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LegoMan
Mar 17, 2002

ting ting ting



College Slice

Antillie posted:

His tablet might be connecting to a neighbor's wifi. Also depending on his age he might have figured out how to change the MAC address on the tablet. MAC filtering is a joke really. In fact some old versions of Android would change their MAC address every time they booted up due to a bug. Most OS's will generate a random MAC on boot if they can't read the MAC burned into the NIC for whatever reason, so flaky hardware can cause this too. If you don't want him on the wifi either don't tell him what the password is or take the tablet away. All other methods of keeping people off of your wifi are easily circumvented.
I know the MAC address is correct as I read it off the tablet itself, but it could be a nearby wifi. The flaky hardware mac address thing is new to me, which sucks to think about.

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Proteus Jones
Feb 28, 2013





LegoMan posted:

I know the MAC address is correct as I read it off the tablet itself, but it could be a nearby wifi. The flaky hardware mac address thing is new to me, which sucks to think about.

You can look at the wireless settings in the tablet. It should show the networks in the area. I don't know Android, but if it's iOS, you select the "info" icon (letter "i" with a circle around it). If it says "forget this network" then the iPad has at one time connected to that network. Might be a way to narrow down whether or not he's connecting to someone else's network.

Honestly, you might be better served setting up usage restrictions or straight up confiscating the tablet in the evening.

Proteus Jones fucked around with this message at 12:49 on Apr 25, 2017

unbutthurtable
Dec 2, 2016

Total. Tox. Rereg.




College Slice

Hey thread -- I live in a small apartment and currently have cable internet with a cable modem I own, plus a TP-LINK Archer C9 (AC1900) router. I'm planning to switch to FiOS soon, and I'm not totally sure about what the deal is with their "router." Is it actually a combo modem/router, in which case I need it to have modem functionality, or is it just a router and I'd be a dummy to get theirs when I already have one?

Secondly, and not totally thread relevant, but I might as well ask -- I haven't had cable TV for years. Is a DVR worth it if FiOS has on demand anyway?

THF13
Sep 26, 2007

Keep an adversary in the dark about what you're capable of, and he has to assume the worst.


unbutthurtable posted:

Hey thread -- I live in a small apartment and currently have cable internet with a cable modem I own, plus a TP-LINK Archer C9 (AC1900) router. I'm planning to switch to FiOS soon, and I'm not totally sure about what the deal is with their "router." Is it actually a combo modem/router, in which case I need it to have modem functionality, or is it just a router and I'd be a dummy to get theirs when I already have one?

Secondly, and not totally thread relevant, but I might as well ask -- I haven't had cable TV for years. Is a DVR worth it if FiOS has on demand anyway?

FIOS doesn't have modems so if you're getting only internet it's possible to use your own router but a little complicated (Making sure you are provisioned for ethernet vs coax, activating the service requires an official fios router).

Things get more complicated if you are using their phone/tv service, I would probably just use the official one in that case. I did internet only so I'm not too familiar with that.

unbutthurtable
Dec 2, 2016

Total. Tox. Rereg.




College Slice

THF13 posted:

FIOS doesn't have modems so if you're getting only internet it's possible to use your own router but a little complicated (Making sure you are provisioned for ethernet vs coax, activating the service requires an official fios router).

Things get more complicated if you are using their phone/tv service, I would probably just use the official one in that case. I did internet only so I'm not too familiar with that.

Alright, well, I can just use theirs as a bridge to mine, right? Or is theirs good enough that I should just consider using that as the primary?

Herr Tog
Jun 18, 2011




Grimey Drawer

Hi thread, the OP is indeed accurate and I am thankful. All I need now is to know how to connect my tower computer to my wireless network now that I had to move my work station across a room and door way. I think I need a thing to plug in but what thing and a good one. Thanks!

THF13
Sep 26, 2007

Keep an adversary in the dark about what you're capable of, and he has to assume the worst.


unbutthurtable posted:

Alright, well, I can just use theirs as a bridge to mine, right? Or is theirs good enough that I should just consider using that as the primary?

You can set the official FIOS router to bridge mode but that will still cause issues with some of their TV/phone services. It's possible to get stuff working despite that but it's complicated.

http://www.dslreports.com/faq/16710
http://www.dslreports.com/faq/16077

Ur Getting Fatter
Jun 9, 2007

Fast Food Fight



Grimey Drawer

Our small office has 4 windows PCs, 5 VOIP phones, one Apple TV, and one linux server running an Asterisk server VM plus an SMB share, plus whatever cellphones anyone's using. Router is an Asus N66U.

It's about 1000 square feet, with really only about 600 of those being actual office space and the rest being kitchen/bathroom. It's a 4 rooms mostly separated by glass and drywall that is so thin it barely blocks any sound. I've never had WIFI issues.

I'd like to move everything to wireless since our current cabling layout sucks, forcing us to keep the computers and phones in awkward places, and having cables running all over the place. Redoing it would involve recarpeting the floor which isn't worth it.

None of our work involves moving heavy files around or collaborating on networked files. Internet is 10/10 Mb, so not even close to Gigabit or something like that.

My plan is basically to get 4 or 5 wireless APs, plug them in at comfortable locations and then connect each PC/phone/server etc. to the AP.

Am I setting myself for a headache doing this?

My main concern is having good performance on the VOIP phones.

Here's the site survery that the router gives me:

bobfather
Sep 20, 2001

I will analyze your nervous system for beer money

The problem with your idea is that cables "just work" 100% of the time, and your users are going to get frustrated when the AP they're using crashes and brings down their phone and workstation. I guess the question is, how important are your phones to your business, and will a missed/dropped call cost you anything?

If the answer is even remotely close to yes, I would try to find a way to stay wired.

As far as cable routing, do you have a ceiling that has moveable panels you could route through? We buy flat Ethernet cable that matches the color of the walls and make runs that way, by running the cable up a wall and into the ceiling, then down a wall where it needs to connect. We're a non-profit mom-and-pop, so getting drops done correctly would be cost-prohibitive in the space we're renting.

bobfather fucked around with this message at 20:48 on Apr 27, 2017

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005


Ur Getting Fatter posted:

Am I setting myself for a headache doing this?

Yes, don't do this.

Lolcano Eruption
Oct 29, 2007
Volcano of LOL.

Ur Getting Fatter posted:

Our small office has 4 windows PCs, 5 VOIP phones, one Apple TV, and one linux server running an Asterisk server VM plus an SMB share, plus whatever cellphones anyone's using. Router is an Asus N66U.

It's about 1000 square feet, with really only about 600 of those being actual office space and the rest being kitchen/bathroom. It's a 4 rooms mostly separated by glass and drywall that is so thin it barely blocks any sound. I've never had WIFI issues.

I'd like to move everything to wireless since our current cabling layout sucks, forcing us to keep the computers and phones in awkward places, and having cables running all over the place. Redoing it would involve recarpeting the floor which isn't worth it.

None of our work involves moving heavy files around or collaborating on networked files. Internet is 10/10 Mb, so not even close to Gigabit or something like that.

My plan is basically to get 4 or 5 wireless APs, plug them in at comfortable locations and then connect each PC/phone/server etc. to the AP.

Am I setting myself for a headache doing this?

My main concern is having good performance on the VOIP phones.

Here's the site survery that the router gives me:



Never use wireless for anything important.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Please do it and then post more when everything comes crashing down

Ur Getting Fatter
Jun 9, 2007

Fast Food Fight



Grimey Drawer

No you guys, I'm gonna be the exception, it's gonna work out for me!




Yeah, ok, I won't do it.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

i need your tears to survive

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005


Well, that escalated quickly.

SEKCobra
Feb 28, 2011


You should go to the Working in IT thread, I'm pretty sure a few people there argued for wireless-only offices.

Antillie
Mar 14, 2015



Herr Tog posted:

Hi thread, the OP is indeed accurate and I am thankful. All I need now is to know how to connect my tower computer to my wireless network now that I had to move my work station across a room and door way. I think I need a thing to plug in but what thing and a good one. Thanks!

Powerline adapters would be a good place to start if you want to go wired. Or I guess you could buy a wifi adapter for the desktop. I don't really know which ones are good because I wire in my desktops but this one is AC 1900 at least.

Antillie fucked around with this message at 13:14 on Apr 29, 2017

WayyyTooMuchIrony
Jun 28, 2008


I would never question the extremely accurate and helpful OP but I noticed it doesn't talk about the Ubiquiti Unified Security Gateway. I've wasted a couple of days googling "usg vs er-x edgerouter" and want to ask for some feedback regarding the USG now that the software has evolved a little bit.

I think its worth asking again because it seems the advantage is having a unified interface with the other Ubiquiti products. The price difference right now is $50 vs $110 so i'd love to read what i'm missing here.

My situation:

I'm not a turbo-nerd but not a total mouth breather either. I'm moving into a three story attached townhouse thats 2500 sq feet. Right now i'm planning on purchasing an er-x edgerouter, two UAP-AC-LITEs, and ARRIS SB6183 SURFboard Cable Modem.

Internet choices are bloodsucking vampires Comcast or soulless poo poo eating AT&T. AT&T fiber hasn't made it all the way down the street yet so i'll probably be going with Comcast $50 200Mbps service.

We have plenty of devices but probably the most advanced networking i'll do is setting up some 2.1 bonded moca adapters and forwarding ports on the router. Can anyone talk me into buying the USG?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




It's renovation time and I'd like to wire up the house. I'm assuming cat 7a cable would be a good call but I'm wondering how far down that rabbit hole I should go at this point.

Do I bother with 7a-style termination or go with standard cat 5e stuff for now? I sure don't need 40Gbit yet, probably not even 10Gbit for now, and there's only a couple of options for terminating 7a right now if I'm reading google right, one GG45 manufacturer and a company doing custom stuff? If/when I do put properly shielded connectors into a patch panel does the panel need to be special to earth the shields or would the metal shield of the keystone do the job with any bare metal blank patch panel?

Edit: The main issue is cost rather than time or effort, with the LANmark keystone connectors coming in at 18 each (2 per cable run?) and cutting-edge switches usually being prohibitively expensive.

Jaded Burnout fucked around with this message at 14:35 on Apr 30, 2017

bobfather
Sep 20, 2001

I will analyze your nervous system for beer money

Better safe than sorry in terms of your speed expectations for the future, I know, but who's to say in 20 years we won't have honest and true gigabit+ wireless networking licked?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




bobfather posted:

Better safe than sorry in terms of your speed expectations for the future, I know, but who's to say in 20 years we won't have honest and true gigabit+ wireless networking licked?

I'll have moved house by then.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Also come on, I'm not going to be sat in my kitchen in my 50s crying over the cost of the 7a I installed back in '17. If the upgrade happens it'll be in the next few years as prices come down.

SamDabbers
May 26, 2003



Arachnamus posted:

It's renovation time and I'd like to wire up the house. I'm assuming cat 7a cable would be a good call but I'm wondering how far down that rabbit hole I should go at this point.

Do I bother with 7a-style termination or go with standard cat 5e stuff for now?

Run conduit, so you can upgrade your cabling later. Then you can buy cheap CAT5e/CAT6 cable, patch panels, and keystones now, and use the existing cable to pull CAT7 or Fiber when you need it.

Edit: Also, 10GBase-T will work up to 50m over regular CAT6. No need to go CAT6a unless your runs will be longer than that.

SamDabbers fucked around with this message at 17:32 on Apr 30, 2017

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




SamDabbers posted:

Run conduit, so you can upgrade your cabling later.

The cost of the cable isn't that significant. The house is over a hundred years old so there's not really room for proper conduits outside of the main runs and some will wind up under plaster, so redoing the cabling later isn't an easy option, unfortunately.

SamDabbers
May 26, 2003



Arachnamus posted:

The cost of the cable isn't that significant.

That's not the point...

Arachnamus posted:

the main runs and some will wind up under plaster, so redoing the cabling later isn't an easy option, unfortunately.

This is. You put conduit in so that you can change it later, whatever the current cabling technology happens to be, without ripping open walls. There isn't room for ~25mm diameter conduit in the walls?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




SamDabbers posted:

There isn't room for ~25mm diameter conduit in the walls?

I'll have a chat with the electrician, but on brick the plaster undercoat is typically 11mm with two 3mm skim topcoats. The route to the main patch panel is also likely to be a windy one and pulling cable when the ceilings are back on might be more effort than it's worth. As I say it's an old house, lots of external walls that are now internal etc.

PraxxisParadoX
Jan 24, 2004
bittah.com

Pillbug

WayyyTooMuchIrony posted:

I would never question the extremely accurate and helpful OP but I noticed it doesn't talk about the Ubiquiti Unified Security Gateway. I've wasted a couple of days googling "usg vs er-x edgerouter" and want to ask for some feedback regarding the USG now that the software has evolved a little bit.

I think its worth asking again because it seems the advantage is having a unified interface with the other Ubiquiti products. The price difference right now is $50 vs $110 so i'd love to read what i'm missing here.

My situation:

I'm not a turbo-nerd but not a total mouth breather either. I'm moving into a three story attached townhouse thats 2500 sq feet. Right now i'm planning on purchasing an er-x edgerouter, two UAP-AC-LITEs, and ARRIS SB6183 SURFboard Cable Modem.

Internet choices are bloodsucking vampires Comcast or soulless poo poo eating AT&T. AT&T fiber hasn't made it all the way down the street yet so i'll probably be going with Comcast $50 200Mbps service.

We have plenty of devices but probably the most advanced networking i'll do is setting up some 2.1 bonded moca adapters and forwarding ports on the router. Can anyone talk me into buying the USG?

I've been doing a little research on this question and the only major difference I've found is that the USG GUI can't do static DNS. You can still do it on the command line. And I think you use the same GUI as the AP's to configure the USG.

WayyyTooMuchIrony
Jun 28, 2008


PraxxisParadoX posted:

I've been doing a little research on this question and the only major difference I've found is that the USG GUI can't do static DNS. You can still do it on the command line. And I think you use the same GUI as the AP's to configure the USG.

Thanks for the feedback. I went ahead and ordred the edge router to save myself some money. If it turns out i'm too much of a knuckle dragger to figure it out ill i'll post in shameful detail here so other low-level nerds can have a headstart.

BusinessWallet
Sep 13, 2005
Today has been the most perfect day I have ever seen

I have FiOS Gigabit as of this morning. I have an ethernet setup from Verizon so I'm going directly from the ONT to my EdgeRouter X and a couple APs. I'm getting 350/250 on a wired connection. If I wire directly into the ONT, I get 950/950, which is a little faster than the advertised speeds.

I'm thinking the EdgeRouter is the bottleneck, is it just not capable of routing internet traffic at that speed? QoS is turned off. I did order a USG and an 8 port 60W switch to mess with, hoping that it would be able to handle connection a little better. Just wanted to see if I was missing anything obvious.

n0tqu1tesane
May 7, 2003

She was rubbing her ass all over my hands. They don't just do that for everyone.

Grimey Drawer

BusinessWallet posted:

I have FiOS Gigabit as of this morning. I have an ethernet setup from Verizon so I'm going directly from the ONT to my EdgeRouter X and a couple APs. I'm getting 350/250 on a wired connection. If I wire directly into the ONT, I get 950/950, which is a little faster than the advertised speeds.

I'm thinking the EdgeRouter is the bottleneck, is it just not capable of routing internet traffic at that speed? QoS is turned off. I did order a USG and an 8 port 60W switch to mess with, hoping that it would be able to handle connection a little better. Just wanted to see if I was missing anything obvious.

The Edgerouter X should be at least able to get you up into the 800s up/down without a problem. Could be something off in your config that's bottlenecking you. Do you have anything more than just NAT/DHCP running on it?

https://www.stevejenkins.com/blog/2...er-speed-tests/

BusinessWallet
Sep 13, 2005
Today has been the most perfect day I have ever seen

n0tqu1tesane posted:

The Edgerouter X should be at least able to get you up into the 800s up/down without a problem. Could be something off in your config that's bottlenecking you. Do you have anything more than just NAT/DHCP running on it?

https://www.stevejenkins.com/blog/2...er-speed-tests/

Very basic setup, just did the WAN+2LAN2 wizard, set up the controller and added the two APs.

Photex
Apr 6, 2009






I hit 700/700 on my edgerouter, check the cable by any chance?

smax
Nov 9, 2009



Is HWNAT enabled? If you don't have any clue what I'm talking about, look up hardware offloading and HWNAT on Ubiquiti's forums.

BusinessWallet
Sep 13, 2005
Today has been the most perfect day I have ever seen

smax posted:

Is HWNAT enabled? If you don't have any clue what I'm talking about, look up hardware offloading and HWNAT on Ubiquiti's forums.

That was it! Thank you so much!

Antillie
Mar 14, 2015



WayyyTooMuchIrony posted:

I would never question the extremely accurate and helpful OP but I noticed it doesn't talk about the Ubiquiti Unified Security Gateway. I've wasted a couple of days googling "usg vs er-x edgerouter" and want to ask for some feedback regarding the USG now that the software has evolved a little bit.

I think its worth asking again because it seems the advantage is having a unified interface with the other Ubiquiti products. The price difference right now is $50 vs $110 so i'd love to read what i'm missing here.

The USG is basically exactly the same hardware as the ERL. Except the USG costs more and is missing some features (unless you like monkeying around on the command line). In exchange for that the USG integrates nicely into the Unifi controller which makes managing a fleet of them quite easy. So the USG makes sense for a commercial use case where you plan to have a bunch of them deployed and want to manage them all from a central location. However in a home setting where you are only going to have one of them, it just doesn't make any sense unless you really really want to spend more money for fewer features and centralized management that doesn't really mean anything until you have at least 3 or 4 of the things.

Its not that one is better than the other, they are just aimed at different use cases.

Antillie fucked around with this message at 04:12 on May 2, 2017

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

I just moved into an apartment that is wired for ethernet but am running into a slight problem. There's three ethernet connections (one for each room) that all run back to a tiny access box in the wall. This access box also has the termination point for DSL where the modem will go. This access box is not big enough to house both my wireless router and modem so I'm now considering how to get this done.

From my perspective I'm best off buying a dedicated routing device that is small enough to sit in that access panel with the modem and plug the ethernet for all the rooms into said routing device. Then in one of the rooms I'll plug in the wireless router but set it up to just be an AP that forwards DHCP to the tiny routing device.

Does this makes sense? If it does, what router could I get that would fit my needs?

Wacky Delly
Apr 2, 2008






I'm switching my office's internet providers and I'll need my own router/ap. What's the recommendation now? Its literally 2 computers and the voip phone. I should be able to have a wire at my desk, but I'll still want wifi.

smax
Nov 9, 2009



Ashex posted:

I just moved into an apartment that is wired for ethernet but am running into a slight problem. There's three ethernet connections (one for each room) that all run back to a tiny access box in the wall. This access box also has the termination point for DSL where the modem will go. This access box is not big enough to house both my wireless router and modem so I'm now considering how to get this done.

From my perspective I'm best off buying a dedicated routing device that is small enough to sit in that access panel with the modem and plug the ethernet for all the rooms into said routing device. Then in one of the rooms I'll plug in the wireless router but set it up to just be an AP that forwards DHCP to the tiny routing device.

Does this makes sense? If it does, what router could I get that would fit my needs?

Makes perfect sense. If you're willing to dive into some technical details, then I'd suggest the Ubiquiti ER-X. Cheap, small, and very configurable.

For the wireless, you can either use your existing wireless router somewhere (you will have to set it up in a particular way) or grab a dedicated access point (Ubiquiti has those as well).

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Ashex posted:

From my perspective I'm best off buying a dedicated routing device that is small enough to sit in that access panel with the modem and plug the ethernet for all the rooms into said routing device. Then in one of the rooms I'll plug in the wireless router but set it up to just be an AP that forwards DHCP to the tiny routing device.

Network devices need cool air circulating around them to make them not die. Don't run your network devices in a sealed box. If you can fit the DSL modem and, say, a Edgerouter X in there without the box acumulating heat, then yeah that's a reasonable approach, but be prepared to just leave the box open air.

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WayyyTooMuchIrony
Jun 28, 2008


Antillie posted:

So the USG makes sense for a commercial use case where you plan to have a bunch of them deployed and want to manage them all from a central location. However in a home setting where you are only going to have one of them, it just doesn't make any sense unless you really really want to spend more money for fewer features and centralized management that doesn't really mean anything until you have at least 3 or 4 of the things.

I wasn't joking when I said I wasted a couple of days googling trying to figure this out. I felt like the unsure Larry David GIF.

You have concisely explained the issue in a single paragraph. Thanks

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