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Not Wolverine
Jul 1, 2007

by Fluffdaddy


daslog posted:

The ladder I built for my treehouse when I was 10 was safer that that.
Seconding this ^.

If you read this thread expecting to not see a train wreck of OSHA violations and questionable financial decisions you're here for the wrong reasons. The only part I'm question is why were the two 4.0 engine blocks not a structural part of the design??? Keep up the good work Ken, A+ would read again.

EDIT

Totally TWISTED posted:

They aren't OSHA violations when it's DIY.
:golfclap:

Not Wolverine fucked around with this message at 16:21 on Nov 22, 2015

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tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





They aren't OSHA violations when it's DIY.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

Geneva Convention still applies.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


gently caress the haters, it had to work once and it did :v: it's already torn down again.

Requirements were "cheap, made mostly from poo poo I already have around, holds together once."

Those are 2x6s vertical and diagonal, with 4x6 beams holding the ramp up. 3/4 ply, though somewhat water damaged.

I had more to worry about than falling off the sides, like falling down the drat thing. Railings? :lol:

I tore it down the second the window was caulked and screwed in place. Good thing it went in yesterday because it rained last night.

Also, one of those is a 4.2 block not a 4.0 block :banjo:

ephphatha
Dec 18, 2009






Crotch Fruit posted:

The only part I'm question is why were the two 4.0 engine blocks not a structural part of the design???

They're there to provide cushioning if the ramp collapses.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

kastein posted:

I had more to worry about than falling off the sides, like falling down the drat thing. Railings? :lol:

I figured you had climbed the ladder slowly and humped it cleat to cleat up the ramp from the ladder side, I just meant a rail to keep it from pitching over the far side. Instead you did it the harder way. :stonklol:

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Nah, I was above the window dragging/walking it up slowly from cleat to cleat while my girlfriend pushed from the ground, sorta guided it as well as she could, and told me how much further I had to drag it to the next cleat.

It was a sketchy shitshow for sure but nowhere near as bad as people think. The worst part was once it got high enough that I was getting sandwiched between the wall and the window, then I worked my way inside and continued dragging/walking it side to side on its corners until it was started into the window opening, we traded spots and I lifted/pushed from below while she kept the nailing flanges from ripping off on the rough opening sides. All she had to do was not push it out too far and flop it over on me and all I had to do was lift it and not push it in too far so it'd flop over on me, until the top got behind that goofy temporary wooden retention hook on the wall. From there it was easy, just lift/wiggle/dink around with it till each lower corner cleared the lower support shims, then slide it mostly into place, caulk the nailing flange, check level/true/square, and screw it to the wall.

Oh yeah. She has a lot more patience with stupid broken things than me and managed to get Bagster to show up. The new bagster with a lot of the plaster debris and such in it is gone, but the older one that I've been trying to get them to pick up for several years was so UV-damaged that the straps tore off before it even left the ground, so I'm going to need to empty it mostly, then get what's left of it into the new one, and have them come back out.

Since no dumpster companies will give me the time of day (it seems they have enough business to not bother with "annoying" deliveries to locations their drivers can't be bothered driving into, I'm guessing) I may be stuck with bagster for the rest of the project as well. Dammit.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


No pictures since it's pretty much 0:dark30 when I leave for work and also when I come back these days, but we gutted drat near the entire kitchen last night and the night before, and most of the wood debris has been thrown out a window into the burn pile. An evening more of moving poo poo around, shoveling up debris, and removing the remaining walls (which are trapped behind the debris pile) and it should be down to bare studs and ceiling joists.

At that point there is a whopping ONE ROOM remaining to be gutted! :woop: Once the gutting is complete (aside from subflooring that needs to come up and be replaced one 4x8 section at a time for safety) we'll spend a few evenings shopvacing the entire place out and the nasty demolition dust should be a thing of the past. It'll be all clean sawdust and spackle/mud dust after that. I can't loving wait.

Seat Safety Switch
May 27, 2008

MY RELIGION IS THE SMALL BLOCK V8 AND COMMANDMENTS ONE THROUGH TEN ARE NEVER LIFT.



Pillbug

I'm not sure you remember what it was like to not be demolishing things.

Can you really go back?

Will they understand?

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


We shall see.

In the meanwhile, I did a bunch of work in the master bedroom. Rim joist installed, along with 2 fireblocks and 6 crossbraces (2 on the rim joist, 4 in the middle of the floor at a joist that had to be shimmed to the right spot for the end of the subflooring plywood to land on its center, and thus had to wait till the endwall was replaced so I knew where it would be.) Then put down 4 sheets of subflooring. It's all held down with Liquid Nails subflooring adhesive and 3.5" #10 corrosion-proof decking screws every 6 inches.


The other 4 sheets will probably be done tonight... or I'll finish the kitchen gutting, not sure which.

daslog
Dec 10, 2008

#essereFerrari


kastein posted:

We shall see.

In the meanwhile, I did a bunch of work in the master bedroom. Rim joist installed, along with 2 fireblocks and 6 crossbraces (2 on the rim joist, 4 in the middle of the floor at a joist that had to be shimmed to the right spot for the end of the subflooring plywood to land on its center, and thus had to wait till the endwall was replaced so I knew where it would be.) Then put down 4 sheets of subflooring. It's all held down with Liquid Nails subflooring adhesive and 3.5" #10 corrosion-proof decking screws every 6 inches.


The other 4 sheets will probably be done tonight... or I'll finish the kitchen gutting, not sure which.

Need to finish the Bedroom first. :gooncamp:

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




Seat Safety Switch posted:

I'm not sure you remember what it was like to not be demolishing things.

Can you really go back?

Will they understand?

It's okay, the yard is still full of the lurking corpses of Jeeps waiting to be resurrected back into messy, sputtering undeath. He'll be fine.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


daslog posted:

Need to finish the Bedroom first. :gooncamp:

We already have one semi finished bedroom (two, actually, but one's being used for storage until the closets, kitchen, dining room, living room, and basement are complete) so who knows.

apatite
Dec 2, 2006

Got yer back, Jack



Keep up the good work, man.

I use those corrosion proof decking screws that are approved for treated lumber in basically -everything- now. gently caress nails! :goshawk:

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





In some distant future, someone may eventually be tasked with taking this all apart, and is going to wonder what the gently caress prompted you to make sure it all stayed stuck together so drat well.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Yeah, whoever tears this place down is going to really hate me :v:

- all subflooring held down with liquid nails and a billion bigass decking screws
- roof decking held down with 12d and 16d nails every 6 inches. I used 16d common nails and 12 twist nails hammered by hand till I realized I didn't have all goddamn year to do the roof and switched to 12d nails and a pneumatic nailer.
- shingles held down with 5-6 nails (3 or 4, I forget, in the designated locations, plus more where it seemed like they'd do good)
- 2x6 studs held in with 3 3.5" #10 structural screws at each end, 6 to 8 in some locations
- sill beams held down with 12" J bolts into concrete every 16"
- drywall screwed in about every 6-8 inches
- nuke-proof ledgers and joists for the master bedroom

I was joking with a friend last night that anyone who tries to rip the gable end wall I just built off of the house with a backhoe will probably get more than they bargained for when the entire wing of the house comes off with it.

Hopefully that'll be in 100+ years though. It lasted 100 years how it was, with only bare minimum repairs of incredibly shoddy quality, so I wouldn't be surprised if it lasts another 100 now.

apatite
Dec 2, 2006

Got yer back, Jack



It makes me unreasonably happy that you went with 2x6 for that end wall btw. That's probably the best decision I ever made... true dimension 2x6 walls 16" OC OHHHHHHH YEAH BABY.

Aside from the "gonna last nearly forever" beef factor, now that the insulation is finished (R42 fiberglass in ceiling as of this fall, R21 walls and floor) we switched to an even smaller woodstove and with the weather being the way it has been (30F+ during the day) we burn it once a day for a few hours or once every couple of days and the whole place stays warm.

Looking forward to details re: your radiant heating setup!!

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Now that is some great news to hear, because I don't want to spend a lot of money on heat this winter, assuming I ever get the rest of the place finished.

Not much has happened recently due to being busy on other stuff and the holidays, but I did manage to get that torn Bagster loaded into a new bag, using the comanche crane, a pickaxe, a few 2" wide ratchet straps, a pitchfork, and a lot of banjo-fab ideas. Hopefully that will be going away in the coming weeks... I might even do another one just to get rid of the plaster from the last two rooms, since that will be the last of the C&D waste I can't burn (clean lath, framing wood, subflooring boards, etc) dispose of specially (asbestos siding, I have to deal with that in accordance with state laws) or throw out in small quantities over time (remaining small amounts of other stuff.) The convenience, now that the assholes are showing up again, may outweigh the cost savings.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Got half of the remaining subflooring in the second floor done last night.

First sheet down, preparing for second sheet by tearing up most of the remaining straggler original floorboards:


Second sheet down:


The remaining open area, other than some small patches that have to be cut to fit around stuff like the stairs, railing, etc:


My apologies for the blurry as hell pictures, the new cellphone I got long ago is awful at focusing, even compared to a 3 year old motorola droid 3. I may have to actually buy a camera.

Hopefully doing the remainder of the large pieces of subflooring tonight when I get home.

Jeherrin
Jun 7, 2012


kastein posted:

My apologies for the blurry as hell pictures, the new cellphone I got long ago is awful at focusing, even compared to a 3 year old motorola droid 3. I may have to actually buy a camera.

Hopefully doing the remainder of the large pieces of subflooring tonight when I get home.

It would lose a certain something if it wasn't poorly lit and blurry.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







The blurriness comes hand in hand with the poorly lit. It has to do a long-rear end exposure and a handheld camera is always going to be blurry with a long-rear end exposure.

Any cheapo snapshot camera will be fine, if it has a flash, but you won't actually get good photos without good lighting, even with an expensive DSLR.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


That cellphone has a flash (:lol: if a bright rear end white LED counts as a flash) and yeah, I know that, but under the same exact conditions it takes far worse pictures than my droid 3 did. Sadly, that's about the only thing the droid 3 was actually better at, so I'll live with the current phone.

e: also I'm using a Husky 800 lumen LED work light there. If 800 lumens on the work area isn't enough, I don't know what is. It's pretty much just a lovely cellphone camera/the software is poorly written as an afterthought and worked well enough to meet the release date.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Pretty lame weekend update, but here goes.

Finished the big sections of subflooring (where big is defined as more than half a sheet in one contiguous piece) in the hall/master bedroom:


Started on the small sections around the stairwell, for the first time in about 3.5 years it's possible to walk up the stairs without having to dodge the hole in the floor at the top:


I believe I've used either 15 or 20 pounds of 3.5" #10 decking screws now, all when installing the upstairs subflooring. Along with an entire case of the large-size (28oz) liquid nails subflooring adhesive.

There's just the large 1.5x9.5 foot hole along the side of the stairwell remaining, and I have the plywood for that on hand, just need to do it tonight.

Other stuff: picked up a ton of air tool hoses, garden hoses, extension cords, etc outside before snow covers them. Also burned a bunch of lath and old subflooring/studs/joists that were in a pile. Bought all the lumber for the master bedroom wall (the one that separates the bedroom from the hall and hasn't existed since 2012 or 2013) and started talking about where we want to put the master bedroom closet. Knocked out and cleared away debris from the two basement half-windows (one has the temporary water heater exhaust stack going out it, the other has the dryer vent, both were shattered), boarded them up with 3/4 pressure treated plywood and cut proper holes for the vent and exhaust stack. Fixed the dryer vent duct and made it go out the hole properly since it'd been hit by falling demolition debris and knocked apart. Moved more demolition debris from the kitchen outside.

Hoping to have the remaining subflooring upstairs done tonight, along with measuring the kitchen floor outline so my girlfriend and mother can plan how they think the kitchen should be laid out over Christmas, and might fill the next Bagster with bagged plaster debris if there's still time left.

kastein fucked around with this message at 17:06 on Dec 21, 2015

Laminator
Jan 18, 2004

You up for some serious plastic surgery?


What do you do with the ash?

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I throw it in a Bagster and it becomes trash/C&D waste.

I could probably toss it in the woods behind my house but it's all full of nails and poo poo and I don't want it back there. I've sent off maybe 1/3 to 1/2 of a bagster worth of ash and nails when it would have easily filled a 20 yard dumpster before being burned. Worth it.

If I really wanted to reduce things to their bare minimum volume, I would use a magnet to separate out the nails and water to sort the ash (mixes with water, sinks to bottom) and bits of charcoal (floats), then re-burn the charcoal, repeat until it's all ash. But at that point it's already reduced 10 to 20 times in volume so I just take the hit and pay to dispose of it rather than spending a bunch of time separating things.

The only hassle is sorting out the pressure treated, nasty painted wood, knocking off bits of plastic trim, etc before burning. That stuff still has to be thrown out the normal way because I like my lungs.

The ash could probably be spread evenly across the lawn as fertilizer (it's high in potassium and calcium carbonate) but again, I'd have to sift it out from the nails and charcoal and it's not worth the time.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


kastein posted:

Hoping to have the remaining subflooring upstairs done tonight, along with measuring the kitchen floor outline so my girlfriend and mother can plan how they think the kitchen should be laid out over Christmas, and might fill the next Bagster with bagged plaster debris if there's still time left.

Not a single loving bit of this got done, but I did pick up a 10" Sears Craftsman radial arm saw, with stand, for $50. Needs a not-beat-up cord, a new blade, and a new wooden fence/table (disposable item, expected that) plus some nuts and bolts and leveling feet and it's ready to go.

I might have a tool buying problem but this will make finish carpentry a lot easier.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Ba

By

Sharkytm doot doo do doot do doo




Fallen Rib

I love using a RAS. It does so many tasks, and doesn't demand to be in the middle of the shop like a table saw. That said, mine hasn't been used in several years, and my wife's Christmas present to me was a rigid table saw on a portable stand. Mine to her was a 10" sliding compound miter saw and stand. We're practical people.

Jeherrin
Jun 7, 2012


kastein posted:

I throw it in a Bagster and it becomes trash/C&D waste.

I could probably toss it in the woods behind my house but it's all full of nails and poo poo and I don't want it back there. I've sent off maybe 1/3 to 1/2 of a bagster worth of ash and nails when it would have easily filled a 20 yard dumpster before being burned. Worth it.

If I really wanted to reduce things to their bare minimum volume, I would use a magnet to separate out the nails and water to sort the ash (mixes with water, sinks to bottom) and bits of charcoal (floats), then re-burn the charcoal, repeat until it's all ash. But at that point it's already reduced 10 to 20 times in volume so I just take the hit and pay to dispose of it rather than spending a bunch of time separating things.

The only hassle is sorting out the pressure treated, nasty painted wood, knocking off bits of plastic trim, etc before burning. That stuff still has to be thrown out the normal way because I like my lungs.

The ash could probably be spread evenly across the lawn as fertilizer (it's high in potassium and calcium carbonate) but again, I'd have to sift it out from the nails and charcoal and it's not worth the time.

Frankly, I'm amazed you haven't taken the opportunity to rig up a giant ghetto electromagnet to hang off the ghetto pickup crane you've got going on, just to pick the nails out.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Ehhh. I'd have to make a giant electromagnet and winding those is a pain in the rear end, especially when steel scrap peaked at what, 14 cents a pound? and is now so worthless that scrapyards won't even pay for it.

I might get 50lbs of scrap out of the entire pile of ashes if I was lucky - even at its peak, that means I'd net about 7 dollars for who knows how many hours of loving around winding an electromagnet of suitable size and sifting through piles of ashes.

I've got like a thousand pounds of scrap iron and steel sitting in the corner of the yard that I haven't bothered to bring in anyways. It's worthless, it can sit till it's worth something then I'll call a scrapper and tell them it's free if they take it away.

apatite
Dec 2, 2006

Got yer back, Jack



kastein posted:



I've got like a thousand pounds of scrap iron and steel sitting in the corner of the yard that I haven't bothered to bring in anyways. It's worthless, it can sit till it's worth something then I'll call a scrapper and tell them it's free if they take it away.

Yep, waited too long due to other stuff going on. Now who knows if all our scrap steel will ever be worth enough money to bother getting rid of or if it will just return to the earth... It is literally worthless right now but I still see people grabbing it up as fast as possible so they can stockpile for "when the prices go back up"

dreesemonkey
May 14, 2008


Pillbug

Are you planning on adding a bathroom for your master and/or bringing the laundry out of the basement?

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


No to both.

This house is simply far too small to add features like that to. The master bedroom is 13x15 with sloped ceilings even including the fact that I knocked down the closet walls (which will be put back up) and the other bedrooms are smaller. Even the main (currently only) bathroom is only 8x8.

The previous owners had their laundry (badly) installed in the back entryway, but the back entryway's been merged with the kitchen (non weight bearing, sideways-stud walls... easy choice) so that the kitchen isn't so cramped. I'm fine with laundry in the basement, it keeps the noise, heat, and humidity out of the rest of the house.

We're debating putting a sink and mirror in a little alcove upstairs, but not sure on whether that's allowed by code yet and it might make resale interesting, since I've never seen an arrangement like that in any other house.

e: finished the second floor subflooring!

kastein fucked around with this message at 16:56 on Dec 23, 2015

Magnus Praeda
Jul 18, 2003
The largess in the land.

kastein posted:

The master bedroom is 13x15 with sloped ceilings even including the fact that I knocked down the closet walls (which will be put back up) and the other bedrooms are smaller. Even the main (currently only) bathroom is only 8x8.

What about popping out a dormer to accommodate a small half-bath?

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Nope.

It's not happening. Between structural changes I'd have to make to get pipes where they'd need to go and how it'd still eat up at least 25% of the floor space of an already small bedroom, it won't work. Also I don't want to gently caress around with the roof I just finished completely redoing a few years ago. Especially when there's no real reason to put a second bathroom in a 1400 square foot, 3 bedroom, 1.5 floor house.

e: even in the early 1900s the people who put the first bathroom on as an addition (yes that's right, this place originally had an outhouse as built in the 1890s) realized it wouldn't fit anywhere in the existing house. It's just not gonna work.

beep-beep car is go
Apr 11, 2005

I can just eyeball this, right?





Remember, Kastein is in New England, the land of 100 (and 150 and 200) year old houses. Having only one awkwardly laid out bathroom off the kitchen (since that was where the water was) is completely normal. I've lived in more than one house where you can easily tell one bedroom is smaller because they walled it off to make a bathroom when it was "the thing" to do.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Yeah, basically. My parents place has two bathrooms, but it was built in 1912 and originally designed to have two bathrooms. This place has no space for that, all the rooms are small enough as it is.

If I build a new house from scratch eventually, it is getting several bathrooms, but that's an entirely different plan and I haven't drawn it up yet so it mostly resides completely in my head.

apatite
Dec 2, 2006

Got yer back, Jack



My brother recently bought an old rear end house that has a toilet and sink under the stairway to the second floor. Code probably won't let you get away with cool space saving early 1900s tricks like that anymore :bahgawd:

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


apatite posted:

My brother recently bought an old rear end house that has a toilet and sink under the stairway to the second floor. Code probably won't let you get away with cool space saving early 1900s tricks like that anymore :bahgawd:

I recently stayed in an old rear end house that also had a bathroom under the stairs... but it was a normal, decent sized bathroom with three or four stairs down to it.



If you're just sticking in a sink though, I think you can put one wherever you want. If you use a counter/vanity, your AHJ could consider it a wet bar and require typical kitchen counter outlet spacing, and you probably have to GFCI protect any outlets near it.

Nostalgia4Butts
Jun 1, 2006

WHERE MY HOSE DRINKERS AT

I feel very lucky that my 170 year old new england house has 2 full bathrooms

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kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I'd love to see behind their walls and figure out how they were retrofitted. Construction archaology (or in my case, construction crime scene reconstruction) is really interesting.

Zhentar posted:

I recently stayed in an old rear end house that also had a bathroom under the stairs... but it was a normal, decent sized bathroom with three or four stairs down to it.



If you're just sticking in a sink though, I think you can put one wherever you want. If you use a counter/vanity, your AHJ could consider it a wet bar and require typical kitchen counter outlet spacing, and you probably have to GFCI protect any outlets near it.

Probably just a sink, yeah. Interesting, I'll have to look through the code again. I don't even really mind having to do wet-area outlet spacing/GFCI if it comes down to it.

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