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Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


mediaphage posted:

I don't buy that you have to pay a fee to make a warranty claim, if for no other reason than it doesn't sound legal. Why not reach out on twitter (nicely) and ask them what your next step should be? Leave out the lightning bit because this isn't even a warranty worthy incident.

Also true. Looks like you can just call them to set up an RMA. Much ado about nothing.

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PBCrunch
Jun 17, 2002

Lawrence Phillips Always #1 to Me

Boris Galerkin posted:

I'm moving to a new apartment next month and need to setup/buy a home network for it from scratch. The apartment is wired for fiber but the plan I'm taking is "only" going to be 100/100 advertised. I'm thinking I'll only need 3 wired connections (Roku, desktop, NAS/media/Plex server) and wifi. How do I choose between one of the router+ap combos in the OP (the TP Link ones) vs getting an EdgeRouter X and one of their access points? Is it just price (the TP Link C7 is about $100 for example, vs. the EdgeRouter + AP Pro being around $200 from a glance) or is there something more to it? The most networky thing I'll want to do is maybe putting the server on it's own isolated network, if this is possible, cause I wanted to open it up to the world so I can stream Plex to my iPhone from anywhere and also setup a OpenVPN server or something similar on it. I'll also want QoS I suppose. It's not a big apartment so I'm fairly sure a single 5 GHz access point could cover the entire place.

I've never owned a really expensive router before, but the difference between the cheapo wireless-N access points I have always used to a UAC-AP-Lite is unbelievable. It is very fast and never suffers from hangups or dropped connections. You don't have to use an EdgeRouter with it. I use an old laptop running pfSense with my UAC. Keep in mind you will be able to keep your EdgeRouter (or whatever), even when you upgrade to a new wireless technology.

redeyes
Sep 14, 2002
I LOVE THE WHITE STRIPES!

PBCrunch posted:

I've never owned a really expensive router before, but the difference between the cheapo wireless-N access points I have always used to a UAC-AP-Lite is unbelievable. It is very fast and never suffers from hangups or dropped connections. You don't have to use an EdgeRouter with it. I use an old laptop running pfSense with my UAC. Keep in mind you will be able to keep your EdgeRouter (or whatever), even when you upgrade to a new wireless technology.

Mikrotik rules the poo poo out of consumer junk. No question. I haven't messed with anything or rebooted anything in over a year on my network.

Thirteenth Step
Mar 3, 2004



I have a 2008 desktop machine I want to get working wirelessly. I have a wireless AC access point and is like to use the full speed. I'm guessing a USB2 dongle will be a huge bottleneck, so what other options do I have? PCIE?

PBCrunch
Jun 17, 2002

Lawrence Phillips Always #1 to Me

Thirteenth Step posted:

I have a 2008 desktop machine I want to get working wirelessly. I have a wireless AC access point and is like to use the full speed. I'm guessing a USB2 dongle will be a huge bottleneck, so what other options do I have? PCIE?
480Mbps is plenty of bandwidth (your Wifi will never be close to its advertised throughput), but in my experience USB Wifi dongles suck (possibly for heat dissipation reasons?).

Get a PCIe to mini PCIe adapter like this: https://goo.gl/8INd4P

And a used Intel 7260 wireless AC/BT4.0 card like this: http://goo.gl/Xsd8fT

Make sure the antenna count on the adapter matches up to the antenna count on the card.

Thirteenth Step
Mar 3, 2004



PBCrunch posted:

480Mbps is plenty of bandwidth (your Wifi will never be close to its advertised throughput), but in my experience USB Wifi dongles suck (possibly for heat dissipation reasons?).

Get a PCIe to mini PCIe adapter like this: https://goo.gl/8INd4P

And a used Intel 7260 wireless AC/BT4.0 card like this: http://goo.gl/Xsd8fT

Make sure the antenna count on the adapter matches up to the antenna count on the card.

Had no idea those adapter cards existed. Thanks!

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

My E3000 router bricked during a firmware upgrade today so I'm out a router. Working on getting another but in the meantime I dug out an old FON router running DD-WRT to see if I can use it to get things online again.

After fighting with the crazy slow interface (the router has horrible specs) and networking I've given up.

This router has one port on it so all I want to do is plug the modem in then NAT wifi over to it but the default setup is to bridge the interfaces to create a single network.

Anyone mind pointing me in the right direction on how to accomplish this?

On3moresoul
Apr 22, 2010


Lipstick Apathy

This may be more appropriate elsewhere and is a dumb question, but should I keep Windows firewall enabled since my router also has a firewall? I haven't had any issues with both being on but was wondering what the general consensus is. Initial googling seems to indicate each have their benefits and using both shouldn't have adverse issues.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



On3moresoul posted:

This may be more appropriate elsewhere and is a dumb question, but should I keep Windows firewall enabled since my router also has a firewall? I haven't had any issues with both being on but was wondering what the general consensus is. Initial googling seems to indicate each have their benefits and using both shouldn't have adverse issues.

Yeah, you should leave windows firewall on.

Steakandchips
Apr 30, 2009



PBCrunch posted:

480Mbps is plenty of bandwidth (your Wifi will never be close to its advertised throughput), but in my experience USB Wifi dongles suck (possibly for heat dissipation reasons?).

Get a PCIe to mini PCIe adapter like this: https://goo.gl/8INd4P

And a used Intel 7260 wireless AC/BT4.0 card like this: http://goo.gl/Xsd8fT

Make sure the antenna count on the adapter matches up to the antenna count on the card.

I'm curious, what's the benefit of using the two components you linked instead of just getting a pcie wifi card like this: https://www.amazon.com/TP-LINK-450M...words=pcie+wifi ?

Sir DonkeyPunch
Mar 23, 2007

I didn't hear no bell


Steakandchips posted:

I'm curious, what's the benefit of using the two components you linked instead of just getting a pcie wifi card like this: https://www.amazon.com/TP-LINK-450M...words=pcie+wifi ?

I have this card, works well enough

Actuarial Fables
Jul 29, 2014



Taco Defender

Bouchacha posted:

Can anyone provide help with this issue? I'm more confused than anything else.

Have you tried using the "private" mode of the browsers? Do you have any addons?


Wirehark was brought up, might be a bit too low-level, but you said you'd be willing to learn so...

Once Wireshark opens up, select your interface and add in a filer for "port 80 or port 443." These two ports are most commonly used for http and https, the former being unencrypted and the latter being encrypted. (You can also start a new capture with different settings by clicking the gear looking icon in the upper left, as I've done in the picture)


Start the capture then try to load the trouble page.


Once it times out, or you get an error page, stop the capture by pressing the red square.


You probably picked up some traffic unrelated to your issue. To hide it, add a display filter of ip.addr == ###.###.###.###, putting in the destination IP of the site you're trying to access.


Once this is done, you now have a lot of information about what's going on...
...if you can understand any of it, that is.

Some things to look for; are there replies from the server, what kind of packets do they send back, do you ever try to GET the site, are you getting actual data (usually shown as [TCP segment of a reassembled PDU] or is it just a bunch of overhead with [SYN]s and [ACK]s and maybe some [RST] thrown in there?

Actuarial Fables fucked around with this message at 23:56 on Jun 25, 2016

Eletriarnation
Apr 6, 2005

People don't appreciate the substance of things...
objects in space.



Oven Wrangler

The Intel cards are recommended due to being really good, and since Intel doesn't make them in a desktop PCIe form factor the adapter is needed to use a mini-PCIe card.

That TP-Link would probably do the job but is only 802.11n and not AC, so it won't have the same speed potential.

You can however get an adapter card with an Intel chipset mini-PCIe already built in like this: https://amzn.com/B00HF8K0O6

This has the additional benefit of being a newer chipset than the other one linked. It looks like there may be some inconsistency with the product being delivered from this particular entry on Amazon though, since some reviews refer to Qualcomm drivers and other Intel chipsets.

Eletriarnation fucked around with this message at 23:51 on Jun 25, 2016

Lobus
Jun 24, 2016

What happened here?


Has anyone looked into the new wireless mesh options for home?

https://www.amazon.com/eero-Home-Wi...kduckgo-ffab-20

https://www.amazon.com/Luma-Home-Wi...kduckgo-ffab-20

http://www.open-mesh.com/

The open mesh software almost looks like Meraki, but the hardware is cheap when compared to the other systems I see. Seems like it is just the next evolution of a WiFi repeater.

MrMoo
Sep 14, 2000



Eero is great but not exactly cheap, see the other kickstarter project with smaller devices.

MrMoo fucked around with this message at 02:55 on Jun 26, 2016

Thermopyle
Jul 1, 2003

...the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt. —Bertrand Russell



I was never able to figure out what Eero does that makes it worth getting instead of open mesh.

I haven't actually used either but I've been watching open mesh for years, and Eero doesn't seem that special.

Bouchacha
Feb 7, 2006



Hasaple posted:

Wirehark was brought up, might be a bit too low-level, but you said you'd be willing to learn so...

Thanks so much for the tutorial but now I have another problem: the website I had issues with works just fine now. I literally did nothing and now it works without issue but I still have no idea what the problem was before. :|

Ynglaur
Oct 9, 2013



Thermopyle posted:

I was never able to figure out what Eero does that makes it worth getting instead of open mesh.

I haven't actually used either but I've been watching open mesh for years, and Eero doesn't seem that special.

Eero seems to have an excellent, dare-I-say Apple-quality, website design.

MrMoo
Sep 14, 2000



Thermopyle posted:

I was never able to figure out what Eero does that makes it worth getting instead of open mesh.

I believe it is something like Eero works as a single system and Open Mesh is a mesh of many individual systems.

30 TO 50 FERAL HOG
Mar 2, 2005





So now that I have a rack mount server, I guess I should build a rack. Since I'm going to do that, I think I'm going to convert my router, switches, UPS, etc all to rack mount. It helps that I have a few rack mount amps that need a place to live.

Anyways, I'm thinking of going with a Ubiquiti EdgeRouter Lite for my router and then something like this for a switch. Not sure about Nortel though, I didn't even know they existed recently enough to produce gigabit gear. Any other recommendations for switches are welcome. 24 port or 48 port since I'm going to be dropping 2-4 Cat6 in each room (4 for rooms with a TV in case I want to do HDMI over it in the future). PoE since I'll eventually replace my Airport Extremes with some Ubiquiti 802.11ac PoE APs. The Lite APs use their own proprietary 24V PoE so I'll probably get the Pro which uses regular 802.3af/at and has 3x3 MIMO for 1300MBps links.

redeyes
Sep 14, 2002
I LOVE THE WHITE STRIPES!

Lobus posted:

Has anyone looked into the new wireless mesh options for home?

https://www.amazon.com/eero-Home-Wi...kduckgo-ffab-20

https://www.amazon.com/Luma-Home-Wi...kduckgo-ffab-20

http://www.open-mesh.com/

The open mesh software almost looks like Meraki, but the hardware is cheap when compared to the other systems I see. Seems like it is just the next evolution of a WiFi repeater.

I use open mesh stuff all the time. You can install it and forget it. It will happily just work for years. My first OM2P's are still running after about 7 years. No issues.

Lobus
Jun 24, 2016

What happened here?


Thermopyle posted:

I was never able to figure out what Eero does that makes it worth getting instead of open mesh.

I haven't actually used either but I've been watching open mesh for years, and Eero doesn't seem that special.

Looking into it further it seems like these Eero and Luma units have more content / family oriented controls.

I found this video where they test out open mesh http://geekbeat.tv/editors-choice-o...all-businesses/

The units cost less than Eero, and I like that if you have Ethernet you can connect more than one of them to the wired network.

ndrake
Mar 29, 2002

You know, this is a damn fine cup of coffee.

I've been using an Eero system connected together wireless for the past few months. It works pretty well. But I've also found that there is cat5 cable in various places in my house.

A couple questions because I have limited networking knowledge:

If I wire together the eeros with the existing wiring I found in theory speeds should improve (the farthest reaches of the network currently are about 30% of what I get near the primary device), right?

Is wiring 3 eeros together a better solution than just wiring a couple of good routers as additional access points? The Eero replaced a netgear nighthawk and I much preferred the Netgear (except that I had no wifi in 40% of my house). In theory, as I understand it, the benefit to the eero mesh network is that it can move your device from one access point to another to maintain the strongest connection. If I just have a few wireless access points wired to the same router, each device will connect to one and try to hold onto that connection regardless of how unfavorable it becomes, right?

Last, any idea how I figure out which ethernet cable goes where? I have found some cables in the wall and jacks in the basement, how do I test which ones are connected? I admit this may be a stupid question (or at least one that informs how much I understand networking). Thanks for any guidance.

Boris Galerkin
Dec 17, 2011



PBCrunch posted:

I've never owned a really expensive router before, but the difference between the cheapo wireless-N access points I have always used to a UAC-AP-Lite is unbelievable. It is very fast and never suffers from hangups or dropped connections. You don't have to use an EdgeRouter with it. I use an old laptop running pfSense with my UAC. Keep in mind you will be able to keep your EdgeRouter (or whatever), even when you upgrade to a new wireless technology.

Yeah, I think that's a nice thing being able to just upgrade the wireless part instead of buying a new router combo altogether.

If I were to get an EdgeRouter, should I go for the X or the Lite? I'm not really worried about price so much at this price point ($50 vs $100) but more about performance really. I've read on Reddit that the X has faster/better hardware but doesn't do hardware acceleration, while the Lite has slower hardware but does hardware acceleration, but only if I don't enable things like QoS. I imagine I'm going to want to enable things like QoS. I guess the other thing is having only 3 ports on the Lite might be a bit restrictive.

Rukus
Mar 13, 2007

Hmph.


BiohazrD posted:

So now that I have a rack mount server, I guess I should build a rack. Since I'm going to do that, I think I'm going to convert my router, switches, UPS, etc all to rack mount. It helps that I have a few rack mount amps that need a place to live.

Anyways, I'm thinking of going with a Ubiquiti EdgeRouter Lite for my router and then something like this for a switch. Not sure about Nortel though, I didn't even know they existed recently enough to produce gigabit gear. Any other recommendations for switches are welcome. 24 port or 48 port since I'm going to be dropping 2-4 Cat6 in each room (4 for rooms with a TV in case I want to do HDMI over it in the future). PoE since I'll eventually replace my Airport Extremes with some Ubiquiti 802.11ac PoE APs. The Lite APs use their own proprietary 24V PoE so I'll probably get the Pro which uses regular 802.3af/at and has 3x3 MIMO for 1300MBps links.

Seems like a solid plan, but jeeze, that's quite a deep chassis, best to keep that in mind when searching for a rack. That switch looks like a good deal for the price, but be aware it's pulling 135W before any PoE (and is pretty deep, too).

I'd almost suggest an Edgeswitch Lite 48 port and either a Toughswitch or Unifi Switch 8 for your APs over the Nortel, but once again that's a good price and fits the form factor of your server.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

ndrake posted:

In theory, as I understand it, the benefit to the eero mesh network is that it can move your device from one access point to another to maintain the strongest connection.

Roaming between access points is up to the client device - not the AP. Eero may have some central processing that tries to force weak clients off earlier, but that would require significantly more cpu power than I'd guess it has. The 30% figure you mentioned tells me that eero just works by making the secondary units a client of the first one, and then re-broadcasting a new AP signal on a different channel/band.


Boris Galerkin posted:

I've read on Reddit that the X has faster/better hardware but doesn't do hardware acceleration, while the Lite has slower hardware but does hardware acceleration, but only if I don't enable things like QoS.

That's pretty much wrong all around. The ER-X's advantage is that it's based off of a 5-port switch-on-chip design, where all the networking, NAT, firewall stuff is done in software. There's no additional hardware for protocol acceleration. So if you're plugging in 1 WAN + 4 LAN ports and you want wire-rate switching between the 4 ports then the ER-X is for you.

The ER-Lite has three discretely routed interfaces, so if you try to tie them together like a switch it will do that in software, and eat up all your CPU power. Meanwhile it's got hardware offload for IPv4, IPv6, IPSec, and VLAN processing. QoS runs through the hardware acceleration unless you disable that feature via CLI. If you're going to plug a switch downstream from your router and you don't mind the extra $50 cost, this is the router for you.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Rukus posted:

I'd almost suggest an Edgeswitch Lite 48 port and either a Toughswitch or Unifi Switch 8 for your APs over the Nortel, but once again that's a good price and fits the form factor of your server.

Edgeswitch Lite does not have PoE. IMHO it's not worth the savings to break out of rack mounted hardware just to re-add PoE capabilities in an odd-form-factor switch like the Toughswitches. It's probably better to get the UniFi Switch 16 port or the Unifi/Edgeswitch 24 port, and then tack on a cheap 16/24/48 port gigabit cheap switch if you need extra port density.

30 TO 50 FERAL HOG
Mar 2, 2005





Rukus posted:

Seems like a solid plan, but jeeze, that's quite a deep chassis, best to keep that in mind when searching for a rack. That switch looks like a good deal for the price, but be aware it's pulling 135W before any PoE (and is pretty deep, too).

I'd almost suggest an Edgeswitch Lite 48 port and either a Toughswitch or Unifi Switch 8 for your APs over the Nortel, but once again that's a good price and fits the form factor of your server.

Well I'll either make my own rack or buy this one. 31.5" is plenty deep, the server chassis is like 23"

Didn't think about the power consumption, I'd be surprised if it actually used that much if most ports weren't actively being used for PoE.

I might get one of these instead and then just get a single 8 port PoE switch. It might be a bit more expensive but it should save on the electric cost

ndrake
Mar 29, 2002

You know, this is a damn fine cup of coffee.

CrazyLittle posted:

Roaming between access points is up to the client device - not the AP. Eero may have some central processing that tries to force weak clients off earlier, but that would require significantly more cpu power than I'd guess it has. The 30% figure you mentioned tells me that eero just works by making the secondary units a client of the first one, and then re-broadcasting a new AP signal on a different channel/band.

They advertise that (and each unit has a dual core 1ghz cpu, for what its worth). It's supposed to be better than a range extender because each unit has two radios, one for communicating to other eeros and one for communicating with devices. I'm just curious if I wire them together if there is any benefit compared to using standalone routers-as-APs since the dual radio thing is useless.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

ndrake posted:

They advertise that (and each unit has a dual core 1ghz cpu, for what its worth). It's supposed to be better than a range extender because each unit has two radios, one for communicating to other eeros and one for communicating with devices. I'm just curious if I wire them together if there is any benefit compared to using standalone routers-as-APs since the dual radio thing is useless.

Yeah, that does kinda defeat the purpose.

Gothmog1065
May 14, 2009


Hey guys, question:

I just got in an Edegrouter X SFP, and everything seems to work OK, except it takes awhile for the DNS to start responding and resolving DNS addresses. I've seen it priimarily on my wireless (UAP-AC-LITE). I had no issues with my pfSense router. Is there a setting I'm missing? It takes about 3 minutes for everything to start working.

WAN is on eth0, and I'm only using 1 LAN address (192.168.1.0/24). Are there any settings that would cause this?

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Are you using the DNS cache/listener? Are you using your ISP's DNS servers?

This sounds to me like your computer's first DNS server entry is invalid, so your computer tries it first, waits for it to timeout, and then moves over to the secondary DNS server. With the Edgerouters (especially if you use the wizards) it means that the router itself is supposed to be your first DNS server and it's supposed to cache all of your DNS queries to make them faster across multiple local machines. But if that feature's not setup right or not working, then you're just going to be stuck.

Try hard-setting your ISP's dns servers, or Google DNS (8.8.8.8 & 8.8.4.4) or OpenDNS (don't care to remember these)

CrazyLittle fucked around with this message at 22:12 on Jun 26, 2016

Gothmog1065
May 14, 2009


CrazyLittle posted:

Are you using the DNS cache/listener? Are you using your ISP's DNS servers?

This sounds to me like your computer's first DNS server entry is invalid, so your computer tries it first, waits for it to timeout, and then moves over to the secondary DNS server. With the Edgerouters (especially if you use the wizards) it means that the router itself is supposed to be your first DNS server and it's supposed to cache all of your DNS queries to make them faster across multiple local machines. But if that feature's not setup right or not working, then you're just going to be stuck.

Try hard-setting your ISP's dns servers, or Google DNS (8.8.8.8 & 8.8.4.4) or OpenDNS (don't care to remember these)

It's a mix. My static IPs use Google's DNS (that you listed) and the DHCP uses my ISP's DNS servers.

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


ndrake posted:

Last, any idea how I figure out which ethernet cable goes where? I have found some cables in the wall and jacks in the basement, how do I test which ones are connected? I admit this may be a stupid question (or at least one that informs how much I understand networking). Thanks for any guidance.

Cheap way- connect each end to a switch and see if just keep trying different ends until it lights up. Then you have both ends of the cable. You can do this more expensively with a fox and hound kit.

Boris Galerkin
Dec 17, 2011



CrazyLittle posted:

That's pretty much wrong all around. The ER-X's advantage is that it's based off of a 5-port switch-on-chip design, where all the networking, NAT, firewall stuff is done in software. There's no additional hardware for protocol acceleration. So if you're plugging in 1 WAN + 4 LAN ports and you want wire-rate switching between the 4 ports then the ER-X is for you.

The ER-Lite has three discretely routed interfaces, so if you try to tie them together like a switch it will do that in software, and eat up all your CPU power. Meanwhile it's got hardware offload for IPv4, IPv6, IPSec, and VLAN processing. QoS runs through the hardware acceleration unless you disable that feature via CLI. If you're going to plug a switch downstream from your router and you don't mind the extra $50 cost, this is the router for you.

I don't know if I'll need any of that nor do I really know what it all means. Is there a good website/video that can explain all that to me to figure it all out other than wikipedia?

ndrake
Mar 29, 2002

You know, this is a damn fine cup of coffee.

Dogen posted:

Cheap way- connect each end to a switch and see if just keep trying different ends until it lights up. Then you have both ends of the cable. You can do this more expensively with a fox and hound kit.

Thanks! Yeah I need a simple cheap way. I'll get another switch and move them around the house.

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


Well also really you could just use a device on one end if you don't have two switches. You just need something for the switch on the other end to talk to.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Boris Galerkin posted:

I don't know if I'll need any of that nor do I really know what it all means. Is there a good website/video that can explain all that to me to figure it all out other than wikipedia?

Are you getting an ISP connection > 300mbit? If not then get the ER-X

30 TO 50 FERAL HOG
Mar 2, 2005





CrazyLittle posted:

Are you getting an ISP connection > 300mbit? If not then get the ER-X

I don't get having your router run off of PoE. What device are you going to have upstream to power it? Maybe if FIOS ONTs were PoE compatible but they're going to be 802.3af/at and not the 24v passive proprietary stuff.

Also the ER-lite has a rack mount kit.

Back to switch chat, I think I'm just going to spend the money and get one of these bad boys. 24 ports, PoE (not PoE+ but oh well), low power consumption. Originally I was going to get two separate switches, an 8 port PoE and a 24 port gigabit switch, but since they aren't managed I cant do link aggregation, which would mean all of my 1300mbps WAP would share a single gigabit link. It would be about $80 cheaper, but gently caress it.

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smax
Nov 9, 2009



BiohazrD posted:

I don't get having your router run off of PoE. What device are you going to have upstream to power it?

If you use an ER-X with a Unifi UAP, you can power both with the UAP PoE injector. Not a huge benefit, but it does cut down on wires.

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