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Antifreeze Head
Jun 6, 2005

It begins

Pillbug

Double post just because.

Drone_Fragger posted:

British coinage is great because if you flick pennies out of a car window while traveling at speed they tend to hit other cars fast enough to smash windscreens. Good times.

UK coins are seriously thick. Here, from left to right, is a Canadian 25 cent piece, a United States 25 cent piece and a British 10 pence piece. They all have the same diameter, but you can see just how much thicker that 10p coin is.



I also don't much care for the Queen on the 10p coin as she looks rather fat and angry. Nice that you lot include the crown though, the current queen we use just looks like some random old lady who had a snapshot taken after church.

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hailthefish
Oct 24, 2010

by Nyc_Tattoo


Non-currency-related post (also not mine):

Ein cooler Typ
Nov 26, 2013

by FactsAreUseless


I hate carrying around change

I wish they'd start printing 25cent bills

Veotax
May 16, 2006




Krispy Kareem posted:

I can hardly imagine what being a cashier these days must be like. More than half the time you're not handling cash and when you do credit card transactions you never forget to give the card back to the customer. Must be dreamy...

Don't you guys have Chip & Pin? I almost never have to touch the customer's card.

big parcheesi player
Mar 31, 2014

Also, I can kill you with my brain.


Antifreeze Head posted:

At least that held true until the Mint here started issuing commemorative designs all the drat time. Now I only make an exception to set aside the quarters struck in 1999 because they are a loving embarrassment and I hate that they are in circulation.



The same thing happened when the U.S. started minting state quarters. Companies came out with maps and books to place a quarter for each state in. Then if you really wanted to get technical, there were 2 mints running, noted on the coin by a d or s. So one could really get picky about which they were collecting if they wanted to. (I may have dabbled in doing this when they were conning out for the first couple years but lost interest in waiting for a new quarter to be released quarterly).

Wanamingo
Feb 22, 2008

by FactsAreUseless


drgnwr1 posted:

The same thing happened when the U.S. started minting state quarters. Companies came out with maps and books to place a quarter for each state in. Then if you really wanted to get technical, there were 2 mints running, noted on the coin by a d or s. So one could really get picky about which they were collecting if they wanted to. (I may have dabbled in doing this when they were conning out for the first couple years but lost interest in waiting for a new quarter to be released quarterly).

That's basically why we're stuck with the coinage that we have. Every time the mint comes out with a new denomination people start treating it like a collectible, and they always hang onto them. Then after a while the mint realizes that nobody is spending any of the new coins, so they decide to stop making them. This just reinforces the cycle, and that's why 50 cent and dollar coins are so rare in the States.

So, what I'm saying is that you're part of the problem.

Non Serviam
Feb 25, 2006

wAstIng 10 bUcks ON an aVaTar iS StUpid

While I find the conversation about currency interesting, I think it is now reaching autistic levels.
Let's focus on a different tech, please.

BogDew
Jun 14, 2006

E:\FILES>quickfli clown.fli




It's measured in mega-clicks

hailthefish
Oct 24, 2010

by Nyc_Tattoo


I think that's the only one of those I've ever seen that hadn't had the speakers ripped open and destroyed.

BogDew
Jun 14, 2006

E:\FILES>quickfli clown.fli

ASCII art is older than you might think.


And print screen?


Old ads are kinda cheating.

tribbledirigible
Jul 27, 2004
I finally beat the internet. The end boss was hard.



WebDog posted:

Old ads are kinda cheating.


I'd lime to draw attention to the Telex number at the bottom of this screen. Basically a point to point text messaging system that weren't unlike the telepgraph crossed sith a fax machine. A law firm I once worked for had one sittting in a closet with some casette based computers.

Collateral Damage
Jun 13, 2009



Veotax posted:

Don't you guys have Chip & Pin? I almost never have to touch the customer's card.
Don't scare the natives. They're not ready for that level of civilisation yet.

Code Jockey
Jan 24, 2006

you can call
but I seldom answer after all




WebDog posted:

And print screen?



Holy poo poo, that's amazing.

What an interesting way to solve the issue of dumping screens to physical copies. I'm imagining some 80's business suit guy waving a gigantic Polaroid in the air, trying to speed up development of the quarterly earnings report

C.M. Kruger
Oct 28, 2013


tribbledirigible posted:

I'd lime to draw attention to the Telex number at the bottom of this screen. Basically a point to point text messaging system that weren't unlike the telepgraph crossed sith a fax machine. A law firm I once worked for had one sittting in a closet with some casette based computers.

Whenever people mention Telex, I'm always reminded of Salvador Allende's plan to create a computer controlled state.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Cybersyn

quote:

There were 500 unused telex machines bought by the previous government, each was put into one factory. In the control centre in Santiago, each day data coming from each factory (several numbers, such as raw material input, production output and number of absentees) were put into a computer, which made short-term predictions and necessary adjustments. There were four levels of control (firm, branch, sector, total), with algedonic feedback. If one level of control did not remedy a problem in a certain interval, the higher level was notified. The results were discussed in the operations room and a top-level plan was made.

quote:

According to Gustavo Silva (executive secretary of energy in CORFO), using the system's telex machines, the government was able to guarantee the transport of food into the city with only about 200 trucks driven by strike-breakers, recouping the shortages caused by 40,000 striking truck drivers.

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...lanning-machine

quote:

At the center of Project Cybersyn (for “cybernetics synergy”) was the Operations Room, where cybernetically sound decisions about the economy were to be made. Those seated in the op room would review critical highlights—helpfully summarized with up and down arrows—from a real-time feed of factory data from around the country. The prototype op room was built in downtown Santiago, in the interior courtyard of a building occupied by the national telecom company. It was a hexagonal space, thirty-three feet in diameter, accommodating seven white fibreglass swivel chairs with orange cushions and, on the walls, futuristic screens. Tables and paper were banned. Beer was building the future, and it had to look like the future.

That was a challenge: the Chilean government was running low on cash and supplies; the United States, dismayed by Allende’s nationalization campaign, was doing its best to cut Chile off. And so a certain amount of improvisation was necessary. Four screens could show hundreds of pictures and figures at the touch of a button, delivering historical and statistical information about production—the Datafeed—but the screen displays had to be drawn (and redrawn) by hand, a job performed by four young female graphic designers. Given Beer’s plans to build an entire “factory to turn out operations rooms”—every state-run industrial concern was to have one—Project Cybersyn could at least provide graphic designers with full employment.

Beer, who was fond of cigars and whiskey, made sure that an ashtray and a small holder for a glass were built into one of the armrests for each chair. (Sometimes, it seemed, the task of managing the economy went better with a buzz on.) The other armrest featured rows of buttons for navigating the screens. In addition to the Datafeed, there was a screen that simulated the future state of the Chilean economy under various conditions. Before you set prices, established production quotas, or shifted petroleum allocations, you could see how your decision would play out.

One wall was reserved for Project Cyberfolk, an ambitious effort to track the real-time happiness of the entire Chilean nation in response to decisions made in the op room. Beer built a device that would enable the country’s citizens, from their living rooms, to move a pointer on a voltmeter-like dial that indicated moods ranging from extreme unhappiness to complete bliss. The plan was to connect these devices to a network—it would ride on the existing TV networks—so that the total national happiness at any moment in time could be determined. The algedonic meter, as the device was called (from the Greek algos, “pain,” and hedone, “pleasure”), would measure only raw pleasure-or-pain reactions to show whether government policies were working.

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


WebDog posted:

ASCII art is older than you might think.

That article is from 1948, but it's even older than that. The first commercially produced and successful typewriter was introduced in the 1870s, and there are surviving examples of typewriter art from the 1890s. E.g., from Pitman's Typewriter Manual published in 1893:



A lot of typewriter art (like a lot of line printer art) was even more sophisticated (if you want to call it that) than most ASCII art designed to be displayed on a terminal (or the equivalent) in using overstriking and other techniques involving physically moving the paper around:



That one is (as noted below the image, click to enbiggen) from 1946 (despite looking an awful lot like Patrick Stewart) and the image is taken from a 1975 book called Typewriter Art edited by Alan Riddell. It also includes examples of stuff that looks pretty much like modern ASCII art but which predates the personal computer, like:



...from 1951.

WeX Majors
Apr 16, 2006
Joined for the archives


I will make it my life's work to be able to sit in one of those chairs while I make some important decision. I don't care if the decision is "do you want Chinese or Pizza for dinner", it needs to happen.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


SubG posted:

That article is from 1948, but it's even older than that. The first commercially produced and successful typewriter was introduced in the 1870s, and there are surviving examples of typewriter art from the 1890s. E.g., from Pitman's Typewriter Manual published in 1893:





It warms my bitter heart to know the ASCII art in GameFAQs is the continuation of a century-old tradition.

Last Chance
Dec 31, 2004



Collateral Damage posted:

Don't scare the natives. They're not ready for that level of civilisation yet.

We're skipping over it for stuff like ApplePay and whatever Google does. No point in bothering with chip and pin now.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Last Chance posted:

We're skipping over it for stuff like ApplePay and whatever Google does. No point in bothering with chip and pin now.

Chip and pin are the cards with microchips, right?

So yeah, we're getting there. My AmEx has it, but my debit card (where it's probably needed most) doesn't.

1000 Brown M and Ms
Oct 22, 2008

F:\DL>quickfli 4-clowns.fli

WeX Majors posted:

I will make it my life's work to be able to sit in one of those chairs while I make some important decision. I don't care if the decision is "do you want Chinese or Pizza for dinner", it needs to happen.

Me too. There is something really cool about that 60s/70s wood-paneled sci-fi decor.

As for money chat: In New Zealand, we haven't had any coin smaller than 10c since 2006, and 1c/2c pieces along with $1/$2 bills were phased out when I was a baby (~1989). The removal of the 5c coin coincided with a redesign of all other coins to make them smaller because people just don't use cash anymore. Everyone mostly uses Eftpos now, which is an electronic way of paying using a card (Australia has the same system). It's not the same as a credit card because the money is taken straight from your account, but it's not the same as a debit card either because it's not internationally recognised (except for Aus) so it can't be used like a credit/debit card online.

I lived in Korea for a while and they have a similar system, but now I live in Japan and it's like going back to the stone age. Cash is almost universal here and many places don't even accept credit cards, much less any other kind of electronic payment. It's a good thing petty theft is uncommon here considering I often have several hundred dollars of cash on me.

blugu64
Jul 17, 2006

Do you realize that fluoridation is the most monstrously conceived and dangerous communist plot we have ever had to face?

So people without small bills...how do you pay for things like Parking meters, or one of those parking attendants at a sporting event?

big parcheesi player
Mar 31, 2014

Also, I can kill you with my brain.


1000 Brown M and Ms posted:

I lived in Korea for a while and they have a similar system, but now I live in Japan and it's like going back to the stone age. Cash is almost universal here and many places don't even accept credit cards, much less any other kind of electronic payment. It's a good thing petty theft is uncommon here considering I often have several hundred dollars of cash on me.

Its the same going to small towns or even older/hole in the wall places in the U.S. Sometimes they have the stickers posted on the doors that they accept this list of cards, other times they don't. And since I carry plastic around with me I'm rarely carrying any cash, though I should just in case when I find myself in a place like this. Some restaurants are aware of this fact and have adapted and installed an ATM on prem.

mints
Aug 15, 2001

Living on past glories

blugu64 posted:

So people without small bills...how do you pay for things like Parking meters, or one of those parking attendants at a sporting event?

Meters in my town have taken CC for the past few years and parking attendants at sporting events almost always cost more than a few bucks so I plan and make a withdrawal on my way out to an event.

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



blugu64 posted:

So people without small bills...how do you pay for things like Parking meters, or one of those parking attendants at a sporting event?

Your parking meters take bills?

1000 Brown M and Ms
Oct 22, 2008

F:\DL>quickfli 4-clowns.fli

drgnwr1 posted:

Its the same going to small towns or even older/hole in the wall places in the U.S. Sometimes they have the stickers posted on the doors that they accept this list of cards, other times they don't. And since I carry plastic around with me I'm rarely carrying any cash, though I should just in case when I find myself in a place like this. Some restaurants are aware of this fact and have adapted and installed an ATM on prem.

That both surprises me and doesn't, speaking as a non-American who has only ever visited the US once. I view the US as one of (if not the most) technologically advanced places on the planet, but I also realise it's a very big and diverse country so what I experienced in big cities isn't representative of the entire country.

blugu64
Jul 17, 2006

Do you realize that fluoridation is the most monstrously conceived and dangerous communist plot we have ever had to face?

Platystemon posted:

Your parking meters take bills?

Sorry I meant small bills/coins like the guy above me was talking about.

1000 Brown M and Ms
Oct 22, 2008

F:\DL>quickfli 4-clowns.fli

Do you mean me?

NZ has $1/$2 coins and everything is rounded to the nearest 10c. So long as you have coins you're fine for parking meters. Not so sure about events where you have to pay in cash, but every food place at sports stadiums etc. have Eftpos machines, and even parking attendants and other people like taxi drivers will have mobile Eftpos machines in their cars/bags/stalls/whatever so there are usually ways to pay for things without cash.

PhotoKirk
Jul 2, 2007

insert witty text here


WebDog posted:




It's measured in mega-clicks

I hope those are set up as a RAID.

http://macguild.org/raid.html

Antifreeze Head
Jun 6, 2005

It begins

Pillbug

I found a 2007 article on ComputerWorld about some tech flops, which has some definite failures (Apple Newton, DIVX, Microsoft Bob) but also some things that were written off as dead yet seem pretty commonplace now, less than 10 years after publication.

For instance,

ComputerWorld posted:

E-books

E-book readers started being sold about 10 years ago and are still being developed. The most recent entrant into the market is the Sony Reader. But they're still a flop.

The article was published in April of 2007, the Kindle released in November of 2007. Tablet computing gained popularity a few years later and now they pretty much all come pre-shipped with a few e-books. I guess there is an argument to be made about dedicated e-book readers flopping, but you could almost use that same line of argument for any device which a smartphone includes in its repertoire.

ComputerWorld posted:

Speech recognition

Over the years, Bill Gates (among others) has repeatedly predicted that speech recognition will be a major form of input, but it hasn't happened yet. Part of the problem is that, even with 99% accuracy, there are still a lot of errors to correct. Plus, many of us use computers in public places where speech recognition would be clumsy, embarrassing or downright rude. Still, the technology continues to improve, and it is being used in niche markets such as in medicine. Maybe someday it'll make it to the rest of us.

Siri, how wrong was ComputerWorld about voice recognition flopping?

There is that obvious qualifier there about the tech making it available to everyone, and while it does have its problems, I think it is safe to saw voice recognition didn't flop.

ComputerWorld posted:

Internet currency

Remember Flooz and Beenz? These two Internet bubble vendors arguably deserved to die simply because of their goofy names. They provided online currency, which many dot-com proponents in the late '90s considered the secret sauce that would lead to the wild success of e-commerce.

I'm not exactly sure how to qualify this one because obviously BitCoin and its ilk are a Big Thing (TM) but their use seems pretty constrained to crazy people and media savvy businesses who understood a proclamation of accepting a crypto currency was a fast track to free ink in the newspaper.


Another fun article from 2007 has 30 technology predictions that turned out to be dead wrong. I think these are safe in calling out how completely wrong the predictor was, though this one sticks out:

ListVerse posted:

10. “Nuclear-powered vacuum cleaners will probably be a reality in 10 years.” -– Alex Lewyt, president of vacuum cleaner company Lewyt Corp., in the New York Times in 1955.

I don't think this was completely unreasonable to believe at the time. Had the many safety concerns been easily remedied, there would be all sorts of nuclear powered devices. But considering how many warnings come with a box that heats bread, it is probably best that this didn't pan out.

Just Winging It
Jan 19, 2012

The buck stops at my ass


As far as nuclear powered devices go, you could argue that anything that runs on electricity is nuclear powered if the majority of it is supplied by a nuclear power plant. It's a bit of a reach, but still.

Humbug Scoolbus
Apr 25, 2008

The scarlet letter was her passport into regions where other women dared not tread. Shame, Despair, Solitude! These had been her teachers, stern and wild ones, and they had made her strong, but taught her much amiss.


Clapping Larry

Platystemon posted:

Your parking meters take bills?

Berkeley CA Parking meters take bills and credit cards as well as coins. Parking here is still a nightmare though.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Antifreeze Head posted:

The article was published in April of 2007, the Kindle released in November of 2007. Tablet computing gained popularity a few years later and now they pretty much all come pre-shipped with a few e-books. I guess there is an argument to be made about dedicated e-book readers flopping, but you could almost use that same line of argument for any device which a smartphone includes in its repertoire.

I had one of the e-readers from Sony they reference. If you were basing the future of electronic books on your experience with that (or more specifically the Sony Connect store) then yes, e-readers are a flop.

The problem is people were trying to create new markets while taking on entrenched interests that wanted your product dead. If the efforts are terrible (like the Sony Connect store) then the baby dies in the womb and it's a failed product. Amazon was the only company that could make it work because they had lots of book-selling marketshare and were not burdened by retail stores full of unsold paper books.

So ComputerWorld would have been correct, at least for the foreseeable future, if not for Amazon.

ranbo das
Oct 16, 2013

Who would win in a fight: 100 duck-sized horses, or one horse-sized duck?

~SMcD

Chip and Pin is going to be the de facto swap to chip and pin for the USA, although from a consumer's point of view I never got the fuss. Doesn't that just mean that you have to memorize a new pin for each credit card you own? Seems like a hassle for pretty much no benefit to me. I get that corporations and companies benefit, so I can see why they'd like it.

BogDew
Jun 14, 2006

E:\FILES>quickfli clown.fli

PhotoKirk posted:

I hope those are set up as a RAID.
The filename is "zipraid" so I presume that's a yes.

quote:

E-books
E-book readers started being sold about 10 years ago and are still being developed. The most recent entrant into the market is the Sony Reader. But they're still a flop.

The Ebook world is an interesting one as the concept had been rattling around since the 30's with the idea that you'd load books via microfiche along with some thought concepts in the 60's.

My first ebook reader was my P910i smart phone, in 2004, running .mobi files through it's 208 x 320 screen. Ebooks were around but were either public domain stuff or pirated books fed through an OCR reader, so you'd end up with shonky formatting mixed with the occasional dud letter and mangled formatting.

The main problem with early adoption was reading ebooks wasn't that pleasant. Text was jagged and it was hard to read these in varying lighting conditions. Plus many devices stamped DRM over their books. Also the market was virtually non existent beyond Amazon having a few books here and there on offer from 1995 onwards.

Some early contenders:

Sony DataDiscman - 1991

One of the first that got to market. The idea was that it would read out audio books. It was mainly marketed towards students and you'd have encyclopedias which were loaded into the CD caddy.

The SoftBook - 1998. $600.

It also featured an online book store and had the ability to download newspapers and add your own books. It's capacity went from 2MB to 64MB.
It ran off the Open eBook format.
Sadly Softbook and it's competitor, RocketEbook were brought out by GemStar, who despite a passionate plea for adoption failed to even get Oprah onboard with the device.

When Sony released it's Sony Librie with digital ink in 2004 things started to move. The Kindle emerging in 2007 was when it really started to pick up steam and then finally in 2010 Apple's iPad secured ebook dominance.
Curiously Sony has given up on Ebook readers.


ranbo das posted:

Doesn't that just mean that you have to memorize a new pin for each credit card you own?
Well that's what we have in Australia. Granted you are keeping track of multiple pins if you have multiple cards, but not many people have more than one or two and it's usually something like one card for personal the other for business.

BogDew has a new favorite as of 16:37 on Jul 16, 2015

big parcheesi player
Mar 31, 2014

Also, I can kill you with my brain.


1000 Brown M and Ms posted:

That both surprises me and doesn't, speaking as a non-American who has only ever visited the US once. I view the US as one of (if not the most) technologically advanced places on the planet, but I also realise it's a very big and diverse country so what I experienced in big cities isn't representative of the entire country.

Surprised me the most when I first went to the restaurant, and is one of the places I was thinking of while writing my post, is a pizza place called Santarpio's in East Boston, Massachusetts. Thats jump on the T (subway in Boston) at the Aquarium, go one stop, walk half a mile and you are at Santarpio's. Great pizza, but cash only.

spog
Aug 7, 2004

It's your own bloody fault.


ranbo das posted:

Chip and Pin is going to be the de facto swap to chip and pin for the USA, although from a consumer's point of view I never got the fuss. Doesn't that just mean that you have to memorize a new pin for each credit card you own? Seems like a hassle for pretty much no benefit to me. I get that corporations and companies benefit, so I can see why they'd like it.

Well, you can always change your PIN on all your cards to the same number. (Not the most secure option)

There are very good benefits: it is impossible to clone a card and it is impossible to anyone to use your card without the PIN.

As well as the corporations benefitting, you don't have to go through all the hassles when someone copies/steals your card.

ranbo das
Oct 16, 2013

Who would win in a fight: 100 duck-sized horses, or one horse-sized duck?

~SMcD

Makes sense I guess. My one experience with a stolen card was about 15 minutes on the phone telling them it was stolen, and a new card showed up three days later in the mail.

I get why, from an overall economic standpoint, you'd want a chip and pin system so sure bring it, wasn't sure if there was any additional reasons.

Also on an unrelated note, only having one credit card seems weird to me. I have three and that's about the lower end of what I could imagine. Maybe that's part of it, if I only had one and it was stolen that would suck.

Phanatic
Mar 13, 2007

Please don't forget that I am an extremely racist idiot who also has terrible opinions about the Culture series.


Antifreeze Head posted:



Siri, how wrong was ComputerWorld about voice recognition flopping?

Is Siri really the example you want to use there? I don't think I've ever successfully used it for anything completely non-trivial. It can't find me the nearest coffee shop along my route, it can't find me a public parking lot in Ocean City, it's not hooked in to the platform's other flagship apps (Like, "Siri, rate this song 4 stars" should actually be a thing, as should "Siri, add this song to [playlist name].")

Does anyone think Siri's anything more than a gimmick? What do you use it for?

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Phanatic posted:

Is Siri really the example you want to use there? I don't think I've ever successfully used it for anything completely non-trivial. It can't find me the nearest coffee shop along my route, it can't find me a public parking lot in Ocean City, it's not hooked in to the platform's other flagship apps (Like, "Siri, rate this song 4 stars" should actually be a thing, as should "Siri, add this song to [playlist name].")

Does anyone think Siri's anything more than a gimmick? What do you use it for?

I use Google Now when I'm driving so I can do stuff like send texts or find directions. It would be great if it could do more stuff in non-Google apps besides just opening them. Even some Google apps don't have great control; if Maps found a faster route I can't tell it to switch over by voice, I have to tap the screen.

e: voice controls will never be 100% until my devices acknowledge when I instinctively thank them for helping me. I still do it but a "no problem" would be nice.

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bring back old gbs
Feb 28, 2007

by LITERALLY AN ADMIN


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBbCsNS8nco

It'll be cool when these glasses are obsolete technology and it's just built into contact lenses.

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