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TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

Darchangel posted:

This. I hate that building houses out of kindling is still the way to do it.

You say "kindling" but they're bundles of carbon tubes with pretty incredible strength-to-weight ratios in tension and in compression, especially considering their cost. Concrete is awesome stuff too, but it has a way higher carbon footprint, requires extra work if you want a space you can route wires, etc. through (though I guess Kastein will be running conduit everywhere as he builds the walls, regardless of what they're made of), and doesn't do so great on an unstable foundation, e.g. in earthquake country.

There's an awful lot to recommend about stick-built housing. There are also plenty of reasons why you might go with concrete, but I'd quibble with the idea that it's automatically superior.

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kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I'd rather do stick built for eco reasons as explained, though concrete is definitely better in a fire. And yes, there will be conduit everywhere, though the wireless revolution has kinda killed most of the reasons for me doing that the first time. It's still nice to have but not strictly necessary.

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!




I like aerated concrete. You work it with woodworking tools, itís usually in block form (like cinderblocks) and apparently is amazing insulation. You do have to use steel framing, since itís not load bearing.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Darchangel posted:

itís not load bearing.

I mean, neither was most of what Kastein started with.

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!




IOwnCalculus posted:

I mean, neither was most of what Kastein started with.

Point.

Coasterphreak
May 29, 2007
I like cookies.

kastein posted:

I'd rather do stick built for eco reasons as explained, though concrete is definitely better in a fire. And yes, there will be conduit everywhere, though the wireless revolution has kinda killed most of the reasons for me doing that the first time. It's still nice to have but not strictly necessary.

gently caress that, there should be HDMI, coax, and 2x Cat 6 to every room in a house imo

n0tqu1tesane
May 7, 2003

She was rubbing her ass all over my hands. They don't just do that for everyone.

Grimey Drawer

Coasterphreak posted:

gently caress that, there should be HDMI, coax, and 2x Cat 6 to every room in a house imo

Honestly, since HDMI maxes out around 50 feet, I'd just run 4 Cat6, and use two of them for HDMI extenders, or HDBaseT.

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!




n0tqu1tesane posted:

Honestly, since HDMI maxes out around 50 feet, I'd just run 4 Cat6, and use two of them for HDMI extenders, or HDBaseT.

Yeah, the extenders work great at work, and every idiot knows how to run Cat6.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I actually sized the ENT conduit in the living room ceiling specifically to fit a premade HDMI cable through it, expecting to put a protector there. You're welcome, future owner.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Make a big hole in the dining room floor.


Cover it up.


Make another big hole. Forget to take a picture. It looks just like the other one though.

Cover it up.


I ran out of plywood though so I'm at HD picking up another sheet now. Once this is done, I can do the remainder of the center wall replacement and wire the last room and a half, then it's vapor barrier, insulation, and sheetrock time.

Seat Safety Switch
May 27, 2008

MY RELIGION IS THE SMALL BLOCK V8 AND COMMANDMENTS ONE THROUGH TEN ARE NEVER LIFT.



Pillbug

kastein posted:

I actually sized the ENT conduit in the living room ceiling specifically to fit a premade HDMI cable through it, expecting to put a protector there. You're welcome, future owner.

I feel like HDMI will become obsolete faster than any other video standard in history, so good idea on the conduit.

wooger
Apr 16, 2005

YOU RESENT?

Seat Safety Switch posted:

I feel like HDMI will become obsolete faster than any other video standard in history, so good idea on the conduit.

Eh?

It has decades left imo, and has been spec revved multiple times already with the same connector. What is going to replace it?

People still donít buy new TVs very often, and any new device that canít connect by it will be DOA.

NoSpoon
Jul 2, 2004


Seat Safety Switch posted:

I feel like HDMI will become obsolete faster than any other video standard in history, so good idea on the conduit.

My HDMI DVD player is 13 years old next month. In the 7 years prior Iíd been through RF, composite, s-video, and component for my primary video connection medium.

Seat Safety Switch
May 27, 2008

MY RELIGION IS THE SMALL BLOCK V8 AND COMMANDMENTS ONE THROUGH TEN ARE NEVER LIFT.



Pillbug

Alright, you win. I really figured they'd come out with some new version of HDCP that would gently caress up legacy connectivity, but maybe it's here to stay after all.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


They keep updating HDCP to fix encryption issues but people keep breaking it again because information wants to be free, yo. The hardware interface could last a long time (it's just a bunch of lvds lanes used in parallel iirc) but I would expect constant updating of the higher level protocols layered on top of it because the media industry is a bunch of shitheads who don't understand that no one gives a gently caress about them or their rights and we're tired of our legally purchased stuff not working right.

Anyways. I got the last large piece of subflooring replaced:

Alright. Time to figure out what to do about the last section of weight bearing center wall and floor.


Notice that there is no bottom plate and the studs don't line up with the joists... Wonder what that could cause?


Well it's basically like this in every direction. It looks flat in the pictures until I put a straightedge on it.


I especially like the "just knock a huge hole in it for a gas line, that won't compromise the already minimal structural integrity at all" thought process shown here

The idiot motherfucker who built this place in 1879 was all like "forsooth, I shall build the abode any true female could desire, and one shall choose to dwell with me" and tried to sink his outhouse into the floorboards to make it more comely to her fair visage

So of course step 1 is jack up the drat house and knock out some studs


And step 2 is rip all his structurally unsafe stupidity outta there


And step 3 is to build it right


At this point I've gotta jack up and replace only a little 4 foot section around the basement door (the one on the right in that last pic) that holds up the top of the stairwell, and it's ready for the next step.

gently caress this house... I thought I was going to be able to keep that wall instead of wasting time replacing it.

Sarah Bellum
Oct 21, 2008


kastein posted:

The idiot motherfucker who built this place in 1879 was all like "forsooth, I shall build the abode any true female could desire, and one shall choose to dwell with me" and tried to sink his outhouse into the floorboards to make it more comely to her fair visage

bEatmstrJebediah

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Well first I jacked it up and ripped part of the wall and floor out as usual...


And then it was time to replace the subflooring again


And then the new studs went up


That's all for now, probably doing the other side of the door opening tomorrow, which is the last section of weight bearing wall! At that point the remaining dining room wall replacement should go pretty quickly (after I do the stair stringer replacement anyways...) Because it's just a divider wall and I don't have to jack anything up. But the next project is wiring the remaining exterior walls of the kitchen and dining room so I can get the vapor barrier up and insulation and drywall in place. Because winter is coming.

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


kastein posted:

Well first I jacked it up and ripped part of the wall and floor out as usual...

I read this in a foreboding tone and assumed by the bottom of the post the house fell down. Basically like the second half of the post would continue with "but then..."

Seat Safety Switch
May 27, 2008

MY RELIGION IS THE SMALL BLOCK V8 AND COMMANDMENTS ONE THROUGH TEN ARE NEVER LIFT.



Pillbug

H110Hawk posted:

I read this in a foreboding tone and assumed by the bottom of the post the house fell down. Basically like the second half of the post would continue with "but then..."

The house is more afraid of kastein at this point.

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





kastein posted:

Because winter is coming.

Unlike game of thrones this thread will have a solid ending.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

tangy yet delightful posted:

Unlike game of thrones this thread will have a solid ending.

Fire's more of a gas than a solid IMO.

Blistex
Oct 30, 2003

Macho Business
Donkey Wrestler


Honestly, what percent of the finished house is going to be original materials (from when you bought it)? Exterior walls and Rafters?

rndmnmbr
Jul 3, 2012



Blistex posted:

Exterior walls and Rafters?

Until he takes a look at those, sees how utterly hosed they are, and replaces them too.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Far less than I wanted at this point.
About 3/4 of the foundation.
The floor joists of 2/3 of the first floor.
Floor joists of 2/3 of the second floor.
One top plate of a first floor wall.
The front door, but not the doorframe.
Most of the rafters, except the bottom halves of 6 or so.
Basement door, basement utility sink.
About 50% of the sill beams.
Maybe the door from the kitchen to the front porch, but possibly replacing that too.
Most of the exterior wall framing and sheathing boards, except the bottoms of 2 walls and all of 3 walls plus a lot of random patches.
Maybe the banister and stringers in the stairway... But it's looking like I'm going to end up replacing those.
The living room and hallway floor and framing... But this was all replaced 30-40 years ago by someone else.

This house was built in 1879. But it was built by me, essentially.

I wish I had loving bulldozed this place into a dumpster on day one. Never again. It was all garbage and I tried to save it. At least it's built to handle another 200 years now, if it survived 140 like this with almost no proper maintenance by anyone competent.

Speaking of which.

Jacked up and a few old studs removed already...


The last old floorboards that I'm replacing are gone now.


I used a double jackstud here just for more bearing area under the end of the top plate. It was a single 2x4 under it before but it didn't pass the smell test, so it got two going back together plus the two kingstuds... Will actually be 3 kingstuds after I hit the lumberyard today, I ran out of 2x6x10s.


This is also where I discovered that the stair stringer closer to the camera is not properly dimensioned at the top and was held in with scrap wood, and the one further away I already knew was cut too short and spliced at the bottom. I'm really close to giving up on keeping any of the original stairs and learning to make stringers. That's the only part I was going to end up keeping other than the railings and Newell posts anyways. gently caress this house.


Header buildup detail. 3x 2x4s plus two layers of half inch ply.


I'd put another jackstud in there but the duct will go through that opening and the only jackstud shown is directly under the only joist being supported by this span of the top plate.


I am officially out of surprises to find. I've opened every wall, I've condemned everything except what was listed above.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


rndmnmbr posted:

Until he takes a look at those, sees how utterly hosed they are, and replaces them too.

Already carefully inspected what's left of them from the inside before putting the new front porch up. Those are staying. They were far enough above grade (it's a walk-out basement on that side) that nothing is rotten, surprisingly.

Even if they were marginal, at this point they're staying because I bolted the new porch to them with 4 inch 5/16 GRK RSS screws so I am not replacing them. That's a project for a new owner in 100-200 years assuming they keep the roof well maintained.

I seriously regret not bulldozing this house. It would have been more pain up front, but I would be done by now.

rndmnmbr
Jul 3, 2012



You already have mad respect for what you've done. If it were me and this house, I'd have been a doctor going in to remove a small tumor and discovering widespread metastatic stage IV cancer - gently caress it, sew it back up and pass it to some other poor schmuck for pallative care.

tetrapyloctomy
Feb 18, 2003

Okay -- you talk WAY too fast.

Nap Ghost

I feel like your ongoing project would have served as a fantastic reference for this contest. "A 6,000-square-foot, 10-bedroom Victorian mansion could've been yours for only $50,000, but there was one catch: You had to put together a restoration proposal for the historic property in order to be considered."

I hope that the restoration work -- which per a quick glance at the interior photos will be extensive -- works out well.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


That place looks awesome. I see evidence of some failed roof issues but with a brick exterior and stone block foundation, and far less mold than this place had, I would be very surprised if they have to dig in as far I did.

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!




kastein posted:

The idiot motherfucker who built this place in 1879 was all like "forsooth, I shall build the abode any true female could desire, and one shall choose to dwell with me" and tried to sink his outhouse into the floorboards to make it more comely to her fair visage

That right there drat near made me hurt myself laughing.

dreesemonkey
May 14, 2008


Pillbug

kastein posted:

I'm really close to giving up on keeping any of the original stairs and learning to make stringers.

I've linked this guy's youtube before (in the context of building pole buildings), he recently had a good video on building stairs that made a lot of sense to me.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_8nz6fLxS0

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


That's really cool! Thanks a ton, I forgot all about that guy.

Now I just have to worry about how to run a sawzall straight up and down after using a regular circ saw to go as far as I can... Because I don't own a beam saw and I mostly use sawzalls for demolition and turning good materials into poorly cut, shorter scrap metal. And my usual "just buy one" route isn't acceptable here because 280 bucks for a one time use (till we get to Washington) saw isn't really in the budget.

I have a ton of pics to post but I'm in a time crunch right now on the insulation blower rental so it will have to wait.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

What are you cutting? If you've done most of it with a circular saw, maybe a hand wood saw could do the rest? It'd probably be easier to cut straight with than a sawzall would.

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





My attempts at using a sawzall to do anything but mangled demo cuts have me wishing you luck here. I'd probably go the bowsaw route with some fresh blades depending on quantity to do.

Beach Bum
Jan 13, 2010


I haven't built anything in forever but those GRK countersink screws look nifty. Having used the cheapest crosshead drywall screws for general poo poo, I think when I start building up an inventory I'll go with those if they're not bleedingly expensive.

I have RR Buildings on my subs but I had to turn notification back to "Occasional" because of how much content they put out.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







kastein posted:

And my usual "just buy one" route isn't acceptable here because 280 bucks for a one time use (till we get to Washington) saw isn't really in the budget.

Just as a general note, it might be worth checking your local equipment rental places. Sometimes when you only need a tool for a quick job, renting a professional-grade one for $20 is better than either buying a consumer-grade $300 tool, or making do with the wrong tool.

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


I like that out of all of the expensive over-engineering that has gone on in this house this is where the line is drawn. I presume because it's yet another drat thing to haul off to Washington.

(I understand you're trying to limit outward cashflow at the moment.)

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Yeah, I don't want to spend the money only to have yet another tool I gotta drag with me. Once I'm there? If I need one I'll buy one. Especially with the number of stringers and rafters and such I'm going to have to cut for the house and barn/shop.

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!




Beach Bum posted:

I haven't built anything in forever but those GRK countersink screws look nifty. Having used the cheapest crosshead drywall screws for general poo poo, I think when I start building up an inventory I'll go with those if they're not bleedingly expensive.

I have RR Buildings on my subs but I had to turn notification back to "Occasional" because of how much content they put out.

The GRK screws are the poo poo. The ones I used to build my shelves and workbench are amazing. They are self-drilling, have a second set of threads near the top to act like a ring-shank nail, *and* have serrations on the bottom of the head to not only help it to countersink, but also resist unscrewing. I don't think I split a single board using these things, thanks to the really effective self-drilling tip.
They also cost about twice as much as coarse drywall screws. I will keep said drywall screws handy for non-critical stuff, but I love those GRKs. Also, the ones I bought are T10 Torx, which drive *so* much better than Phillips.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Ba

By

Sharkytm doot doo do doot do doo




Fallen Rib

Darchangel posted:

The GRK screws are the poo poo. The ones I used to build my shelves and workbench are amazing. They are self-drilling, have a second set of threads near the top to act like a ring-shank nail, *and* have serrations on the bottom of the head to not only help it to countersink, but also resist unscrewing. I don't think I split a single board using these things, thanks to the really effective self-drilling tip.
They also cost about twice as much as coarse drywall screws. I will keep said drywall screws handy for non-critical stuff, but I love those GRKs. Also, the ones I bought are T10 Torx, which drive *so* much better than Phillips.

I feel the same about Spax.

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ThinkFear
Sep 14, 2007



kastein posted:

That's really cool! Thanks a ton, I forgot all about that guy.

Now I just have to worry about how to run a sawzall straight up and down after using a regular circ saw to go as far as I can... Because I don't own a beam saw and I mostly use sawzalls for demolition and turning good materials into poorly cut, shorter scrap metal. And my usual "just buy one" route isn't acceptable here because 280 bucks for a one time use (till we get to Washington) saw isn't really in the budget.

I have a ton of pics to post but I'm in a time crunch right now on the insulation blower rental so it will have to wait.

Don't waste your time trying to gang them like he did. That's just a smoke 'em if you got 'em kind of thing. Cut one and use it as a template for the others. Circular saw and a jig saw to do the corners. Essential Craftsman just did a couple of stair videos you might be interested in as well.

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