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HerrBrau
Dec 20, 2005




beepsandboops posted:

I would think that if this person has physical access to the router, that they'd just be able to reset it anyway and do what they want (assuming that they have any sort of tech savvy). So I would think that access to the ethernet ports would be moot point?
This is true, also. May suggest keeping the router in a locked space. Thanks.

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Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


HerrBrau posted:

This is true, also. May suggest keeping the router in a locked space. Thanks.

I am going to almost guarantee that whatever you're trying to accomplish here, this is the wrong way to go about it.

Anjow
Aug 14, 2006




I got a Fortigate 40C from work and I'm using it with my FTTC line. Can anyone recommend a free dynamic DNS (subdomain only, so xxxx.provider.com) service that I can set up with this? It has a number of built in ones but I've tried to visit their URLs and they appear to either require payment or the pages don't load.

netwerk23
Aug 22, 2000
I spelled 'network' wrong.

cr0y posted:

I think I have to come in with coax since I am getting television as well but I would like to avoid being locked into renting some garbage equipment from verizon when I have my own nice routers and whatnot.

Just in case this isn't done yet, you can have TV and use your own router. Have the installer enable the ethernet port on the ONT, and if he can't, call in the help center. This is how my house is setup, I use my router, the FiOS router is downstream of it and it supplies the guide data and on-demand. The regular TV still goes over the MoCA from the ONT. If they install their router before you can configure yours, log into it and release its WAN IP (DHCP), this frees it for your router to pick it up. Otherwise you either have to wait for the lease to expire or call in to have them release it manually.

PM me if you have any questions.

cr0y
Mar 24, 2005

IRONKNUCKLE PERMBANNED! READ HERE


Alright so verizon came and setup my fios. All is well (and fast!) except for having this atrocity sitting on my network:


And to be honest, I don't really have a problem with this hardware aside from the fact that verizon has some backdoor that lets them reset the settings and admin password remotely. With that being said I am paying $5 a month to rent this and would like to replace it with something that I actually own. Can someone recommend a solid simple 'fios coax/cable modem' that I can hookup to my existing Buffalo N600?

edit: Was also considering setting the N600 as the DMZ and managing all my forwarding and whatnot from there, is their a downside to doing it that way?

cr0y fucked around with this message at 19:42 on May 21, 2014

Farecoal
Oct 15, 2011

There he go


How well does powerline work if the two connectors are on different circuits?

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Farecoal posted:

How well does powerline work if the two connectors are on different circuits?

Not at all, is my understanding.

SlayVus
Jul 10, 2009


Grimey Drawer

Farecoal posted:

How well does powerline work if the two connectors are on different circuits?

Powerline only works when both adapters are plugged into plugs that are on the same breaker.

Scott808
Jul 11, 2001


sbyers77 posted:

Quoting myself here, but I ended up going with the RT-N66U and flashed Tomato by Shibby on it. Really happy so far, highly impressed by the router. It has some noticeable heft because it has an internal heat-sink.

I had the same issue others had with the firmware flash taking a long time to complete, but once it was done it worked fine. (Another note: I've read its more-or-less impossible to brick this router with a failed flash, it always reverts back to a flashable state, which is nice.)

I really like Tomato. It's simple yet powerful. And it seems to be on of the few firmwares that are still actively developed (I don't get dd-wrt, it is still "pre SP2" which was initially released 2012?).

The RT-N66U is awesome and I would recommend it.

Since you posted that, I started wondering about it and went searching a bit and found this - http://stevejenkins.com/blog/2013/0...nd-kong-builds/ . DD-WRT's Router Database on their homepage is apparently out of date/generally hosed up, I guess. The forum says something about how the database sometimes recommends bad builds and you should read the forum thread stickies to figure out what build to actually put on your router.

Yesterday I figured out that the old WRTSL54GSes I have lying around the office are actually supported by Tomato by Shibby (I didn't even realize the plain old PolarCloud Tomato supported them too). So today I started loving around with them and went from whatever build of DD-WRT I had on them (whatever was in the Router Database like 2 years ago) to current Shibby. They're not critical, so I'm not afraid of messing around with settings that I haven't bothered figuring out how to use on my home router.

Pryor on Fire
May 14, 2013


Well poo poo, a couple of weeks after singing the praises of or the Airport Extreme on here I just had my first crash. Wouldn't connect over wired or wireless, had to pull the plug. Works again but it's no longer been a flawless router for me.

Guess my multi-decade hunt for the reliable router continues. Very disappointing, but oh well.

Pryor on Fire fucked around with this message at 14:43 on May 22, 2014

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade




Didja upgrade the firmware to the latest?

Think you're gonna wind up like the 'honest man' dude with the lamp on the end of his staff if you're looking for the 'flawless' router.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Pryor on Fire posted:

Well poo poo, a couple of weeks after singing the praises of or the Airport Extreme on here I just had my first crash. Wouldn't connect over wired or wireless, had to pull the plug. Works again but it's no longer been a flawless router for me.

Guess my multi-decade hunt for the reliable router continues. Very disappointing, but oh well.

Spend more money and buy an enterprise-level router, congrats, your uptime probably just went up. However, now you have to buy a separate AP and switch.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





SlayVus posted:

Powerline only works when both adapters are plugged into plugs that are on the same breaker.

No? It works best when it can be as close as possible but you can absolutely have powerline devices on separate breakers in the same panel.

Think of it this way - it's still a 'wired' connection method, just one that degrades very quickly with distance. Two outlets on the same breaker means the signal is just going from one outlet to the other. Two outlets on different breakers means the signal is going from one outlet, back to your house's electrical panel, and back to the other outlet, which is probably a far greater distance.

I used a TPLink powerline kit between my garage and a bedroom for a printer (definitely separate breakers there) and while the throughput was pretty damned low, it did work. I did switch over to an old bargain-basement 802.11g AP-as-client once I freed it up from another system, though, and it's much faster.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


Farecoal posted:

How well does powerline work if the two connectors are on different circuits?

The Generation 2 stuff works much better than the old Gen 1 stuff. Make sure whatever you buy is the 2nd gen chipset. Any of the marketed '500mbit' adapters should work.

netwerk23
Aug 22, 2000
I spelled 'network' wrong.

IOwnCalculus posted:

Two outlets on different breakers means the signal is going from one outlet, back to your house's electrical panel, and back to the other outlet, which is probably a far greater distance.
Unless the outlets are on different hot legs in a 3-phase house, which means the ethernet has to go out your house, to the local transformer and then back. If you have to use two outlets on different legs you can get a special breaker that attaches to both legs and works as a bridge. I had one for an X-10 system many years back and it worked well.

cr0y just have ethernet enabled on the ONT and use any router you want, then put the FiOS router's WAN port connected to your router's LAN port. I use an older Cisco RVS4000 and it's been stable.

calandryll
Apr 25, 2003

Ask me where I do my best drinking!



Pillbug

cr0y posted:

edit: Was also considering setting the N600 as the DMZ and managing all my forwarding and whatnot from there, is their a downside to doing it that way?

Just set the Verizon router as bypass and use the N600. I don't remember how exactly I did but there is a guide out there on Google.

serebralassazin
Feb 20, 2004
I wish I had something clever to say.


DSL reports has a guides on using a separate router with Fios in their Fios FAQs.

cr0y
Mar 24, 2005

IRONKNUCKLE PERMBANNED! READ HERE


serebralassazin posted:

DSL reports has a guides on using a separate router with Fios in their Fios FAQs.

Rad. Thanks everyone for the input.

SlayVus
Jul 10, 2009


Grimey Drawer

I am having problems sharing a drive on my desktop to my laptop. The Public user folders are accessible on both computers from both computers, but I can't figure out the proper settings for sharing a drive.

Turnquiet
Oct 24, 2002

My friend is an eloquent speaker.




serebralassazin posted:

DSL reports has a guides on using a separate router with Fios in their Fios FAQs.

I use FIOS internet and TV service via cable card in a media center PC. Has anyone heard if it was possible to have the ONT send FIOS internet over CATV to my own router, and at the same time send the digital cable over MOCA into my PC w/ cablecard? The MOCA bridge seems to be needed to enable VOD, guide data, and other stuff that I simply bypass by using windows media center. Right now my cable splitter is after the OTN and from there one goes to the actiontec and the other my PC, so the actiontec doesn't seem necessary for my setup at all.

I am moving soon and would like to lean on my own router when I set things up at my new place while retaining my TV.

mmm11105
Apr 27, 2010


Can anyone comment on the range of the UniFi Long Range Access Points.

I have a moderately sized house, with a small garage about 25m away from it. If I were to put a UniFi LR at the centre of my house (on the main floor), would the reception reach out to the Garage, or should I be looking at mounting a PicoStation outside?

Lawnie
Sep 5, 2006

That is my helmet
Give it back
you are a lion
It doesn't even fit


Grimey Drawer

I managed to break my router/modem all in one yesterday, and I'm going to buy my own equipment finally instead of renting from my lovely cable company. I'm probably going to get the ASUS router going for $120 on amazon and newegg now, but I'm assuming I'll need a modem, too. Is that something I can purchase and, if so, what's recommended? Or do I have to get that from the cable company?

EDIT: in case it's relevant, the piece of poo poo that I broke through physical abuse was a Motorola SBG6580.

Lawnie fucked around with this message at 16:47 on May 24, 2014

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Lawnie posted:

I managed to break my router/modem all in one yesterday, and I'm going to buy my own equipment finally instead of renting from my lovely cable company. I'm probably going to get the ASUS router going for $120 on amazon and newegg now, but I'm assuming I'll need a modem, too. Is that something I can purchase and, if so, what's recommended? Or do I have to get that from the cable company?

EDIT: in case it's relevant, the piece of poo poo that I broke through physical abuse was a Motorola SBG6580.

Your cable provider will have a list of approved modems that work with their service. In general the Motorola ones are very good, but make sure your provider supports them.

For example, here's Comcast's list: http://mydeviceinfo.comcast.net/
If someone was using comcast I'd tell them to get the 6121 or the 6141. I used to use the 6120 and it was fantastic and had far fewer signal issues than the comcast-provided lovely modems before it.

Lawnie
Sep 5, 2006

That is my helmet
Give it back
you are a lion
It doesn't even fit


Grimey Drawer

Rexxed posted:

Your cable provider will have a list of approved modems that work with their service. In general the Motorola ones are very good, but make sure your provider supports them.

For example, here's Comcast's list: http://mydeviceinfo.comcast.net/
If someone was using comcast I'd tell them to get the 6121 or the 6141. I used to use the 6120 and it was fantastic and had far fewer signal issues than the comcast-provided lovely modems before it.

Awesome, thanks a ton. I went with the 6141 modem and ASUS RT-N66U.

It's days like today I look back on the I spent for this account almost 8 years ago and pat 15-year-old me on the back for such a smart move.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Crotch Fruit posted:

I did disable remote admin. The foreign MAC address showed up as one of the wifi connected devices despite me setting up WPA2 and disabling WPS.
Weird! If you take the first six digits of that MAC address and put it in here: http://standards.ieee.org/develop/r...oui/public.html then you can see who manufactured that rogue device. Sometimes that can be informative.

As for a new router, if you have any Apple devices at all you should consider a refurbished Airport Extreme Base Station 5th Gen as your next router. It's lovely. http://support.apple.com/kb/SP628

Xenomorph
Jun 13, 2001


CuddleChunks posted:

As for a new router, if you have any Apple devices at all you should consider a refurbished Airport Extreme Base Station 5th Gen as your next router. It's lovely. http://support.apple.com/kb/SP628

I have a bunch of Apple devices, including the new MacBook Pro with Retina and 1300 Mbps 802.11ac, a bunch of iPads, iPhones, and an Apple TV.
I still went with the ASUS router for home.

I use the newest Apple AirPort Extreme at work, and I find it a bit lacking. You must use their app to configure it. No web access. Configuration consists of making a network and making a guest network. I also think you can attach storage to it. That's about it.

In contrast, something like the ASUS should work as well as the Apple one, but have a dozen more options that Apple devices can take advantage of.

H2SO4
Sep 11, 2001

put your money in a log cabin




Buglord

Xenomorph posted:

I use the newest Apple AirPort Extreme at work, and I find it a bit lacking. You must use their app to configure it. No web access. Configuration consists of making a network and making a guest network. I also think you can attach storage to it. That's about it.

Definitely depends on the intended usage. I got a previous-gen Airport for use solely as an AP and it's fantastic. The next time my family needs to upgrade their network they're definitely getting one. "Launch the app and do what it says" is a billion times easier than walking them through a web GUI over the phone.

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


Yeah. I started using them back in the early days of 802.11b because I was tired of poo poo breaking and I have only ever retired them due to obsolescence, and they almost never require restarts. I wish they were slightly more configurable, but they are hard to beat for the majority of home or soho applications.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Xenomorph posted:

In contrast, something like the ASUS should work as well as the Apple one, but have a dozen more options that Apple devices can take advantage of.
I got tired of "options" in my Mikrotik RB751 and ditched it in favor of the Airport Extreme. It's my home, I don't give two shits about configuring or tweaking settings once it's setup and it has performed admirably in the role of sending a nice wireless signal all over my house.

Then again, I don't have this thing as a router, just an access point and it's kicking rear end in that role. Hope the Asus treats you well.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade




Here's a permalink to the refurb $85 Apple Airport Extreme 5th Generation:

http://store.apple.com/us/product/F...me-base-station

If anybody could stick this in the OP...

i am kiss u now
Dec 26, 2005



College Slice

So, I want to redo the hodgepodge of a network that's been slowly expanding in my parents house over the years (since 2003). Right now it's bits and pieces of hardware that had been added as more devices that need ethernet connections appear. I want to ideally streamline it from the several, old routers and switches into as few devices set up in the most proper configuration as possible. When I first set this thing up, it was just a big old trial and error session to see what worked and what didn't without any regard for proper set up. As for devices, here's what I have off the top of my head:

4 wired PC's, 2 wired WDTV Live boxes, A FISHTANK (wired), 4 wireless laptops and about 3 wireless phones, 2 tablets, 1 wireless picture frame, 1 wireless printer and 2 gaming consoles plus any guests who come over and want to use the network, so around 20 devices potentially.

We have a Time Warner cable modem in the basement office where the hubs (and most switches) are. I would like to upgrade the modem too if possible since it's also pretty dated but the problem is that the phone lines are also plugged into it so we're paying for that rental anyway.

Map:

Time Warner Modem (basement) --> (WAN Port) Linksys WRT54G 4-port router (192.168.1.1) (basement)
Port:
1 > Dad's computer (basement) (.101)
2 > Brother's unmanaged switch (bedroom):
---1 > fishtank (his bedroom)
---2 > xbox? (his bedroom) (I don't think he even uses this so the switch can probably go away)

3 > sisters's Bedroom (used on occasion for her laptop, otherwise she's wireless)
4 > basement switch (unmanged):
----1 > Media Server/PC (basement)
----2 > WDTV Live (living room)
----3 > (Open?)
----4 > Wireless Access Point (kitchen) (192.168.1.99)

5 --> (uplink port?) My bedroom linksys WRT54G2 4 port router (192.168.1.2):
-------1 > Mac Mini (my room)
-------2 > Gaming PC (my room)
-------3 > WDTV Live (my room)
-------4 > PS3? (can't remember if it's wired or wireless but my room)

If that makes any sense. Anyway, the first router after the cable modem is also the DHCP server. The other "router" in my room, is in "switch" mode I believe (I'm not at home as I write this) if that's possible. I know I have the DHCP disabled on both it and the wireless access point. Also, it's all running the default firmware and when it comes to IP addresses, it's a free for all. Although the two routers have wireless built in, I don't use it because one's in the basement and the other is a cheapo router in my bedroom. The WAP is pretty decent and has great range in a good, central location and it's the only device broadcasting our wireless. There's only one computer that needs to have a constant IP and that's my dad's PC because it has an older laser printer hooked up to it that's shared so we can all print. Right now, it's just manually assigned 192.168.1.101 but if and when he turns it off, I've had one of the 8 million wireless devices "steal" that IP address and then I have to go and take it away which is annoying so if there was a way to "reserve" that IP and keep the DHCP server from giving it out, that'd be awesome. In fact, if it's possible, I'd love to be able to assign all the wired devices static IPs like 192.168.1.100-.120 and then anything that pops up on wireless from like .125 - .999. So, for all of you who actually know about this sort of thing, how can I improve the efficiency of this setup? My goals are to have all wired devices on a 1Gb connection (everything is currently 10/100 because of hardware), eliminate unnecessary switches or routers, assign static IPs to one range and dynamic, wireless to another and have it all connected and configured properly. I'm willing to spend a few dollars but don't want to really go above $500.

i am kiss u now fucked around with this message at 14:58 on May 29, 2014

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


The physical setup seems fine assuming it's actually switches and not hubs. If there are hubs, throw them off a cliff and replace them with switches. In terms of getting everything up to gigabit speeds, you're just going to have to buy replacements. You should be able to just to straight upgrades, as in just buy the same sort of model, just with gigabit ports (and honestly it's probably most of what you'll find these days for low-port-count unmanaged switches.)

In terms of IPs, if you go onto the router acting as the DHCP server, you can see the range of addresses it's assigning. You can assign static IPs outside of that range and they will never get assigned to anything else. On Linksys stuff I think the default range was .100-.150 or something. You could expand that pool to .254 (usable IPs only go up that high) and then use everything from .2-.99 inclusive for your static'd hosts.

You can also add reservations to the DHCP pool using the MAC addresses of the devices you need reserved, but honestly just using the non-DHCP pool range is much easier.

EDIT: IP addresses go up to .255

Inspector_666 fucked around with this message at 19:43 on May 29, 2014

i am kiss u now
Dec 26, 2005



College Slice

Inspector_666 posted:

The physical setup seems fine assuming it's actually switches and not hubs. If there are hubs, throw them off a cliff and replace them with switches. In terms of getting everything up to gigabit speeds, you're just going to have to buy replacements. You should be able to just to straight upgrades, as in just buy the same sort of model, just with gigabit ports (and honestly it's probably most of what you'll find these days for low-port-count unmanaged switches.)

In terms of IPs, if you go onto the router acting as the DHCP server, you can see the range of addresses it's assigning. You can assign static IPs outside of that range and they will never get assigned to anything else. On Linksys stuff I think the default range was .100-.150 or something. You could expand that pool to .250 (IPs only go up that high) and then use everything from .2-.99 inclusive for your static'd hosts.

You can also add reservations to the DHCP pool using the MAC addresses of the devices you need reserved, but honestly just using the non-DHCP pool range is much easier.

Ah, now I get it, thanks. Testing on my present setup is working as intended so far, everything seems much smoother after a bit of reworking. Now I'll just need a gigabit router (an extra of which I may have at work) and a gigabit switch or two.

Naffer
Oct 26, 2004

Not a good chemist

IceLicker posted:

Ah, now I get it, thanks. Testing on my present setup is working as intended so far, everything seems much smoother after a bit of reworking. Now I'll just need a gigabit router (an extra of which I may have at work) and a gigabit switch or two.

To add to this, you should look at your cables and figure out if they are Cat5 or Cat5e. When I upgraded a segment of my network to gigabit recently, I found that one of my devices wouldn't connect at gigabit speeds because it was using a lower quality cat5 cable. You probably won't have this problem with all Cat5 cables, but they might be less likely to work at gigabit than cat5e and cat6.

i am kiss u now
Dec 26, 2005



College Slice

Naffer posted:

To add to this, you should look at your cables and figure out if they are Cat5 or Cat5e. When I upgraded a segment of my network to gigabit recently, I found that one of my devices wouldn't connect at gigabit speeds because it was using a lower quality cat5 cable. You probably won't have this problem with all Cat5 cables, but they might be less likely to work at gigabit than cat5e and cat6.

Good call. I ended up buying a 500ft spool of Cat6 and so now I'm gonna rewire the house. Gonna be a little tricky since I'll be using the air vents for some of it but I think we found a solution to prevent a bunch of ethernet lines from just hanging out in coils outside the vents. What we're gonna do is still run them through the vents but punch the cable under/behind the molding then install a small box right above it with a female receptacle to make it look presentable. This is only necessary for the bedrooms, everything on the first floor is accessible from the basement.

SEKCobra
Feb 28, 2011


I'd future proof with at least Cat6e

Shaocaholica
Oct 29, 2002

Fig. 5E


Are most rackmount switches pretty noisy with their active cooling? I'm looking for a budget (used or new) rackmount 1G switch thats not going to bug the poo poo out of me in my living room.

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

Shaocaholica posted:

Are most rackmount switches pretty noisy with their active cooling? I'm looking for a budget (used or new) rackmount 1G switch thats not going to bug the poo poo out of me in my living room.

1810-24g

They're 1U. They're loud. Not as loud as 1U servers, but 40mm fans are not quit.

Shaocaholica
Oct 29, 2002

Fig. 5E


evol262 posted:

1810-24g

They're 1U. They're loud. Not as loud as 1U servers, but 40mm fans are not quit.

Its going into a AV rack so its not going to be masked by any real rackmount servers. I think I might just go with one of those sub $100 switches without active cooling.

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Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Shaocaholica posted:

Its going into a AV rack so its not going to be masked by any real rackmount servers. I think I might just go with one of those sub $100 switches without active cooling.

If it's going into an AV rack I assume there will generally be other things making noise around it. I had a Cisco Catalyst 1U switch in my desk back home that I couldn't hear over the fans I my computer, so I wouldn't worry about it too much.

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