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Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

skipdogg posted:

I'm tossing the idea around of buying the 5th gen AEBS. Refurbs are 85 bucks right now and I don't need AC coverage. Used ones are going for around 50 bucks

Sounds like a good idea to me. Definitely worth saving $115 over. Are there any problems working with PCs?

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Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade




No problems, the utilities are available in Windows versions and are updated at about the same time as the Mac ones.

The refurb AEBS 5th gen is a good deal since it's literally the same as a new AEBS, as Apple themselves has replaced any defective parts and you get the same warranty as a new one.

Also, the AEBS has a 1.2 GHz processor and 128 MB of RAM, it's beefy enough to handle a boatload of clients. It also has 3X3 MIMO if you have compatible wireless hardware.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 02:02 on Dec 31, 2013

Psimitry
Jun 3, 2003

Hostile negotiations since 1978

So I've done some googling around for a fix to this issue and can't seem to find one.

Basically, it's that Windows 8 is completely hit-or-miss whether or not it will access a NAS box.

(and yes, I'm aware that people hate Win8 with a passion, but with Start8 installed, I actually rather like Win 8. This is the only problem I ever have with it)

When I try to access my NAS (or previously, my Windows 7 based server), I'll do my standard \\server on an explorer window, and I've got a 25% chance of it coming up. When it comes back and says "cannot access \\server", I try again. I've got probably a 50% of it coming up. I'll try a few more times and eventually reboot, where it usually works. The one computer in the house running Windows 7 has absolutely no problem with this.

Here's the strange bit - it may work one moment, and then if I close the explorer window and try again a few moments later, it might not.

The google work I've done seems to indicate that it is a credentials problem, so I've added the server to both windows and generic credentials. That seemed to solve it for a bit, but afterwards, no dice.

Anyone have any thoughts on how I might be able to solve this? It's really rather aggravating.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





The fact that it seems like you're having to go to great lengths to get everything assigned an IP properly still makes me think there's another issue at hand.

What does your network layout look like, and what IP does each device have?

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

Binary Badger posted:

No problems, the utilities are available in Windows versions and are updated at about the same time as the Mac ones.

The refurb AEBS 5th gen is a good deal since it's literally the same as a new AEBS, as Apple themselves has replaced any defective parts and you get the same warranty as a new one.

Also, the AEBS has a 1.2 GHz processor and 128 MB of RAM, it's beefy enough to handle a boatload of clients. It also has 3X3 MIMO if you have compatible wireless hardware.

Welp, for $85 that sounds like a no brainer. Just ordered one!

Psimitry
Jun 3, 2003

Hostile negotiations since 1978

IOwnCalculus posted:

The fact that it seems like you're having to go to great lengths to get everything assigned an IP properly still makes me think there's another issue at hand.

What does your network layout look like, and what IP does each device have?

Let's see if I can do this:

code:
DIR-655 Router
w |||
w ||-Main Desktop PC
w |-Network Attached Storage
w -Switch #1
w     |||||
w     ||||-Bedroom HTPC
w     |||-Living Room HTPC
w     ||-Printer
w     |-Xbox 360
w     -Switch #2
w          ||
w          |-Roommate Computer
w          -Additional ports for future expansion
wwwwwireless
     w
     w-Windows 8 tablet
     w-Android phone
     w-Nest Thermostat
Main desktop PC: 192.168.0.100
NAS: 192.168.0.107
Bedroom HTPC: 192.168.0.104
Living Room HTPC: 192.168.0.103
Printer: 192.168.0.105
Roommate Computer: 192.168.0.106
Xbox 360: Haven't turned on since switching over router (probably won't - am planning on selling it)
Windows 8 Tablet: 192.168.0.102
Android Phone: 192.168.0.101
Nest Thermostat: Havent reconnected it since switching over router

Hope that helps, again, this isn't a problem on any unit NOT running Windows 8. My roommate's computer runs Windows 7, no problem accessing it. Before I upgraded my desktop and the living room HTPC to Win 8, they had no issues accessing NAS/Storage Server.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Alright, I was probably reading more into what must've been a typo when you said you had your NAS on a 192.168.1.x IP and then started rattling off 192.168.0.x IPs for everything else.

If you map the share to a drive name on the Win8 box, does that work? Does \\192.168.0.107 work even when the name doesn't?

Psimitry
Jun 3, 2003

Hostile negotiations since 1978

IOwnCalculus posted:

If you map the share to a drive name on the Win8 box, does that work? Does \\192.168.0.107 work even when the name doesn't?

Kind of. Once I get the connection established, mapping a network drive seems to hold the connection open. But I still have to go through the same issues to get it connected initially.

I haven't tried accessing the ip directly. I'll give that a try when I get home.

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


My parents have a pretty big house and need a new router. I hooked them up with an old WRT54G with Tomato that I had lying around and it worked pretty good until a few months ago it started dropping connections like crazy. At first I thought that it was just that their iPhones and iPads had tiny antennas and were moving out of range, so I moved the router into the very center of the house and got them a repeater for the house addition where they had the most problems. During these past holidays, they mentioned that their wireless woes never stopped. It turns out that a repeater doesn't have anything to repeat if the source router is crapping itself regularly... I'm tired of it, they're tired of it, they gave me money to replace it. So what's a good router for a 2000 ft2 3-story? I might as well upgrade them to N while I'm at it. I run an RT-N16 at home. The only thing I wish it did was dual band.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

RT-N66U or the TP-Link TL-WDR4900 will work very well for them. Everyone on this thread is in love with the N66U so take your pick, if you want to stick with Tomato go with the N66U.

Mr Shiny Pants
Nov 12, 2012


Psimitry posted:

Kind of. Once I get the connection established, mapping a network drive seems to hold the connection open. But I still have to go through the same issues to get it connected initially.

I haven't tried accessing the ip directly. I'll give that a try when I get home.

Can you try from the command line? That usually gives a bit more information.

code:
 net use \\ip-address\sharename /user:computername\username 
where computername is the name of the server that hosts the share you trying to connect to.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Is there a proper way to add a static DNS entry to a router? I've got a domain pointed to my external IP so I can access me stuff when I'm away, I'd like to have things so it resolves to the internal IP when I'm on the network. I added an entry to static DHCP which works but is there a better way to do it? I'm using Tomato USB by Shibby.

Psimitry
Jun 3, 2003

Hostile negotiations since 1978

Mr Shiny Pants posted:

Can you try from the command line? That usually gives a bit more information.

I can, but for some reason, everything has been working perfectly over the past few days. I now have a unit that stays on 24/7 (AMD E-350 HTPC box running on SSD), that uses the NAS for mass storage, and it seems like as long as one computer in the house is making a constant connection (in this case from a mapped network drive), everything else can access the server easily.

Very strange. The thread title fits.

Mr Shiny Pants
Nov 12, 2012


Ashex posted:

Is there a proper way to add a static DNS entry to a router? I've got a domain pointed to my external IP so I can access me stuff when I'm away, I'd like to have things so it resolves to the internal IP when I'm on the network. I added an entry to static DHCP which works but is there a better way to do it? I'm using Tomato USB by Shibby.

You would need an internal DNS server that hosts your zone. That way can add the host you want to connect to and set its IP as the internal one.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Mr Shiny Pants posted:

You would need an internal DNS server that hosts your zone. That way can add the host you want to connect to and set its IP as the internal one.

I'm using the router for my internal DNS though, I have the domain on it set to something different but I could change it to match the primary domain. Would that work? Assuming the url is snacks.strawberry.com, the internal hostname for the server is snacks and I set the domain on the router to strawberry.com. By doing so, wouldn't snacks.strawberry.com automatically resolve to the internal ip without requiring a special dns entry?

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

Ashex posted:

I'm using the router for my internal DNS though, I have the domain on it set to something different but I could change it to match the primary domain. Would that work? Assuming the url is snacks.strawberry.com, the internal hostname for the server is snacks and I set the domain on the router to strawberry.com. By doing so, wouldn't snacks.strawberry.com automatically resolve to the internal ip without requiring a special dns entry?

Not unless you host an authoritative DNS server for strawberry.com with an A record or CNAME to snacks, no. Without knowing what setting the domain does on your router (is it dnsmasq? some vendor thing?), it's impossible to say, but DNS doesn't work without "special entries". Hostnames that look like they automatically work do so because dynamic DNS is creating A records behind the scenes or one already exists.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


kid sinister posted:

My parents have a pretty big house and need a new router. I hooked them up with an old WRT54G with Tomato that I had lying around and it worked pretty good until a few months ago it started dropping connections like crazy. At first I thought that it was just that their iPhones and iPads had tiny antennas and were moving out of range, so I moved the router into the very center of the house and got them a repeater for the house addition where they had the most problems. During these past holidays, they mentioned that their wireless woes never stopped. It turns out that a repeater doesn't have anything to repeat if the source router is crapping itself regularly... I'm tired of it, they're tired of it, they gave me money to replace it. So what's a good router for a 2000 ft2 3-story? I might as well upgrade them to N while I'm at it. I run an RT-N16 at home. The only thing I wish it did was dual band.

Consider a 5th Gen Airport Extreme base station. They are 85 dollars refurbished from Apple right now and do dual band 2.4/5Ghz and are by all accounts rock solid routers. If you want to just set it and forget it, it's what I would pick for my extended family right now. The 85 dollar price tag is pretty decent as well. There are a few dual band routers that are cheaper, but you can count on not having to futz with the AEBS.

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

Gotta love my lovely Verizon router. 17 Mbps with 802.11g. Can't wait for the AEBS to show up!

Mr Shiny Pants
Nov 12, 2012


Ashex posted:

I'm using the router for my internal DNS though, I have the domain on it set to something different but I could change it to match the primary domain. Would that work? Assuming the url is snacks.strawberry.com, the internal hostname for the server is snacks and I set the domain on the router to strawberry.com. By doing so, wouldn't snacks.strawberry.com automatically resolve to the internal ip without requiring a special dns entry?

If you want this to work:

snacks.strawberry.com resolves on the outside internet to your external IP right? So when a machine ask for snacks.strawberry.com it asks its configured DNS server for com.strawberry.snacks. and the configured DNS server will ask around for the DNS server that hosts this domain and if it has a record that is called snacks.

If found, it will return the IP address configured for this record. On the internet this will be your external IP address.

If you want to configure this as follows: When on the LAN snacks resolves to the internal IP address of the server and on the outside (internet) to the external IP address of the server you are creating a splitbrain DNS configuration. This in fact "breaks" how things are supposed to work but it gets done all the time. You want one URL to point to the same server wherever you are.

You need to create an internal DNS server that hosts strawberry.com and which has a record for snacks that resolves to your internal IP address for the server. All your LAN clients should point to this DNS server for this to work. This way when on your LAN your clients will ask the local DNS for snacks.strawberry.com and the internal address of the server will be returned. On the internet, due to the magic of DHCP, you will get your ISP's DNS servers and those have no idea of your own internal LAN DNS server, only the regular DNS servers, and so clients will get the external IP when asking for snacks.strawberry.com.

As Evol pointed out: Without knowing the "magic" stuff your router does this is how you usually build something like this.

Mr Shiny Pants fucked around with this message at 16:31 on Jan 3, 2014

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Mr Shiny Pants posted:

If you want this to work:

snacks.strawberry.com resolves on the outside internet to your external IP right? So when a machine ask for snacks.strawberry.com it asks its configured DNS server for com.strawberry.snacks. and the configured DNS server will ask around for the DNS server that hosts this domain and if it has a record that is called snacks.

If found, it will return the IP address configured for this record. On the internet this will be your external IP address.

If you want to configure this as follows: When on the LAN snacks resolves to the internal IP address of the server and on the outside (internet) to the external IP address of the server you are creating a splitbrain DNS configuration. This in fact "breaks" how things are supposed to work but it gets done all the time. You want one URL to point to the same server wherever you are.

You need to create an internal DNS server that hosts strawberry.com and which has a record for snacks that resolves to your internal IP address for the server. All your LAN clients should point to this DNS server for this to work. This way when on your LAN your clients will ask the local DNS for snacks.strawberry.com and the internal address of the server will be returned. On the internet, due to the magic of DHCP, you will get your ISP's DNS servers and those have no idea of your own internal LAN DNS server, only the regular DNS servers, and so clients will get the external IP when asking for snacks.strawberry.com.

As Evol pointed out: Without knowing the "magic" stuff your router does this is how you usually build something like this.


Yeah, this makes perfect sense. I've only dealt with this type of DNS configuration in an Active Directory environment, I want to see if I can pull this off with just the router (I could host it on my file server but I don't want that dependency). Tomato USB uses dnsmasq for the dns server, I've got it configured so it's the primary DNS server for all clients on my network and there's a section in the admin interface to add my own custom dnsmasq configuration.

Mr Shiny Pants
Nov 12, 2012


Reading about DNSmasq I am pretty sure you could get this to work.

I might be as simple as putting your hostname in /etc/hosts.

It's not entirely clear yet.

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

Ashex posted:

Yeah, this makes perfect sense. I've only dealt with this type of DNS configuration in an Active Directory environment, I want to see if I can pull this off with just the router (I could host it on my file server but I don't want that dependency). Tomato USB uses dnsmasq for the dns server, I've got it configured so it's the primary DNS server for all clients on my network and there's a section in the admin interface to add my own custom dnsmasq configuration.

AD doesn't do anything special regarding DNS. It's MS-DNS with dynamic updates from delegated DHCP servers (Microsoft has a checkbox for this).

Put:

address=/snack.strawberry.com/1.2.3.4

In the DNSMasq custom configuration box on Tomato.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

evol262 posted:

AD doesn't do anything special regarding DNS. It's MS-DNS with dynamic updates from delegated DHCP servers (Microsoft has a checkbox for this).

Put:

address=/snack.strawberry.com/1.2.3.4

In the DNSMasq custom configuration box on Tomato.

Yeah, I probably should have used the proper name (Even then it was mainly creating A/CNAME records).

I just arrived to that conjecture when you posted, looks like this will cover forward and reverse lookups:

address=/snack.strawberry.com/192.168.1.31
ptr-record=snack,192.168.1.31


Although should I not add a ptr-record since the record for snack already exists?

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

Ashex posted:

Yeah, I probably should have used the proper name (Even then it was mainly creating A/CNAME records).

I just arrived to that conjecture when you posted, looks like this will cover forward and reverse lookups:

address=/snack.strawberry.com/192.168.1.31
ptr-record=snack,192.168.1.31


Although should I not add a ptr-record since the record for snack already exists?

You need a ptr for DNS to work properly if you ever want to do anything moderately security related (Kerberos, reasonable SSH timeouts, etc).

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

evol262 posted:

You need a ptr for DNS to work properly if you ever want to do anything moderately security related (Kerberos, reasonable SSH timeouts, etc).

Gotcha, that's part of what I'm working on right now so I'll put that in.

Coldstone Cream-my-pants
Jun 21, 2007


skipdogg posted:

Consider a 5th Gen Airport Extreme base station. They are 85 dollars refurbished from Apple right now and do dual band 2.4/5Ghz and are by all accounts rock solid routers. If you want to just set it and forget it, it's what I would pick for my extended family right now. The 85 dollar price tag is pretty decent as well. There are a few dual band routers that are cheaper, but you can count on not having to futz with the AEBS.

I'm trying to take your advice here too. Is dual band 2.4/5Ghz a perfectly no-downsides setup? Because we have 2.4Ghz wireless phone stations in every room. Would I have to do anything special special to get it on 5Ghz?

Edit: I'm beginning to think my problem is network range and wall penetration so that an Airport Extreme isn't quite a solution. I get excellent speeds closer to the router. Should I be looking at point to point or what for boosting coverage of a ~60 mbps connection? Currently sporting a combo modem/router supplied by Verizon (Actiontec MI424WR Rev I) which I'm reading might not support "range extenders".

Coldstone Cream-my-pants fucked around with this message at 02:48 on Jan 4, 2014

emdash
Oct 19, 2003

and?


Is there anything to be done about DPC latency on a Centrino 6300/ndis.sys? Any driver version that's known to have fewer DPC spikes? Any wifi cards that are known to do better with DPC latency? This thing turns every DirectX game into a stuttershow :\

Positronic Spleen
May 4, 2010


I'm getting internet through Time Warner and own neither a modem or router. Apparently they're going to charge me about $11 a month for both, so I'm definitely looking into just buying them instead of renting. I would need a modem off of this list. The thing is, it seems cheaper overall to just buy a modem/router combo, but I don't know if those are a good value. It's just for a relatively small apartment, so probably 1-3 devices tops, but there are a lot of apartments in the area. Any advice?

Person Dyslexic
Jul 23, 2007


How well does the AEBS play with external hard drives? My sister is looking for a way to allow a couple of laptops, a desktop, numerous S4's and an Ipad to all access her collection of movies and music and just her laptops and PC to be able to back up to one. Her current router sucks so I am going to recommend she just upgrade it when she gets her hard drive and the AEBS seems too good a deal to pass down, but it won't do much good if she gets a hard drive that it doesn't support or work well with.

I should mention that this is really the only things she wants to be able to do; internet is not an issue as they pipe theirs in via a lovely US Cellular modem. The chief concern for them is being able to access their files quickly and from anywhere in the house(Or the block if the AEBS is as good as it seems).

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Positronic Spleen posted:

I'm getting internet through Time Warner and own neither a modem or router. Apparently they're going to charge me about $11 a month for both, so I'm definitely looking into just buying them instead of renting. I would need a modem off of this list. The thing is, it seems cheaper overall to just buy a modem/router combo, but I don't know if those are a good value. It's just for a relatively small apartment, so probably 1-3 devices tops, but there are a lot of apartments in the area. Any advice?

In general a combo modem/router is going to be a lot crappier than individual units. I've had good luck with the Motorola cable modems, they tend to handle weird signal problems a lot better than the company provided ones I've had (apparently motorola manufactures a lot of the cable company equipment so I guess it makes sense that their end of the line stuff works well with the company line stuff). I have the 6120 but the 6121 and the 6141 are both good from what I've heard. As for routers, the OP and multiple posts in the last couple of pages will be better at suggesting one than I will be since I've always rolled my own.

smax
Nov 9, 2009



Person Dyslexic posted:

How well does the AEBS play with external hard drives? My sister is looking for a way to allow a couple of laptops, a desktop, numerous S4's and an Ipad to all access her collection of movies and music and just her laptops and PC to be able to back up to one. Her current router sucks so I am going to recommend she just upgrade it when she gets her hard drive and the AEBS seems too good a deal to pass down, but it won't do much good if she gets a hard drive that it doesn't support or work well with.

I should mention that this is really the only things she wants to be able to do; internet is not an issue as they pipe theirs in via a lovely US Cellular modem. The chief concern for them is being able to access their files quickly and from anywhere in the house(Or the block if the AEBS is as good as it seems).

Mine (ac) has been great so far. Not as quick as I wanted it to be, but it'll do. If I remember right, speeds max out at about 14MB/s.

Person Dyslexic
Jul 23, 2007


smax posted:

Mine (ac) has been great so far. Not as quick as I wanted it to be, but it'll do. If I remember right, speeds max out at about 14MB/s.

Have you found it to be an issue that there is only one USB 2 slot on it? I would much rather find something that is USB 3 or at the very least has more than one port but if this is the best there is for their situation I will take it and be happy. The onboard media server sounds nice as they are not particularly network savvy so something that I don't have to be there for all the time is almost required.

Person Dyslexic fucked around with this message at 13:36 on Jan 4, 2014

smax
Nov 9, 2009



Person Dyslexic posted:

Have you found it to be an issue that there is only one USB 2 slot on it? I would much rather find something that is USB 3 or at the very least has more than one port but if this is the best there is for their situation I will take it and be happy. The onboard media server sounds nice as they are not particularly network savvy so something that I don't have to be there for all the time is almost required.

I just have 1 4TB drive hooked up to it, but I believe you can use a USB hub if you need more.

Person Dyslexic
Jul 23, 2007


smax posted:

I just have 1 4TB drive hooked up to it, but I believe you can use a USB hub if you need more.

Yeah I will probably just end up doing that. They are still trying to figure out what they want to budget for this and I'm afraid they are going to try to go cheap again. I mean, it worked so well for them last time they cut corners against my advice and got a single backup drive for like 40 bucks that failed after 2 months and they ended up losing all their files but hey, I'll try. Thanks for the info!

As an aside are those wireless external drives at all decent? I feel like overheating would be an issue since they are trying to do so much but I can't find much info on them at all.

Shaocaholica
Oct 29, 2002

Fig. 5E


I ask this every year but are we any closer to 10G at home or built into workstations? I know its a lot of bandwidth but I'm already hitting that at work and somewhat at home. Its more like the difference between waiting 10 minutes for files to copy vs however less it would be with 10G.

I feel like consumers/smaller businesses would be inclined to get 10G switches if their workstations all had it standard but not if it meant getting a NIC as well. Kinda like 1G. I didn't know anyone back in the day who really wanted to buy a 1G NIC but all of a sudden they were standard on mobos and laptops.

I know 10G adoption is slow and very few people would have a real use for it but that doesn't mean its not going to happen.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade




Yep, you can use a USB hub to add both a printer and a hard drive to the AEBS. Just don't expect bleeding edge blazing fast file transfers; and Macs running the latest MacOS will be able to communicate the fastest with the AirDrive as AppleShare File Protocol has been optimized on both sides of the issue (better drivers and fixes in the latest firmware update, make sure to check the update level using Airport Utility.)

BTW, the most current Airport Extreme Base Station (802.11ac) is up on Apple's refurb store for $169 if anyone cares.

Ziploc
Sep 19, 2006
MX-5

OP seems a bit dicey for what I need, so I'm posting a reply.

I'd like an inexpensive router to throw in a home which I visit from time to time. My father and my grandmother's caregiver only occasionally use the internet that's there. But they individually plug their laptops into the modem for access. And I cringe every time I see it. And I think it would be a nice gift to the two of them to make their lives a bit easier while there.

Extra features are not very important. Reliability is probably most important. What say you?

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

The Asus RT-N16 would be a pretty reliable router to go with, if that's a bit pricey the Linksys E2500 is another good option.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


Shaocaholica posted:

I ask this every year but are we any closer to 10G at home or built into workstations? I know its a lot of bandwidth but I'm already hitting that at work and somewhat at home. Its more like the difference between waiting 10 minutes for files to copy vs however less it would be with 10G.

I feel like consumers/smaller businesses would be inclined to get 10G switches if their workstations all had it standard but not if it meant getting a NIC as well. Kinda like 1G. I didn't know anyone back in the day who really wanted to buy a 1G NIC but all of a sudden they were standard on mobos and laptops.

I know 10G adoption is slow and very few people would have a real use for it but that doesn't mean its not going to happen.

Not really. It's still cost prohibitive. 600+ dollars for an adapter and over 1000 for the cheapest switch

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Shaocaholica
Oct 29, 2002

Fig. 5E


skipdogg posted:

Not really. It's still cost prohibitive. 600+ dollars for an adapter and over 1000 for the cheapest switch

Just checked newegg for shits and its good to see that I got a 130 results for 10G NICs which is nice to have the selection. Cheapest Intel was $334. I'm not sure how much that's really changed over the last year or 2 though.

10G Switches are still $1k+ but I think thats come down. So if you 10G at home you're looking at $2k for 2 NICs and a switch at the minimum. Guh. I'd be in personally if it were ~$500 although for $2k+ I could justify it if I owned a small business that lives on moving data.

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