiny couple-seconds glimpse until she was half a day old or so. In the NICU she was primarily bottle-fed and had a pacifier. We had zero problems with breastfeeding once she got home. I'm not trying to diminish the issues other people have had, which are very real, but I don't think you need to worry about some crucial step being missed that will automatically ruin everything. Sometimes the language about childbirth and parenting gets kind of ramped up from "this is ideal" to "this is the only way."

But definitely look into finding some breastfeeding support groups! There can be problems and they're often fixable.

Moms Stuffing posted:

Wearing babies spoils them.

So does leaving them out in the sun, even just for a few hours. And remember, always refrigerate your baby after opening.

Andrias Scheuchzeri fucked around with this message at 13:13 on Aug 28, 2012

Chickalicious
Apr 13, 2005

We are the ones we've been waiting for.

I had a c-section under general anesthesia and didn't get to breastfeed until 3 hours after he was born simply because I was unconscious. We did fine and he's still nursing at 22 months. I definitely agree that support is important. Seek out your local La Leche League, or ask about breastfeeding support groups your hospital may run. And make sure your partner is on board; that made the biggest difference for me. The early weeks were not fun, but he got me through it.

dreamcatcherkwe
Apr 14, 2005
Dreamcatcher

Colton posted:

My son, Max, is 6 weeks old and ever since he turned 2 weeks old he has been pooping very infrequently. He's down to pooping once a week now. When he does it's normal looking (so we know he's not constipated), there's just a week's worth of poo in one diaper. We know it's getting close to pooping day when he starts being very fussy, straining, and just generally being very unhappy. We've tried karo syrup in a bottle, tummy massage, warm baths, anti-gas drops, colic drops, burping, putting him in his swing.. everything we can think of. Any advice for how we can get Max to work it out of his system more regularly? I read somewhere that at 8 weeks he'll have figured out the basics of pooping and things may resolve themselves, but it really sucks hearing him scream most of the day.

Colton posted:

He is breastfed. There were a couple of weeks when we supplemented with formula because my wife wasn't producing enough milk, but it's been a week since he had any formula since her boobs caught up with his demand

This is normal in breastfed babies sometimes and no need for alarm or anything special, really. Warm baths might help him feel better, as well as tummy massage. The anti-gas drops never did much for mine. It'll work itself out in time.

SassySally posted:

Any experience with either strep b or the sacred hour? They made it sound so ridiculously important to getting a baby breastfeeding and I want to have all of the advantages I can on that end because there is no one I know in my community who is near my age (28) who stuck with breastfeeding for any longer than a week.

I had group b strep. I just had the antibiotics at the birth center and they didn't give any to the baby himself. Even if you have to wait a little bit to breastfeed, that doesn't mean it will negatively effect your nursing relationship.

dreamcatcherkwe fucked around with this message at 14:05 on Aug 28, 2012

Ben Davis
Apr 17, 2003

I'm as clumsy as I am beautiful

Mnemosyne posted:

I might be a t-rex, because I can't seem to reach it. It doesn't seem to want to sit behind my neck though, it seems to be more behind my shoulderblades, where it's harder to reach. Maybe I just have it adjusted wrong.

I think you do have it adjusted wrong. Take a look at the back of it. The buckles are attached to straps that in turn attach in loops to the big straps that go around your arms. Those loops are adjustable and slide up and down. Try sliding them all the way up, and it'll be no different than reaching your hands to unclasp a necklace or put your hair in a low ponytail.

Randomity
Feb 25, 2007

Careful what you wish,
You may regret it!


Randomity posted:

We have one. She slept in it exclusively for the first few months but now it's just an expensive white noise machine.

I should elaborate that the reason we don't use it anymore is because when she started rolling over reliably she would sleep fine in her bed (only on her tummy though, which is why we waited until she could roll). We can't have it in any of the rooms that we actually hang out in during the day because my toddler would try to climb into it and break it and hurt himself. It's very nice for what it is but to be honest I am not sure it's any better than your standard side-to-side swing. The white noise function on it is awesome though, it gets really loud which newborns really like.

I wouldn't recommend you buy one for yourself but if someone is wanting to get you an expensive gift and you have the essentials, go for it. That's how we ended up with ours.

Randomity fucked around with this message at 20:45 on Aug 28, 2012

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Ben Davis posted:

I think you do have it adjusted wrong. Take a look at the back of it. The buckles are attached to straps that in turn attach in loops to the big straps that go around your arms. Those loops are adjustable and slide up and down. Try sliding them all the way up, and it'll be no different than reaching your hands to unclasp a necklace or put your hair in a low ponytail.

Ah ha, this is the secret. On the regular Ergo, the strap is attached to loops, which makes it obvious that it can be adjusted up and down. On the Performance (which is what I have,) there aren't loops, and it looks like the strap is sewn in place (as seen here in a photo I found while googling: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_b2ZRv02ip4E/TD8h_3NJNmI/AAAAAAAAGqI/MulGw3WIJ6k/s1600/ergo+do+good+031-w.jpg )

On closer examination, that line that looks like decorative piping is actually a plastic track that I can slide the strap along. So thank you, I think you just solved my problem. I had looked at the manual, but it's just the manual for the regular Ergo with one extra page that shows a photo of the Performance, so it's sort of useless, because my ergo doesn't look like the ones in the diagrams.

orinth
Apr 15, 2003

NFC WEST IS THE BEST

Sorry I hadn't posted in a while, but our triplets are doing well. They are gaining weight and we're just happy as can be! They've started a little breast feeding and all three have latched on for at least a little bit. They're still being fed primarily through a feeding tube. They are 26 days old now and around 33.5 weeks gestational age.

Avery is up to 3 lbs 14 oz



Trevor is up to 4 lbs 5 oz



Brendan is up to 2 lbs 15 oz

CravingSolace
Mar 3, 2012


I'm glad to hear your triplets are doing well! They're adorable! :)

I have a question. Has anyone's stomach ever gone numb?

It sounds strange, but the top of my stomach has little to no feeling. It's really bizarre. I called my friend who's a nurse and she said it might be that he's positioned on a nerve. Is that possible?

Also, in regards to back pain- I went swimming for a bit today, and that helped a lot. That was this afternoon and it's evening now and the pain is back, but it helped for a little while.

A SPECIAL UNICORN
Apr 12, 2006

REALLY FUCKING SPECIAL

.

A SPECIAL UNICORN fucked around with this message at 03:42 on Feb 15, 2019

Alterian
Jan 28, 2003



My husband got his work schedule for next semester (he teaches at a college). It looks like he only has classes Monday - Wednesday with no morning classes (only afternoon and evening) AND they gave him an extra class. That'll be nice with a newborn.

I'm glad his boss is a woman with a kid and understands. She also knows about my whole layoff situation which is why he got the extra class. I was starting to stress about money and figuring out a budget. Things were going to be really tight with just his income and my unemployment, but I think we'll be pretty good now. He's working on his masters degree currently and we've been paying for it out of pocket so there's no extra student loans. He'll be finished next summer and things will be a lot easier.

Its nice to have a little stress relief. Now I just have to deal with my family visiting this weekend/next week. Yes, my crazy mom I've complained about before. :suicide:

Seizure Sloth
Dec 28, 2006

The electroshock seizure of the sloth consists of weak extension followed by tonic flexion and terminal clonus.


CravingSolace posted:

I'm glad to hear your triplets are doing well! They're adorable! :)

I have a question. Has anyone's stomach ever gone numb?

It sounds strange, but the top of my stomach has little to no feeling. It's really bizarre. I called my friend who's a nurse and she said it might be that he's positioned on a nerve. Is that possible?

Also, in regards to back pain- I went swimming for a bit today, and that helped a lot. That was this afternoon and it's evening now and the pain is back, but it helped for a little while.

I'm glad I'm not the only one experiencing this weird raw, numb feeling at the top of my uterus. When I touch it, it feels like my arm or leg when they have fallen asleep for quite some time. I'm 40 weeks along today, and it's been feeling this way for days now. Except as of today, there's also a sharp stabbing pain that accompanies the numbness. I have my next and final appointment tomorrow, so I will ask my midwife about it then. I'm also being induced on September 1st, not too much longer now :D Come on babby!

Doing a little bit of searching on the net, I came across Costochondritis, which sounds like it might be our answer: http://gaylejk.blogspot.com/2008/07/misery-thy-name-is-costochondritis.html

Seizure Sloth fucked around with this message at 00:32 on Aug 30, 2012

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Awesome Kristin posted:

I have a quick question. Is there a way to change a newborn's schedule? Ben seems to have his longest stretch of sleep right after my husband and would normally wake up for the day. Because of this, I don't get any sleep at a normal hour, and end up sleeping the day away during his long naps.

Can I do something to make his longer naps and shorter feedings be at night?

This was a problem for us. My son would sleep for 5-6 hours from the get-go... between 11 am and 4-5pm. Yeah, that was awesome. This was also pretty much his schedule when he was in the womb, where he would be up all night.

What we ended up doing was not letting him sleep for longer than two hours during the day. We'd wake him up, feed him, change him, then back down. The acronym from the baby book we used (Baby Whisperer) was EASY: Eat, Activity, Sleep, and You (presumably nap time for him is you time.) The idea is that you're kind of on a three hour rotation or thereabouts, it probably varies a bit from baby to baby. At night time, we would start cluster feeding him before bedtime, and since he was pretty predictable, we would give him a dreamfeed about 20 minutes before he would have woken up for feeding (this one was difficult to do breastfeeding, so I found it easier to do with a bottle.) It kind of helped keep him in the sleep mode. It was also good to give him a bottle then, because it usually ended up being around ten or eleven that he would get that bottle, so I would go to sleep for 5-6 straight hours, his dad gave him the bottle, and then I took the 12-6 "shift." I found that this helped a lot with with my sanity, since it was a simple routine for me to remember.

The hardest thing was waking him up to eat. He was pretty determined to sleep during the daytime.

Awesome Kristin
May 9, 2008

yum yum yum


ChloroformSeduction posted:

This was a problem for us.

Thank you for this. I hope it helps us.

Here's my new favorite picture of him.

CravingSolace
Mar 3, 2012


Seizure Sloth posted:

I'm glad I'm not the only one experiencing this weird raw, numb feeling at the top of my uterus. When I touch it, it feels like my arm or leg when they have fallen asleep for quite some time. I'm 40 weeks along today, and it's been feeling this way for days now. Except as of today, there's also a sharp stabbing pain that accompanies the numbness. I have my next and final appointment tomorrow, so I will ask my midwife about it then. I'm also being induced on September 1st, not too much longer now :D Come on babby!

Doing a little bit of searching on the net, I came across Costochondritis, which sounds like it might be our answer: http://gaylejk.blogspot.com/2008/07/misery-thy-name-is-costochondritis.html

The pain and location described is how it feels EXACTLY. I'm going to bring this up with my OB at my next appointment. Thank you! :)

bamzilla
Jan 13, 2005

All butt since 2012.




Awesome Kristin posted:

Thank you for this. I hope it helps us.

Here's my new favorite picture of him.



Ben is a good name. I approve.

(it might also be my son's name)



The Ikea $30 changing table is like half the size of a real changing table and I would not recommend it as my 5 week old is almost just as long as it is. :mad:

bamzilla fucked around with this message at 13:54 on Aug 30, 2012

CravingSolace
Mar 3, 2012


Does anyone know how to deal with a pinched sciatic nerve?

I don't know if this boy is just sitting on the nerve or how I managed to pinch it, but pain shoots from my lower back down my left leg, into the knee and around the calf. It's incredibly painful and makes walking excruciating. I've tried sitting/lying down in different positions, but nothing really offers any relief. Tylenol doesn't do anything, either.

skeetied
Mar 10, 2011


A yoga ball helped mine a lot, as did a chiropractor. My midwife recommended one that isn't super voodoo-y crack-y and I could finally walk after getting my pelvis back aligned.

ChloroformSeduction
Sep 3, 2006

THERE'S NO CURE FOR BEING A CUNT, SO PLEASE KEEP REMINDING ME TO SHUT THE FUCK UP

Awesome Kristin posted:

Thank you for this. I hope it helps us.


You're welcome. I thought I was losing my mind until someone recommended that book, actually. I wish I had read up on infant sleep while I was still pregnant. Trying to research it while you're dealing with it is awful, and everyone has recommendations that contradict each other (or you get the "My friend's wife sent this book to loan you, she says it works great and their kids were sleeping through the night at 6 weeks old!" and the book consists of locking the kid in a room for 12 hours and ignoring them.) Having a routine that was fairly flexible was good. The only real "rule" during the day was not letting him sleep longer than 2 hours, sometimes he woke up earlier if he was hungry.

Oh, and we didn't change his diapers at night unless he had a bowel movement, because it kind of woke him up more. Not sure how this would work if you use cloth, but the sposies would wick any wetness away.

Alterian
Jan 28, 2003



What are the best books about teaching baby sign language and about the whole thing with super early toilet training? (I can't remember what its called)

Ben Davis
Apr 17, 2003

I'm as clumsy as I am beautiful

I use the Baby Signing Time dvds. I don't show them to Kosta, but I watch them and then use the sins. I think they're super helpful in showing the correct way to do a sign, how a kid is likely to do it instead, and teaching a song you can use to reinforce it. I got mine from the library.

bamzilla
Jan 13, 2005

All butt since 2012.




ChloroformSeduction posted:


Oh, and we didn't change his diapers at night unless he had a bowel movement, because it kind of woke him up more. Not sure how this would work if you use cloth, but the sposies would wick any wetness away.

I wish I could get away with doing this. I have to change my kid at least 2x at night cause he pees so drat much :mad:

Bank
Feb 20, 2004
I paid five bucks and all I got was this custom title.

So my wife was discharged Wednesday afternoon with a ~6.5lbs baby boy. We're ecstatic and have been aiming to purely breastfeed. We had to give a bit of formula at first to supplement as he didn't eat for two days while we're waiting for the milk to come in.

We spoke to a lactation consultant the day we left, and she recommended us to get a hospital grade pump for a month to help with the feeding, as our kid has a good latch but sucks very slowly so we will need to supplement a bit with a syringe. The thing is, the person that had to approve the pump order denied it for no reason -- we're thinking it's because they gave us a manual pump to go home with instead. I've left voice messages and can't get a response, and even the lactation consultant is impossible to reach (the phone number she gave us goes straight to the general advice nurse line). Aside from making more milk faster, should I be working hard to try and get this hospital grade pump in our hands? I can potentially drive to the hospital and bitch at them, but not sure if it's worth going that route since they were pretty nice during our stay otherwise.

We're probably going to buy an electric pump eventually, so if it's not worth fighting for the hospital grade pump, we can buy an electric one now since the milk is coming through (2-3 oz per feeding).

Another thing is the hospital we were at tried to make us stay in a shared postpartum room, leaving several single rooms empty. After I made them admit that they were "saving" the rooms for C-section births, they immediately gave us a room. Is there some kind of law or health compliance they broke by "discriminating" our natural birth against C-sections by giving us a shared room? I understand that C-sections can be much more difficult on the mothers, but it just seemed unfair that they were saving those rooms for C-sections that may not happen (the rooms would just be empty for the night), so I was just curious.

bamzilla
Jan 13, 2005

All butt since 2012.




Bank posted:

We had to give a bit of formula at first to supplement as he didn't eat for two days while we're waiting for the milk to come in.

Did they not tell you that this is perfectly normal and that babies don't need a lot those first few days in the hospital? This is when they get the colostrum. Milk on average doesn't come in for most women until 2-5 days after birth so supplementing isn't necessary in most situations. I only mention this because I didn't know it with my first and I was stressing out about her not getting much in the hospital when I shouldn't have been stressing at all.

Look and see if your insurance will cover an electric pump. Some will now and a lot more will after January of next year.

Hdip
Aug 21, 2002


We just took a breastfeeding class.

The babies stomach is the size of a large marble the first few days. They don't need very much at first.

They also said that 70% of your production comes while the baby is sucking. So always offer the breast first. Your milk will come in.

MoCookies
Apr 22, 2005



Bank, I'm bummed that you guys didn't get better breastfeeding advice while in the hospital. The first few days are important for setting up a good breastfeeding relationship, and a few drops of colostrum are all that's necessary or expected until the milk comes in. There wasn't a need to supplement with forumla, and it sucks that you guys were worrying about the baby not getting enough milk for those days.

Its awesome to hear how committed you are to exclusive breastfeeding though. My first piece of advice is to find a certification lactation consultant that does house calls and be ready to call her in. I had a really rough start at first, and without the in-person help from my persistent midwives, I would have quit in frustration that first week. I know so many people who have quit breastfeeding who just needed some help from someone knowledgeable and experienced. Please, find a La Leche League meeting for your wife to attend (with the baby of course) ASAP. Its awesome for support, asking questions, but for me, the best thing was being with a bunch of women who didn't think I was a freak for breastfeeding.

My advice for getting off to a good start with breastfeeding is for mum and baby to spend as much time as possible skin-to-skin, and to offer the boob to the baby often. If in doubt - whip the boob out. I wish I had known that "just comfort sucking" wasn't a bad thing at all, and is good for milk production, and isn't a bad habit that needed to be broken. It was frustrating to me to spend so much of the early days getting almost nothing done and my boobs hanging out. It was so helpful to have someone else (my husband) completely in charge of laundry, washing dishes, cooking meals, and making sure I always had water.

Bank
Feb 20, 2004
I paid five bucks and all I got was this custom title.

That's what I figured..unfortunately the wrong RN was attending to our room while we were worried about it, and she said "no big deal just supplement a bit." He drank about 12ml of formula, but hasn't gotten anything else since. He was a bit constipated due to that, but is doing great now, and BMs are starting to turn yellow and slightly brown.

Milk is actually coming in great now, but I'll keep these tips in mind if we start to get frustrated again. I can see why so many people give up as you want to feed your baby, but most people don't know about the size of their stomachs.

We did take a breastfeeding class, but I guess they didn't emphasize the number of days not having to supplement while waiting for the milk to come through so it slipped our minds.

Schweig und tanze
May 22, 2007

STUBBSSSSS INNNNNN SPACEEEE!



Bank posted:

Another thing is the hospital we were at tried to make us stay in a shared postpartum room, leaving several single rooms empty. After I made them admit that they were "saving" the rooms for C-section births, they immediately gave us a room. Is there some kind of law or health compliance they broke by "discriminating" our natural birth against C-sections by giving us a shared room? I understand that C-sections can be much more difficult on the mothers, but it just seemed unfair that they were saving those rooms for C-sections that may not happen (the rooms would just be empty for the night), so I was just curious.

They weren't "discriminating" against you, c-sections are major surgery and while natural childbirth is no picnic, it's not the same as recovering from surgery. You don't know that an emergency wouldn't have come in in the middle of the night, or if surgeries were booked the next day or what. In NYC space is so limited that if you want a private recovery room you have to pay out of pocket for it - at our hospital it's $500 and up per night.

In any case there's no point in worrying about it now, baby is born and healthy and you guys need to get the breast feeding situation sorted out.

CravingSolace
Mar 3, 2012


I feel like I'm at my wit's end. I don't know how I'm supposed to last five more weeks. The pain in my rib and my back are excruciating and so is the pinched sciatic nerve. I've tried everything. I've taken tylenol, hot showers and baths, used a heating pad, tried stretching and also used an exercise ball when I went to the gym today. Nothing helps.

It's at the point where no matter what I'm doing (standing, sitting, lying down), there is no relief or comfortable position. I'm tempted to go to the ER, but I don't know what they'd be able to do. I'm telling myself to quit whining and suck it up, but the pain is awful.

Stairs
Oct 12, 2004


Bank posted:

That's what I figured..unfortunately the wrong RN was attending to our room while we were worried about it, and she said "no big deal just supplement a bit." He drank about 12ml of formula, but hasn't gotten anything else since. He was a bit constipated due to that, but is doing great now, and BMs are starting to turn yellow and slightly brown.

Yeah, I know all about the "wrong RN". Mine literally woke me and my daughter up every hour or two demanding that I feed her or they'd "have no choice" but to give her a bottle. The poor child was exhausted after labor and being born natural and breech and didn't want to wake up, let alone feed. The nurses forceful behaviour (she even shoved my nipple into her mouth causing me a lot of pain) actually caused my baby to be terrified of my breasts. She's pretty much having to be bottle fed primarily now. I'm glad your experience ended up a lot more favorable than mine. They really need to reteach a lot of nurses about this stuff, because the ones that have old fashioned beliefs make it really hard for those of us smart enough to actually want to think for ourselves.

Awesome Kristin
May 9, 2008

yum yum yum


ChloroformSeduction posted:

You're welcome. I thought I was losing my mind until someone recommended that book, actually. I wish I had read up on infant sleep while I was still pregnant. Trying to research it while you're dealing with it is awful, and everyone has recommendations that contradict each other (or you get the "My friend's wife sent this book to loan you, she says it works great and their kids were sleeping through the night at 6 weeks old!" and the book consists of locking the kid in a room for 12 hours and ignoring them.) Having a routine that was fairly flexible was good. The only real "rule" during the day was not letting him sleep longer than 2 hours, sometimes he woke up earlier if he was hungry.

Oh, and we didn't change his diapers at night unless he had a bowel movement, because it kind of woke him up more. Not sure how this would work if you use cloth, but the sposies would wick any wetness away.

Well I've been trying this for a couple days now. There's one evening nap where I just can not wake him up for anything. If you name it, I've tried it. So he ends up sleeping for 3 or more hours at around 5pm. At night he doesn't sleep AT ALL. He's up the whole time either hungry, burping, or dealing with intestinal gas/pooping. He does not have these problems in the day. He goes down to nap totally fine and sleeps solid. We try to keep him stimulated at night for a few hours before bed. His bath is at night and we use the night time lavender stuff. I'm going crazy.

starshine
Nov 26, 2007


CravingSolace, have you tried swimming? It did a lot to ease my joint and nerve pain during the last trimester. I think you're right that the ER probably couldn't do anything additional for you - I'd probably call the OB/midwife. I had intense rib pain at one point and my midwife did some blood tests to make sure my liver function was OK because an enlarged liver could cause pain there, no idea if that's something your HP has mentioned to you. For the sciatica, my MIL swears by walking around backward. If things are desperate, give that a try? Sorry you're in so much pain, pregnancy does such lovely things to the body :(

starshine fucked around with this message at 02:36 on Sep 2, 2012

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Colton
Mar 30, 2003

Member of the Kevin Smith look-alikes local #45317

I have another question about max. He is close to 2 months now and he is still a sleepy eater. From the day he was born he would always pass out when breastfeeding. We've tried to keep him awake by taking his clothes off, changing him before a feeding, burping, switching breasts, putting cold rags on him... hell, i've even given him wet willies and all that does is make him suck for 2 seconds. Any suggestions? Or is this still normal? When the hell is he going to grow out of this because he didn't gain any weight at all last week

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