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Pudgygiant
Apr 8, 2004

Garnet and black? More like gold and blue or whatever the fuck colors these are

code:
C:\Users\ben>tracert -d 159.153.85.144

Tracing route to 159.153.85.144 over a maximum of 30 hops

  1     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  192.168.1.10
  2    48 ms    22 ms    22 ms  x.x.x.x
  3    22 ms    57 ms    22 ms  71.217.188.57
  4    23 ms    22 ms    68 ms  67.14.24.118
  5     *        *        *     Request timed out.
  6   355 ms   354 ms   353 ms  4.69.147.94
  7   213 ms   211 ms   213 ms  4.69.132.57
  8   234 ms   237 ms   238 ms  4.69.153.26
Solid work Centurylink.

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Hardflip
Jul 21, 2007



I've got a question about which device would be the culprit of some network problems I'm having: the modem or the router. I have a Virgin Superhub (set to modem only mode) and 2013 Time Capsule. My ISP gives me 60mbit.

At random times the bandwidth the router allows devices to get dips - there is no sign of when this is going to happen. All devices should be able to pull the full 60mbit, as their transmit rates (listed in Airport Utility) is usually above 50Mb/s.

When these dips happen, the bandwidth isn't consistent among devices. My iPhone 5 might pull 10mbit, my Macbook may pull 40mbit. My PS4, which is connected via ethernet, might only pull 5mbit.

When I take out the modem to router ethernet cable and replug it back in, speeds go back to normal again for all devices.

Am I wrong in thinking this shouldn't be a modem issue, since it's just passing on the connection to the router? Rather, it is the router messing up handling out bandwidth distribution?

I had a 2009 Time Capsule prior to this and never had any issues like this.

Sikreci
Mar 23, 2006



Is the recommended router list in the OP still accurate (hasn't been updated in over a year)? I want a new router since I'm getting tired of my RT-N16's poo poo.

Machismo
Mar 29, 2007

I'm a rapist! Who cares if there's no evidence, I'm guilty until innocent!

What kind of device will allow me to extend a wireless Internet connection over more of my property, but use the same SSID? I don't want a wireless extender, I think, since I will connect it back to my modem with a wired connection.

Is this a standard function on a decent router?

graynull
Dec 2, 2005

Did I misread all the signs?

Apologies if this issue has been covered a ton, but I found it kind of difficult to search for with such common terms.

Has anyone had any insight or information on the random disconnect issue with the Intel Centrino wireless cards(specifically Advanced-N 6205)? I picked it up, I believe, from the recommended component thread and had no issues until the last few months. I've read a few things about Intel working on a driver solution and a bunch of other people having the same issue, but I figured I'd ask to see if some of the more well-read goons had any advice or knowledge.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


AceSnyp3r posted:

Is the recommended router list in the OP still accurate (hasn't been updated in over a year)? I want a new router since I'm getting tired of my RT-N16's poo poo.

It's fairly out of date. I just bought a TP-Link Archer C7 1750 AC box and will post a trip report on it in a few days. I was going to get a 5th gen AEBS but I had 100 Amazon bucks to spend so I took a chance on it. If I don't like it I'll just return it and pick up the AEBS.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

AceSnyp3r posted:

Is the recommended router list in the OP still accurate (hasn't been updated in over a year)? I want a new router since I'm getting tired of my RT-N16's poo poo.

RT-N66U is apparently the new golden child, TP-Link TL-WDR4900 is the alternate if you're cheap.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Machismo posted:

What kind of device will allow me to extend a wireless Internet connection over more of my property, but use the same SSID? I don't want a wireless extender, I think, since I will connect it back to my modem with a wired connection.

Is this a standard function on a decent router?

2x Ubiquiti Unifi access points set up as zero-handoff.

LRADIKAL
Jun 10, 2001
$10


Fun Shoe

Hardflip posted:

I've got a question about which device would be the culprit of some network problems I'm having: the modem or the router. I have a Virgin Superhub (set to modem only mode) and 2013 Time Capsule. My ISP gives me 60mbit.

At random times the bandwidth the router allows devices to get dips - there is no sign of when this is going to happen. All devices should be able to pull the full 60mbit, as their transmit rates (listed in Airport Utility) is usually above 50Mb/s.

When these dips happen, the bandwidth isn't consistent among devices. My iPhone 5 might pull 10mbit, my Macbook may pull 40mbit. My PS4, which is connected via ethernet, might only pull 5mbit.

When I take out the modem to router ethernet cable and replug it back in, speeds go back to normal again for all devices.

Am I wrong in thinking this shouldn't be a modem issue, since it's just passing on the connection to the router? Rather, it is the router messing up handling out bandwidth distribution?

I had a 2009 Time Capsule prior to this and never had any issues like this.

To find the answer to your question I suggest plugging your device directly into the modem. If there are no dips it is more likely your router, if there are dips then it's your modem.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


Ashex posted:

RT-N66U is apparently the new golden child, TP-Link TL-WDR4900 is the alternate if you're cheap.

I thought the new Netgear R7000 Nighthawk was the best on the block right now? I'm not sure if any of the newer AC routers have 3rd party firmware support yet though, I recall reading something about driver issues on one of the websites preventing it.

Hardflip
Jul 21, 2007



Jago posted:

To find the answer to your question I suggest plugging your device directly into the modem. If there are no dips it is more likely your router, if there are dips then it's your modem.

Yeah, I'll give that a go or return to my old router to see if it happens. The problem is I have a few devices around the house that I need connected, and the dips are totally unpredictable.

The main aim of the question was to understand if a modem could influence particular devices only getting 5mbit, others 10mbit, etc. I was under the impression all of that was totally under the router's control, and if one device could get 30mbit, any other nearby should get the same.

silentpenguins
May 9, 2013

Abysswalking

So my apartment was having issues with lag spikes in gaming/general internet usage so we got a new router, the RT-N16. My roommate likes to download HD anime (720/1080p) then stream it from his pc downstairs to the ps3 upstairs. PC is wireless, PS3 is plugged into the router. So if I'm playing games/doing anything online while he's doing this (the streaming, or throttled torrenting, which he says he caps at 200kb down/60kb up) I get a noticeable jump in ping. As in I'll be hovering around 120-160 when I'm normally at 40-60.

Is this typical, and if so is there anything I can do about it? I don't want to complain but it's really annoying because most of the time he's doing one or the other when I want to be gaming. It seems like a brand new router should be able to deal with non-internet streaming at the very least.

If it helps, the router seems to be hitting it's highs. It hit 5 mb/s downloading a couple steam games. Also, if relevant I have a Zoom Docsis 3.0 router.

bobfather
Sep 20, 2001

I will analyze your nervous system for beer money

skipdogg posted:

I thought the new Netgear R7000 Nighthawk was the best on the block right now? I'm not sure if any of the newer AC routers have 3rd party firmware support yet though, I recall reading something about driver issues on one of the websites preventing it.

It is incredibly fast and powerful. In fact, the fastest and most powerful. But you can't find any decent AC PCI-E cards, and by the time AC devices come out that can connect to these AC routers, there will probably be a better router out.

reading
Jul 27, 2013


I had a beaglebone (running Angstrom linux) hooked up to a crappy router. The 'bone had a static IP address, which worked great for a long time. But now I've upgraded to an RT-N66U with Tomato and I can't seem to find the beaglebone's new IP address in the devices list. It just won't show up, whether I plug it in or unplug it. What's going on? Do I need to alter something in the router for the 'bone to get a static IP too? I actually can't remember what I did to get the static IP in the first place.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

reading posted:

I had a beaglebone (running Angstrom linux) hooked up to a crappy router. The 'bone had a static IP address, which worked great for a long time. But now I've upgraded to an RT-N66U with Tomato and I can't seem to find the beaglebone's new IP address in the devices list. It just won't show up, whether I plug it in or unplug it. What's going on? Do I need to alter something in the router for the 'bone to get a static IP too? I actually can't remember what I did to get the static IP in the first place.

You could have statically configured the IP in Angstrom on the Beaglebone, in which case the IP will remain the same regardless of router, or you could have created a static DHCP lease on the router, in which case you'd need to find the MAC address of your Beaglebone and follow the process for creating a static DHCP lease on your new router.

I'm guessing your BB's IP is statically configured in the OS. The device list on your router is likely just a dump of all the DHCP leases it's given out, so if the BB isn't showing up in the list then it's probably not even trying to request a DHCP lease.

reading
Jul 27, 2013


Cenodoxus posted:

The device list on your router is likely just a dump of all the DHCP leases it's given out, so if the BB isn't showing up in the list then it's probably not even trying to request a DHCP lease.

At this point maybe I should take the question to the linux thread but if the device does not seem to show up in the router's list of devices this sounds plausible.

Edit: After putting the MAC address of the beaglebone in to the router's list of static DHCP things, it still doesn't show up when I plug it in. The lights on the router flash for that ethernet port, it shows up in the web GUI as a connected eth, but...nothing.

reading fucked around with this message at 05:51 on Jan 8, 2014

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

skipdogg posted:

I thought the new Netgear R7000 Nighthawk was the best on the block right now? I'm not sure if any of the newer AC routers have 3rd party firmware support yet though, I recall reading something about driver issues on one of the websites preventing it.

drivers for AC routers are an issue for pretty much all third party firmware right now. The only ones that have drivers are DD-WRT and some TomatoUSB builds, DD-WRT is partially closed source so they can do legal stuff to get permission and TomatoUSB devs just want to get things working. That said, don't really see the benefit of an AC router since it's so new.

Tapedump
Aug 31, 2007


College Slice

reading posted:

It just won't show up, whether I plug it in or unplug it. What's going on? Do I need to alter something in the router for the 'bone to get a static IP too? I actually can't remember what I did to get the static IP in the first place.
Run WNetWatcher on a PC connected to the same network. It will show all devices on that subnet that have a valid IP address, wired or otherwise.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


skipdogg posted:

It's fairly out of date. I just bought a TP-Link Archer C7 1750 AC box and will post a trip report on it in a few days. I was going to get a 5th gen AEBS but I had 100 Amazon bucks to spend so I took a chance on it. If I don't like it I'll just return it and pick up the AEBS.

First impressions on this router is to stay away. It seems there's some kind of issue with it and Broadcom chips where the 5ghz won't connect. I found some beta firmware on some guys blog and it didn't really help unless you turn WPA/2 off on the 5ghz. Then clients can connect.

I have mostly apple devices at home and none of them will connect. 4 iPads 3 iPhones and my win7 laptop with the 6200AGN card and none will connect on 5ghz. Everything else is hardwired.

I'm going to return it and get an AirPort Extreme like I should have in the first place. The 2.4ghz performance isn't that great either so there's no real reason to buy this router at all.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Try changing the channel to 36 and see if that helps with the 5Ghz?

Chop Suey
Jul 24, 2003

Wake Up!


Not sure if this is the correct place to ask, but I thought I'd give it a go.

My office/gaming rig is already wired with Cat 5 for the internet, but I'd like to wire my pc to my living room. I know there are limits on HDMI (~40ft) and USB (~5ft) length, but essentially I'd like my 50" plasma (2005 panasonic that only does 1080i... but lets assume 1080p) to be connected to my pc. Not sure if possible but the ideal setup would be to have the HDMI signal and USB come out of the wall in my living room (requires 75ft - 100ft of cable) where I could essentially use it as a second monitor to watch HD movies and play my library of steam games with a couple USB controllers / keyboard. I've searched around online found hints at using fiber/cat5/6, but nothing concrete. If this is possible and cheaper than buying a $500 steam machine in the future... why not? Also makes it easier only updating one rig as opposed to, unless wireless streaming sometime in the future actually works.

Anyone have thoughts experience with this?

UndyingShadow
May 15, 2006
You're looking ESPECIALLY shadowy this evening, Sir

Chop Suey posted:

Not sure if this is the correct place to ask, but I thought I'd give it a go.

My office/gaming rig is already wired with Cat 5 for the internet, but I'd like to wire my pc to my living room. I know there are limits on HDMI (~40ft) and USB (~5ft) length, but essentially I'd like my 50" plasma (2005 panasonic that only does 1080i... but lets assume 1080p) to be connected to my pc. Not sure if possible but the ideal setup would be to have the HDMI signal and USB come out of the wall in my living room (requires 75ft - 100ft of cable) where I could essentially use it as a second monitor to watch HD movies and play my library of steam games with a couple USB controllers / keyboard. I've searched around online found hints at using fiber/cat5/6, but nothing concrete. If this is possible and cheaper than buying a $500 steam machine in the future... why not? Also makes it easier only updating one rig as opposed to, unless wireless streaming sometime in the future actually works.

Anyone have thoughts experience with this?

That's a long way to run HDMI. It might be possible, but I've never seen it done. Maybe others can chime in. Another option in HDBase-T, which lets you run HDMI over cat6:
http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_...&seq=1&format=2

For control, you could use something like this:
http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_...&seq=1&format=2

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



reading posted:

I had a beaglebone (running Angstrom linux) hooked up to a crappy router. The 'bone had a static IP address, which worked great for a long time. But now I've upgraded to an RT-N66U with Tomato and I can't seem to find the beaglebone's new IP address in the devices list.

A static IP address means you programmed the IP information into the device directly. It's not going to get anything dynamically. Log back into the beaglebone and set its network adapter to use DHCP. Plug it into your new router and it should request an address.

It hasn't done this yet because you set it up statically.

Chop Suey
Jul 24, 2003

Wake Up!


UndyingShadow posted:

That's a long way to run HDMI. It might be possible, but I've never seen it done. Maybe others can chime in. Another option in HDBase-T, which lets you run HDMI over cat6:
http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_...&seq=1&format=2

For control, you could use something like this:
http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_...&seq=1&format=2


Thanks! Exactly the solution I'm looking for. Now I'm curious why everyone is making such a fuss about streaming from their desktop pc to their living room? Seems like an electrician can quickly drop some cat5/6 lines which would be easy and cheap. All in I think this would cost me $350 including labor... and I only have one machine to keep up to date.

Psimitry
Jun 3, 2003

Hostile negotiations since 1978

Question for you guys: why is it so difficult for a router to limit bandwidth to a certain IP on its network? As I do google search after search, this is not an uncommon feature to ask for, yet everything always points me to using QoS on my current router (didn't work) or using DD-WRT (installed successfully, NOTHING except standard router functions worked).

Now I get that the mindset in router functioning is that as long as the bandwidth isn't saturated, it doesn't seem like there should be a reason to limit it, and to go with a prioritization scheme, but this never seems to work either. And bandwidth limiting seems to be such a commonly requested feature, you would think that SOMEONE would have made a router with this function built in.

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

Psimitry posted:

Question for you guys: why is it so difficult for a router to limit bandwidth to a certain IP on its network? As I do google search after search, this is not an uncommon feature to ask for, yet everything always points me to using QoS on my current router (didn't work) or using DD-WRT (installed successfully, NOTHING except standard router functions worked).
What didn't work on DD-WRT?

How do you know QoS didn't work on the router? Did you check whether or not packets were tagged? DSCP header?

Psimitry posted:

Now I get that the mindset in router functioning is that as long as the bandwidth isn't saturated, it doesn't seem like there should be a reason to limit it, and to go with a prioritization scheme, but this never seems to work either. And bandwidth limiting seems to be such a commonly requested feature, you would think that SOMEONE would have made a router with this function built in.
They did. It's called "QoS". This isn't a matter of some brain in the router trying to prioritize (which is actually QoS). It's a matter of "that's not how TCP works". TCP doesn't have rate-limiting or packet prioritization built in. If you want that, you use QoS.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


The TP-Link box went back today. I got the latest beta firmware from support and it still didn't play nice with my gear so I said gently caress it and it's going back. I don't have the patience for this.

Psimitry posted:

Question for you guys: why is it so difficult for a router to limit bandwidth to a certain IP on its network? As I do google search after search, this is not an uncommon feature to ask for, yet everything always points me to using QoS on my current router (didn't work) or using DD-WRT (installed successfully, NOTHING except standard router functions worked).

Now I get that the mindset in router functioning is that as long as the bandwidth isn't saturated, it doesn't seem like there should be a reason to limit it, and to go with a prioritization scheme, but this never seems to work either. And bandwidth limiting seems to be such a commonly requested feature, you would think that SOMEONE would have made a router with this function built in.

I think you're going to have a hard time with consumer level gear handling stuff like this. I've had decent luck with pfSense running on an old P4 box doing limiting and prioritization, and something like an Edgerouter or Microtik might handle it better as well.

If you're looking for something to do:

Torrentbox can use all bandwidth at priority level 3 unless priority level 1 or 2 clients need more. Gaming PC gets priority 1 on all data, whatever is left over other clients can have. Netflix client is priority 2, gaming pc comes first, Roku 2nd, and whatever is left over torrent box can have.

That's probably not going to happen very easily.

skipdogg fucked around with this message at 19:28 on Jan 9, 2014

Krailor
Nov 2, 2001
I'm only pretending to care

Taco Defender

Psimitry posted:

Question for you guys: why is it so difficult for a router to limit bandwidth to a certain IP on its network? As I do google search after search, this is not an uncommon feature to ask for, yet everything always points me to using QoS on my current router (didn't work) or using DD-WRT (installed successfully, NOTHING except standard router functions worked).

Now I get that the mindset in router functioning is that as long as the bandwidth isn't saturated, it doesn't seem like there should be a reason to limit it, and to go with a prioritization scheme, but this never seems to work either. And bandwidth limiting seems to be such a commonly requested feature, you would think that SOMEONE would have made a router with this function built in.

QoS is exactly what you're looking for. There's a pretty good write up of it on the DD-WRT wiki. IP or MAC address prioritization will allow you prioritize bandwidth on certain machines so that a torrent box or your roomates aren't always sucking up all your bandwidth.

The trickiest part of setting up QoS is specifying the initial download limits in order for it to kick in. When slow down occurs it's usually not directly between your router and service provider; instead it's usually a couple of hops down the line where you don't have any control. The key to getting QoS working is to make sure you set the limits correctly so that the slow down always happens at the router where you do have control.

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

Krailor posted:

QoS is exactly what you're looking for. There's a pretty good write up of it on the DD-WRT wiki. IP or MAC address prioritization will allow you prioritize bandwidth on certain machines so that a torrent box or your roomates aren't always sucking up all your bandwidth.

The trickiest part of setting up QoS is specifying the initial download limits in order for it to kick in. When slow down occurs it's usually not directly between your router and service provider; instead it's usually a couple of hops down the line where you don't have any control. The key to getting QoS working is to make sure you set the limits correctly so that the slow down always happens at the router where you do have control.

In almost all cases, especially torrents, yhr slowdown is due to TCP window scaling and congestion control. It just acts oddly over asymmetric links.

The advantage of QoS isn't for the provider (who inevitably has more bandwidth than you and is running QoS anyway, plus almost certainly stripping your packets), but in telling your router "it's cool. Life isn't fair. You can leave that packet on the floor and let it try again later" (which it will, TCP retransmits). The problem is generally your router and your users.

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


So I bought that RT-N66U that you guys recommended. Now I'm trying to get Tomato onto it, but the stupid thing is stuck in a Recovery Mode reboot loop. Does anyone have a clue as to what's going on with this stupid thing?

edit: The Asus Firmware Restoration software tool does work, you just need to wait about 45 minutes for it to work. Note: that is about 30 minutes beyond the error message that tool ends with saying that the process failed. Just leave the router on until it finishes the restore process itself and reboots. You'll know the process is complete once the router's power and both wifi LEDs are fully lit.

kid sinister fucked around with this message at 18:46 on Jan 11, 2014

Farecoal
Oct 15, 2011

There he go


Do you guys have any recommendations as far as powerline adapter models go?

Farecoal fucked around with this message at 07:51 on Jan 10, 2014

Henry Black
Jun 27, 2004

If she's not making this face, you're not doing it right.

Fun Shoe

Sorry if this is the wrong place since it's not a home issue, but I'm getting myself confused on Google and don't know where else to ask (Goons to the rescue).

My brother has bought some new IP cameras (AirCams) for his business. He's set them up on a new PoE switch. His existing network was a cheap modem/router from his cable company and another PoE switch, into which were plugged his point of sale computers, server, and IP phones.

What we want to do is keep them separate, but both still have access to the internet. Basically, he doesn't want his staff to be able to access the cameras at work or clog up his existing network, but he still wants to be able to access them at home over the internet/from his work computer if possible.

Where do I start? Everything I've read makes it sound like I need to get a new router, but is it that simple? Can anyone help?

serebralassazin
Feb 20, 2004
I wish I had something clever to say.


Farecoal posted:

Do you guys have any recommendations as far as powerline adapter models go?

I have the Zyxel mini 500 kit and it works well. I have one on my second floor and one in my basement. I get a sustained 70 megabytes while grabbing stuff off newsgroups (I have the fios 75 plan and a direct line to the router can go up to 90 megabits). My home's wiring isn't great either. It's a mix of old and new wiring (from renovating over the years).

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

LittleBob posted:

Sorry if this is the wrong place since it's not a home issue, but I'm getting myself confused on Google and don't know where else to ask (Goons to the rescue).

My brother has bought some new IP cameras (AirCams) for his business. He's set them up on a new PoE switch. His existing network was a cheap modem/router from his cable company and another PoE switch, into which were plugged his point of sale computers, server, and IP phones.

What we want to do is keep them separate, but both still have access to the internet. Basically, he doesn't want his staff to be able to access the cameras at work or clog up his existing network, but he still wants to be able to access them at home over the internet/from his work computer if possible.

Where do I start? Everything I've read makes it sound like I need to get a new router, but is it that simple? Can anyone help?

This is doable and not trivial. Basically he'll need to setup VLANs to isolate the two networks (one VLAN for each) then configure QoS for the second network to limit the bandwidth it consumes. Would be easiest to get a router that supports OpenWRT as I believe you can assign ports to VLANs very easily via the interface. QoS can be tricky, a goon linked to a writeup a few posts up.

Farecoal
Oct 15, 2011

There he go


serebralassazin posted:

I have the Zyxel mini 500 kit and it works well. I have one on my second floor and one in my basement. I get a sustained 70 megabytes while grabbing stuff off newsgroups (I have the fios 75 plan and a direct line to the router can go up to 90 megabits). My home's wiring isn't great either. It's a mix of old and new wiring (from renovating over the years).

Thanks. Looking at the Amazon page for them, what's the difference between pass-through and non pass-through?

Rattlehead
Nov 20, 2004
Only dead fish go with the flow.

Farecoal posted:

Thanks. Looking at the Amazon page for them, what's the difference between pass-through and non pass-through?

The pass-through models have an AC outlet on the front so you don't need to give up the AC outlet where you plug it in.

bobfather
Sep 20, 2001

I will analyze your nervous system for beer money

kid sinister posted:

So I bought that RT-N66U that you guys recommended. Now I'm trying to get Tomato onto it, but the stupid thing is stuck in a Recovery Mode reboot loop. Does anyone have a clue as to what's going on with this stupid thing?

When you put it into recovery mode and flash Tomato using the Asus firmware tool software, just start the flash and then walk away for 30 minutes. For some reason the initial Tomato flash takes a long time to complete.

Munkeymon
Aug 14, 2003

Motherfucker's got an
armor-piercing crowbar! Rigoddamndicu𝜆ous.





Devian666 posted:

ASUS RT-N66U
TomatoUSB build available, including a TOR VPN build, but there are reports of reasonable stability with stock firmware. 256 MB RAM, 32 MB flash, Broadcom 4706 CPU at 600 MHz, 2 x USB connectors, micro SDHC socket, and dual band wireless. 732 Mbit/s

I don't know where people are getting their information, but the stock firmware is five day old hot garbage as far as I can tell. I've had to start over 4 times so far (twice with the newest version) and it only remembers the password I give it half the loving time. Two out of four tries it forgets or just doesn't save the goddamn password I gave it! Why did I have to try again the other two times? I flipped a switch that made it stop responding completely (don't try to turn off IP6 or change the start of the range of IPs it's supposed to use!) and had to reset it, which is super loving annoying because of the hold-the-retard's-hand setup wizard that you have to get past to get to the important options.

I'd have filed an RMA already if this thing didn't have a 3rd party firmware option. Guess we'll see how that goes

Ninja Rope
Oct 22, 2005

Wee.


Munkeymon posted:

I don't know where people are getting their information, but the stock firmware is five day old hot garbage as far as I can tell. I've had to start over 4 times so far (twice with the newest version) and it only remembers the password I give it half the loving time. Two out of four tries it forgets or just doesn't save the goddamn password I gave it! Why did I have to try again the other two times? I flipped a switch that made it stop responding completely (don't try to turn off IP6 or change the start of the range of IPs it's supposed to use!) and had to reset it, which is super loving annoying because of the hold-the-retard's-hand setup wizard that you have to get past to get to the important options.

I'd have filed an RMA already if this thing didn't have a 3rd party firmware option. Guess we'll see how that goes

I posted a few times about the super buggy firmware. I hate it too. It won't actually save more than 16 characters of a password you enter, so if you try something with 17 characters seem like it's cool but you can't actually log in if you enter all 17 characters. Don't try changing the default username or http->https either.

Let me know if Tomato works any better and has a sane install process that isn't "do some poo poo this one guy from russia posted on a forum". If I had to do it again I would have just gotten an AEBS.

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bobfather
Sep 20, 2001

I will analyze your nervous system for beer money

You guys might be overdramatizing things here regarding the N66U.

Yes, the stock firmware sucks. Luckily there's Merlin's, Tomato, DD-WRT and OpenWRT available for it, all of which are mature and good firmware.

Edit: and Tomato is flashed onto it exactly the same way any other unofficial firmware is - by putting the router in recovery mode and then using the Asus Flash Utility. I used the newest version of Shibby's Tomato for my N66U. It does take a really long time to finish flashing though, so just start the firmware upload in the Flash Utility and literally walk away and go vacuum out your car or something. When you get back, you'll have literally the best N router hardware with vastly improved firmware waiting for you.

bobfather fucked around with this message at 12:57 on Jan 11, 2014

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