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Sten Freak
Sep 10, 2008

Despite all of these shortcomings, the Sten still has a long track record of shooting people right in the face.


College Slice

Thanks. I have the feeling those mini and micro lathes are precision instruments, and I do not know if I need precision. I just need a tool that will hold and spin the piece so that I can make the cut and turn the rim down. Still, 400 may be worth it given what brass costs. The best possible solution is Privi Partisan steps up and makes it but I'm not holding my breath.

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IuniusBrutus
Jul 24, 2010



Had my first reloading failure today. I was shooting my Beretta 92 and everything is going great...until I have a failure to feed. Look at the "cartridge" until to discover it is just a casing with no bullet. Live primer in it. Huh. I ran out of bullets before primers, so I figured I must have just set the live case in my ammo box for safe keeping. Checked barrel for squib, no problems, good to shoot. No biggie.

Then, while I'm feverishly hoarding brass, I see one of the 9mm bullets I'd been using lying on the ground. Somehow, the cartridge came apart in the magazine, catapulting the bullet out of the gun along with the previous fired casing, and jammed trying to feed the empty case.

I'm using a Lee 4-die set, and haven't had any other problems with cartridges coming apart. I meticulously check Min OAL and Max OAL on every cartridge. Am I not seating the bullet firm enough, or should I increase the factory taper die a bit?

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Sten Freak posted:

Thanks. I have the feeling those mini and micro lathes are precision instruments, and I do not know if I need precision. I just need a tool that will hold and spin the piece so that I can make the cut and turn the rim down. Still, 400 may be worth it given what brass costs. The best possible solution is Privi Partisan steps up and makes it but I'm not holding my breath.

Wait, did you buy a subgun in a caliber that isn't commercially produced?

Even with a progressive press that has to be like a 1:1k ratio of shooting:reloading time.

thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON

IuniusBrutus posted:

Then, while I'm feverishly hoarding brass, I see one of the 9mm bullets I'd been using lying on the ground. Somehow, the cartridge came apart in the magazine, catapulting the bullet out of the gun along with the previous fired casing, and jammed trying to feed the empty case.

I'm using a Lee 4-die set, and haven't had any other problems with cartridges coming apart. I meticulously check Min OAL and Max OAL on every cartridge. Am I not seating the bullet firm enough, or should I increase the factory taper die a bit?

I've had cases fail to hold the bullet in place, and I honestly have no idea why. If you run your fingernail over the case mouth, and you're getting any crimp happening, you shouldn't have bullets falling out.

Also, Sten Freak did indeed buy a subgun in a caliber that isn't commercially produced.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Sten Freak posted:

Thanks. I have the feeling those mini and micro lathes are precision instruments, and I do not know if I need precision. I just need a tool that will hold and spin the piece so that I can make the cut and turn the rim down. Still, 400 may be worth it given what brass costs. The best possible solution is Privi Partisan steps up and makes it but I'm not holding my breath.

Turning down the rim isn't a big deal. Not cutting the extractor too deep or too far up the case and causing the case to blow when fired is kinda a big deal.

This is the best setup I've seen for reworking the cases.

Because the jaws would crush the brass it looks like people either turn a mandrel, insert it into the round and clamp it in the chuck (which leaves marks on the case) or chuck the mandrel and then build a clamp like the guy above did.

The tool he's using was made to make all the cuts at the same time. That's a pretty big time savings. You're making a single plunge into the material rather than making multiple cuts.

This sort of thing sounds like a really fun project to me but if you don't know how to use a lathe and wouldn't have much use for one otherwise you may be getting in a bit over your head. I've wanted one of those little lathes for a while but my little apartment is already pretty cramped with tools.

E: loving reddit

MisterOblivious fucked around with this message at 00:42 on Jan 3, 2012

Sten Freak
Sep 10, 2008

Despite all of these shortcomings, the Sten still has a long track record of shooting people right in the face.


College Slice

MisterOblivious posted:

Turning down the rim isn't a big deal. Not cutting the extractor too deep or too far up the case and causing the case to blow when fired is kinda a big deal.

[This](http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?t=13870) is the best setup I've seen for reworking the cases.

Because the jaws would crush the brass it looks like people either turn a mandrel, insert it into the round and clamp it in the chuck (which leaves marks on the case) or chuck the mandrel and then build a clamp like the guy above did.

The tool he's using was made to make all the cuts at the same time. That's a pretty big time savings. You're making a single plunge into the material rather than making multiple cuts.

This sort of thing sounds like a really fun project to me but if you don't know how to use a lathe and wouldn't have much use for one otherwise you may be getting in a bit over your head. I've wanted one of those little lathes for a while but my little apartment is already pretty cramped with tools.
Well that setup is just awesome but looks like a one-off custom dealio done by some guys with skills. He should go in the biz of selling his 7.65L brass using that gear but it's probably a liability risk.

Maybe I'll use up the brass I have now and then decide how badly I want to make my own. Thanks for the info.

moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

GET SWOLE


My 550B spat out about 70 subsonic 30-06 rounds the other day and today I got to fire them and omg it is so much fun!

The other guys at the range all had nice Aks ARs and whatever but they all felt that my soft shooting and almost totally quiet old 30-06 repeater was bad rear end

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

Sten Freak posted:

General lathe questions over several posts.

You would need an actual machine lathe. It's less for the percision (people can do amazing things freehand) it's for the ability to get a solid setup so your tools don't chatter like crazy.

If memory serves (and please correct me if I am wrong) the 7.65 Longue is a straight walled case? (absolutetly no taper?) If that is the case you could take a piece of bar stock. (I would suggest aluminum) and cut a mandrel that will JUST fit on the ID of the case (I would use already sized cases so they are all as similar as possible) and then gently chuck on the case with the mandrel on the inside.
It would keep the case from being crushed by the chuck jaws and just resizing it when you're done should iron out any smaller dings that the chuck leaves.

Also remember that Brass objects that small don't require huge amounts of clamping force to be held secure enough to turn.

thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/58...-long-box-of-20

Woah.

And if I remember correctly, you can use .32 Long brass as a starting point, turn down the rim/extractor groove, and then size/trim it.

Mishra
Dec 12, 2007



Ok I just bit the bullet and bought a lee loadmaster progressive press. Right now I got .40 cal dies, but want to reload for my garand at some point. any good tutorials that don't need archives access? Any common beginner mistakes?

thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON

Mishra posted:

Ok I just bit the bullet and bought a lee loadmaster progressive press. Right now I got .40 cal dies, but want to reload for my garand at some point. any good tutorials that don't need archives access? Any common beginner mistakes?

The OP of this very thread

Mishra
Dec 12, 2007



thermobollocks posted:

The OP of this very thread

Looks like I missed the link, I'm seeing people saying .40 S&W has a tendency to blow out, has anyone had any problems?

Sten Freak
Sep 10, 2008

Despite all of these shortcomings, the Sten still has a long track record of shooting people right in the face.


College Slice

shalafi4 posted:

You would need an actual machine lathe. It's less for the percision (people can do amazing things freehand) it's for the ability to get a solid setup so your tools don't chatter like crazy.

If memory serves (and please correct me if I am wrong) the 7.65 Longue is a straight walled case? (absolutetly no taper?) If that is the case you could take a piece of bar stock. (I would suggest aluminum) and cut a mandrel that will JUST fit on the ID of the case (I would use already sized cases so they are all as similar as possible) and then gently chuck on the case with the mandrel on the inside.
It would keep the case from being crushed by the chuck jaws and just resizing it when you're done should iron out any smaller dings that the chuck leaves.

Also remember that Brass objects that small don't require huge amounts of clamping force to be held secure enough to turn.
I think there is the tiniest bit of taper but I don't have the dimensions jpg handy. That all makes sense. I've got 500 cases so when they wear out I'll look into the lathe. Thanks.

Yeah Midway's price is off the charts. Someone else has it listed cheaper, Buffalo something? But they don't have it in stock.

thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON

Mishra posted:

Looks like I missed the link, I'm seeing people saying .40 S&W has a tendency to blow out, has anyone had any problems?



.40 S&W by itself is a rather high pressure cartridge, with little case volume, which leads to much smaller room for powder charge, primer variations, and seating depth. The blowout tendency often referenced, however, doesn't have to do with the cartridge, but rather the chamber dimensions in Glocks. For better reliability, Glocks in .40 have much looser chambers around the base, so if you see some .40 brass that came from a Glock, you'll notice bulging around the base. This substantially decreases case life, and if you overuse your brass, you can indeed run the risk of blowouts. I've heard 5 loadings as a max for .40 through a Glock.

Redding makes a full length resizer that will de-Glock your brass, but I haven't had a chance to try it yet.

You can also get a Lone Wolf barrel, and have a correct chamber, and shoot lead.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


This ought to be in the OP:
http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?t=33855

Mishra
Dec 12, 2007



Well I shoot a sig but my buddy has a glock, that's why I'm a little worried. Using the brass 5 times seems ok though. Has any one used the lee bulge removing tool?

thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON

Mishra posted:

Well I shoot a sig but my buddy has a glock, that's why I'm a little worried. Using the brass 5 times seems ok though. Has any one used the lee bulge removing tool?

I wasn't aware Lee made one. Oddly enough, their die sets say don't reload for .40 Glocks ever at all

Mishra
Dec 12, 2007



thermobollocks posted:

I wasn't aware Lee made one. Oddly enough, their die sets say don't reload for .40 Glocks ever at all

Yes this also made me Nervous, but I figure it's probably them covering their rear end, otherwise why make the tool?

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

Sten Freak posted:

I think there is the tiniest bit of taper but I don't have the dimensions jpg handy. That all makes sense. I've got 500 cases so when they wear out I'll look into the lathe. Thanks.

Yeah Midway's price is off the charts. Someone else has it listed cheaper, Buffalo something? But they don't have it in stock.

If there's a tiny bit of taper through some trial and error make the mandrel as big as the widest part of the ID of the case and force it into place..

basically MAKE it a straight case then full length size it back into shape... I am doing something similar with a different cartridge conversion.

B4Ctom1
Oct 5, 2003

OVERWORKED COCK


Slippery Tilde

Mishra posted:

Looks like I missed the link, I'm seeing people saying .40 S&W has a tendency to blow out, has anyone had any problems?

When I reload 40 S&W, I run every brass through this
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/35...-kit-40-s-and-w

I screw this and any old 2 liter bottle I find on top of it to catch them all
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/78...-bottle-adapter

they cant fall back out, and if they are in the bottle I know they have been debulged.

when I get done loading rounds I drop them into this to make sure they will never misfeed at the range
http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=...RTRIDGE-CHECKER

thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON

Does the Redding one need lube?

B4Ctom1
Oct 5, 2003

OVERWORKED COCK


Slippery Tilde

thermobollocks posted:

Does the Redding one need lube?

yes but not often.

Mishra
Dec 12, 2007



Awesome, what powder do you use? I hear slightly slower burning is better?

Pursus
Nov 27, 2007

Hook on!


His Divine Shadow posted:

This ought to be in the OP:
http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?t=33855

I read the first page and I still don't know what they are recommending. Half the people are saying they've used thousands of them, and the other half say to never use them.

If you want post a quick summary with a link to the thread, I'll gladly link to it in the effortpost section.

IuniusBrutus
Jul 24, 2010



I know there are some programs out there to help calculate velocities, pressures, etc. of handloads. What are they?

Wa11y
Jul 23, 2002

Did I say "cookies?" I meant, "Fire in your face!"

IuniusBrutus posted:

I know there are some programs out there to help calculate velocities, pressures, etc. of handloads. What are they?

If you're talking for load development, I think that QuickLoad is the go-to application. But if there's something else out there, I'd like to hear it.

Absolut_V
Oct 8, 2003

Superman That Jones!

I use a Lee set to run .40SW in my Taurus. I don't have feeding issues unless my pistol is very dirty. I do use the factory crimp die which seems to help since I use a lot of Glocked brass. I like Unique for powder. Generally 6.2gr over a Ranier 155gr flat nose.

Absolut_V fucked around with this message at 04:52 on Jan 5, 2012

A Magical Unicorn
Mar 21, 2010

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Is there any reason I can't use the Trail Boss reduced load guidlines to make some low-powered 7.62x54R rounds firing jacketed bullets?

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Pursus posted:

I read the first page and I still don't know what they are recommending. Half the people are saying they've used thousands of them, and the other half say to never use them.

If you want post a quick summary with a link to the thread, I'll gladly link to it in the effortpost section.

You can use lead bullets in glock factory barrels. Thats really the gist of it, the hows and whys is found in the thread for anyone who cares enough to consider doing this themselves, I thought the message was pretty clear by the first page though. I guess I could sum it up as, size your bullets to your barrel. Just going out and buying commercial lead bullets will probably lead you to nothing good. Best is to slug your barrel and then cast your own with a suitable mold, or find a bullet dealer than can supply you the bullet in the size you need.

Edit: There are a few people in that thread that go against the grain but so far one of them just said it was so and has never actually tried it, the other used commercial cast bullets that where probably too small (probably the most common issue), as the rifling of this type requires a slightly larger bullet usually.

----------
Effort edit:

Since it was linked as an effortpost and I didn't put much effort into it I fiured I should actually put some of that into this post and try and condense the information of this thread here:
http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?t=33855

Lead bullets in glock factory barrels.

OK so you've heard that you can't use lead bullets in your glock because of its polygonal rifling, well this is not true. What is true is that it's more finnicky and having the proper bullet fit to your barrel is crucial.

There are ofcourse loads of people who have had issues with lead bullets in their glocks and I bet you most of them never slugged their barrels and found out what size they should use, I also bet most of them purchased commercially made bullets that could've had any number of deficiencies that will be exaggerated in a Glock. Such as bullets not big enough to seal properly against the barrel walls, lovely lube that hardly helps at all, bullets of improper hardness can also factor in. So it's no problem to see why this rumor exists, because it is different from loading for a normally rifled gun.

As the linked thread also shows, polygonal rifling is old and has been used back in the days when jacketed rounds weren't even around yet, so clearly it's a functional concept.

I would say that shooting cast out of a Glock is mostly for those of us who cast our own bullets and can size the bullets to the required size as well as the preferred hardness and ofcourse the best lube. But to be sure you could find what you need from some commerical loader too.

The important thing is to test your way to a load that works for you, checking regularly for leading and pressure signs. Starting by slugging the bore and sizing your bullets accordingly is the first step. Some of the talk indicate that glocks might like slightly harder alloys too but IMO thats quite often a personal thing that can depend on any number of factors, just test and see what works.

And if you are unsure about any of this or think its too much work etc, just buy an aftermarket barrel I guess.

His Divine Shadow fucked around with this message at 17:30 on Jan 5, 2012

Uncle Caveman
Jun 16, 2006

I'm sorry, I can't hear you over the sound of how awesome I am.


A Magical Unicorn posted:

Is there any reason I can't use the Trail Boss reduced load guidlines to make some low-powered 7.62x54R rounds firing jacketed bullets?
Nope. That pdf even mentions that jacketed is a-ok.

Pursus
Nov 27, 2007

Hook on!


His Divine Shadow posted:

You can use lead bullets in glock factory barrels. Thats really the gist of it, the hows and whys is found in the thread for anyone who cares enough to consider doing this themselves, I thought the message was pretty clear by the first page though. I guess I could sum it up as, size your bullets to your barrel. Just going out and buying commercial lead bullets will probably lead you to nothing good. Best is to slug your barrel and then cast your own with a suitable mold, or find a bullet dealer than can supply you the bullet in the size you need.

Edit: There are a few people in that thread that go against the grain but so far one of them just said it was so and has never actually tried it, the other used commercial cast bullets that where probably too small (probably the most common issue), as the rifling of this type requires a slightly larger bullet usually.

Cool, I linked this in the effortpost section. If you want, edit the link to that thread into your post.

kuffs
Mar 29, 2007

Projectile Dysfunction


My 550 came in last night, already cranked out 50 rounds of 45acp target loads

Presently they are 200gr Berry's plated SWCs over 3.7gr of VV N310. 1.255 OAL and a crimp of .472.

Gonna test them out later today or tomorrow.

IuniusBrutus
Jul 24, 2010



Reloading owns. As I trust my powder measure and seating die, I'm getting quicker - knocked out about 100 rounds of 9mm in 2 hours while watching a movie. Time to get a progressive.

I'm going to vary things up a bit though. I'm thinking about ordering some 147gr 9mm and 200gr SWC .45 from Berry's. I'm not worried about the 9mm - my pistols have fed 147 fine before - but what are the odds that the SWC are going to make my dad's 1911 kill itself? It's 100% reliable with 230 ball.

Not Nipsy Russell
Oct 6, 2004

Failure is always an option.


I'm wanting to load up wadcutters in .38spl. However, I'm seeing mixed messages about expanding the case, seating, and crimping.
How deep do I have to expand the case? The normal amount, just to clear the case edge away so it doesn't shave the bullet? All the way down?

I was reminded of this becuase I shot an S&B Wadcutter today, and it had shaved lead down the side. Even the commercial factories do it from time to time.

Any suggestions for wadcutter loading references?

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

I have loaded a ton of .38 wadcutters. I just expand as normal and make sure they are started straight before I seat them. I don't bother to crimp.

I also seat mine just a little above the casemouth for reasons I can't articulate. It just seemed like the thing to do.

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

I generally "crimp" them enough to just enough to take the bell back out of the case so it's smooth all the way down.

thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON

I bell enough that the bullet sits straight and seating it doesn't shave off any lead, and I don't bother crimping.

markoshark
Nov 6, 2005


So.
Pressure signs - what to look for exactly?

And because i'm a silly goat
140 gr bullets, what powerder weight and what powder are you guys using?
in 6.5x55

markoshark fucked around with this message at 08:28 on Jan 10, 2012

thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON

markoshark posted:

So.
Pressure signs - what to look for exactly?

And because i'm a silly goat
140 gr bullets, what powerder weight and what powder are you guys using?
in 6.5x55

The primer is basically the first indicator, and malformed brass is a sign of serious poo poo.

A short list of them off the top of my head:

Difficulty extracting
Primer flattening (when accompanied by other factors)
Primer blowout
Excessive wear on primer pockets, compared to, say, a practice or "factory" load. That is, the pocket loosens in fewer loadings than you expect
Primer cratering, that is, the primer flows into the firing pin channel and you get a raised volcano-looking thing around the indent (note that some firing pin channels are fatter than others -- my Beretta does this even on min loads)
Higher proportion of split necks than you're used to, or split necks occurring sooner on a particular type of brass. For example, if using Federal brass, I can get 8 loadings until I have to throw it out, and by loading #4 I'm seeing split necks, maybe my load's a little hot.
The base of the case flows into the extractor groove
A white ring around the area where the webbing of the case (the thick part at the base) meets the thin case walls - This is a sign of imminent case head separation, which means your case rips itself in two.

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briefcasefullof
Sep 25, 2004
[This Space for Rent]

It should also be noted that the ABCs of Reloading mentions that primer flattening or cratering may actually be somewhat normal if the primer is known to be on the soft side. However, if cratering/flattening occurs and the case is also doing something else, like flowing into the extractor groove, then you're getting pressure signs / approaching maximum loads.

E: And I totally missed you mentioning flowing into the extractor groove

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