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RoboBoogie
Sep 18, 2008


Residency Evil posted:

Ugh, moving means I get to figure out how to home network again. My new house has FiOS and it looks like I have poor wireless coverage upstairs, since my AP is in the basement. I'm thinking of buying a second ubiquiti AP, but I only have coax upstairs. Could I buy a moca bridge to connect the AP to the network? Would I have to buy one bridge only since the Verizon router is providing a coax - lan bridge?

i would investigate the possibility of doing a drop for an ethernet cable, if you already have one ubiquiti AP, you could do hand offs with the controller and have a primo network set up.

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Sad Panda
Sep 22, 2004

I'm a Sad Panda.

I feel like I must be doing something blindingly wrong.

Router - Billion 8800NL

I just bought a Unifi AP-AC-LR. I plugged the POE adapter into the wall, and then a piece of CAT5 cable from the POE adapter to my AP. I then connected another piece from the LAN port of the POE adapter to the Billion. Result? Nothing. Neither the POE adapter nor the AP have lights on. The POE had a light briefly but that faded away.

Inept
Jul 8, 2003

3 olives has a payment plan with his phone company for his cell phone

If you've got the one labeled POE going to the AP, and the one labeled LAN to your network, and you tried a known working power outlet, then yeah, there's nothing else to do and the adapter was just DOA. Return it.

chippy
Aug 16, 2006

OK I DON'T GET IT

My wireless router can't quite cover my whole house (because it's poo poo, my house is small) so I've got a second AP upstairs (connected to the main router by ethernet), broadcasting the same SSID and the same password. They are on channels 1 and 6. For the most part this works, and devices roam between the two channels, but it also seems to cause some bullshit. There are places in the house where the signal level for both is similar, and in these places, devices seem to bounce between the two and end up with no internet while they do this. In particular, my Google Home, which obviously doesn't move, seems to have this issue and it causes it to frequently fall out of speaker groups until it is restarted. Any devices in my bathroom every now and then have 30-60 seconds of no internet while they decide what loving signal to use.

All of this bullshit goes away if I turn off the wireless on one of the APs, except for the fact that then some devices have no coverage at all. So I figure it's a consequence of my configuration. But, I thought this was the best way of doing it? Should I just configure them as two separate wireless networks? It seems to me as though it would be more disruptive to phones etc. moving around the house, to switch networks entirely, instead of just switching frequencies, but am I wrong about this?

chippy fucked around with this message at 19:56 on Jan 14, 2019

Mr. Apollo
Nov 8, 2000



I have a larger house that was built in the mid-90s. My cable modem and router are in the basement. I'm currently using a couple of PowerLine adapters for ethernet connection but I was thinking of switching over to MoCA as it's supposed to give better speeds.

I'd also like to set up some APs because my WiFi is pretty hit and miss since the router is in a corner in the basement.

I was looking at the Edgerouter but the setup seems a bit over my head.

Would my best bet to get a few Archer C9s, set up one as the main router and the then use the others access points via the MoCA adapters?

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Mr. Apollo posted:

I have a larger house that was built in the mid-90s. My cable modem and router are in the basement. I'm currently using a couple of PowerLine adapters for ethernet connection but I was thinking of switching over to MoCA as it's supposed to give better speeds.

I'd also like to set up some APs because my WiFi is pretty hit and miss since the router is in a corner in the basement.

I was looking at the Edgerouter but the setup seems a bit over my head.

Would my best bet to get a few Archer C9s, set up one as the main router and the then use the others access points via the MoCA adapters?

MoCA might help but you should get Ubiquiti Unifi Lites as your WAPs instead of extra routers. One or two will probably be enough if you can get them in the right spots.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

chippy posted:

All of this bullshit goes away if I turn off the wireless on one of the APs,

If your APs support secondary SSIDs (UniFi does), it's usually a good idea to make an "IoT-specific" SSID on the nearest AP. If you're savvy, you can even go a step further and use the IoT-only SSID to make a separate VLAN and IoT jail to keep them for doing nasty poo poo to your network like Vizio TVs and Rokus

chippy
Aug 16, 2006

OK I DON'T GET IT

CrazyLittle posted:

If your APs support secondary SSIDs (UniFi does), it's usually a good idea to make an "IoT-specific" SSID on the nearest AP. If you're savvy, you can even go a step further and use the IoT-only SSID to make a separate VLAN and IoT jail to keep them for doing nasty poo poo to your network like Vizio TVs and Rokus

Nice, I never thought of that. The upstairs one definitely supports secondary SSIDs, not sure about the main one. I guess that wouldn't really help with the phones freaking out in the bathroom, but it would make all the smart home devices a bit more stable.

I think I may think of investing in a decent router all the same as the current one is a 3 year old ISP-supplied shitpiece. Is the Archer C7 still a good buy? I have a separate fiber modem. Any particular reason I should consider the C9? The house is relatively small, 2 bedrooms. No idea of the footprint.

Mr. Apollo
Nov 8, 2000



Rexxed posted:

MoCA might help but you should get Ubiquiti Unifi Lites as your WAPs instead of extra routers. One or two will probably be enough if you can get them in the right spots.
Hmm OK. Since I won't be running the cabling in the walls I guess I'll just tuck the Unifis behind something.

Is the Edgerouter really worth it? I watched the setup videos and it seemed confusing.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Mr. Apollo posted:

Hmm OK. Since I won't be running the cabling in the walls I guess I'll just tuck the Unifis behind something.

Is the Edgerouter really worth it? I watched the setup videos and it seemed confusing.

If your current router is working I wouldn't buy another one just because. Ubiquiti makes some good products but you don't have to get all of their ecosystem stuff if you don't want to. Even if you did, the Ubiquiti Security Gateway would be the router that works with their unifi access points and cloud controller stuff to all interact with the GUI they show. The edgerouters are good for the price and that's why they're recommended but you don't need one unless you're having routing issues specifically.

Back of the Bus
Aug 15, 2004

Pimpin' ain't easy when yo ride's full of schoolchildren.


I'm not sure if this is a better fit here or the Cisco thread, I figure I'll try here first and see what I get. I currently have two WAN connections at my house, the primary being 400mbps/20mbps cable from Spectrum and the secondary being 18mbps/2mbps DSL from AT&T Uverse. I've got them configured as a failover deployment terminating into an EdgeRouter-X. The failover works wonderfully and all of my IPv4 routing is solid. Here's a quick snapshot of my network as it stands:


Beyond the Edgerouter, the three remaining wireless routers are various makes and models all running OpenWrt, alongside the AP in the lower left also running OpenWrt.

As it stands, wireless functionality and IPv4 routing are working great, failover works as designed. Problem is, IPv6 is giving me a workover and a half. Before I installed the Edgerouter, the Spectrum WAN terminated into a TP-Link Archer C7 V2 and DHCPv6-PD delegation as well as subdelegation worked astoundingly. All subnets on my network were dynamically addressed as the prefix delegation changed from Spectrum. Unfortunately, the router seemingly could not handle MWAN3 for failover and would freeze it's traffic when failed, not coming back online without a reboot. Due to this, I installed the Edgerouter and was able to make the failover functional at the cost of breaking DHCPv6-PD.

Here's a quick sketchup of what I'm trying to achieve:


As you can see, I want the EdgeRouter ( or whatever device I need to put in place of the EdgeRouter) to take the /56 delegation from Spectrum, use the first /64 to assign it's local LAN interface and any connected devices (this part works to some extent - it doesn't release and renew the PD and addressing automatically, so it breaks without me knowing it) then take a chunk - in this case, a /57 - to subdelegate using it's own DHCPv6-PD server to the client router automatically. I have gotten this working by manually configuring the subdelegation and routing, but the prefix changes so often that the configuration is a waste of time.

Once the /57 is subdelegated to the client router, OpenWrt will do the rest without any issue. I find it astounding that the automatic subdelegation doesn't seem to be supported on EdgeOS and won't be for some time according to their forums. I've attempted to work around this issue with a Cisco 3945 and two Cisco 3750s, but automatic subdelegation is unsupported there as well.

Are there any devices at the SME-to-Enterprise level that support this feature? Or any product at all that can do it simultaneously with WAN failover? Ideally, I'd like to avoid consumer equipment since I've got more OpenWrt routers than any man should truly have.

Bonus points if you can find a device that will do the above plus IPv6 masquerading for my secondary connection. That'd be the cherry on top.

Mr. Apollo
Nov 8, 2000



Rexxed posted:

If your current router is working I wouldn't buy another one just because. Ubiquiti makes some good products but you don't have to get all of their ecosystem stuff if you don't want to. Even if you did, the Ubiquiti Security Gateway would be the router that works with their unifi access points and cloud controller stuff to all interact with the GUI they show. The edgerouters are good for the price and that's why they're recommended but you don't need one unless you're having routing issues specifically.
Well, the router works fine but itís an older Asus ďDark KnightĒ 802.11n router. I was thinking of upgrading to a newer 802.11ac Wave 2 unit.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Mr. Apollo posted:

Well, the router works fine but itís an older Asus ďDark KnightĒ 802.11n router. I was thinking of upgrading to a newer 802.11ac Wave 2 unit.

Well in the case maybe the USG or an Edgerouter with a couple of UniFi Lite access points is a good idea.

chippy
Aug 16, 2006

OK I DON'T GET IT

I was looking at the Archer C9 on Amazon and came across this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Connection...words=archer+c9

Am I right in thinking this is basically the same router, just with a built-in modem? It has the same quoted speeds, beamforming, etc,. and both say AC1900 which I guess is the chipset maybe?

I have fibre with Plusnet (UK). I presume I could just replace my router and the BT OpenReach fibre modem with this, as opposed to just replacing the router with the Archer C9? Is there any particular reason I should choose one of these options over the other?

El Jebus
Jun 18, 2008

This avatar is paid for by "Avatars for improving Lowtax's spine by any means that doesn't result in him becoming brain dead by putting his brain into a cyborg body and/or putting him in a exosuit due to fears of the suit being hacked and crushing him during a cyberpunk future timeline" Foundation

I have an ER-X and AP-Lite and the last week or so Iíve been experiencing weird lag spikes while playing Siege on PS4. I am hard wired to the ER-X so I doubt the AP has anything to do with it, but we recently got a Roomba. Whatís the best way for me to go about measuring bandwidth usage across the network so I can see if the issue is on my end and not the ISP (who wont help because Iím not using their router)? Ideally Iíd be able to look at something like a graph or a list of data usage while itís happening (at about 9pm every time)

Iím on fios through Frontier. I guess I should also add that Iím using a MacBook so I canít run windows stuff to monitor it.

Axiem
Oct 19, 2005

I want to leave my mind blank, but I'm terrified of what will happen if I do


I didnít see anything in the OP (but I could be blind), but are mesh networks like Eero or Google Wi-Fi worth it at all? The convenience sounds nice, but it feels like theyíd suffer from speed issues and interference. Are they a last-ditch sort of option, or actually pretty good?

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Axiem posted:

I didnít see anything in the OP (but I could be blind), but are mesh networks like Eero or Google Wi-Fi worth it at all? The convenience sounds nice, but it feels like theyíd suffer from speed issues and interference. Are they a last-ditch sort of option, or actually pretty good?

It mostly depends on the environment you're putting them in. Most of them use wireless backhauls (one of the radios is dedicated to sending traffic through the other access points in the mesh back to the base) so there can be a little bit more latency but when they work they're pretty solid. If you've got long distances to cover or plan to put the APs in areas that the wireless backhaul has issues in then it won't work that well. For a lot of homes it seems like a good solution if you don't mind paying a bit more to not run Ethernet, though.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



El Jebus posted:

I have an ER-X and AP-Lite and the last week or so Iíve been experiencing weird lag spikes while playing Siege on PS4. I am hard wired to the ER-X so I doubt the AP has anything to do with it, but we recently got a Roomba. Whatís the best way for me to go about measuring bandwidth usage across the network so I can see if the issue is on my end and not the ISP (who wont help because Iím not using their router)? Ideally Iíd be able to look at something like a graph or a list of data usage while itís happening (at about 9pm every time)

Iím on fios through Frontier. I guess I should also add that Iím using a MacBook so I canít run windows stuff to monitor it.

The main thing I'm finding for this is installing vnstat on your router. I've never done this nor used an edgerouter for very long but take a look:
https://community.ubnt.com/t5/EdgeR.../1061213#M45030

Your lag spikes are pretty much guaranteed to have nothing to do with wifi or the roomba, it's going to be an issue with either your ISP or the routing from you to the game servers.

Inept
Jul 8, 2003

3 olives has a payment plan with his phone company for his cell phone

El Jebus posted:

I have an ER-X and AP-Lite and the last week or so Iíve been experiencing weird lag spikes while playing Siege on PS4.

You haven't updated your ER-X to the 2.0 firmware, have you? Apparently it's extremely poo poo for the ER-X right now, and it came out last Monday.

Warbird
May 23, 2012

Burn the 'dawgs
Kill the Yellowjackets
Purge the Tiger
It is better to die for Bama than to live for yourself


Fun Shoe

I'm going to be doing a fair amount of road warrior-ing and would like to be able to RDP/VNC/etc into one of my machines (RasPi) so I can manage my Plex library and do other assorted local network things. Is this the way to go? Any assorted hot tips?

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Warbird posted:

I'm going to be doing a fair amount of road warrior-ing and would like to be able to RDP/VNC/etc into one of my machines (RasPi) so I can manage my Plex library and do other assorted local network things. Is this the way to go? Any assorted hot tips?

That gets you a dynamic address that will update so you can find your home PC on the internet, but their default recommendation at the end of port forwarding to an internal machine can be iffy. For one, it's not at all secure, because it lets anyone on the internet in (and if you open a port it will get scanned and all the default usernames and passwords or exploits will get tried against it, 100% of the time). It'd be better to configure a dynamic address, then set up a VPN that will let the laptop or cell phone you're taking with you act like a device on your local network at home once the VPN tunnel is established. What VPN you use will depend on what your router can handle.

What might be easier than that would be to install Teamviewer or chrome remote desktop on your raspberry pi and connect with that remotely while you travel. It relies on those servers but I use both of those now and then and they seem to work okay.

Warbird
May 23, 2012

Burn the 'dawgs
Kill the Yellowjackets
Purge the Tiger
It is better to die for Bama than to live for yourself


Fun Shoe

Excellent point, Iíll poke around with the chrome viewer and see how that goes.

El Jebus
Jun 18, 2008

This avatar is paid for by "Avatars for improving Lowtax's spine by any means that doesn't result in him becoming brain dead by putting his brain into a cyborg body and/or putting him in a exosuit due to fears of the suit being hacked and crushing him during a cyberpunk future timeline" Foundation

Rexxed posted:

The main thing I'm finding for this is installing vnstat on your router. I've never done this nor used an edgerouter for very long but take a look:
https://community.ubnt.com/t5/EdgeR.../1061213#M45030

Your lag spikes are pretty much guaranteed to have nothing to do with wifi or the roomba, it's going to be an issue with either your ISP or the routing from you to the game servers.

Thanks, Iíll poke around and see if I can figure it out. Iím fairly certain youíre right regarding the spikes, but I just want to narrow it down to something so I can blame something else.

Inept posted:

You haven't updated your ER-X to the 2.0 firmware, have you? Apparently it's extremely poo poo for the ER-X right now, and it came out last Monday.

Not on purpose, but Iíll also look into this, too. If thatís the case, hopefully I can downgrade back to a more stable build.

Thanks Ants
May 21, 2004

Bless You Ants, Blants



Yeah Ubiquiti hardware is acceptable but god drat their software is big-filled poo poo.

El Jebus
Jun 18, 2008

This avatar is paid for by "Avatars for improving Lowtax's spine by any means that doesn't result in him becoming brain dead by putting his brain into a cyborg body and/or putting him in a exosuit due to fears of the suit being hacked and crushing him during a cyberpunk future timeline" Foundation

Well, it isn't version 2.0. Still at 1.9.7 Hotfix v4. And I think I just need to monitor the router when it happens so I can see where it is happening rather than how much later on. Thanks!

Jowj
Dec 25, 2010

My favourite player and idol. His battles with his wrists mirror my own battles with the constant disgust I feel towards my zerg bugs.

I need help getting a good router + good wifi for my brother. I've got a full unifi setup which I have loved playing with. My dad now uses it at home and we manage each other's sites, its a gently caress load of fun. However, my brother probably can't swing unifi due to the price. Right now he's got:

- ~35mb down, 10up cable
- some model of the motorola surfboard that does routing and wifi
- a SCREAMIN' LOUD 1gb 24port dell switch that I found for super cheap for him

The surfboard sucks. Over wifi you can get upwards of 40ms ping to the drat thing. It seems like it likely is overheating, so maybe just disabling the wireless on the SB and replacing it with a much faster AP plugged into the switch is the way to go?

Especially since he doesn't have anything approaching gig speeds except for internal to his switch, what sort of gear should I be looking at for him? Bonus if any part of it can eventually be leveraged into unifi poo poo (for instance, maybe purchasing just a ap-lite is the way to go)

Appreciate any advice you guys have!

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Jowj posted:

I need help getting a good router + good wifi for my brother. I've got a full unifi setup which I have loved playing with. My dad now uses it at home and we manage each other's sites, its a gently caress load of fun. However, my brother probably can't swing unifi due to the price. Right now he's got:

- ~35mb down, 10up cable
- some model of the motorola surfboard that does routing and wifi
- a SCREAMIN' LOUD 1gb 24port dell switch that I found for super cheap for him

The surfboard sucks. Over wifi you can get upwards of 40ms ping to the drat thing. It seems like it likely is overheating, so maybe just disabling the wireless on the SB and replacing it with a much faster AP plugged into the switch is the way to go?

Especially since he doesn't have anything approaching gig speeds except for internal to his switch, what sort of gear should I be looking at for him? Bonus if any part of it can eventually be leveraged into unifi poo poo (for instance, maybe purchasing just a ap-lite is the way to go)

Appreciate any advice you guys have!

I think you're right and he should just get a Unifi Lite and disable the wifi on his router for now. Eventually he may want his own modem and router as well but often the wifi on those units is just garbage but they can route okay (especially if it's only 35/10).

Deviant
Sep 26, 2003

I wanted orange.

It gave me lemon-lime.



So I'm confused. For basic home use, would I want a USG, an Edgerouter X, or an Edgerouter Lite?

I was settled on the Lite over the X for the better routing, but what does the USG do differently?. Was going to combine it with a UAC-AP-LITE and an 8 port unmanaged gigabit switch i already have laying around for coverage in a modest apartment


I wasn't going to upgrade at all but my Archer C9 has been having issues with UPnP not working and requiring a reboot.

MonkeyBot
Mar 11, 2005

OMG ITZ MONKEYBOT

Deviant posted:

So I'm confused. For basic home use, would I want a USG, an Edgerouter X, or an Edgerouter Lite?

I was settled on the Lite over the X for the better routing, but what does the USG do differently?. Was going to combine it with a UAC-AP-LITE and an 8 port unmanaged gigabit switch i already have laying around for coverage in a modest apartment


I wasn't going to upgrade at all but my Archer C9 has been having issues with UPnP not working and requiring a reboot.

The USG works with their UniFi controller software so you can manage routers, APs, and switches from a single point. The Edgerouter is also maybe less friendly to work with but comes with a much lower pricetag. That's what I know, others may have more or better input. I went with the USG, managed switch and LR AP and it was pretty straightforward to set up and get running.

Jim Sorrell

Minidust
Nov 4, 2009

Hello chiicagooo!

Oh, wait, is that a GameStop employee in the back? Hey, you, give me a refund. No, I don't care if it was my fault, just - look, am I the one with the microphone or not? REFUND, biyotch!

So I'm finally committing to just running an ethernet cable to the second floor of my house (gave powerline a shot, but it was getting about half the speed of wifi). If I'm getting gigabit service, how long of a cat6 cable could I run from the router before there's a hit in performance? I've seen general warnings about going over 100ft, though I'm not sure how that would apply to different classes of cables and service, or if the length of cable from outside to the router would affect anything.

fwiw the service is through an internet-only fios subscription, so it's a fiber optic cable running to a box outside, which then has a cat6 cable running into the house.

Since the router is in the basement and I'm about to renovate that area, I figure I'll just get an overly long cable to start with and then trim it to an appropriate length once I figure out where everything is going.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


100 meters is generally the limit

Deviant
Sep 26, 2003

I wanted orange.

It gave me lemon-lime.



MonkeyBot posted:

The USG works with their UniFi controller software so you can manage routers, APs, and switches from a single point. The Edgerouter is also maybe less friendly to work with but comes with a much lower pricetag. That's what I know, others may have more or better input. I went with the USG, managed switch and LR AP and it was pretty straightforward to set up and get running.

Jim Sorrell

WTF is unifi controller software and how does it differ from me going to 192.168.1.1 and changing settings?

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Deviant posted:

WTF is unifi controller software and how does it differ from me going to 192.168.1.1 and changing settings?

It's like this and gives you lots of information across multiple devices:
https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...1#post491154893

Wacky Delly
Apr 2, 2008






Deviant posted:

WTF is unifi controller software and how does it differ from me going to 192.168.1.1 and changing settings?

With Unifi you don't go to 192.168.1.1 or whatever to change settings. You connect to the unifi controller and manage everything in one place.

Unlike the all in one units that ISPs give out, you need 3 distinct pieces of hardware for a full unifi setup. The controller provisions their settings. It doesn't have to run all the time unless you want certain features. You can play around with a mock controller here: https://demo.ubnt.com/manage/site/default

Personally, I'm running the controller on a raspberry pi and it's pretty cool.

Deviant
Sep 26, 2003

I wanted orange.

It gave me lemon-lime.



Wacky Delly posted:

With Unifi you don't go to 192.168.1.1 or whatever to change settings. You connect to the unifi controller and manage everything in one place.

Unlike the all in one units that ISPs give out, you need 3 distinct pieces of hardware for a full unifi setup. The controller provisions their settings. It doesn't have to run all the time unless you want certain features. You can play around with a mock controller here: https://demo.ubnt.com/manage/site/default

Personally, I'm running the controller on a raspberry pi and it's pretty cool.

So if I buy an Edgerouter Lite, UAC-AP-Lite combo, how would i set it up? I'm still unclear which is appropriate for my needs. This demo controller is part of the USG, and not the ER-Lite, yes? I have no interest in *also* buying and setting up a raspi for an apartment's worth of networking.

Wacky Delly
Apr 2, 2008






Yes, that demo is a USG + Unifi Switchs + Unifi APs.

You do log into the edgerouter like you described before. To config the AP, you have to run the controller software somewhere make your changes, and have them pushed out. It doesn't have to stay running past that, but you get extra network graphs and guest splash pages if you do.

I mean, I run an edgerouter X + a dumb switch and an AP lite at my office and its fine. If I need to make changes to the Wifi, or update firmware or whatever, I have to log into the edgerouter and do those changes then run the controller log into it and make changes to the AP.

On my unifi setup at home, I just log into the controller and make changes to whatever.

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



You can also run the Unifi software on a windows or Mac. It only needs to be persistently on for a few specific things otherwise run it, set stuff up and provision, then stop it. For what itís worth, I also run it on my raspberry pi along with pi hole.

Laserface
Dec 24, 2004

THERE IS NO PLANET B


Rexxed posted:

It mostly depends on the environment you're putting them in. Most of them use wireless backhauls (one of the radios is dedicated to sending traffic through the other access points in the mesh back to the base) so there can be a little bit more latency but when they work they're pretty solid. If you've got long distances to cover or plan to put the APs in areas that the wireless backhaul has issues in then it won't work that well. For a lot of homes it seems like a good solution if you don't mind paying a bit more to not run Ethernet, though.

google wifi and linksys velop both offer 2 gigabit ports on their satellites, and will automatically use ethernet backhaul if its connected. SOME models of Orbi offer this, but not all.


I have my own question, similar to this.


I have a small 2 bed house and my cable internet comes in at one end. at the other end is my lounge, dining and rear deck, where i like to sit outside and use the internet, but cant, as there is many walls and cupboards between the deck and the router and while my iphone reports 2 bars of wifi, it usually struggles to work. I have poor 4G coverage and somewhat rely on Wifi Calling to work.

I have 2 routers available. will disabling wifi on the primary router at the end of the house with the cable, and disabling DHCP on the secondary at the lounge room, be a similar outcome to spending money on a decent mesh system? I have ethernet over power to the loungeroom for Xbox/Apple TV already.


the only caveat is that while the router broadcasting wifi is more central in the house, it will be a bit closer to the ground, in a open faced TV unit.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Deviant posted:

what does the USG do differently?

MonkeyBot posted:

The USG works with their UniFi controller software so you can manage routers, APs, and switches from a single point.

This.

CrazyLittle posted:

Thanks Ants posted:

If you aren't that fussed about having a full Unifi dashboard all lit up


You know you want this









Having the UniFi switch too will also tell you exactly which port a device is plugged into, in case you get some rogue hardware that you're trying to investigate.


skipdogg posted:

Minidust posted:

how long of a cat6 cable could I run from the router before there's a hit in performance?

100 meters is generally the limit

CAT5 and CAT6 will both support gigabit up to 326 feet with patch cables included, provided the cable is pulled to spec, and each end is terminated into proper punchdown jacks. When done right it can be stretched a bit further. If you need to go more than 300 feet, I suggest pulling single-mode fiber instead.

Thanks Ants posted:

Yeah Ubiquiti hardware is acceptable but god drat their software is big-filled poo poo.

Sometimes yes, sometimes no. It seems to me that the software and some of their QA has taken a hit after several of their most visible developers left the company.

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Deviant
Sep 26, 2003

I wanted orange.

It gave me lemon-lime.



Sounds like the USG is beyond the scope of what I need, considering that if I have rogue hardware on a switch port, someone's getting an rear end-whupping rather than a forensic investigation.

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