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Cathis
Sep 11, 2001

Me in a hotel with a mini-bar. How's that story end?

Chickalicious posted:

It doesn't have to be 20 consecutive minutes. You can do 5 here or 5 there. Or you can wear her and get the same benefits there too.

It's nbever 20 consecutive minutes, I am lucky if I can handle 5 minute increments of her crying her heart out :/ I don't wear her as often as I should, it's true. her head control is awesome, she just has no lying-on-stomach skills at all.

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Ben Davis
Apr 17, 2003

I'm as clumsy as I am beautiful

I was just going to post what Chickalicious did. Plop her in a carrier and she'll be exercising her neck and back and helping round out the back of her head! When I took my little guy to physical therapy for torticollis, the pt was thrilled that we had him in an ergo instead of a stroller for that reason.

edit to say that I didn't do loads of tummy time on the floor, but did a LOT of laying on mama time and ergo time, and it worked just fine.

Twatty Seahag
Dec 30, 2007


Ben Davis posted:

I was just going to post what Chickalicious did. Plop her in a carrier and she'll be exercising her neck and back and helping round out the back of her head! When I took my little guy to physical therapy for torticollis, the pt was thrilled that we had him in an ergo instead of a stroller for that reason.

edit to say that I didn't do loads of tummy time on the floor, but did a LOT of laying on mama time and ergo time, and it worked just fine.

We rarely did tummy time either. I had a colicky sad baby and I couldn't stand the crying.

skeetied
Mar 10, 2011


Ben Davis posted:

edit to say that I didn't do loads of tummy time on the floor, but did a LOT of laying on mama time and ergo time, and it worked just fine.

We did a lot of laying on mama and dada time too because he just wouldn't tolerate it any other way. When he could hold his head up (which he did on schedule without much "real" tummy time), he enjoyed it a lot more.

frenchnewwave
Jun 7, 2012

Would you like a Cuppa?


Vivian (13 weeks now) absolutely hated tummy time up until a week ago. She'd cry and turn her face red within 30 seconds. Then very gradually she started tolerating it for a few more. Now we can do about 3-5 min at a time with really good neck control. We hold her and wear her in a carrier often so I think that helped a lot. She also rolls over from belly to back. We still can't make it past 5 minutes but I'm very pleased with how well she lifts her head and shoulders off the floor, so we just stop once she gets upset.

FretforyourLatte
Sep 15, 2010

Put you in my oven!


Just holding the baby upright while you're carrying her around strengthens those muscles, too. Both of my girls hated tummy time but always wanted to be held up so they could look around as we went about our day.

VorpalBunny
May 1, 2009

Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog


FretforyourLatte posted:

Just holding the baby upright while you're carrying her around strengthens those muscles, too. Both of my girls hated tummy time but always wanted to be held up so they could look around as we went about our day.

On the flipside, I have a friend who did more carrying her upright than tummytime with his daughter and his kid ended up with some kind of kink in her neck that requires physical therapy. According to their pediatrician, if they had done more tummytime she would have worked out the issue naturally.

Fionnoula
May 27, 2010

Ow, quit.


We did most of Liam's tummy time with me or my husband laying on our backs and him facedown on our chest. FWIW, he's got a disability and was already under the care of a physical therapist and an pediatric orthopedics specialist at the time, and that is the method they both suggested for us.

Lyz
May 22, 2007

I AM A GIRL ON WOW GIVE ME ITAMS

VorpalBunny posted:

On the flipside, I have a friend who did more carrying her upright than tummytime with his daughter and his kid ended up with some kind of kink in her neck that requires physical therapy. According to their pediatrician, if they had done more tummytime she would have worked out the issue naturally.

Chris always preferred to be held like he was sitting up from a young age, to the point that anyone holding him on his back like a normal baby made him fuss, and he never had any neck problems.

I would also sit with my feet up so that my lap was tilted up and place him between my legs, so he could chill there, look around and interact with me.

sullat
Jan 8, 2012


So, ear tubes. What's the deal with those? What age are they recommended at? Our kid has had a whole bunch of ear infections this winter, and we're thinking it might be time for the tubes.

skeetied
Mar 10, 2011


sullat posted:

So, ear tubes. What's the deal with those? What age are they recommended at? Our kid has had a whole bunch of ear infections this winter, and we're thinking it might be time for the tubes.

I just posted asking about them at the end of last month if you want to go back and read people's responses. We ended up doing them for my 12 month old and we haven't had an ear infection for three weeks now (previously, the longest we had gone since Thanksgiving was about three days). We've also seen huge leaps in his balance and his language development.

angel opportunity
Sep 7, 2004

Total Eclipse of the Heart

For those of you who have been parents for a while now, what do you feel is the biggest error you have made in your parenting career? It seems somewhat that parenting is mostly something that you just go with and that you can't really look back and critique, but what advice would you give to future parents based off an egregious error that you may have made? Is there anything you really wish you could just go back and do completely differently?

No Butt Stuff
Jun 10, 2004

RUN IT BACK



Two kids, and man am I questioning if I want more. (Yes, I do, but an infant always makes life more stressful.)

The oldest is 4 now, and she's into full on talk back, don't listen mode. I send her to her room, take a magnet off her "doing good and getting rewards" chart, and very occasionally spank her. I'd like to find a more effective form of discipline. I don't want her to behave because of the fear the consequences, I want her to understand that she should want to be good. I talk to her, but man, it seems like it's in one ear and out the other. I guess just keep talking and trying to be consistent? Creative behavior correction input would be helpful.

The other is 8 months old. She's working on crawling, she crawls backwards very well, and will sort of army crawl forward a tiny little bit. She's also pulling herself up and trying to stand up, so I'm wondering if she's going to be crawling for long or just kind of segue directly into walking. She does this thing where she stretches out her arms, and twists her hands while opening and closing her fists a lot. My wife was concerned it's a sign of autism, but I don't think that's the case, since she responds to her name and looks your directly in the eye. Just reinforcing her motor skills right?

She also still isn't sleeping through the night. Wouldn't be a giant deal, because she only wakes up once or so for a feeding every night, but she does just start half-waking up multiple times a night screaming until we pop a binky in her mouth and rub her back while she gets comfortable again. Is this a sign of something? Or is there something we can do to help her get a better nights sleep?

I try to let them play together, but the 4 year old gets a little hyper and it stresses me out, so I end up helicoptering and probably making it no fun. My wife likes to get onto me for not letting them play as much as they should, but I'm just trying to keep the little one safe. Ideas on how to chill out?

Twatty Seahag
Dec 30, 2007


I would not spank at all. What kind of behavior leads to the occasional spanking? I would work on sorting that out first, because spanking really isn't effective and also is kind of awful. I don't want to sound judgmental because I know discipline is very difficult (I have a 2-year-old), but I would really not spank.

No Butt Stuff
Jun 10, 2004

RUN IT BACK



I'm really trying to move away from spanking at all. I don't want to teach her that hitting people is the answer. It's more my own shortcoming. I do it when she repeatedly isn't listening about something that could harm her little sister and I'm trying to get her attention. I make sure I'm not angry when I do it, because I was on the receiving end of that kind of spanking when I was a kid and I know it doesn't do much.

I need more creative discipline options that will get her attention, and I think I need help just to know when it's just kids being kids. I want to be a good dad :(

hookerbot 5000
Dec 21, 2009


systran posted:

For those of you who have been parents for a while now, what do you feel is the biggest error you have made in your parenting career? It seems somewhat that parenting is mostly something that you just go with and that you can't really look back and critique, but what advice would you give to future parents based off an egregious error that you may have made? Is there anything you really wish you could just go back and do completely differently?

Tooth brushing is the only thing I can think. That doesn't mean I haven't made loads of mistakes, but most of them are correctable over time or are the kind of mistakes I could only correct by not having them in the first place (poor choice of partners means I was a single mum for a long time and sometimes I do worry about the effect that will have on them in later life).

Sally Slug
Jul 8, 2005

Ride, Sally, ride!


It can be really, really hard to get a four year old to listen. I know, I have one. You can be doing everything right and sometimes even perfect parenting is going to do sweet gently caress all. One thing that helped slightly improve things for me was a Calm Down Bottle. It gives the kid something to focus on (and yeah, sometimes something to throw, oh well). It can be really hard for a kid to stop being angry/frustrated/naughty and they can just sort of get stuck in this negative loop that goes on forever. The bottle isn't perfect, but it is pretty and sparkly and done right gives the kid just long enough to help redirect them. Good luck with this, it isn't easy and trust me, I know that it can be doubly hard to avoid spanking even when you know it's wrong when it is something that was done to you. Try to remember that "no butt stuff" is a good plan for kids, it really doesn't help. Trying to stay calm, talking in a soft voice, and redirecting is generally the best option. Shaming them doesn't really teach them anything but negativity.

Twatty Seahag
Dec 30, 2007


systran posted:

For those of you who have been parents for a while now, what do you feel is the biggest error you have made in your parenting career? It seems somewhat that parenting is mostly something that you just go with and that you can't really look back and critique, but what advice would you give to future parents based off an egregious error that you may have made? Is there anything you really wish you could just go back and do completely differently?

I wish we would have set better limits about food early on. Our daughter was very reluctant to move on to solids and really didn't show much interest in table food until 15 months. I was so ecstatic that I basically let her eat whatever she asked for. She's extremely picky so when we find something remotely healthy she likes, we end up making it every night for her instead of her eating with us. She's slowly getting better but very reluctant to try new things and often won't eat her lunch at daycare.


EDIT- Parenting Megathread: No Butt Stuff

dreamcatcherkwe
Apr 14, 2005
Dreamcatcher

Twatty Seahag posted:

I wish we would have set better limits about food early on. Our daughter was very reluctant to move on to solids and really didn't show much interest in table food until 15 months. I was so ecstatic that I basically let her eat whatever she asked for. She's extremely picky so when we find something remotely healthy she likes, we end up making it every night for her instead of her eating with us. She's slowly getting better but very reluctant to try new things and often won't eat her lunch at daycare.

It seems a lot of kids have a phase where they don't like to eat certain foods and become very picky. Some kids are also just more naturally picky than others. I would say that's less your parenting and more personality in my experience.

hepscat
Jan 16, 2005

Avenging Nun


I have a middle schooler and a preschooler. With my oldest, one thing I would do differently is be more careful about body size talk. She was on the small size and regular clothes you could pick up in Target or wherever would slip off really easily. I was a fat kid so I always felt like I wouldn't criticize my kids for being fat or do any of that passive aggressive stuff that digs at fat kids. But since she was extra skinny I didn't stop myself from fretting about her out loud and complaining about having to find "slim" sizes. It came to a head when she was in a dressing room when she was 6 and a pair of pants she liked had those inner adjustable waistbands - we put it on the tightest setting and it poofed out on her and looked awful, and she just started sobbing because she felt so different from other kids. So I would definitely check myself on that one if I could go back. She's a totally normal-sized 7th grader. Puberty is the great equalizer and I knew that, I wasn't genuinely worried about her being too skinny, and I let my mouth run too much without realizing I was making her feel like she did something wrong.

No Butt Stuff
Jun 10, 2004

RUN IT BACK



Sally Slug posted:

It can be really, really hard to get a four year old to listen. I know, I have one. You can be doing everything right and sometimes even perfect parenting is going to do sweet gently caress all. One thing that helped slightly improve things for me was a Calm Down Bottle. It gives the kid something to focus on (and yeah, sometimes something to throw, oh well). It can be really hard for a kid to stop being angry/frustrated/naughty and they can just sort of get stuck in this negative loop that goes on forever. The bottle isn't perfect, but it is pretty and sparkly and done right gives the kid just long enough to help redirect them. Good luck with this, it isn't easy and trust me, I know that it can be doubly hard to avoid spanking even when you know it's wrong when it is something that was done to you. Try to remember that "no butt stuff" is a good plan for kids, it really doesn't help. Trying to stay calm, talking in a soft voice, and redirecting is generally the best option. Shaming them doesn't really teach them anything but negativity.

My wife mentioned that bottle. I think we'll give that a shot, maybe make one tonight.

Twatty Seahag posted:

I wish we would have set better limits about food early on. Our daughter was very reluctant to move on to solids and really didn't show much interest in table food until 15 months. I was so ecstatic that I basically let her eat whatever she asked for. She's extremely picky so when we find something remotely healthy she likes, we end up making it every night for her instead of her eating with us. She's slowly getting better but very reluctant to try new things and often won't eat her lunch at daycare.


EDIT- Parenting Megathread: No Butt Stuff

So did you not really start solids at all until 15 months? My wife wants to start giving our 8 month old the little yogurt ball snacks that are supposed to melt in their mouth, but I'm still worried about a choking hazard. And for feeding herself her baby food, I'm guessing I'm going to just have to give her the spoon, sit there, and get messy for a few weeks while she figures it out.

Twatty Seahag
Dec 30, 2007


No Butt Stuff posted:

My wife mentioned that bottle. I think we'll give that a shot, maybe make one tonight.


So did you not really start solids at all until 15 months? My wife wants to start giving our 8 month old the little yogurt ball snacks that are supposed to melt in their mouth, but I'm still worried about a choking hazard. And for feeding herself her baby food, I'm guessing I'm going to just have to give her the spoon, sit there, and get messy for a few weeks while she figures it out.

We started purees and some baby-led-weaning around 6 months; she would play but not really eat. We definitely did puffs, yogurt melts, and pieces of fruits/veggies at around 8 months. The general rule I always heard and followed was "under one, just for fun." Once she turned one, she would have bread, fruit, and small finger food at daycare but primarily wanted to nurse in the evening. 15 months is when she shifted from primarily nursing to pimarily solids. I really just followed her lead, that part I would do again.

No Butt Stuff
Jun 10, 2004

RUN IT BACK



I guess I should give in and get the yogurt bites. I'm too cautious I suppose.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


systran posted:

For those of you who have been parents for a while now, what do you feel is the biggest error you have made in your parenting career? It seems somewhat that parenting is mostly something that you just go with and that you can't really look back and critique, but what advice would you give to future parents based off an egregious error that you may have made? Is there anything you really wish you could just go back and do completely differently?

I would give parents the following advice, because there are too many loving nutcase crazy rear end parents out there:

There's no such thing as a perfect parent. Just do your best and love your kids, if they get a non organic processed cheeseball one day it's not going to kill them. Stop comparing yourself to supermommies and daddies on the internet who are most of the time so full of poo poo their eyes are brown. Kids are resilient, the human race has come this far. Let them get dirty and play in the mud, let them eat some crap food once in a while, TV won't kill them. Relax a little and enjoy your time with your kids, and don't be too hard on yourself.

Oh, and stop comparing your kid to every other kid. They all develop at their own pace, who cares if Susie's daughter is walking at 7 months and your kid didn't walk until 13 months, that poo poo doesn't matter. By the time they're 5 it all evens out anyway. Don't ignore an obvious developmental issue, early intervention is key with those, but don't put some crazy pressure on a 2 year old to know certain things.

No Butt Stuff posted:

My wife mentioned that bottle. I think we'll give that a shot, maybe make one tonight.


So did you not really start solids at all until 15 months? My wife wants to start giving our 8 month old the little yogurt ball snacks that are supposed to melt in their mouth, but I'm still worried about a choking hazard. And for feeding herself her baby food, I'm guessing I'm going to just have to give her the spoon, sit there, and get messy for a few weeks while she figures it out.

Little kids will figure it out, just watch them with solids the first few weeks. They might choke a few times, but they'll get it after a couple tries. Don't freak out and just keep a close watch. My youngest choked his first time eating a cheerio, but he got it after a few tries. They have to learn, and learning when it's ok to swallow is part of that.

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

No Butt Stuff posted:

She does this thing where she stretches out her arms, and twists her hands while opening and closing her fists a lot. My wife was concerned it's a sign of autism, but I don't think that's the case, since she responds to her name and looks your directly in the eye. Just reinforcing her motor skills right?


I don't know if this is helpful or not, but mine just turned 8 months yesterday and he's been doing this hand clenching and unclenching thing all the time for the past few months. I've been concerned about it, but when I google it, I see a lot of people saying their kid does the same thing. I don't know that that means it's normal, but at least it makes it seem a little less strange.

No Butt Stuff
Jun 10, 2004

RUN IT BACK



Yeah, I don't see a whole lot of other kids doing it, but I have a friend whose daughter does it also. I'm guessing it's just a phase, since she seems to be healthy and smart.

Chicken McNobody
Aug 7, 2009


My 13-month-old son does it when he's practicing walking without assistance, every time. He looks like he's riding a motorcycle :3:

Marchegiana
Jan 31, 2006

. . . Bitch.

My biggest regret is not being more vigilant with the tooth-cleaning routine when my oldest was a baby. She was a night-nurser until she was almost 2, and naturally when having to nurse a screaming child back to sleep at 3AM I was obviously very reluctant to try and clean her teeth after eating and potentially wake her up again. End result was she got awful cavities on her baby molars, to the point where two needed fillings, one had to have a pulpectomy and steel crown put on, and one had to be pulled altogether and have a spacer put in. Cost us a couple grand all told after insurance, not to mention the fact that she had to be put under heavy sedation to have it done which is always a terrifying experience.

angel opportunity
Sep 7, 2004

Total Eclipse of the Heart

Thanks guys. I remember when I was growing up seeing some parents get way into their kids flag football games. This included running alongside them when they were on a touchdown play and shouting "GO GO GO GO SEANY" or whatever. On the flip side of that my parents never really forced my brother and me to do anything at all, so I would appreciate some good tips for finding a middle-ground. My parents encouraged us to do things that we enjoyed, but I think making us try out some new stuff and at times forcing us to stick with certain hobbies/sports past the phase where you are just starting and thus terrible at it may have been nice. Obviously you don't want to live through your kids and force them to do something they hate, but it can often feel like such a mind game trying to get a kid to do anything at all.

I'm thinking of how hard it is to get a first grader who is struggling with reading to just sit down and read, because he needs to in order to improve. Reading is a life skill and you have to force it to some degree if kids refuse to do it, but what about something like learning music, art, etc. that you think your kid would have fun with if they could only pass up the early stages and get into the rewarding aspects of it? When do you look at what you have encouraged and decide that you have given the kid ample opportunity to get into it if they really did enjoy it and just stop pursuing it if they still just show no interest? How can you encourage without "forcing", or what always feels to me like "tricky forcing" (using your advanced adult brain to use tactics that won't come off to a kid as forcing them or conning them into doing it)?

Ben Davis
Apr 17, 2003

I'm as clumsy as I am beautiful

No Butt Stuff posted:

I guess I should give in and get the yogurt bites. I'm too cautious I suppose.

Totally do the yogurt bites. Taste them! They melt in your mouth. You know what else is good is banana, mashed with a fork. It's soft and slippery, but not really a puree. My husband was REALLY nervous about foods, but let me lead the way, and we're lucky to have a really good eater at 12 months. He'll eat anything from our plates, from a gyro to steamed green beans to liver to buttered toast. My advice to you is to just take a baby heimlich class or at least watch a video on it. Then you're as prepared as you can be.

edit: and the hand clenching thing could be him indicating he wants something. That's what my neighbor's 10-month-old does!

Ben Davis fucked around with this message at 20:30 on Feb 19, 2013

hepscat
Jan 16, 2005

Avenging Nun


In regards to discipline, for me it has been getting to know my kids' personalities that was most effective long-term. That's a wordy way of saying that my two kids are completely different and what worked with one did not work with the other. The book I found very helpful with knowing how to handle my kids' personalities was "How to Talk So Kids Will Listen and How to Listen So Kids Will Talk" by Adele Faber. It's about more than straight-up discipline but it gives you a good handle on how to react to your children other than just conflict after conflict.

Another great parenting book I recommend to anyone is "Nurture Shock" by Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman. It's kind of the Freakanomics for parenting culture. As long as I'm on a book roll, for anyone with tweens, I have gotten some good insight from "Our Last Best Shot" by Laura Sessions Stepp. I found it especially helpful for the chapters on dads and daughters.

Edit: Systran, I think Nurtureshock -and the Faber book too now that I think about it - is a good read for answers to these types of questions. Really what it boils down to is motivation and teaching your child to be self-motivated. There's a lot of temperament involved, but you can choose what language you use with your kid to subtly encourage them to want to continue themselves. In Faber's book they use the example of a kid drawing a picture. They show it to you, and you react with, "Oh, how pretty! You're so clever!" -- well, that pretty much wraps up that picture. If you were to say instead, "I like how you used the brown on this side" or something that is more of a commentary rather than praise the child is more likely to sit down and work on it some more.

hepscat fucked around with this message at 20:36 on Feb 19, 2013

Ben Davis
Apr 17, 2003

I'm as clumsy as I am beautiful

No Butt Stuff, I'm really glad you recognize that you don't want to hit or spank. It takes a lot to recognize and admit that you need to change! I strongly recommend "Becoming the Parent You Want to Be." It came to me goon-recommended, and I find it really useful. It covers pretty much everything--crying, tantrums, toilet training, parental anger, etc. The chapter I'm looking at right now is called "Being Human: When You're Not Yet the Parent You Want to Be" and it talks about recognizing anger, controlling it, discussing it with your children afterwards, that sort of thing.

No Butt Stuff
Jun 10, 2004

RUN IT BACK



Thanks for the book recommendation. I just ordered it. I'm going to download a good book to start reading to her at night, maybe a chapter a night. I've just got to figure out which book. Any suggestions?

Twatty Seahag
Dec 30, 2007


No Butt Stuff posted:

Thanks for the book recommendation. I just ordered it. I'm going to download a good book to start reading to her at night, maybe a chapter a night. I've just got to figure out which book. Any suggestions?

Ramona Quimby books. :3

Andrias Scheuchzeri
Mar 6, 2010

They're very good and intelligent, these tapa-boys...

Ben Davis posted:

No Butt Stuff, I'm really glad you recognize that you don't want to hit or spank. It takes a lot to recognize and admit that you need to change! I strongly recommend "Becoming the Parent You Want to Be." It came to me goon-recommended, and I find it really useful. It covers pretty much everything--crying, tantrums, toilet training, parental anger, etc. The chapter I'm looking at right now is called "Being Human: When You're Not Yet the Parent You Want to Be" and it talks about recognizing anger, controlling it, discussing it with your children afterwards, that sort of thing.

I think I'll look into this too! My daughter and I are constantly butting heads. I've always been an anxious person but I had no idea until the last year or so that I could have such a short fuse. It's a lousy feeling.

In some ways it actually helped to know that she can have trouble in preschool too with listening, doing what the teachers ask, settling down, etc. It's not just some failure on my part. My mom says she reminds her a lot of my older brother, so I guess it runs in the family.

skullamity
Nov 9, 2004



systran posted:

On the flip side of that my parents never really forced my brother and me to do anything at all, so I would appreciate some good tips for finding a middle-ground. My parents encouraged us to do things that we enjoyed, but I think making us try out some new stuff and at times forcing us to stick with certain hobbies/sports past the phase where you are just starting and thus terrible at it may have been nice.

I'm not really sure how I'll handle that sort of thing with my own kid when the times comes, but as someone who draws comics for a living, what really kindled my interest in art as a kid was a teacher being delighted with my first attempt at painting. I wasn't really any better than anyone else, but I was so interested in what I was doing that having someone believe I was good at something was enough to get the ball rolling to where I drew enough that more than one person took me aside and told me that what I was doing was something special (and believe me, that wasn't until a few years later). I'm not sure if I'd have pursued art at all without that first bit of recognition, especially since my parents have never been the 'put your kids drawings on the fridge' kind of people. It seemed like they'd always rather I be doing something else, and even though I am 28 years old and it is currently my primary source of income and has been for the past few years, they're still not really interested in anything I do. So I guess my advice is to keep a keen eye out for things that your kids get interested in and get in on the ground floor for encouragement.

Also, if they lose interest in things that they previously love, have an earnest talk to them and find out the real reasons behind why they want to quit; I was in love with singing from grades 3-6 and auditioned for our board competitive choir and got in when there were only two spots available. I did it for three years and until I decided to quit because the director of the choir was a massive bully who kept shuffling me around to different sections and discouraging me and telling me that if I would just quit they'd find someone better. When I gave up and decided I did want to quit, my mother would hear nothing of it and basically stayed mad at me for months afterwards. How she handled it didn't encourage me to stick with things I was passionate about, but it did encourage me to hide my interests from my parents so I wouldn't have to deal with them flipping their poo poo if I decided something else I liked just wasn't for me. Thinking back, if my mom had sat down and had a 'but you love this, why are you really quitting' talk then we could have found other options in where I continued singling, whether it going to classes or singing with local youth groups. But since she never talked to me in a way that wasn't trying to force me back instead of figuring out what went wrong, I guess she decided that I hated singing rather than being bullied by a crazy old lady who liked to yell at kids and I never did it again.

I'm not saying that every lost interest is a deeper problem, because kids are fickle and do drop things on whims, but it pays to be vigilant. I'd rather have a serious talk with my daughter only to discover that she just isn't into horseback riding or something like that anymore than not have that talk and discover years later that I killed something that she loved for her just by being inattentive. :shrug:



Not related to anything currently being talked about : My kid's only 6 months old, but man do I ever worry about the future. Her father has massive ADHD that he was diagnosed with in childhood and has been treated for all his life. I feel like I'd worry about her having it in the future less if I wasn't just recently diagnosed with/began medication for adult ADHD myself. When I was being diagnosed I was asked a lot of family history questions because apparently if a parent has it, the odds that the kid gets it shoot way up. I know that the way they treat it in kids now is nothing like they way they did when my husband was young, but I have friends who are 8 to ten years younger than him who have been treated since childhood and all of them report feeling like a wrecked zombie for their younger years. My husband was severely underweight because of his medication and had to be on a special diet for years that was meant to make him gain weight--he's 28, still medicated and I'm a little over 50 pounds heavier than him. He also struggles with having interests and dreams and things that he wants to achieve and struggled to find his place in the world after highschool, whereas I, who am only now being medicated, had a childhood where I spent all of my time daydreaming and imagining and loving the crap out of a million different interests at once even if my grades plummeted.

I know that this is something I'm going to have to discuss with my doctor if she exhibits any symptoms over the next few years, but it would make me feel a hell of a lot better to hear about any of you who have young children being treated for ADHD, good or bad, so I at least kind of know what to expect and can warm up to various ways that they're treating kids now-a-days (since I don't know anyone with kids around the age where this sort of thing would start to show up). Share please? :(

skullamity fucked around with this message at 23:16 on Feb 19, 2013

Mnemosyne
Jun 11, 2002

There's no safe way to put a cat in a paper bag!!

Does anyone have any recommendations for baby spoons that aren't made of plastic (and aren't silicone-coated)? I've gotten pretty paranoid about plastics since I was pregnant, especially plastics that are exposed to heat. The only spoons I see in the stores are plastic or metal with the silicone or other rubbery coating on the bowl.

dreamcatcherkwe
Apr 14, 2005
Dreamcatcher

Mnemosyne posted:

Does anyone have any recommendations for baby spoons that aren't made of plastic (and aren't silicone-coated)? I've gotten pretty paranoid about plastics since I was pregnant, especially plastics that are exposed to heat. The only spoons I see in the stores are plastic or metal with the silicone or other rubbery coating on the bowl.

Just use a regular spoon if you're paranoid about it.

Or order baby silverware on Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Oneida-Paul-Revere-3-Piece-Baby/dp/B000FMTOQE/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1361316499&sr=8-3&keywords=baby+silverware

zonohedron
Aug 14, 2006




Mnemosyne posted:

Does anyone have any recommendations for baby spoons that aren't made of plastic (and aren't silicone-coated)? I've gotten pretty paranoid about plastics since I was pregnant, especially plastics that are exposed to heat. The only spoons I see in the stores are plastic or metal with the silicone or other rubbery coating on the bowl.

Oxo makes spoons and blunt-ended forks that are bare metal on the eating surfaces. (My son chews on the handle end a lot, though, and the handle end is plastic of some sort, so if that's still too much rubbery-substance exposure, they'd be out too.)

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Ben Davis
Apr 17, 2003

I'm as clumsy as I am beautiful

I'd think if something's hot enough to affect the bpa-free plastic or silicone, it wouldn't be fed to an infant anyways.

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