Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
TotalLossBrain
Oct 20, 2010

Hier graben!

Squish posted:

Isn't ferrite memory so drat stable, that these might well have the same data stored in them?

The Apollo guidance computers used ferrite core memory for program storage, sort of like a ROM.

In fact, exactly like ROM in that it couldn't be changed. The bits that made up the software to navigate to the moon and land on it were created by running wires through ferrite cores (1) or bypassing them (0). Program assembly was done by older women in an assembly line process - string this wire through here and there and so forth.

Edit for clarification: the AGC program memory was a form of ferrite core memory called core rope. Different in that it can be read many many times

TotalLossBrain has a new favorite as of 17:11 on Aug 19, 2015

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Lurking Haro
Oct 27, 2009



TotalLossBrain posted:

The Apollo guidance computers used ferrite core memory for program storage, sort of like a ROM.

Yeah, Read-Once Memory. You have to write the data back after reading it.

-e-
Unless it's the rope-variant. That's permanent.

laserghost
Feb 12, 2014

trust me, I'm a cat.


moller posted:

When will another laptop meet my gray, square needs?

My gray square obsolete laptop can crush your laptop with only it's weigth.


pic not mine, made by dude who's been selling those laptops some time ago

Itronix GoBook IX250, a military laptop which weights about seven pounds. Official specs give him 850mhz celeron processor, but I very much doubt it can achieve such speed, before the temperature rises and processor locks into low 450mhz. I use it mostly for DOS games (there is a big issue with lack of sound, though) and I'm going to install Win98 on it next week. The battery still holds charge, though, and it runs off my Thinkpad's charger.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

sirbeefalot posted:

Goddamn that was a great laptop. Mine was the top of the line, last revision for that model. Begrudgingly sold it after a good 7-8 years. One of the first with a multi-touch trackpad, poo poo was like witchcraft.

I think I got mine a month before they announced the switch to Intel.

It still lasted longer than any other laptop I've ever had. About 3 years with me and another 3 or 4 with my mother-in-law.

mints
Aug 15, 2001

Living on past glories

moller posted:

I had a very similar toshiba and it was my second favorite laptop ever in terms of form factor/construction.

Fav. being my 12" Powerbook G4.



When will another laptop meet my gray, square needs?

I loved mine, had it for ages, it survived European traveling and being tossed around in my bag. What it did not survive was the tropical climate of Honduras when I gave it to my dad.

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

BENIS


Count Chocula posted:

Otherwise I couldn't get Facebook messages or anything.

Jesus Christ how horrifying.

Lady Naga
Apr 25, 2008

Voyons Donc!


Jerry Cotton posted:

Jesus Christ how horrifying.

Oh nooo not staying in contact with friends and family members

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

BENIS


Lady Naga posted:

Oh nooo not staying in contact with friends and family members

If only he had a phone.

Count Chocula
Dec 25, 2011

WE HAVE TO CONTROL OUR ENVIRONMENT
IF YOU SEE ME POSTING OUTSIDE OF THE AUSPOL THREAD PLEASE TELL ME THAT I'M MISSED AND TO START POSTING AGAIN


Some people have no credit so they just Facebook. Some people don't have your number.

I'm torn on physical media. I got rid of 90% of my CD collection and I kinda regret it. I had them in this big albums, hundreds of them. Just kept one box. My friend had a bunch of awesome VHS tapes she had to get rid of, so we kept the covers to use for art - lots of b-movie and monster stuff. I'm probably getting rid of most of my DVDs too.

I remember reading some Star Trek book where physical books were just a rare affectation. We're not at that point yet, since it's way more fun and easy to read books than using e-readers or iBooks, but it was still oddly accurate.

Lady Naga
Apr 25, 2008

Voyons Donc!


Jerry Cotton posted:

If only he had a phone.

Facebook messaging has replaced SMS for a lot of people. Sorry the times are moving past you, grandpa

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

BENIS


Lady Naga posted:

Facebook messaging has replaced SMS for a lot of people. Sorry the times are moving past you, grandpa

Call your mum.

Samizdata
May 14, 2007


Jerry Cotton posted:

Call your mum.

Don't worry. I'll call his mum.

Lady Naga
Apr 25, 2008

Voyons Donc!


Samizdata posted:

Don't worry. I'll call his mum.

She'd probably get really angry at you for misgendering me and hang up

Samizdata
May 14, 2007


Lady Naga posted:

She'd probably get really angry at you for misgendering me and hang up

<bows graciously at his defeat>

LethalGeek
Nov 4, 2009



Efexeye posted:

It's only obsolete because they don't make drivers for it any more but I loved my Ergodex DX-1. I still have it and would use it if I could!



All those keys can be repositioned however you want, as many times as you want, and you can assign whatever macros you want to any key. Awesome for gaming and for video editing.
Amused me how much you set this up like my sadly also obsolete keyboard http://www.amazon.com/SteelSeries-M...d/dp/B00292OW1U. I had the sense to go buy another one before they got too rare but I wonder how long the driver package is going to work either way.

LethalGeek has a new favorite as of 16:43 on Aug 20, 2015

boar guy
Jan 25, 2007



Oh, that wasn't my picture, I just grabbed it off the web. I turned mine horizontally and had separate setups for Guild Wars and FPSes.

also you should take the period out of your link

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



Why canít these keyboards work without drivers by following the USB HID specification?

Or do they, just without some features?

Lady Naga
Apr 25, 2008

Voyons Donc!


Platystemon posted:

Why canít these keyboards work without drivers by following the USB HID specification?

Or do they, just without some features?

The SteelSeries Merc keyboards have the little console off to the side bound to random keys for some reason. I guess as an incentive to get you to install their driver suite so you also have to install their proprietary software that lets you bind whatever you want to the keys?

Inco
Apr 3, 2009

I have been working out! My modem is broken and my phone eats half the posts I try to make, including all the posts I've tried to make here. I'll try this one more time.

Lady Naga posted:

The SteelSeries Merc keyboards have the little console off to the side bound to random keys for some reason. I guess as an incentive to get you to install their driver suite so you also have to install their proprietary software that lets you bind whatever you want to the keys?

They're not bound to random keys. If you don't have the driver software, they act like the regular keys. It's pretty useful because some games don't let you rebind keys (like Lost Planet), so you can get around that. The software also changes configs automatically when the game starts. I really like this keyboard, and I'm going to be disappointed when it dies.

Lady Naga
Apr 25, 2008

Voyons Donc!


Inco posted:

They're not bound to random keys. If you don't have the driver software, they act like the regular keys. It's pretty useful because some games don't let you rebind keys (like Lost Planet), so you can get around that. The software also changes configs automatically when the game starts. I really like this keyboard, and I'm going to be disappointed when it dies.

The one I had treated everything in the console like I was holding alt+some random key if the drivers weren't loaded. This was back in like 2007 tho.

m2pt5
May 18, 2005

THAT GOD DAMN MOSQUITO JUST KEEPS COMING BACK


Lady Naga posted:

Facebook messaging has replaced SMS for a lot of people.

Probably because cell companies charge ridiculous rates for text messaging, which costs them next to nothing.

Nutsngum
Oct 9, 2004

I don't think it's nice, you laughing.

Count Chocula posted:

Some people have no credit so they just Facebook. Some people don't have your number.

I'm torn on physical media. I got rid of 90% of my CD collection and I kinda regret it. I had them in this big albums, hundreds of them. Just kept one box. My friend had a bunch of awesome VHS tapes she had to get rid of, so we kept the covers to use for art - lots of b-movie and monster stuff. I'm probably getting rid of most of my DVDs too.

I remember reading some Star Trek book where physical books were just a rare affectation. We're not at that point yet, since it's way more fun and easy to read books than using e-readers or iBooks, but it was still oddly accurate.

I am not entirely sure books are going to become an obsolete medium entirely. The difference is that books form a tactile "experience" when reading that a lot of people like whereas CDs/VHS etc.. are simply storage mediums and arent really part of the actual experience short of the quality they can provide.

Perhaps I am to conservative with my multimedia consumption though as I still buy physical albums I want to listen to and buy actual books to read.

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

BENIS


Lady Naga posted:

She'd probably get really angry at you for misgendering me and hang up

How self-centered do you have to be to think we'd be mentioning you in any way?

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

BENIS


Nutsngum posted:

I am not entirely sure books are going to become an obsolete medium entirely. The difference is that books form a tactile "experience" when reading that a lot of people like whereas CDs/VHS etc.. are simply storage mediums and arent really part of the actual experience short of the quality they can provide.

Perhaps I am to conservative with my multimedia consumption though as I still buy physical albums I want to listen to and buy actual books to read.

Physical books have never been threatened by e-books in the non-Anglophone markets.

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010




Aside from storage, there are usability advantages to ripping a CD or DVD. You can put the files anywhere you want, make your own playlists, ignore lenghty animated menus and forced trailers...

Books, not so much. You take a printed book from the shelf and there's your content right there. Digital text has a huge storage and searchability advantage, but suddenly you have a (comparatively) whole lot of poo poo between you and the content.

Zonekeeper
Oct 27, 2007





Nutsngum posted:

I am not entirely sure books are going to become an obsolete medium entirely. The difference is that books form a tactile "experience" when reading that a lot of people like whereas CDs/VHS etc.. are simply storage mediums and arent really part of the actual experience short of the quality they can provide.

Perhaps I am to conservative with my multimedia consumption though as I still buy physical albums I want to listen to and buy actual books to read.

The main thing I like physical books for is being able to easily flip between two non-adjacent pages at a whim. So books where you may want easy access to multiple pages at once like technical manuals, textbooks, game guides and Tabletop RPG books are far better in physical form than in e-reader form.

Tabbed browsing/window tiling on a computer replicates this functionality so I don't mind accessing those types of information on a computer but e-readers don't compare at all.

GWBBQ
Jan 2, 2005




m2pt5 posted:

Probably because cell companies charge ridiculous rates for text messaging, which costs them next to nothing.
With the caveat that they're not really comparable services, carrier rates for text messages are at least 4 times as much as the cost for getting the same amount of data from the Hubble Space Telescope

Nutsngum
Oct 9, 2004

I don't think it's nice, you laughing.

Jerry Cotton posted:

Physical books have never been threatened by e-books in the non-Anglophone markets.

Thats an interesting point as well. Books at the end of the day are dependent on no infrastructure past their initial printing and transport.


Zonekeeper posted:

The main thing I like physical books for is being able to easily flip between two non-adjacent pages at a whim. So books where you may want easy access to multiple pages at once like technical manuals, textbooks, game guides and Tabletop RPG books are far better in physical form than in e-reader form.

Tabbed browsing/window tiling on a computer replicates this functionality so I don't mind accessing those types of information on a computer but e-readers don't compare at all.

Completely agree with this as well. I also appreciate the art put into such books a lot more when physically holding them.

Lady Naga
Apr 25, 2008

Voyons Donc!


Jerry Cotton posted:

How self-centered do you have to be to think we'd be mentioning you in any way?

What?

I mean; if you actually want an answer, probably the fact that I was directly quoted. The guy even apologized for what he said so I have no clue what you're so angry about????

Jmcrofts
Jan 7, 2008

just chillin' in the club

Lipstick Apathy


You would not be the topic of conversation in his phone calls with your mom.

Lady Naga
Apr 25, 2008

Voyons Donc!


Jmcrofts posted:

You would not be the topic of conversation in his phone calls with your mom.

My mom loves me and would talk about me at length thank you.

Fatty Crabcakes
Jan 31, 2008

HISSSSSSSSSSSSS



GWBBQ posted:

With the caveat that they're not really comparable services, carrier rates for text messages are at least 4 times as much as the cost for getting the same amount of data from the Hubble Space Telescope
That's how much they charge, not how much it costs them. The messages themselves are sent over the same channel that is going back and forth between the phones and the towers anyway. There is a additional overhead, but not quite enough to justify $0.10 per message. That's just gravy.

The_Raven
Jul 2, 2004

Upon this a question arises: whether it be better to be loved than feared or feared than loved?



Obsolete? Hell no! I still use this lil' beauty for talking to serial devices - Win95 and Hyperterm FTW.

GOTTA STAY FAI
Mar 24, 2005

~no glitter in the gutter~
~no twilight galaxy~


College Slice

John Big Booty posted:

That's just gravy.

That reveal and the public's subsequent reaction were two of the strangest things I've seen happen in telecommunications.

"Uh, yeah, you heard right, I guess: It doesn't cost us anything when you send and receive text messages. They just hitch a ride on incoming and outgoing calls. The data is being sent one way or another so there's literally no cost to us whatsoever for you to use the service. Anyway, here's your bill, including a $46 surcharge for text messaging."

"Who do I make the check out to?"

Mayostard
Apr 21, 2007

In the Chamber of Understanding


The_Raven posted:



Obsolete? Hell no! I still use this lil' beauty for talking to serial devices - Win95 and Hyperterm FTW.

With a paint job, I bet that wouldn't look out of place in a cyberpunk movie.

Samizdata
May 14, 2007


GOTTA STAY FAI posted:

That reveal and the public's subsequent reaction were two of the strangest things I've seen happen in telecommunications.

"Uh, yeah, you heard right, I guess: It doesn't cost us anything when you send and receive text messages. They just hitch a ride on incoming and outgoing calls. The data is being sent one way or another so there's literally no cost to us whatsoever for you to use the service. Anyway, here's your bill, including a $46 surcharge for text messaging."

"Who do I make the check out to?"

Ummmm, yeah. MMS is nothing but a hack utilizing some unused (for anything else) packet space. The only cost for the carrier is routing.

Mayostard posted:

With a paint job, I bet that wouldn't look out of place in a cyberpunk movie.

Yo. Check this out guys, this is insanely great, it's got a 28.8 BPS modem! Active matrix, man. A million psychedelic colors. Man, baby, sweet, ooo!

Computer viking
May 30, 2011
Now with less breakage.

Uh, I thought the US had joined the rest of us in "unlimited SMS included in most plans"?

Computer viking has a new favorite as of 07:37 on Aug 21, 2015

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Mayostard posted:

With a paint job, I bet that wouldn't look out of place in a cyberpunk movie.

The typical "cyberpunk" computers you see in stuff like Gibson and Shadowrun are almost always based on the MSX/MSX2 platforms. Because that's what was big in Japan and Japan is the future. They were made by a number of manufacturers but overseen by Microsoft Japan, which eventually split off from MS and became notable publisher of budget video game titles ASCII/Agetec.

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


El Estrago Bonito posted:

The typical "cyberpunk" computers you see in stuff like Gibson and Shadowrun are almost always based on the MSX/MSX2 platforms. Because that's what was big in Japan and Japan is the future. They were made by a number of manufacturers but overseen by Microsoft Japan, which eventually split off from MS and became notable publisher of budget video game titles ASCII/Agetec.


I think my favourite (in terms of aesthetics) computer-in-a-keyboard is the Elektronika BK, which is a Soviet-era PDP-11 clone. Just look at the fuckin' thing (photo from the wikipedia article):

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Count Chocula
Dec 25, 2011

WE HAVE TO CONTROL OUR ENVIRONMENT
IF YOU SEE ME POSTING OUTSIDE OF THE AUSPOL THREAD PLEASE TELL ME THAT I'M MISSED AND TO START POSTING AGAIN


SubG posted:

That article is from 1948, but it's even older than that. The first commercially produced and successful typewriter was introduced in the 1870s, and there are surviving examples of typewriter art from the 1890s. E.g., from Pitman's Typewriter Manual published in 1893:



A lot of typewriter art (like a lot of line printer art) was even more sophisticated (if you want to call it that) than most ASCII art designed to be displayed on a terminal (or the equivalent) in using overstriking and other techniques involving physically moving the paper around:



That one is (as noted below the image, click to enbiggen) from 1946 (despite looking an awful lot like Patrick Stewart) and the image is taken from a 1975 book called Typewriter Art edited by Alan Riddell. It also includes examples of stuff that looks pretty much like modern ASCII art but which predates the personal computer, like:



...from 1951.

The photos from this thread need to be compiled into an awesome Tumblr.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply