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pizzadog
Oct 9, 2009



PRADA SLUT posted:

One other question--which CamelBack/hydration system should I be looking at? I've read a lot of reviews about leakage on the new ones. Is 100 the standard all-around size or would a 70 be okay for day hikes?

A liter of water is roughly 2lbs, correct?

Something like this? http://amzn.com/B002QX3UJ2

I prefer the nalgene brand hydration system actually. The close cap is nicer/easier to get tight, the handle is easy to hold the entire bladder upright while filling, and the sip nozzle has a magnet on it and the other end slides on the sternum strap (or any other strap) of your backpack so it's not flopping or dangling around after you use the last shoulder loop for the tube you have, but secured while hiking, however easy to grab and sip from and drop back and it reattaches to the magnet, it's the perfect strength of magnetism, easy to pull off on purpose but it doesn't fall off... It's really a small awesome detail.
It's also 3L
http://www.hikerly.com/choosing-a-water-reservoir/

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PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


I have to give my vote to the Platypi as well. My 2L 'Hoser' plus nozzle cover has been sufficient for two and a half years of day hikes, today's being five hours and 0.75L of sipping, all the way up to eight hour jaunts that use up all 2L plus another 16oz of something else in a bottle. The thing froze up in 20F in early January when I ended up doing 30 minutes of running without stopping for a drink (I was in a hurry, running in snowshoes ), but it only took wrapping it around my neck for ten minutes to get it flowing freely again (fortunately I had mostly blown it back).

I generally prepare water based on trip time, plus extra for aggressive ascents or temperatures. Early March saw 1.5L for a 9.5mi, 1500m ascent, half snowshoeing. Early November was all 2.0L for a 5mi, 1350m double summit. July, 1.25L, 13mi, 1250m (it ended up being overcast, yay). I rarely take less than 1.25L anymore, and rarely need more than 2L, so it's the right size. Icky heat usually calls for some wholly unhealthy sugar bomb beverage (Powerade) which makes up for and extra.

I'm so happy I don't stock 4-6L for hiking any more. Start with extra until you get a feel for how much you need. (It takes at least a year to determine that due to seasonal variation.)

i_heart_ponies
Oct 16, 2005

because I love feces


The most miserable I have ever been was on a 4 day trip along the crest of the Inyo Mountains, a desert range east of the Sierra Nevada (across the Owens Valley). There was absolutely zero water sources along the trail so we started with 15L per person... 33lbs of just water. I ended up having a hydration bladder failure on the second day and lost 3 liters down the back of my legs which, combined with the fact that I had jumped to 11k+ feet from my apartment at 700 ft, caused me to run out on day three and have to fill my 10L MSR Dromedary with the only patch of snow I could find (after I scraped the rat poo poo off the top) and sleep with it under my shirt in order to melt enough for the next day. GOOD TIMES!


Now that I;ve lost a lot of weight I don't burn through water like I used to, but that trip left a bad taste in my mouth (not just the vegetal taste of the melted poo poo-snow either) for hydration bladders. I find that if I don't have a floppy tube there to tempt me with readily available slurps I can ration my water a lot better, as well as being forced to see just how much water I have left in my bottles.

For short hikes I like the 1L Platypus bags with sport tops, for longer hikes where weight is a concern I use repurposed 32oz Gatorade bottles I stole out of my apartment's recycling - they're a few grams lighter than Platypus bottles and surprisingly durable. For winter trips I use the HDPE (cloudy plastic) Nalgenes with bottle jackets so I can throw some near-boiling water in there and use them as heat packs in my sleeping bag at night.

Since most of my trips now are in the Rockies where streams and creeks are plentiful, my usual summer limit is 1Liter in my pack as a 'backup' and I carry one of these $12 AquaMira filter-straws to carry in my pocket and drink straight from the water sources as I go.

i_heart_ponies fucked around with this message at 18:58 on Apr 28, 2013

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Headed to the AT tomorrow. If you want to vicariously eat ramen and check for ticks, follow along at gizmohike.wordpress.com.

vonnegutt
Aug 7, 2006
Hobocamp.


i_heart_ponies posted:

The most miserable I have ever been was on a 4 day trip along the crest of the Inyo Mountains, a desert range east of the Sierra Nevada (across the Owens Valley). There was absolutely zero water sources along the trail so we started with 15L per person... 33lbs of just water. I ended up having a hydration bladder failure on the second day and lost 3 liters down the back of my legs which, combined with the fact that I had jumped to 11k+ feet from my apartment at 700 ft, caused me to run out on day three and have to fill my 10L MSR Dromedary with the only patch of snow I could find (after I scraped the rat poo poo off the top) and sleep with it under my shirt in order to melt enough for the next day. GOOD TIMES!

Oh god, that sounds awful.

I carry a Platypus 2L as well as a big repurposed Gatorade which is right at 1L. The Gatorade bottle is useful for refilling the Platypus as well as being a nice backup in case of leakage. The Aqua Mira 2-step purification is easy enough in both as well.

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.


I was just concerned since it seems like reviewers are always talking about how X is prone to leaking.

It's between this

Platypus Big Zip SL 3-Liter Hands-Free Hydration System http://amzn.com/B001KZGYLS

or

Camelbak 100 oz/3.0L MG Omega Water Beast Reservoir http://amzn.com/B002QX3UJ2

I've never used one of these before, do I need anything else to go with it? Anything that might just be useful?

taint toucher
Sep 23, 2004




Does anyone have any suggestions for 3 season hiking boots/runners? I hike in the Whites so something that's good on rocky terrain is definitely a must. I currently have Merrell moab mids and I keep getting blood blisters underneath my big toe nails so I think it's time for better fitting boots.

edit: ~$150 would be a good price point.

taint toucher fucked around with this message at 02:08 on Apr 29, 2013

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


I use this. Smaller hole to fill but I've never had a problem with leaks.

http://m.rei.com/mt/www.rei.com/product/767111/platypus-hoser-30l-reservoir-100-fl-oz

John Cenas Jorts
Dec 21, 2012


Verman posted:

I use this. Smaller hole to fill but I've never had a problem with leaks.

http://m.rei.com/mt/www.rei.com/product/767111/platypus-hoser-30l-reservoir-100-fl-oz

Ditto. I have this Platypus and it has been through some rough poo poo, but it still works perfectly.

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

Action Jackson! posted:

Does anyone have any suggestions for 3 season hiking boots/runners? I hike in the Whites so something that's good on rocky terrain is definitely a must. I currently have Merrell moab mids and I keep getting blood blisters underneath my big toe nails so I think it's time for better fitting boots.

edit: ~$150 would be a good price point.

Do you want boots or shoes? At that price point there's a huge difference. I'm going to recommend the Salewa Alp Trainer - you can get them low or high-topped with GoreTex or without. But, as we've said a million times in these threads, it's all about finding a good fit.

remote control carnivore
May 6, 2009


Speleothing posted:

Do you want boots or shoes? At that price point there's a huge difference. I'm going to recommend the Salewa Alp Trainer - you can get them low or high-topped with GoreTex or without. But, as we've said a million times in these threads, it's all about finding a good fit.

Don't buy these if you are doing anything that involves jamming your foot into rock cracks. I shredded the Kevlar rand in less than a month with some (light, in my mind) desert scrambling. Also, buy new shoelaces in advance. It sucks that they have basically fallen apart, because otherwise I love them.

taint toucher
Sep 23, 2004




Speleothing posted:

Do you want boots or shoes? At that price point there's a huge difference. I'm going to recommend the Salewa Alp Trainer - you can get them low or high-topped with GoreTex or without. But, as we've said a million times in these threads, it's all about finding a good fit.

Save me jeebus posted:

Don't buy these if you are doing anything that involves jamming your foot into rock cracks. I shredded the Kevlar rand in less than a month with some (light, in my mind) desert scrambling. Also, buy new shoelaces in advance. It sucks that they have basically fallen apart, because otherwise I love them.

Thanks! I'm actually having a hard time deciding what type of shoe I need. My gear isn't very light and I average ~30-35 lbs with food and water. Would a trail running type of shoe be okay for that kind of load or should I stick with boots?

i_heart_ponies
Oct 16, 2005

because I love feces


Load up a pack to your usual weight. Throw on some normal trainers and walk up and down a few flights of stairs. Repeat that a couple times. Did your ankles feel OK? Congrats you can hike in a less supportive shoe like a trail runner. Did you feel wobbly or like your ankles would roll out at any given minute? You should probably stick with boots.

The problem with shoe recommendations in this thread is that they are so subjective; what works for your body type and foot structure and build and load and hiking style and terrain is going to be different than mine. I like doing rocky 14ers in minimalist trainers; would I suggest that to pretty much anyone else on the face of the earth? No.

While you're experimenting with what works for you, shop a place with a good return policy and try some stuff out on increasingly more strenuous hikes. That being said, if you're getting blood blisters under your toes (especially in the Moab) there is pretty clearly something wrong with the fit of your boots. Either they're too short or too narrow in the toebox. Even the mid-height of the Moabs don't offer much ankle support, so if you're not rolling ankles or feeling wobbly on the trail you could probably get away with a trail runner. I have Morton's Toe, so both length and width of the toebox is critical to my comfort and I've found the Merrell MIx Master 2s to be nice and supportive underfoot (a great cushy midsole and a good rock plate), low drop, aggressively treaded and HUGE in the forefoot. So much so that I actually had to size down half a size from what I wear in my NB Minimus MT10s.

BeefofAges
Jun 5, 2004

Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the cows of war.



Also consider using hiking poles. They improve your stability a lot.

taint toucher
Sep 23, 2004




i_heart_ponies posted:

Awesome, no bullshit advice

Thanks so much. I was overthinking the whole thing way too much and not realizing how subjective it really is.

TerminalSaint
Apr 20, 2007


Where must we go...

we who wander this Wasteland in search of our better selves?


BeefofAges posted:

Also consider using hiking poles. They improve your stability a lot.

I was skeptical of hiking poles because I'd always hated carrying stuff while hiking. Then I tried them out and fell in love. In addition to being knee-savers, they've kept me on my feet in a number of cases that would have been falls.

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

Hey hiking thread. I just got a lifetime pass (disabled vet) to the Wisconsin State Park system. I'd like to find places to actually go backpacking here but for right now I guess I'm just looking for day hikes/camping. The problem is I'm in South East Wisconsin (Kenosha). There isn't a whole lot here that I know of besides Bong Recreation Area . Most of the good stuff is more West and North I think.

I've been slowly acquiring gear for backpacking. I doubt anyone here would use it due to weight and size but I just ordered a Military Modular Sleep System. I'd like to try cold weather camping sometime and I could just take the patrol bag for warmer weather. Unfortunately I bought a REI Catalyst 35L before I got any gear and when I didn't know anything about backpacking. It's a great pack but I definitely think I might need a bigger one when I get around to backpacking. That will probably be my next purchase. I'm also using the REI Half Dome. Decent tent but takes up a lot of room.

Anyway, back to my original question. Does anyone know of any good hiking areas in SE WI? Even small parks that have at least a few miles of trails. I don't really have many people to hike with so I'd be going solo most of the time. I just want to get out as much as I can since I don't work. Might as well hike.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Pennywise the Frown posted:

I've been slowly acquiring gear for backpacking. I doubt anyone here would use it due to weight and size but I just ordered a Military Modular Sleep System. I'd like to try cold weather camping sometime and I could just take the patrol bag for warmer weather.

That's a british military bivvy bag - the camouflage waterproof bit I mean. They work well, I've slept in pretty horrible conditions and stayed dry. Is the sleeping bag a matching military one? If so, they're ok and bombproof but certainly not something I'd carry around on a civilian backpacking trip. Much too heavy and bulky.

mastershakeman
Oct 28, 2008


Pennywise the Frown posted:

Hey hiking thread. I just got a lifetime pass (disabled vet) to the Wisconsin State Park system. I'd like to find places to actually go backpacking here but for right now I guess I'm just looking for day hikes/camping. The problem is I'm in South East Wisconsin (Kenosha). There isn't a whole lot here that I know of besides Bong Recreation Area . Most of the good stuff is more West and North I think.

I've been slowly acquiring gear for backpacking. I doubt anyone here would use it due to weight and size but I just ordered a Military Modular Sleep System. I'd like to try cold weather camping sometime and I could just take the patrol bag for warmer weather. Unfortunately I bought a REI Catalyst 35L before I got any gear and when I didn't know anything about backpacking. It's a great pack but I definitely think I might need a bigger one when I get around to backpacking. That will probably be my next purchase. I'm also using the REI Half Dome. Decent tent but takes up a lot of room.

Anyway, back to my original question. Does anyone know of any good hiking areas in SE WI? Even small parks that have at least a few miles of trails. I don't really have many people to hike with so I'd be going solo most of the time. I just want to get out as much as I can since I don't work. Might as well hike.

Devils Lake (and check out the Crane foundation nearby). Kettle Moraine is supposedly nice but I haven't been.

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

knox_harrington posted:

That's a british military bivvy bag - the camouflage waterproof bit I mean. They work well, I've slept in pretty horrible conditions and stayed dry. Is the sleeping bag a matching military one? If so, they're ok and bombproof but certainly not something I'd carry around on a civilian backpacking trip. Much too heavy and bulky.

No, it's most definitely American and was issued to the US military. I figured that the patrol bag is pretty small and light which might be good for summer camping.

mastershakeman posted:

Devils Lake (and check out the Crane foundation nearby). Kettle Moraine is supposedly nice but I haven't been.

I've heard a lot about Kettle Moraine but have never been there. I don't think it's too far of a drive so I'll definitely have to check that out. Devil's Lake is a bit further away but looks pretty nice. I'm in the lovely flat part of WI so it would be nice to see some hills.

krispykremessuck
Jul 22, 2005

unlike most veterans and SA members $10 is not a meaningful expenditure for me

I'm gonna have me a swag Bar-B-Q

Please add me to the list of hikers, I'm in Western Washington and am generally willing to dayhike anywhere in the Olympic range and North Cascades.

I've been out a ton and have run into a lot of snow still in the North Cascades and Olympics, and an unending supply of assholes with dogs and a set of flat soled Vans.

Later this summer I'm going to be headed up to Glacier Meadows in the Olympics to maintain a base camp for an insane friend who is going to attempt an Olympus summit on a really compressed time schedule.

mastershakeman
Oct 28, 2008


Devils Lake is the best hiking in the Midwest that doesn't require a ferry ride across Lake Superior. Check it out (and the cranes! )

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

Are there any places to actually backpack in Wisconsin? I see that there is the Ice Age Trail, but a some of it looks paved and they have a few campgrounds near it. I'm not sure I could just set up a tent wherever. I'm going to start with just day hikes and stuff but it would be nice to go backpacking in the future.

lavaca
Jun 11, 2010


I am back from Florida, where the closest I came to a serious hike was looking at the sky and saying "today would be a really bad day to hike the Wild Persimmon Trail".

Now I'm planning a trip to Idaho and Montana the week before Memorial Day. Where do Inland Northwest Goons like to hike in late May? We are going to Spokane, Missoula and maybe Sun Valley. I am familiar with Spokane and Northern Idaho but have no useful knowledge of Western Montana or Southern Idaho. Does Glacier have anything to offer this time of year?

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


Out of nowhere, one of my friends said he wanted to go camping this summer ... and it has now turned into a semi impromptu backpacking trip to RMNP in mid august with a small group of guys. We tossed around the idea of the boundary waters in northern Minnesota but the logistics were harder to cope with and people showed more interest in the rockies.

Its funny how things can escalate so quickly.

Otten
Oct 9, 2004



Pennywise the Frown posted:

Are there any places to actually backpack in Wisconsin? I see that there is the Ice Age Trail, but a some of it looks paved and they have a few campgrounds near it. I'm not sure I could just set up a tent wherever. I'm going to start with just day hikes and stuff but it would be nice to go backpacking in the future.


The Porkies in the UP of Michigan are like 20 miles away from WI and they're awesome. They even have yurts and rustic cabins to hike in to and stay. It sounds like you're at the other end of the state, though.

http://www.michigandnr.com/parksandtrails/Details.aspx?type=SPRK&id=426

mastershakeman
Oct 28, 2008


You can certainly carry a backpack around Wisconsin parks/forests. I've done it in WI, IL, and IN, but it's pretty pointless. The top of Wisconsin/UP actually has a lot of nice wilderness and great shorelines (apostle islands/pictured rocks national lakeshores, porkies, etc) but are tough to get to from Milwaukee. It seems like it takes less time to fly to Oakland and drive to Yosemite than to drive up to one of those spots.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


While we're on Midwest chat, is there any place decent to backpack in Ohio, preferably in the Northeast of the state? I am assuming there's some good stuff down near the WV/OH border, but I'm looking for somewhere nice to walk for a few hours, spend the night, and walk out. Nothing major, just a little backwoods overnight.

Every place I've lived except here has good trails where overnight backpacking trips are plentiful, but I'm coming up with nothing here. Cleveland has less of an outdoors "scene" than even Buffalo.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


mastershakeman posted:

It seems like it takes less time to fly to Oakland and drive to Yosemite than to drive up to one of those spots.

Hence the reason I love colorado. Driving from chicago to the UP takes about 7-8 hours depending on how far up you go. When i go bird hunting in october its closer to 8. By the time I pull over in Wisconsin to eat some fried curds, I could have been on a plane to denver, have driven up to RMNP and been on the trail already for a few bucks more. I still love the UP its just so drat far.

Ralphus
Dec 15, 2003


Pennywise the Frown posted:

Are there any places to actually backpack in Wisconsin? I see that there is the Ice Age Trail, but a some of it looks paved and they have a few campgrounds near it. I'm not sure I could just set up a tent wherever. I'm going to start with just day hikes and stuff but it would be nice to go backpacking in the future.

I spent a night at a backpacking shelter on a segment of the Ice Age Trail in Kettle Moraine 2 years ago. I think the shelters were the only places you were allowed to stay, but I could be wrong. The shelter was big, it could easily hold like a dozen people, but it was just me and my wife so I threw our tent up (minus fly) since it was a gorgeous night. None of the trail was paved, it was actually pretty steep and fun for most of it. I've been meaning to look into whether or not you can camp along the other segments of the Ice Age Trail as well. I've hiked a couple of other sections of it and that's pretty much what got me hooked on hiking and backpacking.

We also spend a LOT of weekends at Newport State Park up in Door County (we're in Green Bay). It's the only designated wilderness area in the state but it's relatively small (~3000 acres) compared to larger parks like the Porcupine Mountains. There's 16 sites, 3 are non-reservable. We usually backpack in to a site (usually only 1.5 miles or so), set up camp, then spend a day or 2 dayhiking. Site 15 is non-reservable and is right on Europe Lake. It's gorgeous and absolutely fantastic for a weekend getaway in the summertime. You could also check out Rock Island State Park. There's a handful of "backpacking" sites which are pretty easy to hike to. The regular sites are full of families and college kids. You need to take a ferry from the tip of Door County to Washington Island, then another ferry to Rock Island. If the sites are all reserved (they usually fill up quickly- we're going the last weekend of this month and there wasn't much open after that for a while) you can always camp at the campground on Washington Island and then dayhike on Rock Island. There's a really cool old lighthouse and some neat carvings in the rocks, as well as a stunningly beautiful boathouse that was built by a millionaire back when he owned the island. It's not Yosemite or anything, but it's a ton of fun and there's some unbeatable views of Lake Michigan!

As mentioned, the Porkies in the U.P. are also pretty great. We spent 5 days there last October and loved it so much we've decided to move to Superior/ Duluth so we're closer to the Porkies and we'll also have Ashland/ the Apostle Islands/ the Superior trail/ BWCA/ Isle Royale within striking distance. Lake of the Clouds in stunning in the fall when the colors are changing. Definitely check out the Porkies, it's worth the drive in my opinion.

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

Lots of good ideas. Thanks everyone. Looks like everything is going to be quite a drive though. I guess I'll just start small, probably Kettle Moraine and then work my way up to the Porkies hopefully.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


stealie72 posted:

While we're on Midwest chat, is there any place decent to backpack in Ohio, preferably in the Northeast of the state? I am assuming there's some good stuff down near the WV/OH border, but I'm looking for somewhere nice to walk for a few hours, spend the night, and walk out. Nothing major, just a little backwoods overnight.

Every place I've lived except here has good trails where overnight backpacking trips are plentiful, but I'm coming up with nothing here. Cleveland has less of an outdoors "scene" than even Buffalo.


There's nothing if you want to stay overnight. Cleveland Metroparks are great and wonderful and everything, but there is nearly nothing worth doing overnight in the whole state until you get way south.

Hotel Kpro
Feb 23, 2011

owls don't go to school

Dinosaur Gum

lavaca posted:

I am back from Florida, where the closest I came to a serious hike was looking at the sky and saying "today would be a really bad day to hike the Wild Persimmon Trail".

Now I'm planning a trip to Idaho and Montana the week before Memorial Day. Where do Inland Northwest Goons like to hike in late May? We are going to Spokane, Missoula and maybe Sun Valley. I am familiar with Spokane and Northern Idaho but have no useful knowledge of Western Montana or Southern Idaho. Does Glacier have anything to offer this time of year?

I live in Southwest Idaho so I have no idea if Glacier is going to be worth going to. I've got a couple trips planned the last two weekends of the month, one of which is a multi-day adventure in the Seven Devils Loop. There's a trail you can follow but we're planning on going straight to the lake and then using that as a sort of base camp. There's a mountain called Cape Horn that I'll be doing the weekend before that, it's a couple hours outside of Boise. Haven't had much of a chance to explore more of Idaho but hopefully this summer I can get out a bunch more.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


Anyone in here have experience with gravity filters?

I don't feel like pumping and I'm tired of boiling/chlorine tabs. I really like Platypus products, the bags are simple and pretty bomb proof let alone usually cheaper than the alternatives.

I was considering just buying the standalone filter and an extra bladder for dirty water which would only be about $60 versus the $120 they charge for a 2 bladder system with the filter. That would give me 2 - 100 oz. bladders, one for dirty water and the other for clean and allow me to fill the dirty bag and walk away from it.

Texibus
May 18, 2008


Does anyone have any experience with trails in Southeast Michigan, that are no more than about a two hour drive outside of Detroit. I'm looking for day hike things, that might be a little more challenging than just walking a well worn trail. I've been to Independence and Bald Mountain in Oakland County, looking for something different from those. Also, any good recommendations of parks that I should go to even if it is well worn trails.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Texibus posted:

Does anyone have any experience with trails in Southeast Michigan, that are no more than about a two hour drive outside of Detroit. I'm looking for day hike things, that might be a little more challenging than just walking a well worn trail. I've been to Independence and Bald Mountain in Oakland County, looking for something different from those. Also, any good recommendations of parks that I should go to even if it is well worn trails.

Pinckney and Waterloo State Recreation Areas, just north of 94 in Dexter, have good day-hike and overnight trails. Good swimming holes in the summer, too. I go pretty often, and I know the area well, so let me know if you want to meet up and do some walking.

telarium4
Jul 23, 2010


Recently did the Grand Canyon:







and Monument Valley UT/AZ:















pizzadog
Oct 9, 2009



telarium4 posted:

Recently did the Grand Canyon:







and Monument Valley UT/AZ:

















Oooh the Impossible Astronaut backdrop!

Rad pics! Was it still cold at the GC?

Sierra Nevadan
Nov 1, 2010



lavaca posted:

Does Glacier have anything to offer this time of year?

I'll be there in a week to work for the Summer so I will let you know What I've seen on Facebook though is that they are still clearing the main park road of snow. Here's the webcams, it doesn't look too bad.

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telarium4
Jul 23, 2010


Marshmallow Mayhem posted:



Rad pics! Was it still cold at the GC?

Thanks! It dipped into the upper 40's at night - but the daytime was a very mild 65-70.

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