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Akion
May 7, 2006


Grimey Drawer

Checking in to say that hiking the AT is the best decision I have ever made. Spent the morning watching the sun come up at Fontana Dam. Headed into the GSMNP today.

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Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Chroisman posted:

Yeah I was actually going for backpacking boots, thanks for pointing that out. What's the general consensus about commercial (e.g. Lowa, Asolo, Salomon etc.) vs military boots (Danner, Altama etc.)? Like if they all have Gore-Tex linings, Thinsulate, good shank/midsole and treads, would there be any particular reason to pick one over the other?

There is no harm in trying on a wide range of models. Fit is most important, so if you find something comfortable that meets your other requirements, you'll probably be fine. One thing I will say is that, in my experience interacting with the special operations forces in Iraq, units and individuals who had the option of using non-standard-issue footwear frequently did so. I'm sure there are some excellent military-approved boots out there, but in general it seems that the average civilian backpacker is a more demanding consumer than the military is.

pizzadog
Oct 9, 2009



Ehud posted:

Yep, that's exactly what I got!

I went on my second adventure today. Table Rock in upstate SC. 3.6 miles one way, so 7.2 miles total. The elevation raises about 2000 - 2200 feet during the hike.

Cyah later mountain!


That looks like a seriously fun hike!

I did Iron Mountain in LA yesterday. Yep, I'd believe that's the hardest single peak dayhike in socal on "trail". Went 7 miles in 7 hours on the way up, 5 hours on the way back, and I think I'm in pretty good shape. *hobbles away*

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

Business of Ferrets posted:

There is no harm in trying on a wide range of models. Fit is most important, so if you find something comfortable that meets your other requirements, you'll probably be fine. I'm sure there are some excellent military-approved boots out there, but in general it seems that the average civilian backpacker is a more demanding consumer than the military is.

It can take a while for the military to adopt a piece for use, so military boots aren't going to be cutting-edge. But it's all about fit.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Business of Ferrets posted:

There is no harm in trying on a wide range of models. Fit is most important, so if you find something comfortable that meets your other requirements, you'll probably be fine. One thing I will say is that, in my experience interacting with the special operations forces in Iraq, units and individuals who had the option of using non-standard-issue footwear frequently did so. I'm sure there are some excellent military-approved boots out there, but in general it seems that the average civilian backpacker is a more demanding consumer than the military is.

The military boots are more or les specified on an average by people who will not be making forced marches in them.

Try everything you can..

CRUSTY MINGE
Mar 30, 2011
Chelsea Manning is a goddamned HERO


There are plenty of miltary boots out there that are fine as long as your comfortable in them. Get ones that fit, replace the insoles with comfortable ones, break them in properly.

My favorite and best fitting pair of boots is a beat up old pair of black leathers from basic. drat things fit like a glove, been through hell and back, and the leather can still take a nice shine if I bothered to do it anymore. Soles are shot and have been for years, but those can be replaced.

i_heart_ponies
Oct 16, 2005

because I love feces


For a while all the Marines at Camp Pendleton were coming into my shop for the Lowa Desert Zephyrs before they went overseas. They got approved by their commanders or whatever (I have no idea how the military works) and apparently they're much better than the boots they had been issued. They don't meet your requirements (since they're a desert boot), but i think back to that every time I see someone dressed like Rocky Mountain Rambo on the trail and wonder how uncomfortable they must be to keep up that image.

i_heart_ponies fucked around with this message at 20:25 on Apr 8, 2013

CRUSTY MINGE
Mar 30, 2011
Chelsea Manning is a goddamned HERO


There are a bunch of different military approved boots outside the domain of issue. Even Oakley branded boots are a-ok, just cost a pretty nickel.

I will admit that the cheapest of cheap poo poo $50~ mil surplus boots are going to be a bad idea to start off in. But if you're used to and comfortable in mil boots, why not?

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Spongebob Tampax posted:

There are a bunch of different military approved boots outside the domain of issue. Even Oakley branded boots are a-ok, just cost a pretty nickel.

I will admit that the cheapest of cheap poo poo $50~ mil surplus boots are going to be a bad idea to start off in. But if you're used to and comfortable in mil boots, why not?

I agree, with the caveat that if someone is used to military boots because of years of service and not using anything else, it would be a good idea to try the best civilian stuff, as well. I used military issue boots for years before I found a civilian model that actually fit my foot, and it was like night and day. But I didn't know what I had been missing all those years.

Keyser_Soze
May 5, 2009



Pillbug

i_heart_ponies posted:

For a while all the Marines at Camp Pendleton were coming into my shop for the Lowa Desert Zephyrs before they went overseas. They got approved by their commanders or whatever (I have no idea how the military works) and apparently they're much better than the boots they had been issued. They don't meet you're requirements (since they're a desert boot), but i think back to that every time I see someone dressed like Rocky Mountain Rambo on the trail and wonder how uncomfortable they must be to keep up that image.

I also read that the Merrill Sawtooth is a go to boot for soldiers to get as well. I have a pair and they are fantastic and very well made for the price. Not waterproof by any means but very sturdy and great for rocky trails.

Keyser_Soze fucked around with this message at 17:27 on Apr 8, 2013

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



They're a bit shorter than what you're looking for, but I love the Vasque Breeze boots. Light, good support, and cool. The only thing they really need is a rubber toe cap, which I see they've added on the new model.

Hotel Kpro
Feb 23, 2011

owls don't go to school

Dinosaur Gum

Levitate posted:

I'm hoping to do a hike to this area in Idaho later this summer. Not entirely sure though, might do something in the Tetons instead. These are from the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness



Some lake we just always referred to as the "frog pond" because it has a lot of frogs



Sky High lake



Some mountain meadow around there

That looks super nice. A friend and I are going to the Seven Devils mountains area. Not sure what we'll do after that. We might branch out into the Eastern part of the state later in the summer.

Chroisman
Mar 27, 2010


Thanks for the boot advice everyone. Yeah I was just interested because when I asked for recommendations before someone posted up a military type Danners. I got curious because I thought the really higher end non-issued military looking boots (like the $350 Danners or those Lowa Zephyrs) would have been more geared towards slugging it out with a heavy pack or something like that. I guess that's not always the case?

mystes
May 31, 2006



Chroisman posted:

Yeah I was just interested because when I asked for recommendations before someone posted up a military type Danners.
You asked for waterproof 8" boots, so someone suggested something along the lines of what people used to wear when they wore boots like this, but be aware that this is pretty much the opposite of the current trend in hiking footwear. Now most people want lighter shoes and many just use low shoes such as trail runners and this includes people doing backpacking as well. Of course, the trend is also toward carrying less stuff, so it may be a moot point which style is better suited to heavy packs.

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

mystes posted:

You asked for waterproof 8" boots, so someone suggested something along the lines of what people used to wear when they wore boots like this, but be aware that this is pretty much the opposite of the current trend in hiking footwear. Now most people want lighter shoes and many just use low shoes such as trail runners and this includes people doing backpacking as well. Of course, the trend is also toward carrying less stuff, so it may be a moot point which style is better suited to heavy packs.

For example, I use a pair of Garmont Synchros when I do prescribed burning, which is about as "heavy pack over lovely terrain, for 10 hours" as you can get.

Chroisman
Mar 27, 2010


mystes posted:

You asked for waterproof 8" boots, so someone suggested something along the lines of what people used to wear when they wore boots like this, but be aware that this is pretty much the opposite of the current trend in hiking footwear. Now most people want lighter shoes and many just use low shoes such as trail runners and this includes people doing backpacking as well. Of course, the trend is also toward carrying less stuff, so it may be a moot point which style is better suited to heavy packs.

Ah right yeah, I get you, thanks. I've got a bad ankle so I was after a bit more support, and with a lot of creeks and snowy trails coming up, I just assumed criteria like a tall waterproof boot would be my way to go. Light boots would be amazing, but yeah we're on our way to trek in Nepal at the end of the year, for about a month and a half so I was looking for something really rugged to break in soon.

Thanks for all the suggestions folks.

hobbez
Mar 1, 2012

Don't care. Just do not care. We win, you lose. You do though, you seem to care very much

I'm going to go ride my mountain bike, later nerds.


Popping in to ask if anyone has a recommendation for a good overnight (2-3 nights) trail in the grand canyon area that we could still book in late may? I'm sure there are a lot. My crew is in pretty good shape, we've got all our gear, and we can do just about anything that isn't straight rock climbing.

We're already hiking to and camping at havasu falls for two nights (woo!) but I think we'll want to do another hike since we're already going all the way out there anyway.

Canna Happy
Jul 11, 2004
The engine, code A855, has a cast iron closed deck block and split crankcase. It uses an 8.1:1 compression ratio with Mahle cast eutectic aluminum alloy pistons, forged connecting rods with cracked caps and threaded-in 9 mm rod bolts, and a cast high

hobbez posted:

Popping in to ask if anyone has a recommendation for a good overnight (2-3 nights) trail in the grand canyon area that we could still book in late may? I'm sure there are a lot. My crew is in pretty good shape, we've got all our gear, and we can do just about anything that isn't straight rock climbing.

We're already hiking to and camping at havasu falls for two nights (woo!) but I think we'll want to do another hike since we're already going all the way out there anyway.

I just did a rim2rim2rim. I went in and got a walk up permit no probs, you just have to be flexible. We have some friends that work for the nps in the backcountry, so we got hang out where others might not after we came back down from the north side. We did a nice day hike down the Tonto trail. Honestly, I thought the ~15 miles we did on the Tonto had better views than everything on the r2r2r and that includes South Kaibab, North Kaibab and the Bright Angel. Also, the Grand Canyon has the rudest hikers in the world as far as I'm concerned. Worse than dirty southbound JMT'ers.

mystes posted:

Of course, the trend is also toward carrying less stuff

Less gear, more beer.

Canna Happy fucked around with this message at 20:36 on Apr 9, 2013

one1two2three3
Mar 22, 2013


The 8" military boots come from the very uniformed era of "bigger is better" in footware. They wanted something that protected them from every single possible injury, and sacrificed comfort, weight and practicality to get there. After making soldiers wear them in austere environments, they realized that they're garbage when it matters. There is no reason to have a boot that high unless you're fast-roping out of a helicopter or something.

I've worn Army-style boots (Garmonts are my personal favorites, having gone through 4 pairs), Merrells and Solomons. Weight from nothing to 120lbs on my back, in all of them. In my opinion, with the exception of walking in snow or in very cold weather, the only boots I prefer are hot-weather style.

If you're doing serious hiking your feet are going to get wet by either the environment or by sweat. I prefer to have a boots that dry quickly, and just change out socks at the end of the day or if I know they're not going to get wet again. For that reason, if you're doing a lot of walking anything goretex is a bad idea. At worst, with the hot weather boot, your feet will be a little cold until you get the blood pumping.

Lately I've been wearing an older generation of the Solomon X TRACKS MID WP and they pretty much fit the bill. They also have a pull-string type tie, instead of laces, so the slip-on lazy factor makes them even better.

For a month long training exercise I wore my below-the-ankle Merrells. While they make my feet sweat a lot, but they are very comfortable and worked amazingly well when I walked with a lot of weight very far. I really can't suggest them enough. They kept the snow/water out, and I still have them sitting in my closet for another trek.

I'd suggest the Solomons for Spring/Summer/Fall, and the Merrells for Winter, and adjust depending on the season and location.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Akion posted:

Checking in to say that hiking the AT is the best decision I have ever made. Spent the morning watching the sun come up at Fontana Dam. Headed into the GSMNP today.

Heads up in the area around Hot Springs:

http://blogs2.citizen-times.com/outdoors/2013/04/09/stomach-virus-hits-appalachian-trail-hikers-near-hot-springs/

quote:

A number of hikers have been sickened by a severe, 24-hour stomach virus that is being passed between hikers. Shelters to avoid include No Business Knob, Big Bald and Hogback Ridge. A section of the Appalachian Trail runs through the Appalachian Ranger District, Pisgah National Forest, to the north and south of Hot Springs.

The thru-hikers have been blessed by Father Nurgle it seems. I'm flying out to Springer in 19 days. Can't loving wait.

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

one1two2three3 posted:

If you're doing serious hiking your feet are going to get wet by either the environment or by sweat. I prefer to have a boots that dry quickly, and just change out socks at the end of the day or if I know they're not going to get wet again. For that reason, if you're doing a lot of walking anything goretex is a bad idea. At worst, with the hot weather boot, your feet will be a little cold until you get the blood pumping.

I don't know what you're talking about. Gore is absolutely fantastic most of the time. The dampness from sweat is nothing compared to the drenching you can get from the environment.

Having two pairs is nice, but unless you do all your hiking in a desert, gore is better.

LogisticEarth
Mar 28, 2004

Someone once told me, "Time is a flat circle".


Speleothing posted:

I don't know what you're talking about. Gore is absolutely fantastic most of the time. The dampness from sweat is nothing compared to the drenching you can get from the environment.

Having two pairs is nice, but unless you do all your hiking in a desert, gore is better.

YMMV but I think one1two2three3 isn't totally off. I have had a variety of goretex and non-goretex boots, and could go either way. I find that often enough if it's raining that hard they lined boots end up getting wet anyway, and they stay wet. Depending on the brand, it seems that they're designed more for keeping out water from puddles, streams, and light rain, rather than keeping you dry all day.

That said, my current hiking boots are GoreTex, however my day to day workboots are not. With my work boots, I have found that, while I get wet, they dry out the next day. GoreTex, once wet, seems to take forever to dry properly compared to a traditional boot. I often have to work out in the rain, but I can at least choose the days I hike, so I avoid the real sokers there.

one1two2three3
Mar 22, 2013


Speleothing posted:

I don't know what you're talking about. Gore is absolutely fantastic most of the time. The dampness from sweat is nothing compared to the drenching you can get from the environment.

Having two pairs is nice, but unless you do all your hiking in a desert, gore is better.

In the end its all personal preference. Foot hygiene is critical for my job, and having a good strategy to keep them dry and clean is fundamentally very important. My post was more pointing out that for beyond casual use, the sweat caused by GoreTex isn't worth the water-proofing it provides. Unless its snowing, or very cold and raining.

Mordialloc
Apr 15, 2003

Knight of the Iron Cross

Hey guys,

I'm looking to attempt the AT around mid-March next year and was wondering if you could give some insight. I'm currently looking into a layering system but I'm not sure if it's in the right ball park. The research I've done indicates that at the start, I should expect lows down to around 25F and highs as much as 60F.

As far as sleep systems go I'm looking at a Z packs 30F sleeping bag and a bivy/bag cover. Should I include a liner in case it gets really cold, or can I expect to make up the 5-10 degree deficit with clothing in a pinch?

Clothing wise, I'm looking at a merino shirt, long sleeve hiking shirt, fleece layer, down layer and a hard shell. This comes in at 38 ounces, which is quite alot for top clothing alone. Lower body I'm looking at least hiking boxers, merino leggings and zip-off pants. That's probably going to be at least another 2 pounds, if I'm lucky.

Realistically, I expect to be in a sleeping bag at the times I can expect it to get really cold (i.e. at night) and to be moving during the day and moving during the day obviously. Does this seem like too much stuff for the conditions? What in there can I easily do without? What kind of layering system do you recommend for the trail as it gets warmer?

The reason I ask, is because I currently live in tropical Australia and even when I would hike where it would get "reasonably cold" (barely below freezing) I could always seem to get away with a merino undershirt and a softshell at night. I'm not sure in the climate I can expect on the AT though.

Thanks for the help.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Googled this up for you. http://trailquest.net/weather.html

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

FYAD KNIGHT posted:

The reason I ask, is because I currently live in tropical Australia and even when I would hike where it would get "reasonably cold" (barely below freezing) I could always seem to get away with a merino undershirt and a softshell at night. I'm not sure in the climate I can expect on the AT though.

Thanks for the help.

Just keep in mind that even if you get weather forecast information, it's probably for towns and not for mountains. I would just bring extra clothes and if you don't need them after 100 miles, send them back. Or keep them and feel more confident with your ability to deal with harsh weather. Reading some of the trail journals for the folks already out there, a lot are dropping out because of the weather.

Mercury Ballistic
Nov 14, 2005

not gun related

I just got off after a 5 day, 92 mile section of the AT in SW Virginia. It was hot, and the winter gear I brought was excessive, however last Thursday it snowed a foot. The AT is weird like that. I will try to follow up my post with my packing list. I was ready for temps into the 20s at night, and was able to handle the 80s I experienced with no problems. Total pack weight with 2 liters of water and 5.5 days of food was about 23-25 lbs.

If you are planning a mid march start time I would be ready for temps into the teens. My basic clothing was some convertible pants, a merino T-shirt, trail runners, exofficio boxer briefs and smart wool running socks with dirty girl gaiters. For colder times I had a long sleeve merino top, a mont bell down puffy, a wool hat and my rain shell. Layer up as needed.

Most people have a winter sleeping bag and a summer one. My two were a western mounteering 20 degree and a Mont bell 50 degree. Even the 50 degree bag was too hot in June through mid august.

Chroisman
Mar 27, 2010


More hiking gear questions: Could anyone please recommend some relatively cheap but high quality brands of moisture wicking shirts and pants? Got some extended periods of wet conditions ahead of me and if I bring my normal cotton stuff I will never get dry. Thanks in advance.

Canna Happy
Jul 11, 2004
The engine, code A855, has a cast iron closed deck block and split crankcase. It uses an 8.1:1 compression ratio with Mahle cast eutectic aluminum alloy pistons, forged connecting rods with cracked caps and threaded-in 9 mm rod bolts, and a cast high

Chroisman posted:

More hiking gear questions: Could anyone please recommend some relatively cheap but high quality brands of moisture wicking shirts and pants? Got some extended periods of wet conditions ahead of me and if I bring my normal cotton stuff I will never get dry. Thanks in advance.

Go to your local thrift stores/st vinnys/goodwill etc and check the racks. Any poly dress/western shirt will work fine and will be super cheap. Pants will be a touch harder. Try the thrift stores first and then move on to the REI/local outfitters sale racks and pick through them.
As far as actual outdoorsy brands, I really really like Outdoor Research's line of button up short sleeve shirts. They don't stink as soon and they dry super fast.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005


I have three practical questions for those of you who have flown to an area to hike.

1 - How do you handle your backpacks on the plane? Obviously, you'll have to check them and you can't include JetBoil fuel. But, I'm a little hesitant in just checking my bag. It doesn't take a genius to know that backpacking bags can contain expensive gear. Do you pack them in a duffel bag and then just find a locker for the duffel bag at the destination airport?

2 - What's the easiest way to get JetBoil fuel between the airport and the hiking site?

3 - What's the easiest way to get from the airport to the hiking site? Most are probably a good distance away from the airport, making cabs expensive. It also seems fairly silly to rent a car just to drive to the site and then leave it there for 4-5 days.

I guess I'm really just looking for any advice revolving around traveling to backpack.

JAY ZERO SUM GAME
Oct 18, 2005

Walter.
I know you know how to do this.
Get up.




Internet Explorer posted:

I have three practical questions for those of you who have flown to an area to hike.

1 - How do you handle your backpacks on the plane? Obviously, you'll have to check them and you can't include JetBoil fuel. But, I'm a little hesitant in just checking my bag. It doesn't take a genius to know that backpacking bags can contain expensive gear. Do you pack them in a duffel bag and then just find a locker for the duffel bag at the destination airport?

2 - What's the easiest way to get JetBoil fuel between the airport and the hiking site?

3 - What's the easiest way to get from the airport to the hiking site? Most are probably a good distance away from the airport, making cabs expensive. It also seems fairly silly to rent a car just to drive to the site and then leave it there for 4-5 days.

I guess I'm really just looking for any advice revolving around traveling to backpack.
You can buy a huge duffel and just throw your pack in there. No straps or anything getting caught on any equipment, easy handling. I've also seen people wrap them in garbage bags/trash compactor bags. You can carry on anything that is kinda valuable; GPS units or something like that. No one's gonna jack your sleeping bag or something.

Can't bring isopro fuel on planes of course. I usually just google before I leave somewhere to get it between the airport and the trail. Call around, etc. Also, if you're going to a decent sized park or something, check with the ranger/admin building. They often have canisters for sale or to give away. I know I give away my leftovers when I'm in that situation.

As for getting to the trail, that's gonna vary. Hard to give advice there. Again, if it's a national park or other pretty well established area with good admin, give them a call and they can likely help.

JAY ZERO SUM GAME
Oct 18, 2005

Walter.
I know you know how to do this.
Get up.




Getting from airport to park depends on season, too. For example, from Kalispell to Apgar in GNP, there's a limousine service that runs but it's only during the busy season. Off season you gotta rent a car or find some local to take you. You might be surprised, depending on the location, how helpful people can be in that regard if you're polite.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


Internet Explorer posted:

I have three practical questions for those of you who have flown to an area to hike.

1 - How do you handle your backpacks on the plane?

2 - What's the easiest way to get JetBoil fuel between the airport and the hiking site?

3 - What's the easiest way to get from the airport to the hiking site?

1 - Actually you can just check it and make sure all the loops and buckles are secured and folded in so nothing is dangling loose. Also look into really heavy plastic bags. Most airlines can give them to you at check in. People use them for strollers or car seats all the time. They are easily disposable and can be tossed out at your arrival. I however use a big canvas army duffel that my entire bag can fit into. Works great and keeps everything secure.

2 - I just try to buy fuel at my arrival location. More than likely wherever you're hiking or camping there is probably somewhere nearby that sells camping supplies. Google map it before you arrive so that you know where to go and what places are open. Expect to pay more but the extra 20% is worth the convenience.

3 - I just pay the price of renting a car. It seems stupid to pay for it to sit but unless you know someone nearby who can drop you off and pick you up then there really aren't a lot of options. You can ususlly find cars for about $30/day if you look for codes and if somethjng happens you have a way out just in case. Share the cost with the group and its a very small price for the convenience of transportation. If you get a car you can also pick up supplies or food before setting out and can stash clean clothes or duffel bags that you didn't want to carry along. Taxis can be expensive and sometimes won't go to trailheads depending on the city. Flying into denver and hiking up in rmnp would be outrageously expensive if you could even find a driver to take you.

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

As long as nothing is loose in the side pockets or strapped to the outside, you can just check it. I've never had a problem with waering it right up to the luggage check counter, though wrapping or bagging it is nicer. Try to find a way to keep the straps securely tucked away.

Some airlines still allow fuel, I think. But you're best off googling for a store and calling them.

Agree also with renting a car, unless you can find a friend-of-a-friend to pick you up & drop you off for a few bucks. Having a car is incredibly helpful for picking up fuel and trail snacks that you couldn't or didn't pack with you, and you can store your spare clothes & whatever else you brought in it while you're on the trail. Worst case, I've taken the Greyhound from the airport to a closer city where I could get a ride. You meet a lot of interesting people, and they're way more talkative than you fellow passengers on the plane.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



I got a tear in my pack when I checked it on a flight a bunch of years ago. Not a big one, so it's just a minor annoyance, but it's there. I've checked the same pack ten or twelve other times, and nothing's happened to it.

LogisticEarth
Mar 28, 2004

Someone once told me, "Time is a flat circle".


Had my first decent hike this season yesterday, even if it was only a quick jaunt up Mt. Tammany at the Delaware Water Gap. It was a welcome reminder as to why I have so far stayed away from any hiking boot without a nice stiff shank:



I'm still trying to get used to how popular the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation area has gotten in the past few years. Parking is a pain now and I saw way too many people stumbling along wearing Dockers and leather jackets. Attention citizens of North Jersey: Please stop discovering your national parks and recreation areas.

It gets better if you drive farther into Worthington State Forest, I think most of the tourists just pop off Route 80 near the visitor center and don't venture back to the other trailheads.

Mordialloc
Apr 15, 2003

Knight of the Iron Cross

Mercury Ballistic posted:

I just got off after a 5 day, 92 mile section of the AT in SW Virginia. It was hot, and the winter gear I brought was excessive, however last Thursday it snowed a foot. The AT is weird like that. I will try to follow up my post with my packing list. I was ready for temps into the 20s at night, and was able to handle the 80s I experienced with no problems. Total pack weight with 2 liters of water and 5.5 days of food was about 23-25 lbs.

If you are planning a mid march start time I would be ready for temps into the teens. My basic clothing was some convertible pants, a merino T-shirt, trail runners, exofficio boxer briefs and smart wool running socks with dirty girl gaiters. For colder times I had a long sleeve merino top, a mont bell down puffy, a wool hat and my rain shell. Layer up as needed.

Most people have a winter sleeping bag and a summer one. My two were a western mounteering 20 degree and a Mont bell 50 degree. Even the 50 degree bag was too hot in June through mid august.

Thanks for this kind of info. My main concern is that I have no real concept at the moment of what I'll need at those temps. I don't want to have to spend money on, and carry stuff I won't need.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Canna Happy posted:

Go to your local thrift stores/st vinnys/goodwill etc and check the racks. Any poly dress/western shirt will work fine and will be super cheap. Pants will be a touch harder. Try the thrift stores first and then move on to the REI/local outfitters sale racks and pick through them.
As far as actual outdoorsy brands, I really really like Outdoor Research's line of button up short sleeve shirts. They don't stink as soon and they dry super fast.
Had to come out from lurking for a cautionary tale on this. I'm not sure I'd do this. I have some cheap/lovely thrift store poly shirts that are akin to wearing a trash bag, which I'm pretty sure would kill me if I was depending on them for hiking. A lot of times, though, there are some decent outdoors/athletic shirts at the thrift store.

If you don't need dressy (not sure if I missed somewhere you said you did), Target's C9 brand is a good place to start. I've got several of their "super advanced wicking materials (polyester)" t shirts, and they do the job while hiking. If you want something a little less under-armor looking, but don't want to pay legit outdoor gear prices, look around for hunting clothes. They're never ultra-light, but they're designed for similar activities, and can often be found cheaper.

Also, check ebay for some older North Face button up shirts. I've got a few from the early 2000s that are going strong 10 years later, and that I completely love. They're my go-to travel shirts.

edit: to out myself as a complete loving nerd, I like to hike in a slightly too big, soft-ish (not shiny race material) bike jersey. Pockets in the back, big zipper in the front, comfy as hell, designed to keep you cool. The downside is that I look like a huge dork.

stealie72 fucked around with this message at 14:28 on Apr 15, 2013

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


Places like TJ MAxx, Marshalls and resellers of the like often carry a pretty wide array of technical clothes as well at great prices. Most times you can find technical tops for $10-20 and there are usually brands like columbia, north face, marmot, 2xist, under armor etc.

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El Marrow
Jan 21, 2009

Everybody here is just as dead as you.

Verman posted:

Places like TJ MAxx, Marshalls and resellers of the like often carry a pretty wide array of technical clothes as well at great prices. Most times you can find technical tops for $10-20 and there are usually brands like columbia, north face, marmot, 2xist, under armor etc.

Honestly, you can usually find some really good deals on slightly used gear on Amazon. I saw a VG+ Jetboil Zip on Amazon the other day for about $50, and didn't grab it in time because I'm a terrible person.

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