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MJP
Jun 17, 2007

Are you looking at me Senpai?

Grimey Drawer

Anyone take the 2V0-620 vSphere 6 Foundations exam? I'm not sure if it's some BS exam like the VCA, or if it requires actual prep.

It also seems like there's no Sybex book for VCP6.. any recommendations other than the official VMware book?

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MrBigglesworth
Mar 26, 2005

Lover of Fuzzy Meatloaf

LochNessMonster posted:

Suck too hear that. Good luck on the job search, what was the reason for your lay off?

30% IT Cutback. We didnt "meet Wallstreet analyst" expectations. ONLY sold 2.4B in product instead of 2.6B in product with over $110M in profit for the quarter.

Here is the shitter, 600 people laid off, including me yet we all still get a profit sharing bonus equal to about 84 hours of pay. What the christ?

Peachfart
Jan 21, 2017



MrBigglesworth posted:

30% IT Cutback. We didnt "meet Wallstreet analyst" expectations. ONLY sold 2.4B in product instead of 2.6B in product with over $110M in profit for the quarter.

Here is the shitter, 600 people laid off, including me yet we all still get a profit sharing bonus equal to about 84 hours of pay. What the christ?

They laid you off to keep the stock price up, and did profit sharing to keep brain drain from happening too much.

Jeoh
Jul 20, 2010




Does the 70-346 book still work for the exam? Heard there's a lot more ADFS stuff in the exam nowadays and that's not exactly my strong suit. PluralSight videos are not very up to date either.

Katamari Democracy
Jan 18, 2010

Oh, We understand.
A trip to collect a million votes, yes.
Oh, we know why.
We get the point of rolling up a million


Wedge Regret

Just passed my final in my hardware class and took the A+ test.

I am now certified

Vintimus Prime
Apr 24, 2008

DERRRRRPPP what are picture threads for????



Katamari Democracy posted:

Just passed my final in my hardware class and took the A+ test.

I am now certified

Awesome sauce!

mythicknight
Jan 28, 2009

my thick night



Anyone here have an opinion on Cisco's Platinum Learning Library? Work gave us access to it recently but I haven't had time to look into it yet. Wonder if its better/worse than other things like CBT.

Katamari Democracy
Jan 18, 2010

Oh, We understand.
A trip to collect a million votes, yes.
Oh, we know why.
We get the point of rolling up a million


Wedge Regret

Yeah I am hella happy. My final for school was basically a lab from testout as well as a live lab that I had to be watched. The live lab was troubleshooting what was wrong with a computer at the school and I got the trifecta of problems. Bad RAM, Bad Power Supply, and a bad graphics card.

A+ certification test I took soon after and it wasn't bad at all. Highly recommend Testout as well as the official A+ books you can buy off of Amazon for like 20 bucks or whatever.

Feeling really good

Bigass Moth
Mar 6, 2004

I joined the #RXT REVOLUTION.

he knows...


Passed Cisco 300-070 on my second attempt. Lots of stuff on there not covered at all in the official exam topics.

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

How does one go about getting IT security clearance in the UK? I did my RHCSA back in June and a few of the better looking jobs require security clearance.

I'm not working in IT at the moment, so I'd have to pay for it myself but I'm willing to do so if it's gonna get me into a better job.

From a quick search, it looks like there are three different levels of clearance for the UK.

Should I be trying to get the middle tier one or is basic clearance enough to get on the ladder?

LunaticAngel
Feb 5, 2006
That random guy in the corner. You know, the one that one that everyone avoids?

apropos man posted:

How does one go about getting IT security clearance in the UK? I did my RHCSA back in June and a few of the better looking jobs require security clearance.

I'm not working in IT at the moment, so I'd have to pay for it myself but I'm willing to do so if it's gonna get me into a better job.

From a quick search, it looks like there are three different levels of clearance for the UK.

Should I be trying to get the middle tier one or is basic clearance enough to get on the ladder?

If by "IT Security Clearance" you mean the government issued BPSS/SC/DV clearance levels I'm fairly certain it can't be applied for as an individual - a prospective employer needs to put you through the process.

I didn't have clearance before starting my current IT job and once I'd accepted the offer, my company put me through the process to get mine before I started.

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

Yeah. After I posted that I did a bit more searching and it seemed that it's something you gain during employment.

The curtains are drawn a bit more around the window of opportunity...

MrBigglesworth
Mar 26, 2005

Lover of Fuzzy Meatloaf

Im coming up zilch. Applying everywhere, no return calls. Of those that are interested they want me for something either not network related, or want extra stuff like firewall/security. I have no clearance either.

Wondering if I should shelve my CCNP Switch and get CCNA Security first.

Judge Schnoopy
Nov 2, 2005

dont even TRY it, pal

Firewall and security are going to go hand in hand with networking these days. Ride your CCNA credentials into one of those roles, learn the firewall and security side, and make some bank.

MrBigglesworth
Mar 26, 2005

Lover of Fuzzy Meatloaf

The books for CCNA Security dont seem to get great ratings on Amazon. I do have access to the INE All access pass in the meantime.....Any book recommendations?

Judge Schnoopy
Nov 2, 2005

dont even TRY it, pal

You can go through four different sources for CCNA Security and run into a question that you never studied. The breadth of the test is kind of insane, especially because the books don't really sell Cisco cloud security services like the test does.

Find two books, an online course, and Boson practice tests are invaluable.

KillHour
Oct 28, 2007






For someone with a VCP5-DCV that's expiring in ~6 months and who uses VMWare fairly regularly with a good background in design/architecture, how difficult would it be to just go for a VCAP6.5-DCV Design? Like are we talking studying a couple hours every weekend for a few months or are we talking hours every day until Christmas? I'm super busy at my job, but I feel like every good architecture job is ~~cloud~~ nowadays and something like that would really set me apart. Alternatively if I got a VCP7-CMA, would that renew my DCV cert?

RightClickSaveAs
Mar 1, 2001

Tiny animals under glass... Smaller than sand...




Passed the Sec+ yesterday I finally have arguably the least useless of the CompTIA certs!

It was definitely easier for me than the Network+, I didn't feel time crunched like I did with that one. I got 72 questions and had plenty of time to go back and review everything.

I was so stoked to get a question on Mantraps, which I aced thank you very much. I would have been LIVID had I not, after all the teasing of the subject in all the study materials and the time devoted to studying their workings (hot study tip: they are made to Trap a Mans)

Japanese Dating Sim
Nov 12, 2003

hehe

Lipstick Apathy

RightClickSaveAs posted:

Passed the Sec+ yesterday I finally have arguably the least useless of the CompTIA certs!

It was definitely easier for me than the Network+, I didn't feel time crunched like I did with that one. I got 72 questions and had plenty of time to go back and review everything.

I was so stoked to get a question on Mantraps, which I aced thank you very much. I would have been LIVID had I not, after all the teasing of the subject in all the study materials and the time devoted to studying their workings (hot study tip: they are made to Trap a Mans)

How'd you do on all the wardriving, vishing and smishing questions?

Thom and the Heads
Oct 27, 2010

Farscape is actually pretty cool.


cishing - phishing with a calculator
prishing - phishing with a printer

YOLOsubmarine
Oct 19, 2004

When asked which Pokemon he evolved into, Kamara pauses.

"Motherfucking, what's that big dragon shit? That orange motherfucker. Charizard."



KillHour posted:

For someone with a VCP5-DCV that's expiring in ~6 months and who uses VMWare fairly regularly with a good background in design/architecture, how difficult would it be to just go for a VCAP6.5-DCV Design? Like are we talking studying a couple hours every weekend for a few months or are we talking hours every day until Christmas? I'm super busy at my job, but I feel like every good architecture job is ~~cloud~~ nowadays and something like that would really set me apart. Alternatively if I got a VCP7-CMA, would that renew my DCV cert?

Any VCP you pass renews your other VCP certifications. The VCAP exams are practical lab based exams and they are fairly tricky, mostly due to the time management required. You'll need to be really comfortable performing all of the tasks on the blueprint quickly and correctly. A new VCP is easier.

Solo Wing Pixy
Aug 5, 2008

It's an amanojaku!
And it hates you so much!


Hey all, I took and passed the A+ certification tests about a month ago, and I'm kind of wondering where to go from here. I have the cert but, because of some poor life decisions and the fact that I live in a job desert, it will be a few months before I'm in a position to change careers. Should I look into picking up a Network+ or Security+ cert in the meantime? On that note, I've heard from some people that, at least for most entry level positions, the Network+ is basically redundant if you get Security+. Does this match up with what other people have found?

also lol mantraps

MJP
Jun 17, 2007

Are you looking at me Senpai?

Grimey Drawer

Any 70-413 takers out there with advice? Got a formal goal on my performance review to pass an exam for MCSE Private Cloud, which is now apparently MCSE Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, and yay only one exam to get an MCSE!

Solo Wing Pixy posted:

Hey all, I took and passed the A+ certification tests about a month ago, and I'm kind of wondering where to go from here. I have the cert but, because of some poor life decisions and the fact that I live in a job desert, it will be a few months before I'm in a position to change careers. Should I look into picking up a Network+ or Security+ cert in the meantime? On that note, I've heard from some people that, at least for most entry level positions, the Network+ is basically redundant if you get Security+. Does this match up with what other people have found?

also lol mantraps

Sec+ is good to have and not that difficult to get, IMO. If you already passed the A+ you'll have an idea of the CompTIA experience. Know your buzzwords and read the prep books, and then for good measure, watch The Net - the old Sandra Bullock movie - and you'll be aces.

Network+ is supposedly redundant if you have your CCNA. I have not tried for either so I can't confirm or refute, but that's been the zeitgeist opinion in all the lurk I've had on this thread.

Yo Buddy, you still alive?

MJP fucked around with this message at 12:25 on Aug 9, 2017

Japanese Dating Sim
Nov 12, 2003

hehe

Lipstick Apathy

Solo Wing Pixy posted:

Hey all, I took and passed the A+ certification tests about a month ago, and I'm kind of wondering where to go from here. I have the cert but, because of some poor life decisions and the fact that I live in a job desert, it will be a few months before I'm in a position to change careers. Should I look into picking up a Network+ or Security+ cert in the meantime? On that note, I've heard from some people that, at least for most entry level positions, the Network+ is basically redundant if you get Security+. Does this match up with what other people have found?

also lol mantraps

There's definitely some overlap between Net+ and Sec+. I don't know I'd call them redundant though. Maybe as far as employers are concerned.

I would say to consider Net+ if you think a high level overview on networking would be beneficial for you in terms of your personal learning. I actually got a lot out of it when I studied for it, which was before I actually worked in IT. But if you're already familiar with basic stuff (UDP vs TCP, subnets, port numbers, ARP, DNS, routers vs switches etc - understanding roughly how they work and why they're needed) I wouldn't get it to boost your resume, because it probably won't.

Sec+ is similar in that it will give you a decent high level overview on basic security concepts, but is for some reason somewhat valued by employers.

Judge Schnoopy
Nov 2, 2005

dont even TRY it, pal

Japanese Dating Sim posted:

Sec+ is similar in that it will give you a decent high level overview on basic security concepts, but is for some reason somewhat valued by employers.

It's a DoD supported option to qualify for secret clearance. This leads to certain government contractors requiring it, which snowballs into other companies thinking it's good to have on its own merits.

The best thing about S+ is if you've worked in IT for a year or two, you shouldn't have to study for more than a day to pass it.

RightClickSaveAs
Mar 1, 2001

Tiny animals under glass... Smaller than sand...




Japanese Dating Sim posted:

How'd you do on all the wardriving, vishing and smishing questions?
I thought smishing was a bullshit distraction term until I saw it come up in a book while studying. Oh, CompTIA.

Judge Schnoopy posted:

The best thing about S+ is if you've worked in IT for a year or two, you shouldn't have to study for more than a day to pass it.
I've heard similar before but don't agree. Based on my experience with the three exams I've taken so far, CompTIA's goal is to try to trip you up with minutiae and poorly worded questions. Half the challenge is figuring out exactly what they're asking and which answer they expect you to choose based on what they consider to be best practices (install a ManTrap, turn off your SSID for enhanced security!!), and that took a lot of study time to prepare for. Then there's the pure memorization. Granted, someone in a security or networking role will have a much easier time of it I'm sure.

skooma512
Feb 8, 2012

You couldn't grok my race car, but you dug the roadside blur.


Thom and the Heads posted:

cishing - phishing with a calculator
prishing - phishing with a printer

Warprinting - printing pictures of your butt on open Bluetooth printers

Solo Wing Pixy
Aug 5, 2008

It's an amanojaku!
And it hates you so much!


RightClickSaveAs posted:

I've heard similar before but don't agree. Based on my experience with the three exams I've taken so far, CompTIA's goal is to try to trip you up with minutiae and poorly worded questions. Half the challenge is figuring out exactly what they're asking and which answer they expect you to choose based on what they consider to be best practices (install a ManTrap, turn off your SSID for enhanced security!!), and that took a lot of study time to prepare for. Then there's the pure memorization. Granted, someone in a security or networking role will have a much easier time of it I'm sure.

For what it's worth, outside of a stint doing phone support for a company that made specialized telecom equipment, I don't really have experience in the industry. Judging from the A+ exam, I'm guessing there's a lot of questions along the lines of "what is the first/best thing you should do for this problem?" with four answers that are more or less valid, and you have to select the answer that the book specifically says to do first?

And yeah, long-term I'm interested in going into Cisco certs, but in the meantime I'd like to improve my chances of getting past the HR firewall. Especially since, somewhat perversely, the program I'm in at college requires you to have a job before they'll hand you a degree.

MJP posted:

Yo Buddy, you still alive?

always

FCKGW
May 21, 2006



Any point in doing the Comptia certs in any particular order? I'm doing WGU and will be getting the A+, Linux+, Network+ and Security+ (and Project+ i guess). I just did the A+ and was going to work on Linux+ next then Network+ and Security+, but they suggest working on Network+ before starting Linux+

Vadun
Mar 9, 2011

I'm hungrier than a green snake in a sugar cane field.



I just accepted a job at a recently built facility that has a Mantrap.

I look forward to it malfunctioning and getting stuck inside

rafikki
Mar 8, 2008

I see what you did there. (It's pretty easy, since ducks have a field of vision spanning 340 degrees.)

~SMcD

FCKGW posted:

Any point in doing the Comptia certs in any particular order? I'm doing WGU and will be getting the A+, Linux+, Network+ and Security+ (and Project+ i guess). I just did the A+ and was going to work on Linux+ next then Network+ and Security+, but they suggest working on Network+ before starting Linux+

Probably doesn't matter much if you're knocking them out all at once, but https://certification.comptia.org/c...-certifications shows how they're stacked. Like Sec+>Network+>A+.

Judge Schnoopy
Nov 2, 2005

dont even TRY it, pal

Linux+ is the hardest one so you'll be better to leave that one for later, when you have a lot more background knowledge in other subjects.

It's the only cert I failed the first time, and the second time was not sunshine and roses either.

LochNessMonster
Feb 3, 2005

I need about three fitty



Vadun posted:

I just accepted a job at a recently built facility that has a Mantrap.

I look forward to it malfunctioning and getting stuck inside

Pro Tip: don't do changes on Friday afternoon.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Judge Schnoopy posted:

The best thing about S+ is if you've worked in IT for a year or two, you shouldn't have to study for more than a day to pass it.

Going to go with a hard disagree on that one. I spent a couple of months farting around with books and 3 weeks of pretty regular studying and passed by a much closer margin than I'd like.

It's a lot of data and CompTIA tests are written by people for who English is at best a 3rd language. You'll miss things you'd have otherwise gotten right, so you need some cushion.

RightClickSaveAs
Mar 1, 2001

Tiny animals under glass... Smaller than sand...




Solo Wing Pixy posted:

For what it's worth, outside of a stint doing phone support for a company that made specialized telecom equipment, I don't really have experience in the industry. Judging from the A+ exam, I'm guessing there's a lot of questions along the lines of "what is the first/best thing you should do for this problem?" with four answers that are more or less valid, and you have to select the answer that the book specifically says to do first?

And yeah, long-term I'm interested in going into Cisco certs, but in the meantime I'd like to improve my chances of getting past the HR firewall. Especially since, somewhat perversely, the program I'm in at college requires you to have a job before they'll hand you a degree.
That's pretty much it, most questions will be multiple choice with 4 answers. One or two will be obviously wrong, with the others various degrees of possibly right to where you could make an argument for them, and you're expected to pick the best one. As already mentioned, some of the questions will make little sense and you have to just try to sit there and decipher what the hell they're asking. There will also be a few simulation questions, where you use a horribly-built interface to drag things around and do really simplified configuration / multiple choice "match these concepts" exercises. Drilling their terms into your head through study is really important for that. What I've used every time is practice tests, the really good ones like the TotalTester packs are expensive but mirror the exams really closely in style, other than not having simulation questions.

Nice! I'm also wanting to do the Cisco stuff next, I hear that's another level in terms of work needed to do for studying. I talked to a few people who have done the Cisco classes, and most of the ones available are the 8 week accelerated courses, which are just endless amounts of studying. If I can get my current job to pay for it somehow, I'll probably start that route next.

FCKGW
May 21, 2006



Judge Schnoopy posted:

Linux+ is the hardest one so you'll be better to leave that one for later, when you have a lot more background knowledge in other subjects.

It's the only cert I failed the first time, and the second time was not sunshine and roses either.

I took a Linux class at the local CC but then waited a year after passing before attempting the Linux+ and failed spectacularly.
I've had more experience such then but yeah, I might hold off on that one until later then.

Hot Damn!
Oct 28, 2004


I took the ICND1 on this thread's recommendation and passed with a 906. It was a pretty fair test I thought, and featured a lot of troubleshooting sims in the command line which I found to be a lot more fun and interesting than the CompTIA and Microsoft exams I've done in the past.

I had access to a lot of study materials so heres a quick review of how they worked for me:

Odom's book - I loving hated this poo poo man. This is the first place I started and it had me questioning my decision to focus on networking. I did finish the book, but by the end I found myself skimming more and more just to get through it. I remember an entire paragraph that explicitly explained pressing Enter to submit commands in IOS.
CBT nuggets videos - Jeremy Cioara is a lovable nerd but for my tastes he spent too much time scribbling on diagrams and not enough time showing me practical things. If I could do it again I'd probably skip these in favor of other materials.
Boson Netsim - This was a nice simulator with a lot of labs included in it. The way the instructions are laid out in the UI is pretty lovely I think, and if I went back to do them I would even consider printing them out to make it easier to consult them while working in the command line.
Boson Ex-Sim (practice tests) - These were probably the most accurate practice tests of all the ones I used. I'd say they are slightly more difficult than the real exam, but the types of questions are pretty representative.
Transcender practice tests - These were ridiculously hard compared to the exam and not very similar to what I saw on the actual exam, which really seems to be typical of Transcender tests in my experience so far. Maybe they're useful to find areas you need to revisit, but don't stress the scores on these too much. You could easily get a 60% on one of these and take the exam the next day and pass it.
ITpro.tv videos - I really loved these videos and felt like this was where a lot of concepts finally clicked for me. The presenter spends most of his time working through the commands as he discusses them, goes into an appropriate amount of depth, and doesn't waste too much of my precious study time on weird off topic stuff.
ITpro.tv labs - These labs were from practice-labs.com I think, and they feature real routers and switches, which was pretty great. The actual "labs" provided are not as in depth as the Boson ones, but I used these mostly to play around on my own, exploring topics in between videos.

Also, I'm not saying this is a good idea, but I refused to put any effort at all into studying IPv6 and it totally paid off.

Hot Damn! fucked around with this message at 01:50 on Aug 11, 2017

skooma512
Feb 8, 2012

You couldn't grok my race car, but you dug the roadside blur.


Hot drat! posted:

I took the ICND1 on this thread's recommendation and passed with a 906. It was a pretty fair test I thought, and featured a lot of troubleshooting sims in the command line which I found to be a lot more fun and interesting than the CompTIA and Microsoft exams I've done in the past.

I had access to a lot of study materials so heres a quick review of how they worked for me:

Odom's book - I loving hated this poo poo man. This is the first place I started and it had me questioning my decision to focus on networking. I did finish the book, but by the end I found myself skimming more and more just to get through it. I remember an entire paragraph that explicitly explained pressing Enter to submit commands in IOS.
CBT nuggets videos - Jeremy Cioara is a lovable nerd but for my tastes he spent too much time scribbling on diagrams and not enough time showing me practical things. If I could do it again I'd probably skip these in favor of other materials.
Boson Netsim - This was a nice simulator with a lot of labs included in it. The way the instructions are laid out in the UI is pretty lovely I think, and if I went back to do them I would even consider printing them out to make it easier to consult them while working in the command line.
Boson Ex-Sim (practice tests) - These were probably the most accurate practice tests of all the ones I used. I'd say they are slightly more difficult than the real exam, but the types of questions are pretty representative.
Transcender practice tests - These were ridiculously hard compared to the exam and not very similar to what I saw on the actual exam, which really seems to be typical of Transcender tests in my experience so far. Maybe they're useful to find areas you need to revisit, but don't stress the scores on these too much. You could easily get a 60% on one of these and take the exam the next day and pass it.
ITpro.tv videos - I really loved these videos and felt like this was where a lot of concepts finally clicked for me. The presenter spends most of his time working through the commands as he discusses them, goes into an appropriate amount of depth, and doesn't waste too much of my precious study time on weird off topic stuff.
ITpro.tv labs - These labs were from practice-labs.com I think, and they feature real routers and switches, which was pretty great. The actual "labs" provided are not as in depth as the Boson ones, but I used these mostly to play around on my own, exploring topics in between videos.

Also, I'm not saying this is a good idea, but I refused to put any effort at all into studying IPv6 and it totally paid off.

How long did it take you to get ready? Did you start from zero or do you have prior experience or something like Network+?

Peachfart
Jan 21, 2017



Hot drat! posted:

Also, I'm not saying this is a good idea, but I refused to put any effort at all into studying IPv6 and it totally paid off.

This is doable on ICND1, but I hear there is quite a bit of IPv6 on the ICND2. And I will let you all know how much in a few weeks when I take it.

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Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



skooma512 posted:

Warprinting - printing pictures of your butt on open Bluetooth printers

You're giving me flashbacks to college when everyone was just on a flat layer 2 network, and Windows XP shipped with no firewall and extremely permissive sharing settings. I definitely trolled friends by printing unfortunate things to their unintentionally shared printers.

I also found a horrifying number of "bankaccount.doc" or similar files shared over the network, and I was an idiot 18 year old who had no idea what he was doing. Thankfully for those involved I wasn't quite ready to get into federal crimes yet.

Docjowles fucked around with this message at 04:02 on Aug 11, 2017

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