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Martytoof
Feb 25, 2003







My lovely Fortigate 60-something is finally biting the dust. ERL shouldn't sweat a 500/500 WAN right?

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Antillie
Mar 14, 2015



Martytoof posted:

My lovely Fortigate 60-something is finally biting the dust. ERL shouldn't sweat a 500/500 WAN right?

The ERL is capable of full gigabit speed routing. It will handle a 500/500 line just fine. Just make sure you pair the ERL with a switch as its terrible at being a switch. So your setup should be:

Internet -> ERL -> Switch -> <wired things>

Unless of course you only have one wired thing, such as an AP, then you don't need a switch.

However the PoE version of the ERL does have a three port switch built in so ports eth0 and eth1 are discreet and should be used for routing, and ports eth2, eth3, and eth4 are a switch and should be used for switching. This means that, unlike the base ERL, you donít need a separate switch if you have three or less wired devices. It can also provide PoE power to Ubiquiti APs. So with an ERL PoE you would have:

Internet -> ERL-PoE -> [ (up to three wired things) or (two wired things and a switch -> more wired things) ]

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


Antillie posted:

The ERL is capable of full gigabit speed routing. It will handle a 500/500 line just fine. Just make sure you pair the ERL with a switch as its terrible at being a switch. So your setup should be:

Internet -> ERL -> Switch -> <wired things>

Unless of course you only have one wired thing, such as an AP, then you don't need a switch.

However the PoE version of the ERL does have a three port switch built in so ports eth0 and eth1 are discreet and should be used for routing, and ports eth2, eth3, and eth4 are a switch and should be used for switching. This means that, unlike the base ERL, you donít need a separate switch if you have three or less wired devices. It can also provide PoE power to Ubiquiti APs. So with an ERL PoE you would have:

Internet -> ERL-PoE -> [ (up to three wired things) or (two wired things and a switch -> more wired things) ]

It can also provide POE power to poe 802.3af but no auto sensing and the port is always powered. You just manually set it to 48v.

Antillie
Mar 14, 2015



Concurred posted:

Replacing my WRT54GL - is there a reason the Archer C7 / C9 are the go to recommendations for small home / apartment?

I cut the cord and get all my media streamed so I upgraded to a 110 / 20 mbps package, and the house I'm in is 90 years old. The router is upstairs in my office. I shouldn't run into any issues with older wiring in the house, i.e. any interference, should I?

The C5/7/9 have good bang for your dollar/euro. There are other good routers out there from ASUS and Netgear (and others), they just cost more.

The old wiring in your place will probably prevent powerline networking from working, but the only way to really know for sure is to try it. As for wifi, it depends on what the walls/floors are made out of. Things like wood and drywall don't block wifi too much. But concrete, brick, metal mesh, metal beams/bars, and old types of paint/stucco that contain lead (or other metals) can really gently caress up wifi signals. Old buildings can have all sorts of strange construction materials in the walls that aren't used much these days. So its really hard to predict wifi coverage in old structures. Once again, you won't really know until you try.

Martytoof
Feb 25, 2003







Antillie posted:

The ERL is capable of full gigabit speed routing. It will handle a 500/500 line just fine. Just make sure you pair the ERL with a switch as its terrible at being a switch. So your setup should be:

Internet -> ERL -> Switch -> <wired things>

Unless of course you only have one wired thing, such as an AP, then you don't need a switch.

Thanks. My plan is to hook up ERL to my Brocade FWS48G.

I've got a bunch of VLANs and things so my plan is actually


Home WAN uplink -> Switch (port dedicated to VLAN99 or whatever), then ERL trunked on eth0/1/2 with VIFs to all my VLANs connected to the switch. I posted about it a while back in the thread but didn't really pursue it since my fortigate was still chugging along fine. I managed to simulate this without problems on VyOS so I assume I can do the same with my ERL. If not I'll just split out my WAN link to a discrete eth0 interface and use eth1/2 as a bonded pair for the rest of my traffic/routing.

Concurred
Apr 23, 2003

My team got swept out of the playoffs, and all I got was this avatar and red text



Antillie posted:

The C5/7/9 have good bang for your dollar/euro. There are other good routers out there from ASUS and Netgear (and others), they just cost more.

The old wiring in your place will probably prevent powerline networking from working, but the only way to really know for sure is to try it. As for wifi, it depends on what the walls/floors are made out of. Things like wood and drywall don't block wifi too much. But concrete, brick, metal mesh, metal beams/bars, and old types of paint/stucco that contain lead (or other metals) can really gently caress up wifi signals. Old buildings can have all sorts of strange construction materials in the walls that aren't used much these days. So its really hard to predict wifi coverage in old structures. Once again, you won't really know until you try.

I have no idea why I even mentioned it in the first place - the WRT54GL has been working fine the 3 years I've been here. I'd be surprised if I ran into any WiFi issues with a new router.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Martytoof posted:

Thanks. My plan is to hook up ERL to my Brocade FWS48G.

I've got a bunch of VLANs and things so my plan is actually


Home WAN uplink -> Switch (port dedicated to VLAN99 or whatever), then ERL trunked on eth0/1/2 with VIFs to all my VLANs connected to the switch. I posted about it a while back in the thread but didn't really pursue it since my fortigate was still chugging along fine. I managed to simulate this without problems on VyOS so I assume I can do the same with my ERL. If not I'll just split out my WAN link to a discrete eth0 interface and use eth1/2 as a bonded pair for the rest of my traffic/routing.

Word of warning, ERL-3, ERPoE-5, and ERPro-8 can do wire-rate routing port-to-port, but they can't do QoS, traffic shaping or other packet-analysis at that speed. Basically if you're doing vanilla stuff then you're fine because the Edgerouter has hardware acceleration for those functions: routing, basic NAT, basic firewall. But if you start doing things outside of that hardware acceleration (packet inspection, traffic shaping, etc) then the performance drops down to below 300mbps.

Twerk from Home
Jan 17, 2009

This avatar brought to you by the 'save our dead gay forums' foundation.


all rear end no class posted:

Word of warning, ERL-3, ERPoE-5, and ERPro-8 can do wire-rate routing port-to-port, but they can't do QoS, traffic shaping or other packet-analysis at that speed. Basically if you're doing vanilla stuff then you're fine because the Edgerouter has hardware acceleration for those functions: routing, basic NAT, basic firewall. But if you start doing things outside of that hardware acceleration (packet inspection, traffic shaping, etc) then the performance drops down to below 300mbps.

What's the answer then? Right back to pfsense on an x86 box?

Martytoof
Feb 25, 2003







all rear end no class posted:

Word of warning, ERL-3, ERPoE-5, and ERPro-8 can do wire-rate routing port-to-port, but they can't do QoS, traffic shaping or other packet-analysis at that speed. Basically if you're doing vanilla stuff then you're fine because the Edgerouter has hardware acceleration for those functions: routing, basic NAT, basic firewall. But if you start doing things outside of that hardware acceleration (packet inspection, traffic shaping, etc) then the performance drops down to below 300mbps.

Hmm, that's good to know, thanks.

My switch is L3 so theoretically I really only need the ERL to run NAT, but I'm not sure I want to rule out spinning up other features. For $100 I may just invest in ERL anyway.

Does anyone know how portable an ERL config is to VyOS? The basics should be cut'n'paste, right?

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Twerk from Home posted:

What's the answer then? Right back to pfsense on an x86 box?
I'm running a vyos machine on a 500 megabit connection where the wire is connected at a gig, and any traffic over 500 gets dropped by the switch, so the ERPro wasn't cutting it with shaping policies in place because all of the traffic ran through the CPU. Also if you're running an Edgerouter of any flavor, be sure to upgrade to v1.9 because they fixed CPU utilization reporting to include kernel traffic. IE older firmwares don't actually report all CPU activity.

Martytoof posted:

Does anyone know how portable an ERL config is to VyOS? The basics should be cut'n'paste, right?

Extremely portable. I would still touch up the syntax by hand though.

Martytoof
Feb 25, 2003







Great, thanks. I'll probably pick up ERL since I'm not planning on anything fancy right now. It's really comforting to know that if the ERL ever fails or I need an upgrade I can just gently caress off to a VyOS box on beefier hardware.

metallyca
Oct 25, 2004


I've somehow managed to brick my Asus RT-N16. I've tried to re-flash the firmware using the recovery mode but the Asus Firmware Restoration utility just constantly tells me it's not in recovery mode even though the power light is flashing as it should. I'm able to ping the router when it's supposedly in recovery mode but nothing. Anyone got any advice on what I could try next to get it back up and running?

Or any recommendations on a new router about the same price as the RT-N16 that's able to run Tomato? I wouldn't need anything fancy just something that's decent.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

metallyca posted:

I've somehow managed to brick my Asus RT-N16. I've tried to re-flash the firmware using the recovery mode but the Asus Firmware Restoration utility just constantly tells me it's not in recovery mode even though the power light is flashing as it should. I'm able to ping the router when it's supposedly in recovery mode but nothing. Anyone got any advice on what I could try next to get it back up and running?

Or any recommendations on a new router about the same price as the RT-N16 that's able to run Tomato? I wouldn't need anything fancy just something that's decent.

Why do you want Tomato?

metallyca
Oct 25, 2004


all rear end no class posted:

Why do you want Tomato?

Well I guess it's not really a requirement it's just what I was running on the RT-N16. I was using Tomato by shibby.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Any suggestions on a usb 3.0 AC wireless adapter that works on linux? I did a bit of searching and results seem to be a bit inconsistent. I've got my media server on a 450Mbps wireless N adapter that works okay but I need a bit more bandwidth.

Moey
Oct 22, 2010

I LIKE TO MOVE IT


metallyca posted:

Well I guess it's not really a requirement it's just what I was running on the RT-N16. I was using Tomato by shibby.

My RT-N16 running the same firmware died on me earlier this year. Replaced it with an ER-X and a UAP-AC-Lite. Loving the new setup.

metallyca
Oct 25, 2004


Moey posted:

My RT-N16 running the same firmware died on me earlier this year. Replaced it with an ER-X and a UAP-AC-Lite. Loving the new setup.

I went ahead and ordered an Archer C7 this morning.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Ashex posted:

Any suggestions on a usb 3.0 AC wireless adapter that works on linux? I did a bit of searching and results seem to be a bit inconsistent. I've got my media server on a 450Mbps wireless N adapter that works okay but I need a bit more bandwidth.

If it has to be USB then the only game in town seems to be the TP-Link T4U

But if possible, I would get a mini-pci adapter card and put an Intel AC nic on it inside the computer.

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


This

https://www.amazon.com/Gigabyte-GC-...ds=gigabyte+4.2

Gigabyte wifi card has an intel nic

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

all rear end no class posted:

If it has to be USB then the only game in town seems to be the TP-Link T4U

But if possible, I would get a mini-pci adapter card and put an Intel AC nic on it inside the computer.

Unfortunately I haven't got any room in the case for a card

I think I may just go with a range extender, it's overkill but everything I've read doesn't give me a lot of confidence in linux support for AC adapters.

buildmorefarms
Aug 13, 2004

любоваться


Doctor Rope

edit: wrong thread, i'm an idiot

buildmorefarms fucked around with this message at 06:49 on Oct 20, 2016

EconOutlines
Jul 3, 2004



Skinnymansbeerbelly posted:

So my ISP is rolling out overage charges in my area. Are there any firmwares with a running 30-day counter of data usage, that can impose rate limiting when the cap is reached? Rate limiting sucks, but overage charges suck worse.

Same, Comcast starts 1TB caps November 1st in my area unless you pay an extra $50/month. Currently using the AC66U with the Merlin firmware to monitor bandwidth but it lacks features that I'm looking for. Looking for more in depth bandwidth monitoring, limiting, QoS, using official firmware.

I'm thinking about going with the ER-X and a UAP-AC-Lite combo since Ubiquiti typically has a great feature set.

Twerk from Home
Jan 17, 2009

This avatar brought to you by the 'save our dead gay forums' foundation.


I'd also note that how they measure traffic can differ from you measuring at your router. Be careful if you're trying to run right to the limit, guys.

EconOutlines
Jul 3, 2004



Twerk from Home posted:

I'd also note that how they measure traffic can differ from you measuring at your router. Be careful if you're trying to run right to the limit, guys.

Any way you can be more specific about that? I thought if you were measuring WAN-only traffic and not anything internal, it should be accurate, no?

Twerk from Home
Jan 17, 2009

This avatar brought to you by the 'save our dead gay forums' foundation.


EconOutlines posted:

Any way you can be more specific about that? I thought if you were measuring WAN-only traffic and not anything internal, it should be accurate, no?

http://arstechnica.com/business/201...er-for-overage/

At the very least, they've got customer info swapped sometimes, so if you notice that your usage doesn't match up you can go hog wild because somebody else will be billed for the overage. I've also seen reports that DOS traffic that gets filtered before it ever hits your router counts against your bandwidth cap.

Agrias120
Jun 27, 2002

I will burn my dread.



I'm moving into a 4-story townhouse next month and am a little overwhelmed about the best way to get decent wifi coverage throughout the house. The router is going to be in the bottom floor (above ground basement). I'll need to grab a switch, as well, to hook up the other devices for the entertainment center.

My big question is what to do about making sure the wifi can hit up to 3 floors above. Is picking up something like an Eero or a nanostation solution the best option (it seems like it from the OP, I just want to make sure before taking the plunge)? I'd like to eventually drop an ethernet wire from each of the other floors down to the basement, but for the immediate future I'm just going to have to rely on relaying the wifi up from the basement, I think.

e.pilot
Nov 20, 2011

MR.FUSION
#TEAMTRASHMILES


Agrias120 posted:

I'm moving into a 4-story townhouse next month and am a little overwhelmed about the best way to get decent wifi coverage throughout the house. The router is going to be in the bottom floor (above ground basement). I'll need to grab a switch, as well, to hook up the other devices for the entertainment center.

My big question is what to do about making sure the wifi can hit up to 3 floors above. Is picking up something like an Eero or a nanostation solution the best option (it seems like it from the OP, I just want to make sure before taking the plunge)? I'd like to eventually drop an ethernet wire from each of the other floors down to the basement, but for the immediate future I'm just going to have to rely on relaying the wifi up from the basement, I think.

Is the house wired with phone lines to multiple rooms? Even if it's just 2 pair Cat3 that's enough to get a passable 100mbit connection, better and cheaper than doing power line adapters or wifi repeaters for sure.

smax
Nov 9, 2009



e.pilot posted:

Is the house wired with phone lines to multiple rooms? Even if it's just 2 pair Cat3 that's enough to get a passable 100mbit connection, better and cheaper than doing power line adapters or wifi repeaters for sure.

I don't know about that, there are some pretty quick powerline adapters now.

Consider running a network line for a second access point upstairs (to the third floor?) in a creative way. Remember you can use ductwork or run it outside.

Thermopyle
Jul 1, 2003

...the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt. óBertrand Russell



Yeah, as long as your wiring works out, powerline is fast and good.

Nocheez
Sep 5, 2000

Can you spare a little cheddar?


Nap Ghost

I've got a 2000 sqft home and my wifi can be pretty spotty in my downstairs bedroom, as the router is upstairs and wired to my desktop. I'll check the open channels later tonight, but what is the recommended router for my situation?

- Stream Plex/Netflix/HBO Go to TVs all around the house, sometimes concurrently.
- Have a wired desktop computer that I prefer to have the most priority (not an issue, just important to note)
- Would like to be future-proof for when Google Fiber is finally available in my neighborhood (not sure how soon this will be)

In addition, my mother is having a similar issue. She runs a pretty basic cable internet package from Time Warner but has bad connectivity upstairs. She also has a desktop computer and a large family that visits and brings all their wireless devices with them. She doesn't need as much horsepower as I do, just reliable connections all over her home of about the same size as mine.

Thanks for any suggestions!

caberham
Mar 18, 2009

by Smythe


Grimey Drawer

Thermopyle posted:

Yeah, as long as your wiring works out, powerline is fast and good.

I'm a convert to powerline. Get the higher end models with 2 ports you are pretty much set. But do multiple rooms like 3 rooms need 2 pairs, or just 3 units where they can all talk together with some sort of proprietary host?

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


caberham posted:

I'm a convert to powerline. Get the higher end models with 2 ports you are pretty much set. But do multiple rooms like 3 rooms need 2 pairs, or just 3 units where they can all talk together with some sort of proprietary host?

You only need one per room, they can all talk to each other. Even ones from different companies can talk to each other. I set up some in a customers house and they talked to their ADT installed ones.

Dogen
May 5, 2002

Bury my body down by the highwayside, so that my old evil spirit can get a Greyhound bus and ride


caberham posted:

I'm a convert to powerline. Get the higher end models with 2 ports you are pretty much set. But do multiple rooms like 3 rooms need 2 pairs, or just 3 units where they can all talk together with some sort of proprietary host?

You just need three units.

Also if you need more than two ports just get a switch.

eames
May 9, 2009



There's a massive DDOS attack affecting DNS servers in US-East at the moment, it's getting worse and spreading to US-West.

Major sites like twitter, github, paypal, reddit and others are affected. You probably won't read anything about this on the internet because the people in the affected areas can't post. A bit eerie.

OpenDNS servers are holding up, they use "smart caching" by ignoring the TTL.

208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220

http://downdetector.com/status/level3/map

(even 8.8.8.8 isn't returning queries and I'm in europe)

e.pilot
Nov 20, 2011

MR.FUSION
#TEAMTRASHMILES


eames posted:

There's a massive DDOS attack affecting DNS servers in US-East at the moment, it's getting worse and spreading to US-West.

Major sites like twitter, github, paypal, reddit and others are affected. You probably won't read anything about this on the internet because the people in the affected areas can't post. A bit eerie.

OpenDNS servers are holding up, they use "smart caching" by ignoring the TTL.

208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220

http://downdetector.com/status/level3/map

(even 8.8.8.8 isn't returning queries and I'm in europe)

I have OpenDNS set up at home, I was wondering why I wasn't seeing any of the reported problems.

The Gunslinger
Jul 24, 2004

Do not forget the face of your father.

Fun Shoe

Thermopyle posted:

Yeah, as long as your wiring works out, powerline is fast and good.

I actually found a decent one of these finally - the Extollo Lansocket 1500. It managed triple the speeds of any other adapter in my place and includes a passthru port. I had tried the D-Link high end one, the TP-Link 8010 and etc, most were just barely getting 100Mbps. With the Extollo I am getting 300-400Mbps consistently which is more than enough for my purposes. Plugged a switch into one in the basement and now I don't have to hardwire cat5 down there which is great.

Could not find the damned thing on any online merchant in Canada but I ordered one right from their website and it shipped from Vancouver.

The Gunslinger fucked around with this message at 13:40 on Oct 24, 2016

Antillie
Mar 14, 2015



Nocheez posted:

I've got a 2000 sqft home and my wifi can be pretty spotty in my downstairs bedroom, as the router is upstairs and wired to my desktop. I'll check the open channels later tonight, but what is the recommended router for my situation?

- Stream Plex/Netflix/HBO Go to TVs all around the house, sometimes concurrently.
- Have a wired desktop computer that I prefer to have the most priority (not an issue, just important to note)
- Would like to be future-proof for when Google Fiber is finally available in my neighborhood (not sure how soon this will be)

In addition, my mother is having a similar issue. She runs a pretty basic cable internet package from Time Warner but has bad connectivity upstairs. She also has a desktop computer and a large family that visits and brings all their wireless devices with them. She doesn't need as much horsepower as I do, just reliable connections all over her home of about the same size as mine.

Thanks for any suggestions!

The best solution for spotty wifi coverage in a two story home is to put a second AP on whatever floor doesn't have one already (or wherever the wifi signal is bad really). Outside of bargain bin (or ISP provided) trash no modern wifi router or AP really has much more range than any other as they are all equally constrained by physics and FCC regulations.

If channel congestion is an issue then moving to the 5ghz band is the solution. But since 5ghz doesn't penetrate walls and other solid objects as well as the slower 2.4ghz band (and has less range overall) going to 5ghz may force you to get a second AP for the other floor. Also not all of your wifi things may support 5ghz. But even if some of them don't, getting the ones that do off of the 2.4ghz band will still help alleviate the channel congestion somewhat. If running an ethernet cable for a second AP isn't practical you can always try powerline networking or MOCA. Failing that you can get something that can do a wifi mesh like the Unifi APs or an Eero system.

Antillie fucked around with this message at 14:32 on Oct 24, 2016

EVIL Gibson
Mar 23, 2001

Internet of Things is just someone else's computer that people can't help attaching cameras and door locks to!


Switchblade Switcharoo

If anyone here has a bum network router just to let you know that can be a good opportunity to learn about jtag or serial communications. I had a router that had a bad firmware flash but the led activity was still going. I used a serial to USB chip I had around (originally for a electronic hackable badge our security group made) to connect to the pins and after some corrections in baud rate and error correction just saw it was stuck in a boot loop for a busybox linux deployment. Pressed enter a couple times and it stopped trying to boot up all services and gave me a login prompt which allowed me to login and flash the firmware manually.

Edit: this is the device I used FT232RL USB TO UART (RS232). Google search for "USB to serial ardunio" for more results since the product is usually marketed as the xbee but not always.

EVIL Gibson fucked around with this message at 15:37 on Oct 26, 2016

Krakkles
May 5, 2003

like and subscribe for more passive-aggressive roadway bullshit adventure in Chigcao

What's better? Airport base station + external hard drive or Time Capsule?

Cost is no object, reliability and functionality are king.

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Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


Krakkles posted:

What's better? Airport base station + external hard drive or Time Capsule?

Cost is no object, reliability and functionality are king.

A synology that emulates a time capsule.

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